Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching


 
Edited

On Fri, Jan 8, 2016 at 08:58 pm, Dale Alton wrote:
I feel if it is a windows command it will make some thing change in windows and not make jaws work.

 Dale,

           And in that simple statement you are completely correct, and vice versa.   However, Freedom Scientific documents a number of Windows keyboard shortcuts in their own JAWS keystrokes document without ever differentiating, clouding the water.  Some have already been mentioned, but just looking quickly at the JAWS 15 Keystrokes document, here are a few examples of Windows keyboard shortcuts included in it without mention that they are not, really, JAWS commands:

TAB and SHIFT+TAB to move back and forth between different areas in a Windows Explorer window

CTRL+T to open a new tab in a web browser

CTRL+W to close a tab in a web browser

CTRL+TAB to shift to the next tab in a web browser  

CTRL+9 to shift to the last tab in the web browser

and there are probably more.  One could argue that these are not Windows keyboard shortcuts, but keyboard shortcuts specific to web browsers for the last three, but what they are certainly not is a JAWS keystroke.

I think others have actually confirmed what I had hoped would be confirmed in terms of what I select to teach and how, and that is that it is important to be able to understand, at a minimum, that there is a distinct difference between JAWS control keystrokes and Windows program control keystrokes.  You pointed out that critical difference, and there are times when understanding it can save a person a world of heartache.


Mario
 

ditto. yay Brian.

On 1/8/2016 11:48 PM, Robin Frost wrote:
Your explanation is very well put and confirms that which I thought
about you truly having the gift of the heart of a teacher which is
different than merely knowing something.
Yay you!
Robin
*From:* Brian Vogel <mailto:britechguy@gmail.com>
*Sent:* Friday, January 8, 2016 11:44 PM
*To:* jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps,
emphasize when teaching

Thanks to all for this fascinating exchange of ideas.

Laura, your question is not in any way dumb and it is very difficult to
answer easily. It's relatively easy for me to know the difference
because I can literally see the Windows keyboard shortcuts "reveal
themselves" as the sequences are hit, at least a large number of them.
I certainly, for instance, didn't know the keyboard sequence that was
used in Windows Live Mail to do a message search in its entirety,
particularly the ALT+i for the find now key, but as I work through the
process the first time with the client at each step Windows (or the
Windows program) shows the next character or characters that are part of
the sequence, allowing me to build the entire sequence for inclusion in
the step-by-step directions.

I am glad, though, to hear others saying that it is important to make
this distinction. The main reason it's important to me is that there is
a huge set of Windows keyboard shortcuts, the three best known being
Ctrl+C (copy), Ctrl+X (cut), and Ctrl+V (paste), that are used in
precisely the same manner in more programs than I can count. There are
many more that fall into the "extended common" set of Windows keyboard
shortcuts and I want my clients to understand that, if they're in a
pinch, and they know how to do "process X" in "program Y" that they
should at least try seeing if "process X" will get the same result in
different Windows "program Z."

The same concept applies to the JAWS layer as well, since you use the
same JAWS keyboard shortcuts to accomplish the same tasks in a wide
array of Windows programs.

If you know the difference between the two, though, and you have that
knowledge "in your bones" you can actually sometimes function if speech
goes south at a given point in time and still complete at least the
current thing you're trying to do like save a file.

Another reason it's important to know the difference is because
sometimes assistive technology like JAWS, ZoomText, or the like
"captures" what would be a Windows keyboard shortcut for it's own use.
My client gave an example of this last night, that he'd figured out on
his own. He generally uses either ZoomText or JAWS (much more JAWS
these days) separately along with whatever Windows program he needs
beneath it. The other day he had ZoomText, plus JAWS, plus some Windows
program open. One of the commands that we always used to perform a
function in that Windows program when JAWS was running alone suddenly
wasn't working in the Windows program, and ZoomText was doing something
he'd never seen before. He figured out for himself that ZoomText had
commandeered that particular command for its own use and, thus, was not
passed along to the Windows program running beneath it for processing.

I use the analogy of the various programs being like separate sifting
screens stacked one atop the other. The screen readers and other
assistive technology are always the topmost screen. They get every
blessed keystroke you hit passed through them first, and these programs
get to interpret those first, so if a keystroke sequence is considered a
command by JAWS, for instance, JAWS does it's thing with that sequence
and nothing from it sifts through to the program that is "the next
sifting screen down." Then, all of the keystroke sequences that JAWS
didn't snag as its own get passed down to the next sifting screen, and
for the purposes of this narrative lets say that's ZoomText. Now
ZoomText gets "first crack" at interpreting the sequences that have
passed into its hands, and acts on any of those it recognizes as "my
command." Then whatever is left sifts through and falls into the screen
that is the Windows program running below it for interpretation as
commands it processes. I think it's important for people to understand
that there exists a hierarchy and that AT sits at the top of that heap
and gets first crack at every keyboard input sequence to decide if it
"belongs to me" before passing what remains on to the next guy. Very
often this may be irrelevant to doing what you want to do, but it can be
key to understanding why "things that used to work" may work no longer
if some other AT program gets added to the mix that ends up siphoning
off commands that used to be passed through to other programs, so those
other programs never see them.

Heavens, but the above seems awfully wordy, but I really can't think of
a short way to describe the conceptual framework of program layers and
that knowing about it can make sudden changes in behavior on your system
a bit more understandable when new stuff enters the mix of programs
running at the same time.

Brian


 

Kelly,

          You are indeed correct.   I hasten to add that I do not, and never have, attempted to teach any client the exhaustive list of either JAWS commands or keyboard shortcuts for the Windows programs they're using.   As I pointed out earlier relative to myself, even I don't know anywhere near to all of these.  I let the client's actual needs as I work with them guide just precisely what gets taught in terms of the weird detailed keyboard shortcuts that virtually no sighted person ever uses but that they must use if they wish to independently perform task X.

          I'm also big on the "teach a man or woman to fish" approach to JAWS and Windows, so that when I'm no longer present they are able to do a reasonable amount of digging and exploration on their own.  I do less of this than I'd actually like to because I often have to focus on a list of immediate and pressing needs related to what the client needs to accomplish NOW (or yesterday).

          I will take issue with your statement about blind users and the number of keyboard shortcuts they can manage in their heads.  Virtually every proficient blind computer user I know manages a large number of keyboard shortcuts in their head, far more than I do teaching them, because I learn them to teach them, while they learn them to use them and tend to build upon that list as more and more tasks are required over a period of years.  I'd be shocked if it isn't hundreds, plural, for some of the really, really proficient.

Brian


James Malone
 

Hi, Laura, The Jaws keyboard strokes center around the insert key for a desktop, and Caps lock in laptop modes. Using the Alt or control key depending on the two keys such as control plus P to bring up the print dialog box unless you're in FS reader is a windows command. I also want to explain that Word also have their own reading commands that is not related to Jaws, but could be considered a windows command because both Jaws and Window-Eyes along with other screen readers uses these commands.
I've worked with Window-Eyes, and System access, and they both have their own interpolation of the insert key, and also have their own layout for both laptop and desktop. System Access however has followed in the footsteps of Freedom, and has stuck with the Insert key. Don't know how they handled the Laptop mode though.

-----Original Message-----
From: Laura Richardson [mailto:laurakr65@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 7:06 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Hello,

This may seem like a dumb question but I’ll ask it anyway ...... When using keystrokes to perform certain tasks, could someone tell me how I know if that is a Windows keystroke or a Jaws keystroke? I use Windows 7 and Jaws 15.

Laura


-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 7:41 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Brian, I think that we need to know Windows strokes, since we are working in a Windows system, but, as blind users, it is imperative for us to know JAWS specific strokes. That is why, for us, there is so much more to learn to get maximum use from our computers.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 6:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps. Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you’re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box. Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes. That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find. Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search. After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered. When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.


Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Thanks. That clarifies the difference.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Paul D. J. Jenkins [mailto:pdjj6123@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 9:28 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

In most applications, (and in all of the ones I have worked in that use Microsoft Office), control N makes a new file. A folder is the place where files go. As a comparison, think of each file as a book, and each folder as the bookshelf on which a particular set of books are sitting.

I hope this helps,

Paul

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 20:49
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Question? Doesn't just plain Control-N make a new folder?

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Portillo [mailto:portillo.jim@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 6:56 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Wow! I love this list because I truly learn something.

I appreciate that keystroke for making a new folder. Thank you very much!!





From: Martin Blackwell via Groups.io [mailto:taoman1=yahoo.com@groups.io]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 3:39 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching



Hi,



Good post. That�s pretty much what I do as well. I end up teaching a lot more Windows shortcuts than JAWS shortcuts. People want to get things done in their applications. To me, Windows shortcuts are far more likely to be valuable, as I think you are saying. That is not to say that one can ignore JAWS commands though.



And I usually teach the Windows shortcut for creating folders (Control Shift N) for recent versions of Windows instead of the menu way.







From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 3:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io>
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching



[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps. Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that�s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, �Libraries,� announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, �Documents�.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you�re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you�re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the �hit the first character� technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box. Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file�s name with star after it when the processing completes. That�s how you�ll know it�s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you�re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you�re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------



To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you�re trying to find. Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search. After you�ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered. When you hear the one you�re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.


Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Usually, JAWS specific strokes are Insert something, or maybe a function key one like F12 for Save As. I'm sure there are exceptions, but I can't recall specifically right now. When I took my training at the Morehead Center in Raleigh, Windows Key commands were listed first, and then JAWS specific ones were shown.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Laura Richardson [mailto:laurakr65@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 10:06 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Hello,

This may seem like a dumb question but I’ll ask it anyway ...... When using keystrokes to perform certain tasks, could someone tell me how I know if that is a Windows keystroke or a Jaws keystroke? I use Windows 7 and Jaws 15.

Laura


-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 7:41 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Brian, I think that we need to know Windows strokes, since we are working in a Windows system, but, as blind users, it is imperative for us to know JAWS specific strokes. That is why, for us, there is so much more to learn to get maximum use from our computers.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 6:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps. Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you’re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box. Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes. That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find. Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search. After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered. When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.


Adrian Spratt
 

The F12 "save" command is a Microsoft control.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Saturday, January 09, 2016 12:12 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Usually, JAWS specific strokes are Insert something, or maybe a function key one like F12 for Save As. I'm sure there are exceptions, but I can't recall specifically right now. When I took my training at the Morehead Center in Raleigh, Windows Key commands were listed first, and then JAWS specific ones were shown.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Laura Richardson [mailto:laurakr65@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 10:06 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Hello,

This may seem like a dumb question but I’ll ask it anyway ...... When using keystrokes to perform certain tasks, could someone tell me how I know if that is a Windows keystroke or a Jaws keystroke? I use Windows 7 and Jaws 15.

Laura


-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 7:41 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Brian, I think that we need to know Windows strokes, since we are working in a Windows system, but, as blind users, it is imperative for us to know JAWS specific strokes. That is why, for us, there is so much more to learn to get maximum use from our computers.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 6:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps. Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you’re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box. Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes. That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find. Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search. After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered. When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.


Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Another way is to use JAWS Help. Use keyboard combinations. If it is a JAWS one, JAWS will tell you what it does.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill White [mailto:billwhite92701@dslextreme.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 10:58 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Hi, Laura. No question is dumb, especially if you've done your best to find the answer and still haven't found it when you ask the question.

The only way I know to tell if a keystroke is a JAWS command or a Windows keystroke is to get a list of both, and compare. There isn't a way to tell other than to use another screen reader briefly, and see if the keystroke is still active when the alternate screen reader is being used. If the keystroke works when the alternate reader is invoked, the keystroke is probably a Windows keystroke.

Having said this, it is important to read the JAWS materials, and to familiarize yourself with the various key commands used in JAWS.

Keystrokes for Windows are more easily found on the web.
Bill White billwhite92701@dslextreme.com
----- Original Message -----
From: "Laura Richardson" <laurakr65@gmail.com>
To: <jfw@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 7:05 PM
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching


Hello,

This may seem like a dumb question but I’ll ask it anyway ...... When using keystrokes to perform certain tasks, could someone tell me how I know if that is a Windows keystroke or a Jaws keystroke? I use Windows 7 and Jaws 15.

Laura


-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 7:41 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Brian, I think that we need to know Windows strokes, since we are working in a Windows system, but, as blind users, it is imperative for us to know JAWS specific strokes. That is why, for us, there is so much more to learn to get maximum use from our computers.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 6:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.
Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly,
like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to
perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you’re
dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first
character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.
Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes. That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text
into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which
you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and
Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or
phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find.
Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible
attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search. After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box
to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered.
When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.













__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 12841 (20160108) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com




__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 12841 (20160108) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com


Debbie Kessler
 

I encourage my students to take notes and we add keystrokes as needed or wanted.

DjAndChaz 
Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 9, 2016, at 6:57 AM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Kelly,

          You are indeed correct.   I hasten to add that I do not, and never have, attempted to teach any client the exhaustive list of either JAWS commands or keyboard shortcuts for the Windows programs they're using.   As I pointed out earlier relative to myself, even I don't know anywhere near to all of these.  I let the client's actual needs as I work with them guide just precisely what gets taught in terms of the weird detailed keyboard shortcuts that virtually no sighted person ever uses but that they must use if they wish to independently perform task X.

          I'm also big on the "teach a man or woman to fish" approach to JAWS and Windows, so that when I'm no longer present they are able to do a reasonable amount of digging and exploration on their own.  I do less of this than I'd actually like to because I often have to focus on a list of immediate and pressing needs related to what the client needs to accomplish NOW (or yesterday).

          I will take issue with your statement about blind users and the number of keyboard shortcuts they can manage in their heads.  Virtually every proficient blind computer user I know manages a large number of keyboard shortcuts in their head, far more than I do teaching them, because I learn them to teach them, while they learn them to use them and tend to build upon that list as more and more tasks are required over a period of years.  I'd be shocked if it isn't hundreds, plural, for some of the really, really proficient.

Brian


Jason White
 

Debbie Kessler <jessesgirl@earthlink.net> wrote:
I encourage my students to take notes and we add keystrokes as needed or wanted.

I think it makes good sense to learn to perform frequently occurring tasks
efficiently, then to expand the repertoire to include less frequent
operations. Knowing how to use online help systems effectively is invaluable.
Searching the Web can give answers very quickly. For instance, suppose an
application gives me an error message. I can search the Web for the error
message and thereby find solutions or explanations - not always,
unfortunately, but often enough for this to be a very valuable strategy.


Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Most enlightening, Brian, thanks.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 11:44 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Thanks to all for this fascinating exchange of ideas.

Laura, your question is not in any way dumb and it is very difficult to answer easily. It's relatively easy for me to know the difference because I can literally see the Windows keyboard shortcuts "reveal themselves" as the sequences are hit, at least a large number of them. I certainly, for instance, didn't know the keyboard sequence that was used in Windows Live Mail to do a message search in its entirety, particularly the ALT+i for the find now key, but as I work through the process the first time with the client at each step Windows (or the Windows program) shows the next character or characters that are part of the sequence, allowing me to build the entire sequence for inclusion in the step-by-step directions.

I am glad, though, to hear others saying that it is important to make this distinction. The main reason it's important to me is that there is a huge set of Windows keyboard shortcuts, the three best known being Ctrl+C (copy), Ctrl+X (cut), and Ctrl+V (paste), that are used in precisely the same manner in more programs than I can count. There are many more that fall into the "extended common" set of Windows keyboard shortcuts and I want my clients to understand that, if they're in a pinch, and they know how to do "process X" in "program Y" that they should at least try seeing if "process X" will get the same result in different Windows "program Z."

The same concept applies to the JAWS layer as well, since you use the same JAWS keyboard shortcuts to accomplish the same tasks in a wide array of Windows programs.

If you know the difference between the two, though, and you have that knowledge "in your bones" you can actually sometimes function if speech goes south at a given point in time and still complete at least the current thing you're trying to do like save a file.

Another reason it's important to know the difference is because sometimes assistive technology like JAWS, ZoomText, or the like "captures" what would be a Windows keyboard shortcut for it's own use. My client gave an example of this last night, that he'd figured out on his own. He generally uses either ZoomText or JAWS (much more JAWS these days) separately along with whatever Windows program he needs beneath it. The other day he had ZoomText, plus JAWS, plus some Windows program open. One of the commands that we always used to perform a function in that Windows program when JAWS was running alone suddenly wasn't working in the Windows program, and ZoomText was doing something he'd never seen before. He figured out for himself that ZoomText had commandeered that particular command for its own use and, thus, was not passed along to the Windows program running beneath it for processing.

I use the analogy of the various programs being like separate sifting screens stacked one atop the other. The screen readers and other assistive technology are always the topmost screen. They get every blessed keystroke you hit passed through them first, and these programs get to interpret those first, so if a keystroke sequence is considered a command by JAWS, for instance, JAWS does it's thing with that sequence and nothing from it sifts through to the program that is "the next sifting screen down." Then, all of the keystroke sequences that JAWS didn't snag as its own get passed down to the next sifting screen, and for the purposes of this narrative lets say that's ZoomText. Now ZoomText gets "first crack" at interpreting the sequences that have passed into its hands, and acts on any of those it recognizes as "my command." Then whatever is left sifts through and falls into the screen that is the Windows program running below it for interpretation as commands it processes. I think it's important for people to understand that there exists a hierarchy and that AT sits at the top of that heap and gets first crack at every keyboard input sequence to decide if it "belongs to me" before passing what remains on to the next guy. Very often this may be irrelevant to doing what you want to do, but it can be key to understanding why "things that used to work" may work no longer if some other AT program gets added to the mix that ends up siphoning off commands that used to be passed through to other programs, so those other programs never see them.

Heavens, but the above seems awfully wordy, but I really can't think of a short way to describe the conceptual framework of program layers and that knowing about it can make sudden changes in behavior on your system a bit more understandable when new stuff enters the mix of programs running at the same time.

Brian


Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

My husband has used the cut, paste and copy keyboard commands, the undo and redo, and now he's taken to Alt F4. Also he uses Control A to highlight all. He was doing all of those before he knew me, except for Alt F4.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: David Moore [mailto:jesusloves1966@gmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2016 1:42 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Hi Brian,
With people using laptops and tablets, it is important to know the JAWS key commands when JAWS is set to laptop keyboard mode. You do not have to use the num pad at all when using JAWS, because key commands have been added to JAWS which makes it possible to not have a num pad at all. For example, caps lock + K will read the current word as well as num pad 5. It is good to know the difference between windows and JAWS key commands, because you can perform a lot of tasks, like saving a file, without speech if you know the command. Just think, sighted people would greatly benefit by knowing all of the Windows key commands, because it is much faster to press a key command then it is working with the mouse. I have shown many of my sighted friends and my wife many key commands and they use some like alt + tab. Take care and have a great one.


-----Original Message-----
From: Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 7:24 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Brian, I'm for learning as many shortcuts as possible. If that means that you may have to emphasize what happens when you separate the six-pack key from the numpad keys and other aspects, so be it. With practice, people will get the hang of it.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 3:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.
Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly,
like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to
perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you’re
dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first
character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.
Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes. That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text
into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which
you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and
Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or
phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find.
Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible
attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search. After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box
to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered.
When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.


Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

I forgot that my husband knows Control B, F, G, H, U - he's been using a plethora of them. Of course, he's a big mouser too. So, probably there are a lot of sighted people who use more commands than they'd realize that they do. Of course, they have the choice.

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Paul D. J. Jenkins [mailto:pdjj6123@gmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2016 6:03 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

I think companies should encourage a no-mouse week in their offices! That would be great! Of course, there would need to be some exceptions, but the improvements in productivity over time are immeasurable!

-----Original Message-----
From: David Moore [mailto:jesusloves1966@gmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 09, 2016 1:42
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Hi Brian,
With people using laptops and tablets, it is important to know the JAWS key commands when JAWS is set to laptop keyboard mode. You do not have to use the num pad at all when using JAWS, because key commands have been added to JAWS which makes it possible to not have a num pad at all. For example, caps lock + K will read the current word as well as num pad 5. It is good to know the difference between windows and JAWS key commands, because you can perform a lot of tasks, like saving a file, without speech if you know the command. Just think, sighted people would greatly benefit by knowing all of the Windows key commands, because it is much faster to press a key command then it is working with the mouse. I have shown many of my sighted friends and my wife many key commands and they use some like alt + tab. Take care and have a great one.


-----Original Message-----
From: Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 7:24 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Brian, I'm for learning as many shortcuts as possible. If that means that you may have to emphasize what happens when you separate the six-pack key from the numpad keys and other aspects, so be it. With practice, people will get the hang of it.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 3:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.
Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that s somewhat, but not exactly,
like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, Libraries, announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, Documents .

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you re trying to
perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you re
dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the hit the first
character technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.
Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file s name with star after it when the processing completes. That s how you ll know it s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text
into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which
you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and
Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or
phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you re trying to find.
Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible
attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search. After you ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box
to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered.
When you hear the one you re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.


Charles Coe
 

Hi,

Here is a web site that one can find several shortcut key list for most
applications:
www.shortcutworld.com
Also a list of JAWS keys is found within JAWS help by using function key F1
and arrowing down until "key strokes book " is heard.

Hope this wil be of help
Charles

----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2016 9:53 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching

Debbie Kessler <jessesgirl@earthlink.net> wrote:
I encourage my students to take notes and we add keystrokes as needed or
wanted.


I think it makes good sense to learn to perform frequently occurring tasks
efficiently, then to expand the repertoire to include less frequent
operations. Knowing how to use online help systems effectively is
invaluable.
Searching the Web can give answers very quickly. For instance, suppose an
application gives me an error message. I can search the Web for the error
message and thereby find solutions or explanations - not always,
unfortunately, but often enough for this to be a very valuable strategy.


Angel
 

I agree with you on that score. If I began learning to use the computer attempting to understand all those keyboard shortcuts, I should easily become discouraged. Emphasis should also be put, when instructing the student on the intuitiveness of the windows layout; and be encouraged to explore on his own its intuitiveness . Kathy Anne Murtha (forgive the poor spelling of her name) use to offer free windows courses on "Main Menu". Which were very fine. The National Braille Press also sold to me three fine texts called "Windows 95, windows 98, and windows XP explained. Perhaps your students would benefit, as I did, from reading similar updated texts. I still have the course Miss Murtha aired on "Main Menu. When Debbie Scales ran the JFW lite list, she went out of her way to find free programs which could be downloaded from the internet. which are most helpful to me. I use them to this day.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Kelly Pierce" <kellytalk@gmail.com>
To: <jfw@groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, January 09, 2016 9:42 AM
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching


Brian,

Yes, windows shortcuts are important, but accessibility and
productivity for a blind person relies on being familiar with the JAWS
shortcuts and those built into a particular software application.
After learning a few dozen, I know of no blind end user that can
manage hundreds of keyboard shortcuts in their head. I believe
Microsoft Word has more than 1,000 keyboard shortcuts. It would be an
unreasonable expectation for a blind person to memorize most of these.
Students should be exposed to the JAWS help system that contains
useful information about how to optimize accessibility for a specific
program and how to bring up the menus of JAWS specific keyboard
shortcuts for that program. Often, knowing how to learn is more
important than memorizing the sequences in the accessibility recipes
you provided. This is similar for a blind person in learning to only
travel a specific route from one location to another rather than
learning the general skills of how to travel to any location. In
teaching route travel, the blind person is dependent on the trainer to
constantly teach new routes as their live and personal situations
change.

I do a lot of advocacy projects and find that many people who say they
have accessibility barriers to software or information have received
formal technology access training and some have technology
backgrounds. Yet, few have reviewed the JAWS help system, listened to
the free training tutorials from Freedom Scientific, or searched
online for a solution. I know because I am able to quickly identify a
solution to their access problem that is found in these resources,
showing the person that the issue is their lack of knowledge rather
than one of asserting civil rights.

Kelly

On 1/9/16, Paul D. J. Jenkins <pdjj6123@gmail.com> wrote:
I think companies should encourage a no-mouse week in their offices! That
would be great! Of course, there would need to be some exceptions, but the
improvements in productivity over time are immeasurable!

-----Original Message-----
From: David Moore [mailto:jesusloves1966@gmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 09, 2016 1:42
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching

Hi Brian,
With people using laptops and tablets, it is important to know the JAWS key

commands when JAWS is set to laptop keyboard mode. You do not have to use
the num pad at all when using JAWS, because key commands have been added to

JAWS which makes it possible to not have a num pad at all. For example, caps

lock + K will read the current word as well as num pad 5. It is good to know

the difference between windows and JAWS key commands, because you can
perform a lot of tasks, like saving a file, without speech if you know the
command. Just think, sighted people would greatly benefit by knowing all of

the Windows key commands, because it is much faster to press a key command
then it is working with the mouse. I have shown many of my sighted friends
and my wife many key commands and they use some like alt + tab. Take care
and have a great one.


-----Original Message-----
From: Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 7:24 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching

Brian, I'm for learning as many shortcuts as possible. If that means that
you may have to emphasize what happens when you separate the six-pack key
from the numpad keys and other aspects, so be it. With practice, people will

get the hang of it.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 3:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when
teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly

has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more
personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and

its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and

assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as

many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to

universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that,

in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S

saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring
session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as
using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still
get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks
step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which
will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the

phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows
keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic

understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS

versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of
same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by

extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to
him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to
not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that
also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love

to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of
leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step
instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they
actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps.
Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few
moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange
Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with

that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard
shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of
narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an
image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that�s somewhat, but not exactly,

like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, �Libraries,� announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, �Documents�.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you�re trying to
perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its

name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you�re

dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the

following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the �hit the first
character� technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange
Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box.
Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time
this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not
read the processing status box, but will announce the file�s name with star

after it when the processing completes. That�s how you�ll know it�s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text
into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which
you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you�re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you�re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and
Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or

phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you�re trying to find.

Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible

attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From,

To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you
wish to include in the search. After you�ve filled in whichever are
pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box

to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if

any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but

are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered.
When you hear the one you�re interested in as you move through them, hit
ENTER to open it.













Charles Coe
 

For information:
If you want to know what the keyboard keys are assigned to do Press insert F1. You hear on, to turn off key describer press insert F1 you will hear off.

-----Original Message-----
From: Adrian Spratt [mailto:Adrian@AdrianSpratt.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2016 9:18 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

The F12 "save" command is a Microsoft control.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Saturday, January 09, 2016 12:12 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Usually, JAWS specific strokes are Insert something, or maybe a function key one like F12 for Save As. I'm sure there are exceptions, but I can't recall specifically right now. When I took my training at the Morehead Center in Raleigh, Windows Key commands were listed first, and then JAWS specific ones were shown.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Laura Richardson [mailto:laurakr65@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 10:06 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Hello,

This may seem like a dumb question but I’ll ask it anyway ...... When using keystrokes to perform certain tasks, could someone tell me how I know if that is a Windows keystroke or a Jaws keystroke? I use Windows 7 and Jaws 15.

Laura


-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 7:41 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Brian, I think that we need to know Windows strokes, since we are working in a Windows system, but, as blind users, it is imperative for us to know JAWS specific strokes. That is why, for us, there is so much more to learn to get maximum use from our computers.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 6:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps. Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you’re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box. Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes. That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------




To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find. Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search. After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered. When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.


Adrian Spratt
 

But, as mentioned earlier, JAWS key identifier mode will identify only JAWS functions. It won't pick up F12, for example.

-----Original Message-----
From: Charles Coe [mailto:charlesmar@comcast.net]
Sent: Saturday, January 09, 2016 2:25 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

For information:
If you want to know what the keyboard keys are assigned to do Press insert F1. You hear on, to turn off key describer press insert F1 you will hear off.



-----Original Message-----
From: Adrian Spratt [mailto:Adrian@AdrianSpratt.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 9, 2016 9:18 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

The F12 "save" command is a Microsoft control.

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Saturday, January 09, 2016 12:12 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Usually, JAWS specific strokes are Insert something, or maybe a function key one like F12 for Save As. I'm sure there are exceptions, but I can't recall specifically right now. When I took my training at the Morehead Center in Raleigh, Windows Key commands were listed first, and then JAWS specific ones were shown.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Laura Richardson [mailto:laurakr65@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 10:06 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Hello,

This may seem like a dumb question but I’ll ask it anyway ...... When using keystrokes to perform certain tasks, could someone tell me how I know if that is a Windows keystroke or a Jaws keystroke? I use Windows 7 and Jaws 15.

Laura


-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Friday, January 08, 2016 7:41 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

Brian, I think that we need to know Windows strokes, since we are working in a Windows system, but, as blind users, it is imperative for us to know JAWS specific strokes. That is why, for us, there is so much more to learn to get maximum use from our computers.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Friday, January 8, 2016 6:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

[Edited Message Follows]

Hello All,

What follows is a rather philosophical question but that certainly has practical implications that the cohort will know about a lot more personally than I ever can. Hence this is the place to ask.

When I tutor on using JAWS I do not focus exclusively on JAWS and its keystrokes because JAWS hovers on top of all other Windows programs and assists in using those. My philosophy is that I want my clients to know as many, if not more, keyboard shortcuts that are universally, or very close to universally, applicable in all Windows programs. I want them to know that, in almost all cases, ALT+F opens the file menu or equivalent, followed by S saves a file, followed by A does a Save as, etc.

One of my clients, with whom I had a marathon 3.25 hour tutoring session yesterday, is relatively new to using Windows Live Mail as well as using PDF XChange viewer to perform OCR on the many image PDFs that still get thrown his way. As a result, I worked him through certain tasks step-by-step and create instructions in the same format, examples of which will follow. It was only when we were conversing afterward, and he used the phrase JAWS keyboard shortcuts when talking about conventional Windows keyboard shortcuts that I thought it important that he had at least a basic understanding that keyboard shortcuts do differ in what program layer, JAWS versus a give Windows program, is responsible for the interpretation of same. I want him to understand how to apply Windows keyboard shortcuts "by extension" when he is playing around with a Windows program that's new to him. Is this a mistake to try to make this distinction? Is it unwise to not focus nearly exclusively on JAWS keyboard shortcuts for functions that also exist independently as a different Windows keyboard shortcut? I'd love to get the perspective of those who would know the pluses and minuses of leaning one way or another.

What follows are a couple of examples of the step-by-step instruction sets I've created, and they look more complicated than they actually are because I try to break things down into simple single steps. Once you know what you're doing most of these tasks can be done in a few moments. I'll include the instructions for running OCR with PDF XChange Viewer because it may be helpful to some here who have decided to play with that program. All focus almost exclusively on using WIndows keyboard shortcuts for the program in question with JAWS serving the role of narrating what's happening while you do this.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using PDF XChange Viewer to perform OCR on any PDF you receive that is an image PDF, step-by-step:

1. Open PDF XChange Viewer from your start menu.

2. Hit ALT+F,O to bring up the file open browsing dialog.

3. Hit ALT+I to jump directly to the Look In combo box

4. Hit down arrow to get into the area that’s somewhat, but not exactly, like the tree view in Windows Explorer.

5. Hit L until you hear, “Libraries,” announced.

6. Hit TAB two times, you should hear, “Documents”.

7. Hit SPACEBAR to select the Documents library.

8. Hit ENTER to open the documents library.

9. Hit the first character of the folder or file name you’re trying to perform OCR on. Keep doing this with the first character until you hear its name announced.

10. Hit Enter to open the file or folder. If you’re dealing with a file at this step go straight to step 11. Otherwise, do the following

a. If you know the file is in this folder then use the “hit the first character” technique to locate it and jump to step 11 once you have.

b. If you need to drill down another folder level go back to step 9.

11. Hit ALT+O to open the file in PDF XChange Viewer.

12. Hit CTRL+SHIFT+C to open the OCR dialog box. Immediately hit ENTER to initiate the OCR processing. The length of time this takes depends on the size of the file being processed. JAWS does not read the processing status box, but will announce the file’s name with star after it when the processing completes. That’s how you’ll know it’s done.

13. Hit ALT+F,S to save the file and its OCR text into the original file itself.

14. Hit ALT+F4 to close PDF XChange Viewer.




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------




Creating a new folder in Windows Explorer, step-by-step:

1. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the folder location in which you wish to create the new folder.

2. Hit ALT+F,W,F to create the new folder itself.

3. Type in the name you want for the new folder you’re creating.

4. Hit ENTER to make that new name stick, and you’re done.

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To find a specific e-mail message in WLM, step-by-step:

1. Hit ALT+O,FI which opens the message find submenu

2. You are presented with two choices in this submenu: Find Text and Find Message. I will cover each of these briefly.

3. Find Text presents a dialog box allows you to enter a word, words, or phrase that you know is somewhere within the message you’re trying to find. Simply enter that text and skip to step 5.

4. Find Message presents you with a dialog box with a number of possible attributes of the message you might want to search on, e.g., Subject, From, To, and others. Tab through and fill in whichever of these attributes you wish to include in the search. After you’ve filled in whichever are pertinent, go to step 5.

5. Hit ALT+I to activate the Find Now key. This will cause a dialog box to come up with the list of messages that match whatever you searched on, if any exist. These are presented very much like your inbox message list, but are composed only of messages that match the search criteria you entered. When you hear the one you’re interested in as you move through them, hit ENTER to open it.


Louise Johnson <herclouise@...>
 

Hi Brian thanks for saying what you said here. I have read all the messages in this group of emails. We as users learn new things by trying or something not working at the time. I only wish things didn’t have to change. We learn the things we use daily. I can do a keyboard command a few times and remember it always if using within daily use. I can say using something within our daily life helps us remember it fully.

 

I will say I don’t mean that we use every command daily but within the short time.

 

I have friends who wonder how I remember how to make a new folder in outlook 2013 and don’t even have to think about it.

 

I can do this also with JAWS keyboard commands. I learn and use it and I won’t forget. Now only use once a year or twice a year and I do forget.

 

I don’t remember how to spell but keyboards commands are so easy for me.

 

I believe learning is easier for some than others. So some can write wonderfully and some remember keyboard commands and can just do them.

 

One thing is when learning the commands knowing if computer commands or JAWS commands. When you can’t see. I learned at first that JAWS had its own key that you added other keys with. So my trainer helped me that way. She asked me after learning how to do something what was JAWS commands and the computer commands so I learned very early the differences and that was very smart of her.

 

There isn’t any perfect way to learn and there are so many different ways to do the same thing. So I take when learning I ask for how people do the same thing and find the way I like to do it. I keep in my mind when helping others if they can’t learn my way to show them another way and they learn that my way is most less keys overall but I still read all emails and see if there is an faster way to do the same thing.

 

Louise and princess Kiara

 

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: January 9, 2016 6:57 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize when teaching

 

Kelly,

          You are indeed correct.   I hasten to add that I do not, and never have, attempted to teach any client the exhaustive list of either JAWS commands or keyboard shortcuts for the Windows programs they're using.   As I pointed out earlier relative to myself, even I don't know anywhere near to all of these.  I let the client's actual needs as I work with them guide just precisely what gets taught in terms of the weird detailed keyboard shortcuts that virtually no sighted person ever uses but that they must use if they wish to independently perform task X.

          I'm also big on the "teach a man or woman to fish" approach to JAWS and Windows, so that when I'm no longer present they are able to do a reasonable amount of digging and exploration on their own.  I do less of this than I'd actually like to because I often have to focus on a list of immediate and pressing needs related to what the client needs to accomplish NOW (or yesterday).

          I will take issue with your statement about blind users and the number of keyboard shortcuts they can manage in their heads.  Virtually every proficient blind computer user I know manages a large number of keyboard shortcuts in their head, far more than I do teaching them, because I learn them to teach them, while they learn them to use them and tend to build upon that list as more and more tasks are required over a period of years.  I'd be shocked if it isn't hundreds, plural, for some of the really, really proficient.

Brian


Kelly Pierce
 

Brian,

I was speaking about typical student performance not the capacity of
blind people. Some people are fluent in six languages, but this is
very few. Travel and tourism companies would be foolish to believe
that most travelers are fluent in the world’s most commonly spoken
languages. While a few blind people have memorized many hundreds of
keyboard shortcuts, it would be folly to believe most blind people
need or want to invest the time to learn hundreds of keyboard
shortcuts and are facile with many software programs. The learning
curve to master adaptive technology used by the blind is steep. Most
blind people have other interests than learning technology and decide
to learn what they need to know rather than comprehensively know
everything about a software application. They could learn hundreds of
keyboard shortcuts like people learning six languages but choose to do
other things with their time.

This is all said because you seem to focus on students learning
detailed recipes of keyboard shortcuts like the examples you posted
rather than a system of understanding screen reading technology that
would be used when you are no longer in the student’s life.

A few months ago, I was transferred to a new job where I needed to
learn Excel for the first time. I had never used Excel before and
taught myself the program well enough to surpass the expectations in
my new job. This was possible because I knew how to learn JAWS and
Windows functions and adapt to new software not because a trainer at
one time provided long lists of keyboard sequences for me to use
sometime in the future but because I learned key functions of JAWS,
windows and common applications in addition to Windows shortcuts. My
employer expected me to figure out the software and the accessibility
I needed to do the job, not to turn around and tell them to hire a
trainer to teach me Excel because I only knew Windows.

Kelly

On 1/9/16, Louise Johnson <herclouise@shaw.ca> wrote:
Hi Brian thanks for saying what you said here. I have read all the messages
in this group of emails. We as users learn new things by trying or something
not working at the time. I only wish things didn’t have to change. We learn
the things we use daily. I can do a keyboard command a few times and
remember it always if using within daily use. I can say using something
within our daily life helps us remember it fully.



I will say I don’t mean that we use every command daily but within the short
time.



I have friends who wonder how I remember how to make a new folder in outlook
2013 and don’t even have to think about it.



I can do this also with JAWS keyboard commands. I learn and use it and I
won’t forget. Now only use once a year or twice a year and I do forget.



I don’t remember how to spell but keyboards commands are so easy for me.



I believe learning is easier for some than others. So some can write
wonderfully and some remember keyboard commands and can just do them.



One thing is when learning the commands knowing if computer commands or JAWS
commands. When you can’t see. I learned at first that JAWS had its own key
that you added other keys with. So my trainer helped me that way. She asked
me after learning how to do something what was JAWS commands and the
computer commands so I learned very early the differences and that was very
smart of her.



There isn’t any perfect way to learn and there are so many different ways to
do the same thing. So I take when learning I ask for how people do the same
thing and find the way I like to do it. I keep in my mind when helping
others if they can’t learn my way to show them another way and they learn
that my way is most less keys overall but I still read all emails and see if
there is an faster way to do the same thing.



Louise and princess Kiara





From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: January 9, 2016 6:57 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Views on Keyboard Shortcuts to teach or, perhaps, emphasize
when teaching



Kelly,

You are indeed correct. I hasten to add that I do not, and never
have, attempted to teach any client the exhaustive list of either JAWS
commands or keyboard shortcuts for the Windows programs they're using. As
I pointed out earlier relative to myself, even I don't know anywhere near to
all of these. I let the client's actual needs as I work with them guide
just precisely what gets taught in terms of the weird detailed keyboard
shortcuts that virtually no sighted person ever uses but that they must use
if they wish to independently perform task X.

I'm also big on the "teach a man or woman to fish" approach to
JAWS and Windows, so that when I'm no longer present they are able to do a
reasonable amount of digging and exploration on their own. I do less of
this than I'd actually like to because I often have to focus on a list of
immediate and pressing needs related to what the client needs to accomplish
NOW (or yesterday).

I will take issue with your statement about blind users and the
number of keyboard shortcuts they can manage in their heads. Virtually
every proficient blind computer user I know manages a large number of
keyboard shortcuts in their head, far more than I do teaching them, because
I learn them to teach them, while they learn them to use them and tend to
build upon that list as more and more tasks are required over a period of
years. I'd be shocked if it isn't hundreds, plural, for some of the really,
really proficient.

Brian




 

Kelly,

        You are simply incorrect about what I do.  I'll leave it at that.

Brian