moderated Resources for accessing PDFs with JAWS


James Benstead
 

Are there any good tutorials or resources covering how JAWS can be used to access PDFs, and how PDFs can be manipulated to work better with JAWS? I know how to read through a well put together PDF, and I know how to OCR and Autotag a PDF in Acrobat Pro, but I'm still having problems dealing with a lot of PDFs I encounter day to day.

--
Too brief? Here's why! http://emailcharter.org


Milton Ota
 

Hi,

 

If you have the most current version of JAWS, the OCR feature is probably the best thing for quick and fast reading of PDF‘s.

 

You can find find information on the Freedom Scientific website on how to use the OCR in JAWS.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Benstead
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 10:16 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Resources for accessing PDFs with JAWS

 

Are there any good tutorials or resources covering how JAWS can be used to access PDFs, and how PDFs can be manipulated to work better with JAWS? I know how to read through a well put together PDF, and I know how to OCR and Autotag a PDF in Acrobat Pro, but I'm still having problems dealing with a lot of PDFs I encounter day to day.

 

--

Too brief? Here's why! http://emailcharter.org


Richard Turner
 

Have you tried Jaws built-in convenient OCR?

 

Otherwise, you probably have to reach out to the person creating the PDF to see if they cannot improve the structure.

 

 

Richard

 

Ralph's Observation:  It is a mistake to allow any mechanical object<>to realize that you are in a hurry.

 

 

My web site, www.turner42.com

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Benstead
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 8:16 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Resources for accessing PDFs with JAWS

 

Are there any good tutorials or resources covering how JAWS can be used to access PDFs, and how PDFs can be manipulated to work better with JAWS? I know how to read through a well put together PDF, and I know how to OCR and Autotag a PDF in Acrobat Pro, but I'm still having problems dealing with a lot of PDFs I encounter day to day.

 

--

Too brief? Here's why! http://emailcharter.org


Jasmine Kotsay
 

You may want to try Abbyy Fine Reader

On Mar 11, 2021, at 8:20 AM, Richard Turner <richardturner42@...> wrote:



Have you tried Jaws built-in convenient OCR?

 

Otherwise, you probably have to reach out to the person creating the PDF to see if they cannot improve the structure.

 

 

Richard

 

Ralph's Observation:  It is a mistake to allow any mechanical object<>to realize that you are in a hurry.

 

 

My web site, www.turner42.com

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Benstead
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 8:16 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Resources for accessing PDFs with JAWS

 

Are there any good tutorials or resources covering how JAWS can be used to access PDFs, and how PDFs can be manipulated to work better with JAWS? I know how to read through a well put together PDF, and I know how to OCR and Autotag a PDF in Acrobat Pro, but I'm still having problems dealing with a lot of PDFs I encounter day to day.

 

--

Too brief? Here's why! http://emailcharter.org


HH. Smith Jr.
 

Hi,

Have you tried using Google chrome to open your pdf’s.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Turner
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 11:21 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Resources for accessing PDFs with JAWS

 

Have you tried Jaws built-in convenient OCR?

 

Otherwise, you probably have to reach out to the person creating the PDF to see if they cannot improve the structure.

 

 

 

Richard

 

Ralph's Observation:  It is a mistake to allow any mechanical object<>to realize that you are in a hurry.

 

 

My web site, www.turner42.com

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Benstead
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 8:16 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Resources for accessing PDFs with JAWS

 

Are there any good tutorials or resources covering how JAWS can be used to access PDFs, and how PDFs can be manipulated to work better with JAWS? I know how to read through a well put together PDF, and I know how to OCR and Autotag a PDF in Acrobat Pro, but I'm still having problems dealing with a lot of PDFs I encounter day to day.

 

--

Too brief? Here's why! http://emailcharter.org


 

There are still scads of image scanned PDFs out there that are unlikely to be OCR converted by the people sending them around.

See my post from 2018 on the NVDA Group entitled:  Free & Good OCR Software for Image Scanned PDFs

The advice still stands and the steps are screen reader agnostic, as the shortcuts involved are for PDF-Xchange Viewer.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

To think is to differ.
      ~ Clarence Darrow


 

Oh, and I forgot to note in my last message that while PDF-Xchange Viewer is a really excellent tool for running OCR and then saving the resulting text layer with the original file so that you never need to do it again, it is NOT near to 100% accessible.  You should read the resulting files using the PDF reader of your preference.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

To think is to differ.
      ~ Clarence Darrow


Scott Pearl
 

Brian,

This is a good resource, thank you. Do you know how it differs from JAWS convenient OCR? Are there advantages?

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 2:09 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Resources for accessing PDFs with JAWS

 

Oh, and I forgot to note in my last message that while PDF-Xchange Viewer is a really excellent tool for running OCR and then saving the resulting text layer with the original file so that you never need to do it again, it is NOT near to 100% accessible.  You should read the resulting files using the PDF reader of your preference.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

To think is to differ.
      ~ Clarence Darrow


 

Scott,

            I really do not know how it differs from JAWS convenient OCR.  What I do know is that PDF X-Change Viewer has been an incredibly good, and incredibly accurate, OCR scanner that has worked very well on some pretty rough originals.  It also supports many additional language packs, at no cost, beyond English, French, German, and Spanish (if I'm remembering the four correctly) that come with the native utility.  I had a client who was a translator from Swedish to English and she used it with the Swedish language pack for documents that were in Swedish.  It does not, however, do any automatic language switching.  It presumes that a given document will be in a single language, so it wouldn't be good for, say OCRing an image scanned page from a language text where both languages are used interspersed on the same page.

             What I liked about it was that it was easy both to run the OCR and to save the resulting file such that you'd never have to do OCR again and could send it to others with the text layer already there.  I had my client who was a grad student send these to his instructors, and asking them to replace the existing image scanned PDFs with those with the OCR text layer so that later students who were blind or visually impaired would not have to do any OCR processing on them.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

To think is to differ.
      ~ Clarence Darrow


James Benstead
 

Thank you all! That's some really helpful information regarding OCR. I had been using the OCR functions in Acrobat Pro, but I'll give what you suggest a run through, too.

I'm also interested in more general guides to PDF accessibility. I've got various PDFs here that don't need OCR done to them -- they are there on the screen as actual text -- but when I go to read them I still get stuck. Some won't read past the first page, for example; others aren't tagged (this is almost all of them!) and while I've had some success with the AutoTag feature in Acrobat Pro this certainly hasn't solved all of my problems. What I'm really looking for, I suppose, is a list of all the tricks people have developed to deal with PDFs that don't need OCR work, but still aren't accessible.

Jim

--
Too brief? Here's why! http://emailcharter.org


On Thu, 11 Mar 2021 at 22:57, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:
Scott,

            I really do not know how it differs from JAWS convenient OCR.  What I do know is that PDF X-Change Viewer has been an incredibly good, and incredibly accurate, OCR scanner that has worked very well on some pretty rough originals.  It also supports many additional language packs, at no cost, beyond English, French, German, and Spanish (if I'm remembering the four correctly) that come with the native utility.  I had a client who was a translator from Swedish to English and she used it with the Swedish language pack for documents that were in Swedish.  It does not, however, do any automatic language switching.  It presumes that a given document will be in a single language, so it wouldn't be good for, say OCRing an image scanned page from a language text where both languages are used interspersed on the same page.

             What I liked about it was that it was easy both to run the OCR and to save the resulting file such that you'd never have to do OCR again and could send it to others with the text layer already there.  I had my client who was a grad student send these to his instructors, and asking them to replace the existing image scanned PDFs with those with the OCR text layer so that later students who were blind or visually impaired would not have to do any OCR processing on them.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

To think is to differ.
      ~ Clarence Darrow


Richard Turner
 

James,

I don’t know that there are any particular tricks with poorly designed PDF files.

If you have a PDF where Jaws stops reading after a page, you could try the page down command which may tell you the author locked it into 1 page at a time, though I guess you could check the reading settings.

If I just need to read the information, I will also try importing it into Word.

The reality is there are still lots of very badly designed PDF files and other than just coping with it, contact the author and letting them know it needs to be made screen reader accessible is about all you can do.

Sometimes, that even works.

 

 

 

Richard

 

Ralph's Observation:  It is a mistake to allow any mechanical object<>to realize that you are in a hurry.

 

 

My web site, www.turner42.com

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Benstead
Sent: Friday, March 12, 2021 4:58 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Resources for accessing PDFs with JAWS

 

Thank you all! That's some really helpful information regarding OCR. I had been using the OCR functions in Acrobat Pro, but I'll give what you suggest a run through, too.

 

I'm also interested in more general guides to PDF accessibility. I've got various PDFs here that don't need OCR done to them -- they are there on the screen as actual text -- but when I go to read them I still get stuck. Some won't read past the first page, for example; others aren't tagged (this is almost all of them!) and while I've had some success with the AutoTag feature in Acrobat Pro this certainly hasn't solved all of my problems. What I'm really looking for, I suppose, is a list of all the tricks people have developed to deal with PDFs that don't need OCR work, but still aren't accessible.

 

Jim

 

--

Too brief? Here's why! http://emailcharter.org

 

 

On Thu, 11 Mar 2021 at 22:57, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Scott,

            I really do not know how it differs from JAWS convenient OCR.  What I do know is that PDF X-Change Viewer has been an incredibly good, and incredibly accurate, OCR scanner that has worked very well on some pretty rough originals.  It also supports many additional language packs, at no cost, beyond English, French, German, and Spanish (if I'm remembering the four correctly) that come with the native utility.  I had a client who was a translator from Swedish to English and she used it with the Swedish language pack for documents that were in Swedish.  It does not, however, do any automatic language switching.  It presumes that a given document will be in a single language, so it wouldn't be good for, say OCRing an image scanned page from a language text where both languages are used interspersed on the same page.

             What I liked about it was that it was easy both to run the OCR and to save the resulting file such that you'd never have to do OCR again and could send it to others with the text layer already there.  I had my client who was a grad student send these to his instructors, and asking them to replace the existing image scanned PDFs with those with the OCR text layer so that later students who were blind or visually impaired would not have to do any OCR processing on them.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

To think is to differ.
      ~ Clarence Darrow


JM Casey
 

If you have adobe acrobat pro and use its OCR feature, I find that works really well, though the process tends to cause the computer to become unresponsive while it is working.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Benstead
Sent: March 12, 2021 07:58 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Resources for accessing PDFs with JAWS

 

Thank you all! That's some really helpful information regarding OCR. I had been using the OCR functions in Acrobat Pro, but I'll give what you suggest a run through, too.

 

I'm also interested in more general guides to PDF accessibility. I've got various PDFs here that don't need OCR done to them -- they are there on the screen as actual text -- but when I go to read them I still get stuck. Some won't read past the first page, for example; others aren't tagged (this is almost all of them!) and while I've had some success with the AutoTag feature in Acrobat Pro this certainly hasn't solved all of my problems. What I'm really looking for, I suppose, is a list of all the tricks people have developed to deal with PDFs that don't need OCR work, but still aren't accessible.

 

Jim

 

--

Too brief? Here's why! http://emailcharter.org

 

 

On Thu, 11 Mar 2021 at 22:57, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Scott,

            I really do not know how it differs from JAWS convenient OCR.  What I do know is that PDF X-Change Viewer has been an incredibly good, and incredibly accurate, OCR scanner that has worked very well on some pretty rough originals.  It also supports many additional language packs, at no cost, beyond English, French, German, and Spanish (if I'm remembering the four correctly) that come with the native utility.  I had a client who was a translator from Swedish to English and she used it with the Swedish language pack for documents that were in Swedish.  It does not, however, do any automatic language switching.  It presumes that a given document will be in a single language, so it wouldn't be good for, say OCRing an image scanned page from a language text where both languages are used interspersed on the same page.

             What I liked about it was that it was easy both to run the OCR and to save the resulting file such that you'd never have to do OCR again and could send it to others with the text layer already there.  I had my client who was a grad student send these to his instructors, and asking them to replace the existing image scanned PDFs with those with the OCR text layer so that later students who were blind or visually impaired would not have to do any OCR processing on them.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

To think is to differ.
      ~ Clarence Darrow


James Benstead
 

Thank you, and thank you Richard for your advice about accessing a PDF where I can only get to the first page.

It seems like a combination of using Acrobat Pro’s OCR and opening PDFs with Word may be the best workflow to adopt.

Nobody has mentioned the auto tagging feature in Acrobat Pro. I have had very mixed results with it, and haven’t looked any further into the different tagging features that seem to be available in the application. Is it just not worth bothering with?

Jim

On 12 Mar 2021, 19:07 +0000, JM Casey <jmcasey@...>, wrote:

If you have adobe acrobat pro and use its OCR feature, I find that works really well, though the process tends to cause the computer to become unresponsive while it is working.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Benstead
Sent: March 12, 2021 07:58 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Resources for accessing PDFs with JAWS

 

Thank you all! That's some really helpful information regarding OCR. I had been using the OCR functions in Acrobat Pro, but I'll give what you suggest a run through, too.

 

I'm also interested in more general guides to PDF accessibility. I've got various PDFs here that don't need OCR done to them -- they are there on the screen as actual text -- but when I go to read them I still get stuck. Some won't read past the first page, for example; others aren't tagged (this is almost all of them!) and while I've had some success with the AutoTag feature in Acrobat Pro this certainly hasn't solved all of my problems. What I'm really looking for, I suppose, is a list of all the tricks people have developed to deal with PDFs that don't need OCR work, but still aren't accessible.

 

Jim

 

--

Too brief? Here's why! http://emailcharter.org

 

 

On Thu, 11 Mar 2021 at 22:57, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Scott,

            I really do not know how it differs from JAWS convenient OCR.  What I do know is that PDF X-Change Viewer has been an incredibly good, and incredibly accurate, OCR scanner that has worked very well on some pretty rough originals.  It also supports many additional language packs, at no cost, beyond English, French, German, and Spanish (if I'm remembering the four correctly) that come with the native utility.  I had a client who was a translator from Swedish to English and she used it with the Swedish language pack for documents that were in Swedish.  It does not, however, do any automatic language switching.  It presumes that a given document will be in a single language, so it wouldn't be good for, say OCRing an image scanned page from a language text where both languages are used interspersed on the same page.

             What I liked about it was that it was easy both to run the OCR and to save the resulting file such that you'd never have to do OCR again and could send it to others with the text layer already there.  I had my client who was a grad student send these to his instructors, and asking them to replace the existing image scanned PDFs with those with the OCR text layer so that later students who were blind or visually impaired would not have to do any OCR processing on them.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

To think is to differ.
      ~ Clarence Darrow


JM Casey
 

Hmm, not sure about that one or about the different tagging features – I just know I’ve let Acrobat autotag probably thousands of PDFs over the years. Results are, as you say, mixed – but what do about it probably depends on specific results you are getting. I know at least a few times I had to change a document’s “orientation” in order for it to read properly. No idea why Acrobat doesn’t always detect that automatically.

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Benstead
Sent: March 12, 2021 05:03 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Resources for accessing PDFs with JAWS

 

Thank you, and thank you Richard for your advice about accessing a PDF where I can only get to the first page.

It seems like a combination of using Acrobat Pro’s OCR and opening PDFs with Word may be the best workflow to adopt.

Nobody has mentioned the auto tagging feature in Acrobat Pro. I have had very mixed results with it, and haven’t looked any further into the different tagging features that seem to be available in the application. Is it just not worth bothering with?

Jim

On 12 Mar 2021, 19:07 +0000, JM Casey <jmcasey@...>, wrote:

If you have adobe acrobat pro and use its OCR feature, I find that works really well, though the process tends to cause the computer to become unresponsive while it is working.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Benstead
Sent: March 12, 2021 07:58 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Resources for accessing PDFs with JAWS

 

Thank you all! That's some really helpful information regarding OCR. I had been using the OCR functions in Acrobat Pro, but I'll give what you suggest a run through, too.

 

I'm also interested in more general guides to PDF accessibility. I've got various PDFs here that don't need OCR done to them -- they are there on the screen as actual text -- but when I go to read them I still get stuck. Some won't read past the first page, for example; others aren't tagged (this is almost all of them!) and while I've had some success with the AutoTag feature in Acrobat Pro this certainly hasn't solved all of my problems. What I'm really looking for, I suppose, is a list of all the tricks people have developed to deal with PDFs that don't need OCR work, but still aren't accessible.

 

Jim

 

--

Too brief? Here's why! http://emailcharter.org

 

 

On Thu, 11 Mar 2021 at 22:57, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Scott,

            I really do not know how it differs from JAWS convenient OCR.  What I do know is that PDF X-Change Viewer has been an incredibly good, and incredibly accurate, OCR scanner that has worked very well on some pretty rough originals.  It also supports many additional language packs, at no cost, beyond English, French, German, and Spanish (if I'm remembering the four correctly) that come with the native utility.  I had a client who was a translator from Swedish to English and she used it with the Swedish language pack for documents that were in Swedish.  It does not, however, do any automatic language switching.  It presumes that a given document will be in a single language, so it wouldn't be good for, say OCRing an image scanned page from a language text where both languages are used interspersed on the same page.

             What I liked about it was that it was easy both to run the OCR and to save the resulting file such that you'd never have to do OCR again and could send it to others with the text layer already there.  I had my client who was a grad student send these to his instructors, and asking them to replace the existing image scanned PDFs with those with the OCR text layer so that later students who were blind or visually impaired would not have to do any OCR processing on them.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

To think is to differ.
      ~ Clarence Darrow


 

Hi brian,
Is PDF XChange viewer free, if it is, where can i get it please.
Thank you so much 
Arvind

No trees were destroyed in the sending of this message, however, a significant number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced. 

On 12 Mar 2021, at 8:58 PM, James Benstead <james.benstead@...> wrote:


Thank you all! That's some really helpful information regarding OCR. I had been using the OCR functions in Acrobat Pro, but I'll give what you suggest a run through, too.

I'm also interested in more general guides to PDF accessibility. I've got various PDFs here that don't need OCR done to them -- they are there on the screen as actual text -- but when I go to read them I still get stuck. Some won't read past the first page, for example; others aren't tagged (this is almost all of them!) and while I've had some success with the AutoTag feature in Acrobat Pro this certainly hasn't solved all of my problems. What I'm really looking for, I suppose, is a list of all the tricks people have developed to deal with PDFs that don't need OCR work, but still aren't accessible.

Jim

--
Too brief? Here's why! http://emailcharter.org


On Thu, 11 Mar 2021 at 22:57, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:
Scott,

            I really do not know how it differs from JAWS convenient OCR.  What I do know is that PDF X-Change Viewer has been an incredibly good, and incredibly accurate, OCR scanner that has worked very well on some pretty rough originals.  It also supports many additional language packs, at no cost, beyond English, French, German, and Spanish (if I'm remembering the four correctly) that come with the native utility.  I had a client who was a translator from Swedish to English and she used it with the Swedish language pack for documents that were in Swedish.  It does not, however, do any automatic language switching.  It presumes that a given document will be in a single language, so it wouldn't be good for, say OCRing an image scanned page from a language text where both languages are used interspersed on the same page.

             What I liked about it was that it was easy both to run the OCR and to save the resulting file such that you'd never have to do OCR again and could send it to others with the text layer already there.  I had my client who was a grad student send these to his instructors, and asking them to replace the existing image scanned PDFs with those with the OCR text layer so that later students who were blind or visually impaired would not have to do any OCR processing on them.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

To think is to differ.
      ~ Clarence Darrow


 

The actual contents of, Free & Good OCR Software for Image Scanned PDFs, which gives the direct link to the download page for PDF-XChange Viewer.  The page also contains a link to additional language packs for OCR in addition to English, French, Spanish, and German that are built-in to the software:
-----
The question of OCR scanning Image Scanned PDFs that one knows contain text comes up again and again.  If you don't want to invest some huge amount of money in a fully dedicated specialty OCR suite there is an excellent option available for free from Tracker Software:  PDF-XChange Viewer.

This software is not 100% accessible, but what you need to perform an OCR scan on an Image Scanned PDF is.

You have nothing to lose but a few minutes time to test out either PDF-XChange Viewer (which uses the "old Windows interface style" and I know to be accessible for running OCR) or the free edition of PDF-XChange Editor to check out whether it suits your needs.  I personally prefer PDF-XChange Viewer.  Here are the step-by-step instructions I wrote for a client who was a grad student who kept having old image scanned PDFs assigned for reading by various professors on how to OCR process them using PDF-XChange Viewer:

Used when you receive a PDF that was scanned without Optical Character Recognition.  For reading stick to Adobe Reader or other reader of your choice as PDF-XChange Viewer is not 100% accessible.

1.     Open PDF-XChange Viewer from your start menu or the desktop.

2.     ALT+F, O  Open a file, you’ll need to know where it is and navigate there in the Open Dialog, which is very much like Windows Explorer.

3.     CTRL+SHIFT+C  Perform optical character recognition on the file.  This will be quick for small files, 20 pages or less, but will take some time for very large files, hundreds of pages.  Listen for the process to complete.

4.     ALT+F, S  Save the file over itself with the OCR text now included.  If you wish to save the file under a different name and keep the original use ALT+F, A Save As to do this instead.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

To think is to differ.
      ~ Clarence Darrow


Jim Weiss
 

Based on the website it appears the free version is no longer supported. The currently supported version is approximately $50 U. S.


On Mar 13, 2021, at 12:13 PM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

The actual contents of, Free & Good OCR Software for Image Scanned PDFs, which gives the direct link to the download page for PDF-XChange Viewer.  The page also contains a link to additional language packs for OCR in addition to English, French, Spanish, and German that are built-in to the software:
-----
The question of OCR scanning Image Scanned PDFs that one knows contain text comes up again and again.  If you don't want to invest some huge amount of money in a fully dedicated specialty OCR suite there is an excellent option available for free from Tracker Software:  PDF-XChange Viewer.

This software is not 100% accessible, but what you need to perform an OCR scan on an Image Scanned PDF is.

You have nothing to lose but a few minutes time to test out either PDF-XChange Viewer (which uses the "old Windows interface style" and I know to be accessible for running OCR) or the free edition of PDF-XChange Editor to check out whether it suits your needs.  I personally prefer PDF-XChange Viewer.  Here are the step-by-step instructions I wrote for a client who was a grad student who kept having old image scanned PDFs assigned for reading by various professors on how to OCR process them using PDF-XChange Viewer:

Used when you receive a PDF that was scanned without Optical Character Recognition.  For reading stick to Adobe Reader or other reader of your choice as PDF-XChange Viewer is not 100% accessible.

1.     Open PDF-XChange Viewer from your start menu or the desktop.

2.     ALT+F, O  Open a file, you’ll need to know where it is and navigate there in the Open Dialog, which is very much like Windows Explorer.

3.     CTRL+SHIFT+C  Perform optical character recognition on the file.  This will be quick for small files, 20 pages or less, but will take some time for very large files, hundreds of pages.  Listen for the process to complete.

4.     ALT+F, S  Save the file over itself with the OCR text now included.  If you wish to save the file under a different name and keep the original use ALT+F, A Save As to do this instead.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

To think is to differ.
      ~ Clarence Darrow


 

On Sat, Mar 13, 2021 at 12:42 PM, Jim Weiss wrote:
Based on the website it appears the free version is no longer supported.
-
Uh, no.  Just downloaded it.  It's there and free as it always has been, as is PDF-XChange Editor, but that option is less accessible.  
 
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Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

To think is to differ.
      ~ Clarence Darrow