Topics

moderated Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms


 

In response to a recent set of questions about accessible, fillable forms in MS-Word I did a major rewrite of my tutorial about same, using Word 2016 for the screenshots, keyboard shortcuts, etc., to bring it entirely up to date (as nothing has changed from 2016 through Office 365 in this respect). I thought it might be of interest to some of the readers of the JAWS group.  I tried to make the tutorial on creating them accessible as well.  Screenshots have alt-text and I've tried to include all of the keyboard shortcuts for actually creating the legacy form content controls and adding the help text to them so that a screen reader announces what you've landed on and, if you hit F1, give additional details when that's necessary (or just repeat what you have focus on at the moment if you walked away or otherwise got distracted and need to refresh your memory).  The target audience is really sighted individuals, most of whom have never even attempted to make a fillable form, and if they have, they've almost certainly not bothered to add the help text to the various form fields, and that's the part that actually makes these things accessible.

Microsoft Word Accessible Fillable Forms Tutorials

Creating Accessible Microsoft Word Fillable Forms.docx

Converting a Fillable Word Form to a Document Whose Contents Can Be Copied or Edited.docx

Examples of MS-Word Accessible Fillable Forms

            Simple_Fillable_Form.dotx  (the one used in the tutorial on creating them)

            BusNoteForm.dotx  (actually used in a local school, but anonymized; has a date field automatically populated with today's date when form is used)

            Faux_Service_Invoice_Fillable_Form.dotx

            NVDA_GitHub_Issue_Template.dotx

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


Justin Williams
 

Do you have one for accessible pdfs, and fillable pdsf?

 

Justin

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 12:13 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

In response to a recent set of questions about accessible, fillable forms in MS-Word I did a major rewrite of my tutorial about same, using Word 2016 for the screenshots, keyboard shortcuts, etc., to bring it entirely up to date (as nothing has changed from 2016 through Office 365 in this respect). I thought it might be of interest to some of the readers of the JAWS group.  I tried to make the tutorial on creating them accessible as well.  Screenshots have alt-text and I've tried to include all of the keyboard shortcuts for actually creating the legacy form content controls and adding the help text to them so that a screen reader announces what you've landed on and, if you hit F1, give additional details when that's necessary (or just repeat what you have focus on at the moment if you walked away or otherwise got distracted and need to refresh your memory).  The target audience is really sighted individuals, most of whom have never even attempted to make a fillable form, and if they have, they've almost certainly not bothered to add the help text to the various form fields, and that's the part that actually makes these things accessible.

Microsoft Word Accessible Fillable Forms Tutorials

Creating Accessible Microsoft Word Fillable Forms.docx

Converting a Fillable Word Form to a Document Whose Contents Can Be Copied or Edited.docx

Examples of MS-Word Accessible Fillable Forms

            Simple_Fillable_Form.dotx  (the one used in the tutorial on creating them)

            BusNoteForm.dotx  (actually used in a local school, but anonymized; has a date field automatically populated with today's date when form is used)

            Faux_Service_Invoice_Fillable_Form.dotx

            NVDA_GitHub_Issue_Template.dotx

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


Justin Williams
 

Going to keep this one and practice.

 

Justin

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 12:13 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

In response to a recent set of questions about accessible, fillable forms in MS-Word I did a major rewrite of my tutorial about same, using Word 2016 for the screenshots, keyboard shortcuts, etc., to bring it entirely up to date (as nothing has changed from 2016 through Office 365 in this respect). I thought it might be of interest to some of the readers of the JAWS group.  I tried to make the tutorial on creating them accessible as well.  Screenshots have alt-text and I've tried to include all of the keyboard shortcuts for actually creating the legacy form content controls and adding the help text to them so that a screen reader announces what you've landed on and, if you hit F1, give additional details when that's necessary (or just repeat what you have focus on at the moment if you walked away or otherwise got distracted and need to refresh your memory).  The target audience is really sighted individuals, most of whom have never even attempted to make a fillable form, and if they have, they've almost certainly not bothered to add the help text to the various form fields, and that's the part that actually makes these things accessible.

Microsoft Word Accessible Fillable Forms Tutorials

Creating Accessible Microsoft Word Fillable Forms.docx

Converting a Fillable Word Form to a Document Whose Contents Can Be Copied or Edited.docx

Examples of MS-Word Accessible Fillable Forms

            Simple_Fillable_Form.dotx  (the one used in the tutorial on creating them)

            BusNoteForm.dotx  (actually used in a local school, but anonymized; has a date field automatically populated with today's date when form is used)

            Faux_Service_Invoice_Fillable_Form.dotx

            NVDA_GitHub_Issue_Template.dotx

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 12:57 PM, Justin Williams wrote:
Do you have one for accessible pdfs, and fillable pdsf?
-.
Unfortunately not, and that's mostly because I don't have any real, high-powered PDF Editor at my disposal.

The concepts have got to be parallel, but the actual commands involved would vary depending on the specific PDF editing software used to create the fillable PDF.

And the last time I played with it, even though MS-Word can save as PDF, it cannot save its own fillable forms as a PDF equivalent.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


Cynthia Bruce
 

Thanks, Brian! Honestly, my university has been struggling with this – they seem to be stumped. Go figure.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: November 25, 2020 1:13 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

In response to a recent set of questions about accessible, fillable forms in MS-Word I did a major rewrite of my tutorial about same, using Word 2016 for the screenshots, keyboard shortcuts, etc., to bring it entirely up to date (as nothing has changed from 2016 through Office 365 in this respect). I thought it might be of interest to some of the readers of the JAWS group.  I tried to make the tutorial on creating them accessible as well.  Screenshots have alt-text and I've tried to include all of the keyboard shortcuts for actually creating the legacy form content controls and adding the help text to them so that a screen reader announces what you've landed on and, if you hit F1, give additional details when that's necessary (or just repeat what you have focus on at the moment if you walked away or otherwise got distracted and need to refresh your memory).  The target audience is really sighted individuals, most of whom have never even attempted to make a fillable form, and if they have, they've almost certainly not bothered to add the help text to the various form fields, and that's the part that actually makes these things accessible.

Microsoft Word Accessible Fillable Forms Tutorials

Creating Accessible Microsoft Word Fillable Forms.docx

Converting a Fillable Word Form to a Document Whose Contents Can Be Copied or Edited.docx

Examples of MS-Word Accessible Fillable Forms

            Simple_Fillable_Form.dotx  (the one used in the tutorial on creating them)

            BusNoteForm.dotx  (actually used in a local school, but anonymized; has a date field automatically populated with today's date when form is used)

            Faux_Service_Invoice_Fillable_Form.dotx

            NVDA_GitHub_Issue_Template.dotx

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 01:58 PM, Cynthia Bruce wrote:
Honestly, my university has been struggling with this – they seem to be stumped. Go figure.
-
It really does astound me how little fillable forms (whether done with accessibility in mind, or not) under MS-Word have never really caught on.  When you couple that with people who think that an MS-Word document that prints perfectly as a standard blank paper form is accessible, it's even worse.

I've been using fillable forms for a very long time now.  When I hand someone the electronic equivalent of a paper form, the only things I want them to be able to touch are the parts that you'd actually fill out were you using pen on a paper form.  No accidental removal of labels, checkboxes, etc., and fillable forms have "filled that bill" perfectly.

I believe that anyone with more than a cursory familiarity with MS-Word will be able to follow that tutorial, particularly since screen shots of each and every critical, and some not so critical, steps are shown so that a sense of, "Oh, I'm seeing that, I must be doing it right," will develop quickly.

The trickiest part, really, is getting the sighted to understand that they absolutely, positively must take the time to add the Help Text for each and every form control, be it a text box, checkbox, or dropdown, that a user can touch if they want the form to be accessible.  That text is what the screen reader reads upon encountering a form control, and it never has any access to the protected elements in a fillable form, just like the end user doesn't have access to those when filling it out.

The one thing that's even less known is that the capability exists, after the form is completed, to convert its contents to plain old text.  There are occasions where you want to control entry of form information, but where being able to see the form in its entirety afterward is desirable.  Sometimes it doesn't matter, and others it does.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


mike mcglashon
 

Mr. brian:

 

Quoted:

I've been using fillable forms for a very long time now.  When I hand someone the electronic equivalent of a paper form, the only things I want them to be able to touch are the parts that you'd actually fill out were you using pen on a paper form.  No accidental removal of labels, checkboxes, etc., and fillable forms have "filled that bill" perfectly.

End quote:

 

I like your response to fillable forms, however, you stated earlier,

That,

You haven’t much experience with pdf fillable forms because you do not have a pdf editor which allows you to make such forms.

I believe you stated that your experience is within the word arena of making fillable word forms.

 

Maybe the answer lies somewhere in between.

I can see where sighted persons love pdf because they can take a picture of the paper form scan it in as image and be done with it.

Wouldn’t it be worth word to somehow take a pdf image and create a fillable form on the fly, resave the form as pdf and then we’d have pdf fillable forms?

 

I think it would be unreasonable, let alone impossible, to ask the “majority” sighted persons, to take “extra time” to create such forms, when the “majority” of persons using the forms are in fact sighted?

 

I do wish however, that sighted persons creating such forms by automation could be forced to create the accessible forms.  For instance, if someone creates a fillable form, there could be a “wcag” you know the supposed “guidelines” “not law” to automatically do an error check for specifically accessible characteristics, and when it fails, the thing wouldn’t even let them save it to their computer?

(kind of like a program compiler)?

They most  certainly would learn wouldn’t they?

 

I believe the guidelines, although not congressional law, could be implemented in some sort of automated way; hence, the sightee would either fix it till the compiler gets it right, or,

Risk losing their work altogether.  They’d learn quickly, wouldn’t they?

 

Please advise as you like.

 

Mike M.

 

Mike mcglashon

Email: Michael.mcglashon@...

Ph: 618 783 9331

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 3:30 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 01:58 PM, Cynthia Bruce wrote:

Honestly, my university has been struggling with this – they seem to be stumped. Go figure.

-
It really does astound me how little fillable forms (whether done with accessibility in mind, or not) under MS-Word have never really caught on.  When you couple that with people who think that an MS-Word document that prints perfectly as a standard blank paper form is accessible, it's even worse.

I've been using fillable forms for a very long time now.  When I hand someone the electronic equivalent of a paper form, the only things I want them to be able to touch are the parts that you'd actually fill out were you using pen on a paper form.  No accidental removal of labels, checkboxes, etc., and fillable forms have "filled that bill" perfectly.

I believe that anyone with more than a cursory familiarity with MS-Word will be able to follow that tutorial, particularly since screen shots of each and every critical, and some not so critical, steps are shown so that a sense of, "Oh, I'm seeing that, I must be doing it right," will develop quickly.

The trickiest part, really, is getting the sighted to understand that they absolutely, positively must take the time to add the Help Text for each and every form control, be it a text box, checkbox, or dropdown, that a user can touch if they want the form to be accessible.  That text is what the screen reader reads upon encountering a form control, and it never has any access to the protected elements in a fillable form, just like the end user doesn't have access to those when filling it out.

The one thing that's even less known is that the capability exists, after the form is completed, to convert its contents to plain old text.  There are occasions where you want to control entry of form information, but where being able to see the form in its entirety afterward is desirable.  Sometimes it doesn't matter, and others it does.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 03:58 PM, mike mcglashon wrote:
I can see where sighted persons love pdf because they can take a picture of the paper form scan it in as image and be done with it.
-
Which is fine, if all you plan to ever do it print on paper again.   Also, very few scanning utilities these days don't create PDF files with a text layer associated with them if the thing being scanned contains text.  Image scanned PDFs really are largely a thing of the past, but so many were created during that period of many years that untold millions almost certainly exist.  One of the first things I taught my clients who were students getting image scanned PDFs as part of their required reading was how to OCR scan them with PDF-XChange Viewer and save the file, which keeps the text layer as part of the PDF.  I also suggested that they hand copies of these off to their professors and ask that the OCRed version be made the repository copy as opposed to the image scanned original.

I have never seen anyone create a form using automation, only a human sitting behind a desk, as there's so much trial and error getting things to look the way you want them to.  It should certainly be possible if one is using automation to create a fillable PDF that at least the various fillable fields would be identified in some way, but even that would rely on the human designer using whatever syntax is required to have that happen.

The problem with legally mandating any of this is that there is really no way to enforce it, at least not effectively, along with the fact that, as I said earlier, there are just too many people who don't have a clue as to how to do what's needed for something to be accessible.

You also make a good point with, "I think it would be unreasonable, let alone impossible, to ask the “majority” sighted persons, to take “extra time” to create such forms, when the “majority” of persons using the forms are in fact sighted?"   There are untold millions of forms that get created for small organizations, groups, etc., where there is absolutely no reason for them to be accessible when push comes to shove.  Material is created with target demographics in mind.  I would be thrilled if the realization finally hit that when that demographic is, "the general public," that accessibility must be kept in mind and implemented.  If there are to be legal mandates, they would need to be carefully targeted if there is any hope of having the ability to enforce.  I've created plenty of inaccessible stuff in my life, about which I have zero regrets, because I knew the target audience did not include, and would never include, a screen reader user.  Most of that sort of stuff was questionnaires for business meetings, flyers for street festivals, and the like.  But, back to your original point, it's really not exclusively about whether the majority of people using something are sighted, it's about whether it's reasonable to believe that same would also be expected to be used by those who are visually impaired or blind.  Things like IRS tax forms (or at least the ones I've dealt with) that are PDF fillable forms are accessible and should be because there is every reason to expect that many who are blind will have to deal with them.  And, for large organizations, not limited to the government, having accessibility designed in saves a fortune in "help desk hours" over the life of the form.  There are many who are now cluing in to that fact.  Better late than never.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 03:58 PM, mike mcglashon wrote:
Wouldn’t it be worth word to somehow take a pdf image and create a fillable form on the fly, resave the form as pdf and then we’d have pdf fillable forms?
-
It's only "worth it" if enough people or organizations want it.

But there's really not any point, to my way of thinking, in making Word handle PDFs in this manner.  The PDF format came into existence as a direct offshoot of professional publishing needs.  Word reading these in was an afterthought, and Word's ability to save PDFs is limited in many ways by design.  If you want fillable PDFs, then either design that in when creating them to begin with or retrofit it when you have to go back and edit an existing form that isn't.  If the form is an image scanned PDF then OCR it, save that text layer, then do the correct updates to the form in a PDF editor to make it as it needs to be.  An image scanned PDF read into word behaves no differently than it did in a PDF reader - it's still an image inserted into a Word document.  Word makes no attempt to figure out what that image might contain.

AI, of course, will likely come into the picture as time marches on for a lot of these functions.  But even when it does, I really believe that review by humans afterwards will always be required, as we still catch stuff that somehow gets overlooked by automation (or other humans who set up what the automation carried through).
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


Justin Williams
 

I asked because I am getting a pdf packet sent ot me that I'd like to be able to fill out and return it via e-mail.

 

Justin

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 5:02 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 03:58 PM, mike mcglashon wrote:

I can see where sighted persons love pdf because they can take a picture of the paper form scan it in as image and be done with it.

-
Which is fine, if all you plan to ever do it print on paper again.   Also, very few scanning utilities these days don't create PDF files with a text layer associated with them if the thing being scanned contains text.  Image scanned PDFs really are largely a thing of the past, but so many were created during that period of many years that untold millions almost certainly exist.  One of the first things I taught my clients who were students getting image scanned PDFs as part of their required reading was how to OCR scan them with PDF-XChange Viewer and save the file, which keeps the text layer as part of the PDF.  I also suggested that they hand copies of these off to their professors and ask that the OCRed version be made the repository copy as opposed to the image scanned original.

I have never seen anyone create a form using automation, only a human sitting behind a desk, as there's so much trial and error getting things to look the way you want them to.  It should certainly be possible if one is using automation to create a fillable PDF that at least the various fillable fields would be identified in some way, but even that would rely on the human designer using whatever syntax is required to have that happen.

The problem with legally mandating any of this is that there is really no way to enforce it, at least not effectively, along with the fact that, as I said earlier, there are just too many people who don't have a clue as to how to do what's needed for something to be accessible.

You also make a good point with, "I think it would be unreasonable, let alone impossible, to ask the “majority” sighted persons, to take “extra time” to create such forms, when the “majority” of persons using the forms are in fact sighted?"   There are untold millions of forms that get created for small organizations, groups, etc., where there is absolutely no reason for them to be accessible when push comes to shove.  Material is created with target demographics in mind.  I would be thrilled if the realization finally hit that when that demographic is, "the general public," that accessibility must be kept in mind and implemented.  If there are to be legal mandates, they would need to be carefully targeted if there is any hope of having the ability to enforce.  I've created plenty of inaccessible stuff in my life, about which I have zero regrets, because I knew the target audience did not include, and would never include, a screen reader user.  Most of that sort of stuff was questionnaires for business meetings, flyers for street festivals, and the like.  But, back to your original point, it's really not exclusively about whether the majority of people using something are sighted, it's about whether it's reasonable to believe that same would also be expected to be used by those who are visually impaired or blind.  Things like IRS tax forms (or at least the ones I've dealt with) that are PDF fillable forms are accessible and should be because there is every reason to expect that many who are blind will have to deal with them.  And, for large organizations, not limited to the government, having accessibility designed in saves a fortune in "help desk hours" over the life of the form.  There are many who are now cluing in to that fact.  Better late than never.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 06:49 PM, Justin Williams wrote:
I asked because I am getting a pdf packet sent to me that I'd like to be able to fill out and return it via e-mail.
-
I say the following not to be glib, but because it's a simple truism:  If the person/entity sending them has used fillable PDF forms, that are accessible and that also can be saved (because you can, believe it or not, make a fillable PDF where it cannot be saved once filled out) then you'll be able to do just that.  If they don't, then they need to be made aware of the issues this causes and told they need to address this, and not just for you.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


Justin Williams
 

I apologize, I am not understanding.

 

The person has never done this before.

 

Can you please explain again?

 

I'd like to be able ot make a pdf that is not accessible and fillable, accessible and fillable if possible.

 

Thanks,

 

Justin

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 7:09 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 06:49 PM, Justin Williams wrote:

I asked because I am getting a pdf packet sent to me that I'd like to be able to fill out and return it via e-mail.

-
I say the following not to be glib, but because it's a simple truism:  If the person/entity sending them has used fillable PDF forms, that are accessible and that also can be saved (because you can, believe it or not, make a fillable PDF where it cannot be saved once filled out) then you'll be able to do just that.  If they don't, then they need to be made aware of the issues this causes and told they need to address this, and not just for you.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


 

Justin,

          I cannot explain, in any meaningful detail, something I've never done using an unknown piece of software.  The principles of creating fillable forms really don't change all that much, it's the mechanics in the editing software being used.  There are a very great many PDF editors out there, and it's impossible for anyone to get specific unless they know which one is being used, and actually have experience using that software to create fillable PDF forms.  Here's a WikiHow page on using a previous version of Adobe Acrobat to create fillable forms:  https://www.wikihow.com/Create-a-Fillable-PDF 

          There are almost certain to be web resources for any given PDF Editor with regard to fillable forms with a search on "fillable form" coupled with the name of the software being used to create one.

Mike,

           See this page at Adobe in relation to your earlier commentary about having "scan and create form" software.  It appears that Adobe already has it, though it's not free:  https://acrobat.adobe.com/us/en/acrobat/how-to/create-fillable-pdf-forms-creator.html 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


Justin Williams
 

Okay,

 

Much appreaicted.

 

Thanks,

 

Justin

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 8:46 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

Justin,

          I cannot explain, in any meaningful detail, something I've never done using an unknown piece of software.  The principles of creating fillable forms really don't change all that much, it's the mechanics in the editing software being used.  There are a very great many PDF editors out there, and it's impossible for anyone to get specific unless they know which one is being used, and actually have experience using that software to create fillable PDF forms.  Here's a WikiHow page on using a previous version of Adobe Acrobat to create fillable forms:  https://www.wikihow.com/Create-a-Fillable-PDF 

          There are almost certain to be web resources for any given PDF Editor with regard to fillable forms with a search on "fillable form" coupled with the name of the software being used to create one.

Mike,

           See this page at Adobe in relation to your earlier commentary about having "scan and create form" software.  It appears that Adobe already has it, though it's not free:  https://acrobat.adobe.com/us/en/acrobat/how-to/create-fillable-pdf-forms-creator.html 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


Adrian Spratt
 

Justin,

 

You are a true diplomat. As you imply, making documents can be difficult for those of us with limited technological knowledge and aptitude. Ironically, one of my sighted friends had an accessibility problem using his preferred speech engine with my website’s PDF files. Sometimes you can’t win for trying!

 

We need to choose our battles with an understanding of whom we’re dealing with.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Justin Williams
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 7:56 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

I apologize, I am not understanding.

 

The person has never done this before.

 

Can you please explain again?

 

I'd like to be able ot make a pdf that is not accessible and fillable, accessible and fillable if possible.

 

Thanks,

 

Justin

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, November 25, 2020 7:09 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tutorials on Creating Accessible MS-Word Fillable Forms Plus Examples of Those Forms

 

On Wed, Nov 25, 2020 at 06:49 PM, Justin Williams wrote:

I asked because I am getting a pdf packet sent to me that I'd like to be able to fill out and return it via e-mail.

-
I say the following not to be glib, but because it's a simple truism:  If the person/entity sending them has used fillable PDF forms, that are accessible and that also can be saved (because you can, believe it or not, make a fillable PDF where it cannot be saved once filled out) then you'll be able to do just that.  If they don't, then they need to be made aware of the issues this causes and told they need to address this, and not just for you.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide