moderated The purpose of screen reader instruction:


Angel
 

I apologize for sending that last message without a subject.  It shan’t happen again.  Here it is:  In case my last message was ignored, again I apologize for my carelessness. 

 

We forget, computer instructors teaching the blind are mainly working, not on the behalf of the student; as the blind student is not the one who pays his salary.  Rather, he works for an agency. Which is employed by either personal employers or federal or state government agencies.  So, instructors are obliged to teach whatever it is those agencies require.  When I received my first computer in 98, I was taught only that which pertained to the job for which my computer and adaptive software was purchased; which had nothing at all to do with the internet, for example.  So, I wasn’t taught to use the primitive internet extant.  Individual needs and preferences change and grow over time; along with individual  computer requirements.  Which is why, I agree with mister  Warner.  Given the limited time allotted for training it would be difficult to teach, both, what employment requires and what recreational things the student would like to learn.  This is why many of us teach ourselves much of what it is we prefer in a recreational sense.    I have a dual challenge.  One of which limits the use of one of my hands.  Two screen readers were taught by my local agency for the blind, Window-eyes and Jaws.  I had no idea concerning the use of either screen reader.  It was left to the expertise of my instructor to decide for me the screen reader which would serve my particular needs, and which would best accommodate my secondary challenge.  Because, I was ignorant.  I, however, was given a choice whether or not to have, installed on my computer, Jaws for dos.  I chose not to have that screen reader installed.  I later regretted that decision.  I wish it had been made for me, and I had learned to use that screen reader.  I would have been much wiser, today about the use of command prompts.  By the way:  How does one put on the desktop a shortcut for restarting the computer?  Knowing more about command prompts would allow me to understand how this might be accomplished; without having to ask you fine people such a question.  But, using such a desktop shortcut might come in handy on occasion.  There is always time for us to learn what it is we prefer on our own. 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

 

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Gene Warner
 

The easiest way I've found to shutdown Windows is to just do an Alt+F4 from the desktop. You get a dialog that asks what you want Windows to do and the default is to shut down so just hit Enter.

Gene...

On 8/8/2022 5:45 AM, Angel wrote:
I apologize for sending that last message without a subject.  It shan’t happen again.  Here it is:  In case my last message was ignored, again I apologize for my carelessness.
We forget, computer instructors teaching the blind are mainly working, not on the behalf of the student; as the blind student is not the one who pays his salary.  Rather, he works for an agency. Which is employed by either personal employers or federal or state government agencies. So, instructors are obliged to teach whatever it is those agencies require.  When I received my first computer in 98, I was taught only that which pertained to the job for which my computer and adaptive software was purchased; which had nothing at all to do with the internet, for example.  So, I wasn’t taught to use the primitive internet extant.  Individual needs and preferences change and grow over time; along with individual  computer requirements.  Which is why, I agree with mister  Warner.  Given the limited time allotted for training it would be difficult to teach, both, what employment requires and what recreational things the student would like to learn.  This is why many of us teach ourselves much of what it is we prefer in a recreational sense.    I have a dual challenge.  One of which limits the use of one of my hands.  Two screen readers were taught by my local agency for the blind, Window-eyes and Jaws.  I had no idea concerning the use of either screen reader.  It was left to the expertise of my instructor to decide for me the screen reader which would serve my particular needs, and which would best accommodate my secondary challenge.  Because, I was ignorant.  I, however, was given a choice whether or not to have, installed on my computer, Jaws for dos.  I chose not to have that screen reader installed.  I later regretted that decision.  I wish it had been made for me, and I had learned to use that screen reader.  I would have been much wiser, today about the use of command prompts.  By the way: How does one put on the desktop a shortcut for restarting the computer? Knowing more about command prompts would allow me to understand how this might be accomplished; without having to ask you fine people such a question.  But, using such a desktop shortcut might come in handy on occasion.  There is always time for us to learn what it is we prefer on our own.
Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows
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meow meow
 

I thought alt f4 is to remove the website



--------------------------------------------------
From: "Gene Warner" <genewarner3@...>
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2022 6:12 AM
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

The easiest way I've found to shutdown Windows is to just do an Alt+F4 from the desktop. You get a dialog that asks what you want Windows to do and the default is to shut down so just hit Enter.

Gene...


On 8/8/2022 5:45 AM, Angel wrote:
I apologize for sending that last message without a subject. It shan’t happen again. Here it is: In case my last message was ignored, again I apologize for my carelessness.

We forget, computer instructors teaching the blind are mainly working, not on the behalf of the student; as the blind student is not the one who pays his salary. Rather, he works for an agency. Which is employed by either personal employers or federal or state government agencies. So, instructors are obliged to teach whatever it is those agencies require. When I received my first computer in 98, I was taught only that which pertained to the job for which my computer and adaptive software was purchased; which had nothing at all to do with the internet, for example. So, I wasn’t taught to use the primitive internet extant. Individual needs and preferences change and grow over time; along with individual computer requirements. Which is why, I agree with mister Warner. Given the limited time allotted for training it would be difficult to teach, both, what employment requires and what recreational things the student would like to learn. This is why many of us teach ourselves much of what it is we prefer in a recreational sense. I have a dual challenge. One of which limits the use of one of my hands. Two screen readers were taught by my local agency for the blind, Window-eyes and Jaws. I had no idea concerning the use of either screen reader. It was left to the expertise of my instructor to decide for me the screen reader which would serve my particular needs, and which would best accommodate my secondary challenge. Because, I was ignorant. I, however, was given a choice whether or not to have, installed on my computer, Jaws for dos. I chose not to have that screen reader installed. I later regretted that decision. I wish it had been made for me, and I had learned to use that screen reader. I would have been much wiser, today about the use of command prompts. By the way: How does one put on the desktop a shortcut for restarting the computer? Knowing more about command prompts would allow me to understand how this might be accomplished; without having to ask you fine people such a question. But, using such a desktop shortcut might come in handy on occasion. There is always time for us to learn what it is we prefer on our own.

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows



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Madison Martin
 

No it's used to close out apps and web pages

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of meow meow
Sent: August 8, 2022 4:36 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

I thought alt f4 is to remove the website



--------------------------------------------------
From: "Gene Warner" <genewarner3@...>
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2022 6:12 AM
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

The easiest way I've found to shutdown Windows is to just do an Alt+F4
from the desktop. You get a dialog that asks what you want Windows to
do and the default is to shut down so just hit Enter.

Gene...


On 8/8/2022 5:45 AM, Angel wrote:
I apologize for sending that last message without a subject. It
shan’t happen again. Here it is: In case my last message was
ignored, again I apologize for my carelessness.

We forget, computer instructors teaching the blind are mainly
working, not on the behalf of the student; as the blind student is
not the one who pays his salary. Rather, he works for an agency.
Which is employed by either personal employers or federal or state
government agencies. So, instructors are obliged to teach whatever it is those agencies require.
When I received my first computer in 98, I was taught only that which
pertained to the job for which my computer and adaptive software was
purchased; which had nothing at all to do with the internet, for example.
So, I wasn’t taught to use the primitive internet extant. Individual
needs and preferences change and grow over time; along with
individual computer requirements. Which is why, I agree with mister
Warner. Given the limited time allotted for training it would be
difficult to teach, both, what employment requires and what
recreational things the student would like to learn. This is why many of us teach ourselves much of what
it is we prefer in a recreational sense. I have a dual challenge. One
of which limits the use of one of my hands. Two screen readers were
taught by my local agency for the blind, Window-eyes and Jaws. I had
no idea concerning the use of either screen reader. It was left to
the expertise of my instructor to decide for me the screen reader
which would serve my particular needs, and which would best
accommodate my secondary challenge. Because, I was ignorant. I,
however, was given a choice whether or not to have, installed on my
computer, Jaws for dos. I chose not to have that screen reader
installed. I later regretted that decision. I wish it had been made
for me, and I had learned to use that screen reader. I would have
been much wiser, today about the use of command prompts. By the way:
How does one put on the desktop a shortcut for restarting the
computer? Knowing more about command prompts would allow me to
understand how this might be accomplished; without having to ask you
fine people such a question. But, using such a desktop shortcut
might come in handy on occasion. There is always time for us to learn what it is we prefer on our own.

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows



---------------------------------------------------------------------
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Adrian Spratt
 

This deserves some clarification. Yes, alt-F4 can close down a website. More specifically, it closes individual windows. Sometimes the effect is to close a program or app, such as a browser. Sometimes it just closes a document, as is the case with MS Word, although if only one Word document is open, it will also close Word.

What Gene is referring to here is the effect pressing alt-F4 has when focus is on the desktop. In this case, it presents the user with the option to shut down the computer.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of meow meow
Sent: Monday, August 8, 2022 5:36 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

I thought alt f4 is to remove the website



--------------------------------------------------
From: "Gene Warner" <genewarner3@...>
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2022 6:12 AM
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

The easiest way I've found to shutdown Windows is to just do an Alt+F4
from the desktop. You get a dialog that asks what you want Windows to
do and the default is to shut down so just hit Enter.

Gene...


On 8/8/2022 5:45 AM, Angel wrote:
I apologize for sending that last message without a subject. It
shan’t happen again. Here it is: In case my last message was
ignored, again I apologize for my carelessness.

We forget, computer instructors teaching the blind are mainly
working, not on the behalf of the student; as the blind student is
not the one who pays his salary. Rather, he works for an agency.
Which is employed by either personal employers or federal or state
government agencies. So, instructors are obliged to teach whatever it is those agencies require.
When I received my first computer in 98, I was taught only that which
pertained to the job for which my computer and adaptive software was
purchased; which had nothing at all to do with the internet, for example.
So, I wasn’t taught to use the primitive internet extant. Individual
needs and preferences change and grow over time; along with
individual computer requirements. Which is why, I agree with mister
Warner. Given the limited time allotted for training it would be
difficult to teach, both, what employment requires and what
recreational things the student would like to learn. This is why many of us teach ourselves much of what
it is we prefer in a recreational sense. I have a dual challenge. One
of which limits the use of one of my hands. Two screen readers were
taught by my local agency for the blind, Window-eyes and Jaws. I had
no idea concerning the use of either screen reader. It was left to
the expertise of my instructor to decide for me the screen reader
which would serve my particular needs, and which would best
accommodate my secondary challenge. Because, I was ignorant. I,
however, was given a choice whether or not to have, installed on my
computer, Jaws for dos. I chose not to have that screen reader
installed. I later regretted that decision. I wish it had been made
for me, and I had learned to use that screen reader. I would have
been much wiser, today about the use of command prompts. By the way:
How does one put on the desktop a shortcut for restarting the
computer? Knowing more about command prompts would allow me to
understand how this might be accomplished; without having to ask you
fine people such a question. But, using such a desktop shortcut
might come in handy on occasion. There is always time for us to learn what it is we prefer on our own.

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows



---------------------------------------------------------------------
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Gene Warner
 

The short version is that Alt+F4 is the Windows global close command. Alt+F4 will close whatever the focus happens to be on, if it the Windows desktop, it will shut down Windows.

Gene...

On 8/8/2022 6:15 PM, Adrian Spratt wrote:
This deserves some clarification. Yes, alt-F4 can close down a website. More specifically, it closes individual windows. Sometimes the effect is to close a program or app, such as a browser. Sometimes it just closes a document, as is the case with MS Word, although if only one Word document is open, it will also close Word.
What Gene is referring to here is the effect pressing alt-F4 has when focus is on the desktop. In this case, it presents the user with the option to shut down the computer.
-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of meow meow
Sent: Monday, August 8, 2022 5:36 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:
I thought alt f4 is to remove the website
--------------------------------------------------
From: "Gene Warner" <genewarner3@...>
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2022 6:12 AM
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

The easiest way I've found to shutdown Windows is to just do an Alt+F4
from the desktop. You get a dialog that asks what you want Windows to
do and the default is to shut down so just hit Enter.

Gene...


On 8/8/2022 5:45 AM, Angel wrote:
I apologize for sending that last message without a subject. It
shan’t happen again. Here it is: In case my last message was
ignored, again I apologize for my carelessness.

We forget, computer instructors teaching the blind are mainly
working, not on the behalf of the student; as the blind student is
not the one who pays his salary. Rather, he works for an agency.
Which is employed by either personal employers or federal or state
government agencies. So, instructors are obliged to teach whatever it is those agencies require.
When I received my first computer in 98, I was taught only that which
pertained to the job for which my computer and adaptive software was
purchased; which had nothing at all to do with the internet, for example.
So, I wasn’t taught to use the primitive internet extant. Individual
needs and preferences change and grow over time; along with
individual computer requirements. Which is why, I agree with mister
Warner. Given the limited time allotted for training it would be
difficult to teach, both, what employment requires and what
recreational things the student would like to learn. This is why many of us teach ourselves much of what
it is we prefer in a recreational sense. I have a dual challenge. One
of which limits the use of one of my hands. Two screen readers were
taught by my local agency for the blind, Window-eyes and Jaws. I had
no idea concerning the use of either screen reader. It was left to
the expertise of my instructor to decide for me the screen reader
which would serve my particular needs, and which would best
accommodate my secondary challenge. Because, I was ignorant. I,
however, was given a choice whether or not to have, installed on my
computer, Jaws for dos. I chose not to have that screen reader
installed. I later regretted that decision. I wish it had been made
for me, and I had learned to use that screen reader. I would have
been much wiser, today about the use of command prompts. By the way:
How does one put on the desktop a shortcut for restarting the
computer? Knowing more about command prompts would allow me to
understand how this might be accomplished; without having to ask you
fine people such a question. But, using such a desktop shortcut
might come in handy on occasion. There is always time for us to learn what it is we prefer on our own.

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows



---------------------------------------------------------------------
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checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
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<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>





 

On Mon, Aug 8, 2022 at 06:27 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
The short version is that Alt+F4 is the Windows global close command.
-
I'm going to split a hair here, but only because I have all too often seen how important it is:  ALT + F4 is the Windows global exit command. In most instances it will close the window/program, that is, exit, whatever it is that has focus.

I've watched the horror that occurs when someone accidentally exits something, when what they meant to do was close a tab, for instance.  In all web browsers that I know of right now, if you use tabbed browsing it's very good to get into the habit of using CTRL + W to close your tabs.

I love ALT + F4, and teach it, but it's important to know that it generally exits programs and, for those that don't give you, "Are you sure?," type dialogs, it can catch you out.

This page that focuses on CTRL + W makes the distinction, and does it well:  https://keyboardshortcuts.org/windows-keyboard-shortcuts/close 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Adrian Spratt
 

It won't always present you with a warning before closing. That's the distinction I was making with your example. At the desktop, you'll be given a choice.

--
My novel Caroline is now available in paperback, Kindle and audiobook versions and, for qualified readers in the US, at the National Library Service/BARD. Go to: https://adrianspratt.com/book/

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene Warner
Sent: Monday, August 8, 2022 6:28 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

The short version is that Alt+F4 is the Windows global close command.
Alt+F4 will close whatever the focus happens to be on, if it the Windows
desktop, it will shut down Windows.

Gene...

On 8/8/2022 6:15 PM, Adrian Spratt wrote:
This deserves some clarification. Yes, alt-F4 can close down a website. More specifically, it closes individual windows. Sometimes the effect is to close a program or app, such as a browser. Sometimes it just closes a document, as is the case with MS Word, although if only one Word document is open, it will also close Word.

What Gene is referring to here is the effect pressing alt-F4 has when focus is on the desktop. In this case, it presents the user with the option to shut down the computer.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of meow meow
Sent: Monday, August 8, 2022 5:36 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

I thought alt f4 is to remove the website



--------------------------------------------------
From: "Gene Warner" <genewarner3@...>
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2022 6:12 AM
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

The easiest way I've found to shutdown Windows is to just do an Alt+F4
from the desktop. You get a dialog that asks what you want Windows to
do and the default is to shut down so just hit Enter.

Gene...


On 8/8/2022 5:45 AM, Angel wrote:
I apologize for sending that last message without a subject. It
shan’t happen again. Here it is: In case my last message was
ignored, again I apologize for my carelessness.

We forget, computer instructors teaching the blind are mainly
working, not on the behalf of the student; as the blind student is
not the one who pays his salary. Rather, he works for an agency.
Which is employed by either personal employers or federal or state
government agencies. So, instructors are obliged to teach whatever it is those agencies require.
When I received my first computer in 98, I was taught only that which
pertained to the job for which my computer and adaptive software was
purchased; which had nothing at all to do with the internet, for example.
So, I wasn’t taught to use the primitive internet extant. Individual
needs and preferences change and grow over time; along with
individual computer requirements. Which is why, I agree with mister
Warner. Given the limited time allotted for training it would be
difficult to teach, both, what employment requires and what
recreational things the student would like to learn. This is why many of us teach ourselves much of what
it is we prefer in a recreational sense. I have a dual challenge. One
of which limits the use of one of my hands. Two screen readers were
taught by my local agency for the blind, Window-eyes and Jaws. I had
no idea concerning the use of either screen reader. It was left to
the expertise of my instructor to decide for me the screen reader
which would serve my particular needs, and which would best
accommodate my secondary challenge. Because, I was ignorant. I,
however, was given a choice whether or not to have, installed on my
computer, Jaws for dos. I chose not to have that screen reader
installed. I later regretted that decision. I wish it had been made
for me, and I had learned to use that screen reader. I would have
been much wiser, today about the use of command prompts. By the way:
How does one put on the desktop a shortcut for restarting the
computer? Knowing more about command prompts would allow me to
understand how this might be accomplished; without having to ask you
fine people such a question. But, using such a desktop shortcut
might come in handy on occasion. There is always time for us to learn what it is we prefer on our own.

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows



---------------------------------------------------------------------
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checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
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<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>












Gene Warner
 

Good point, I sometimes hit Alt+F4 when I meant to hit Control+F4 which is the same as Control+W in most cases.

Gene...

On 8/8/2022 7:01 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Mon, Aug 8, 2022 at 06:27 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
The short version is that Alt+F4 is the Windows global close command.
-
I'm going to split a hair here, but only because I have all too often seen how important it is:  ALT + F4 is the Windows global exit command. In most instances it will close the window/program, that is, exit, whatever it is that has focus.
I've watched the horror that occurs when someone accidentally exits something, when what they meant to do was close a tab, for instance.  In all web browsers that I know of right now, if you use tabbed browsing it's very good to get into the habit of using CTRL + W to close your tabs.
I love ALT + F4, and teach it, but it's important to know that it generally exits programs and, for those that don't give you, "Are you sure?," type dialogs, it can catch you out.
This page that focuses on CTRL + W makes the distinction, and does it well: https://keyboardshortcuts.org/windows-keyboard-shortcuts/close <https://keyboardshortcuts.org/windows-keyboard-shortcuts/close>
--
Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044
*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.
*     ~ Lauren Bacall


Lori Lynn
 

This exchange has me a little confused. I have always thought that if I had multiple web pages open that I was to press Control+F4 to close just one of them. I’ve never heard of Control+W. Am I mistaken?

 

Lori Lynn

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, August 8, 2022 6:01 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

 

On Mon, Aug 8, 2022 at 06:27 PM, Gene Warner wrote

 

:

The short version is that Alt+F4 is the Windows global close command.

-
I'm going to split a hair here, but only because I have all too often seen how important it is:  ALT + F4 is the Windows global exit command. In most instances it will close the window/program, that is, exit, whatever it is that has focus.

I've watched the horror that occurs when someone accidentally exits something, when what they meant to do was close a tab, for instance.  In all web browsers that I know of right now, if you use tabbed browsing it's very good to get into the habit of using CTRL + W to close your tabs.

I love ALT + F4, and teach it, but it's important to know that it generally exits programs and, for those that don't give you, "Are you sure?," type dialogs, it can catch you out.

This page that focuses on CTRL + W makes the distinction, and does it well:  https://keyboardshortcuts.org/windows-keyboard-shortcuts/close 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


K0LNY
 

control W works better for single pages, if you don't want to close the
browser.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
From: "Madison Martin" <Madison.Martin2000@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2022 4:38 PM
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:


No it's used to close out apps and web pages

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of meow meow
Sent: August 8, 2022 4:36 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

I thought alt f4 is to remove the website



--------------------------------------------------
From: "Gene Warner" <genewarner3@...>
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2022 6:12 AM
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

The easiest way I've found to shutdown Windows is to just do an Alt+F4
from the desktop. You get a dialog that asks what you want Windows to
do and the default is to shut down so just hit Enter.

Gene...


On 8/8/2022 5:45 AM, Angel wrote:
I apologize for sending that last message without a subject. It
shan’t happen again. Here it is: In case my last message was
ignored, again I apologize for my carelessness.

We forget, computer instructors teaching the blind are mainly
working, not on the behalf of the student; as the blind student is
not the one who pays his salary. Rather, he works for an agency.
Which is employed by either personal employers or federal or state
government agencies. So, instructors are obliged to teach whatever it is
those agencies require.
When I received my first computer in 98, I was taught only that which
pertained to the job for which my computer and adaptive software was
purchased; which had nothing at all to do with the internet, for example.
So, I wasn’t taught to use the primitive internet extant. Individual
needs and preferences change and grow over time; along with
individual computer requirements. Which is why, I agree with mister
Warner. Given the limited time allotted for training it would be
difficult to teach, both, what employment requires and what
recreational things the student would like to learn. This is why many of
us teach ourselves much of what
it is we prefer in a recreational sense. I have a dual challenge. One
of which limits the use of one of my hands. Two screen readers were
taught by my local agency for the blind, Window-eyes and Jaws. I had
no idea concerning the use of either screen reader. It was left to
the expertise of my instructor to decide for me the screen reader
which would serve my particular needs, and which would best
accommodate my secondary challenge. Because, I was ignorant. I,
however, was given a choice whether or not to have, installed on my
computer, Jaws for dos. I chose not to have that screen reader
installed. I later regretted that decision. I wish it had been made
for me, and I had learned to use that screen reader. I would have
been much wiser, today about the use of command prompts. By the way:
How does one put on the desktop a shortcut for restarting the
computer? Knowing more about command prompts would allow me to
understand how this might be accomplished; without having to ask you
fine people such a question. But, using such a desktop shortcut
might come in handy on occasion. There is always time for us to learn
what it is we prefer on our own.

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows



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K0LNY
 


Hi Brian,
As we discussed before, I should have read through all the messages before seeing if it was answered already, but hey, sometimes we get lazy.
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2022 6:01 PM
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

On Mon, Aug 8, 2022 at 06:27 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
The short version is that Alt+F4 is the Windows global close command.
-
I'm going to split a hair here, but only because I have all too often seen how important it is:  ALT + F4 is the Windows global exit command. In most instances it will close the window/program, that is, exit, whatever it is that has focus.

I've watched the horror that occurs when someone accidentally exits something, when what they meant to do was close a tab, for instance.  In all web browsers that I know of right now, if you use tabbed browsing it's very good to get into the habit of using CTRL + W to close your tabs.

I love ALT + F4, and teach it, but it's important to know that it generally exits programs and, for those that don't give you, "Are you sure?," type dialogs, it can catch you out.

This page that focuses on CTRL + W makes the distinction, and does it well:  https://keyboardshortcuts.org/windows-keyboard-shortcuts/close 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


 

On Mon, Aug 8, 2022 at 07:27 PM, Lori Lynn wrote:
I have always thought that if I had multiple web pages open that I was to press Control+F4 to close just one of them. I’ve never heard of Control+W. Am I mistaken?
-
CTRL + F4 does work as CTRL + W does, but I do not choose to teach it because it's so darned easy to hit ALT instead of CTRL if you're in a hurry/distracted/etc.  CTRL + W will never exit a browser except if you have one, and only one, tab open (the same is probably true of CTRL + F4
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Lori Lynn
 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, August 8, 2022 6:48 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

 

On Mon, Aug 8, 2022 at 07:27 PM, Lori Lynn wrote:

I have always thought that if I had multiple weThanks.

b pages open that I was to press Control+F4 to close just one of them. I’ve never heard of Control+W. Am I mistaken?

-
CTRL + F4 does work as CTRL + W does, but I do not choose to teach it because it's so darned easy to hit ALT instead of CTRL if you're in a hurry/distracted/etc.  CTRL + W will never exit a browser except if you have one, and only one, tab open (the same is probably true of CTRL + F4
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


 

Lori,

If you intended to say something, it didn't come true.  Your last message only contains a bottom quote of my last message.  I thought you might like to know.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


 

How what was intended as "through" ended up as "true" I will never know.  That's a write-o, not a type-o!
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Gene Warner
 

Control+F4 closes the current document or web page, if the document or web page is the only one open it also closes the application unless the application can be open with no document open as most Office programs can

Gene...

On 8/8/2022 7:48 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Mon, Aug 8, 2022 at 07:27 PM, Lori Lynn wrote:
I have always thought that if I had multiple web pages open that I
was to press Control+F4 to close just one of them. I’ve never heard
of Control+W. Am I mistaken?
-
CTRL + F4 does work as CTRL + W does, but I do not choose to teach it because it's so darned easy to hit ALT instead of CTRL if you're in a hurry/distracted/etc.  CTRL + W will never exit a browser except if you have one, and only one, tab open (the same is probably true of CTRL + F4
--
Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044
*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.
*     ~ Lauren Bacall


Adrian Spratt
 

Hi Lori,

 

I believe the two keystrokes have exactly the same function. I’m like you in that control-F4 is a long-time favorite. But I can see why control-w might be a better choice.

 

--

My novel Caroline is now available in paperback, Kindle and audiobook versions and, for qualified readers in the US, at the National Library Service/BARD. Go to: https://adrianspratt.com/book/

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Lori Lynn
Sent: Monday, August 8, 2022 7:27 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

 

This exchange has me a little confused. I have always thought that if I had multiple web pages open that I was to press Control+F4 to close just one of them. I’ve never heard of Control+W. Am I mistaken?

 

Lori Lynn

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, August 8, 2022 6:01 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

 

On Mon, Aug 8, 2022 at 06:27 PM, Gene Warner wrote

 

:

The short version is that Alt+F4 is the Windows global close command.

-
I'm going to split a hair here, but only because I have all too often seen how important it is:  ALT + F4 is the Windows global exit command. In most instances it will close the window/program, that is, exit, whatever it is that has focus.

I've watched the horror that occurs when someone accidentally exits something, when what they meant to do was close a tab, for instance.  In all web browsers that I know of right now, if you use tabbed browsing it's very good to get into the habit of using CTRL + W to close your tabs.

I love ALT + F4, and teach it, but it's important to know that it generally exits programs and, for those that don't give you, "Are you sure?," type dialogs, it can catch you out.

This page that focuses on CTRL + W makes the distinction, and does it well:  https://keyboardshortcuts.org/windows-keyboard-shortcuts/close 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Gene Warner
 

I use Control+W because it's easier to do with one hand.

Gene...

On 8/8/2022 8:07 PM, Adrian Spratt wrote:
Hi Lori,
I believe the two keystrokes have exactly the same function. I’m like you in that control-F4 is a long-time favorite. But I can see why control-w might be a better choice.
--
My novel Caroline is now available in paperback, Kindle and audiobook versions and, for qualified readers in the US, at the National Library Service/BARD. Go to: https://adrianspratt.com/book/ <https://adrianspratt.com/book/>
*From:* main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Lori Lynn
*Sent:* Monday, August 8, 2022 7:27 PM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:
This exchange has me a little confused. I have always thought that if I had multiple web pages open that I was to press Control+F4 to close just one of them. I’ve never heard of Control+W. Am I mistaken?
Lori Lynn
*From:* main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>> *On Behalf Of *Brian Vogel
*Sent:* Monday, August 8, 2022 6:01 PM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:
On Mon, Aug 8, 2022 at 06:27 PM, Gene Warner wrote
:
The short version is that Alt+F4 is the Windows global close command.
-
I'm going to split a hair here, but only because I have all too often seen how important it is:  ALT + F4 is the Windows global exit command. In most instances it will close the window/program, that is, exit, whatever it is that has focus.
I've watched the horror that occurs when someone accidentally exits something, when what they meant to do was close a tab, for instance.  In all web browsers that I know of right now, if you use tabbed browsing it's very good to get into the habit of using CTRL + W to close your tabs.
I love ALT + F4, and teach it, but it's important to know that it generally exits programs and, for those that don't give you, "Are you sure?," type dialogs, it can catch you out.
This page that focuses on CTRL + W makes the distinction, and does it well: https://keyboardshortcuts.org/windows-keyboard-shortcuts/close <https://nam12.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fkeyboardshortcuts.org%2Fwindows-keyboard-shortcuts%2Fclose&data=05%7C01%7C%7C72b695a1ae19426aa48008da7991ed7b%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637955964912474522%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&sdata=sKrNc9ZepNI01laV0KVo14Km%2BsDPuxoDiFt0YuhSM8g%3D&reserved=0> --
Brian *-*Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044
*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.**
*     ~ Lauren Bacall


Gene Warner
 

I just thought of something, I don't recall who it was that said that you can't teach a screen reader all by itself. That may be true for some screen readers like NVDA, but it isn't true for JAWS because it has so many features that can stand by themselves. Sure they are even more useful when combined with another program but they can be used all by themselves. Some examples are Picture Smart and Convenient OCR.

Gene...

On 8/8/2022 8:17 PM, Gene Warner via groups.io wrote:
I use Control+W because it's easier to do with one hand.
Gene...
On 8/8/2022 8:07 PM, Adrian Spratt wrote:
Hi Lori,

I believe the two keystrokes have exactly the same function. I’m like you in that control-F4 is a long-time favorite. But I can see why control-w might be a better choice.

--

My novel Caroline is now available in paperback, Kindle and audiobook versions and, for qualified readers in the US, at the National Library Service/BARD. Go to: https://adrianspratt.com/book/ <https://adrianspratt.com/book/>

*From:* main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Lori Lynn
*Sent:* Monday, August 8, 2022 7:27 PM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

This exchange has me a little confused. I have always thought that if I had multiple web pages open that I was to press Control+F4 to close just one of them. I’ve never heard of Control+W. Am I mistaken?

Lori Lynn

*From:* main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>> *On Behalf Of *Brian Vogel
*Sent:* Monday, August 8, 2022 6:01 PM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: The purpose of screen reader instruction:

On Mon, Aug 8, 2022 at 06:27 PM, Gene Warner wrote

:

    The short version is that Alt+F4 is the Windows global close command.

-
I'm going to split a hair here, but only because I have all too often seen how important it is:  ALT + F4 is the Windows global exit command. In most instances it will close the window/program, that is, exit, whatever it is that has focus.

I've watched the horror that occurs when someone accidentally exits something, when what they meant to do was close a tab, for instance. In all web browsers that I know of right now, if you use tabbed browsing it's very good to get into the habit of using CTRL + W to close your tabs.

I love ALT + F4, and teach it, but it's important to know that it generally exits programs and, for those that don't give you, "Are you sure?," type dialogs, it can catch you out.

This page that focuses on CTRL + W makes the distinction, and does it well: https://keyboardshortcuts.org/windows-keyboard-shortcuts/close <https://nam12.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fkeyboardshortcuts.org%2Fwindows-keyboard-shortcuts%2Fclose&data=05%7C01%7C%7C72b695a1ae19426aa48008da7991ed7b%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637955964912474522%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&sdata=sKrNc9ZepNI01laV0KVo14Km%2BsDPuxoDiFt0YuhSM8g%3D&reserved=0>
--

Brian *-*Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.**
*     ~ Lauren Bacall