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moderated Why does JAWS think the scripts for LibreOffice are "Symphony?"


Richard B. McDonald
 

Hi!

 

I am using JAWS 2020, Windows 10 and LibreOffice 7.1.  I wanted to adjust a particular setting while using LibreOffice.  Therefore I pressed JAWSKey+6.  When Settings Center opened, it thinks I am using the scripts for “Symphony.”  There is not a script set for LibreOffice, and I do not have “Symphony”; whatever that is.  Why is this?  How, or should, I go about creating a whole new settings scheme for a new application I will call “LibreOffice?"

 

Thanks,

Richard


 

This is most likely an accident of history, where scripts were written for Symphony and as that software morphed to OpenOffice and LibreOffice there was no real need to rename the scripts.

See this Wikipedia page for how IBM Symphony became Open Office.  Libre Office is a fork of Open Office and is currently much better supported.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Lotus_Symphony 

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


JM Casey
 

It’s probably a generic set of scripts named for Lotus Symphony, a discontinued suite (I think) from IBM on which Libre and Open Office *may* have based some code.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard B. McDonald
Sent: February 19, 2021 04:55 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Why does JAWS think the scripts for LibreOffice are "Symphony?"

 

Hi!

 

I am using JAWS 2020, Windows 10 and LibreOffice 7.1.  I wanted to adjust a particular setting while using LibreOffice.  Therefore I pressed JAWSKey+6.  When Settings Center opened, it thinks I am using the scripts for “Symphony.”  There is not a script set for LibreOffice, and I do not have “Symphony”; whatever that is.  Why is this?  How, or should, I go about creating a whole new settings scheme for a new application I will call “LibreOffice?"

 

Thanks,

Richard


Richard B. McDonald
 

This was very helpful!

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, February 19, 2021 3:13 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Why does JAWS think the scripts for LibreOffice are "Symphony?"

 

This is most likely an accident of history, where scripts were written for Symphony and as that software morphed to OpenOffice and LibreOffice there was no real need to rename the scripts.

See this Wikipedia page for how IBM Symphony became Open Office.  Libre Office is a fork of Open Office and is currently much better supported.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Lotus_Symphony 

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


Jason White
 

I think the original program was StarOffice, released by Sun Microsystems as OpenOffice, and then IBM created a proprietary version called Symphony. I expect the scripts were originally written for that version.

On 19/2/21 6:37 pm, JM Casey wrote:

It’s probably a generic set of scripts named for Lotus Symphony, a discontinued suite (I think) from IBM on which Libre and Open Office *may* have based some code.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard B. McDonald
Sent: February 19, 2021 04:55 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Why does JAWS think the scripts for LibreOffice are "Symphony?"

 

Hi!

 

I am using JAWS 2020, Windows 10 and LibreOffice 7.1.  I wanted to adjust a particular setting while using LibreOffice.  Therefore I pressed JAWSKey+6.  When Settings Center opened, it thinks I am using the scripts for “Symphony.”  There is not a script set for LibreOffice, and I do not have “Symphony”; whatever that is.  Why is this?  How, or should, I go about creating a whole new settings scheme for a new application I will call “LibreOffice?"

 

Thanks,

Richard


 

On Sun, Feb 21, 2021 at 05:35 PM, Jason White wrote:
I think the original program was StarOffice
-
It was.  I just decided to pick up at Symphony since it appeared that this was the point when the scripts originally came into being, and why they likely remain so named.

The Wikipedia page timeline shows StarOffice 1.0 through 5.2 between 1995 and somewhere between 2000 and 2001, when the fork to OpenOffice occurred.

The forking timeline that's on that page is great, if you can see it, but it would take many paragraphs of typing to try to write out what it shows graphically.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide