moderated preforming a right click


Madison Martin
 

Hi all,

Can anyone tell me how to do a right click using Jaws? Someone told me that it’s alt enter but I tried that and I don’t think it worked. Since I don’t have any vision I’ve never had to use a mouse so I’ve never had to learn how to do the functions of a mouse using Jaws. I have multiple entries of this account when I go into my folder list in Outlook; I find this rather annoying as I don’t have that with the other account that I have connected to Outlook so I’d really like to get rid of the other entries for this account as whenever I open Outlook it opens the inbox for one of the other entries instead of this inbox which is rather annoying. I asked on another list and I was told by multiple people that there’s an option to remove these other entries but when I bring up the context menu the remove option doesn’t show up so someone suggested that I try doing a right click to see if that brings up the option. Someone suggested to call the Microsoft Disability help desk but since I know that other visually impaired people can access the remove option I think that I should be able too as well without calling them for help; if anyone has any other ideas of how I could try and access this option then I’d love to hear them as long as it isn’t to remove and add my account again as I did that once as I accidently removed it when removing another account and when I added it again all of my contacts were gone so I’m not going through that again. Using latest versions of Jaws, Microsoft 365 and Windows 11; thanks for any suggestions that anyone can provide me!

Madison


Gene Warner
 

If your keyboard doesn't have the "application" key, you can use shift+F10 to do a right click.

Gene...

On 8/5/2022 2:05 PM, Madison Martin wrote:
Hi all,
Can anyone tell me how to do a right click using Jaws? Someone told me that it’s alt enter but I tried that and I don’t think it worked. Since I don’t have any vision I’ve never had to use a mouse so I’ve never had to learn how to do the functions of a mouse using Jaws. I have multiple entries of this account when I go into my folder list in Outlook; I find this rather annoying as I don’t have that with the other account that I have connected to Outlook so I’d really like to get rid of the other entries for this account as whenever I open Outlook it opens the inbox for one of the other entries instead of this inbox which is rather annoying. I asked on another list and I was told by multiple people that there’s an option to remove these other entries but when I bring up the context menu the remove option doesn’t show up so someone suggested that I try doing a right click to see if that brings up the option. Someone suggested to call the Microsoft Disability help desk but since I know that other visually impaired people can access the remove option I think that I should be able too as well without calling them for help; if anyone has any other ideas of how I could try and access this option then I’d love to hear them as long as it isn’t to remove and add my account again as I did that once as I accidently removed it when removing another account and when I added it again all of my contacts were gone so I’m not going through that again. Using latest versions of Jaws, Microsoft 365 and Windows 11; thanks for any suggestions that anyone can provide me!
Madison


Gene Warner
 

Oh! I almost forgot, if num lock is turned off, you can also do a right click by pressing the star key or asterisk key on the numeric key pad.

Gene...

On 8/5/2022 2:05 PM, Madison Martin wrote:
Hi all,
Can anyone tell me how to do a right click using Jaws? Someone told me that it’s alt enter but I tried that and I don’t think it worked. Since I don’t have any vision I’ve never had to use a mouse so I’ve never had to learn how to do the functions of a mouse using Jaws. I have multiple entries of this account when I go into my folder list in Outlook; I find this rather annoying as I don’t have that with the other account that I have connected to Outlook so I’d really like to get rid of the other entries for this account as whenever I open Outlook it opens the inbox for one of the other entries instead of this inbox which is rather annoying. I asked on another list and I was told by multiple people that there’s an option to remove these other entries but when I bring up the context menu the remove option doesn’t show up so someone suggested that I try doing a right click to see if that brings up the option. Someone suggested to call the Microsoft Disability help desk but since I know that other visually impaired people can access the remove option I think that I should be able too as well without calling them for help; if anyone has any other ideas of how I could try and access this option then I’d love to hear them as long as it isn’t to remove and add my account again as I did that once as I accidently removed it when removing another account and when I added it again all of my contacts were gone so I’m not going through that again. Using latest versions of Jaws, Microsoft 365 and Windows 11; thanks for any suggestions that anyone can provide me!
Madison


Kevin Minor
 

Hi.

If you're using a numeric keypad for your JAWS control, it's the key to the left of the JAWS key.

I'm not sure how to do it with the laptop setup.

Kevin, Valerie and Jilly

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene Warner
Sent: Friday, August 5, 2022 2:10 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: preforming a right click

Oh! I almost forgot, if num lock is turned off, you can also do a right click by pressing the star key or asterisk key on the numeric key pad.

Gene...


On 8/5/2022 2:05 PM, Madison Martin wrote:
Hi all,

Can anyone tell me how to do a right click using Jaws? Someone told me
that it’s alt enter but I tried that and I don’t think it worked.
Since I don’t have any vision I’ve never had to use a mouse so I’ve
never had to learn how to do the functions of a mouse using Jaws. I
have multiple entries of this account when I go into my folder list in
Outlook; I find this rather annoying as I don’t have that with the
other account that I have connected to Outlook so I’d really like to
get rid of the other entries for this account as whenever I open
Outlook it opens the inbox for one of the other entries instead of
this inbox which is rather annoying. I asked on another list and I was
told by multiple people that there’s an option to remove these other
entries but when I bring up the context menu the remove option doesn’t
show up so someone suggested that I try doing a right click to see if
that brings up the option. Someone suggested to call the Microsoft
Disability help desk but since I know that other visually impaired
people can access the remove option I think that I should be able too
as well without calling them for help; if anyone has any other ideas
of how I could try and access this option then I’d love to hear them
as long as it isn’t to remove and add my account again as I did that
once as I accidently removed it when removing another account and when
I added it again all of my contacts were gone so I’m not going through
that again. Using latest versions of Jaws, Microsoft 365 and Windows
11; thanks for any suggestions that anyone can provide me!

Madison


 

By far and away the most reliable method is either using the applications/context menu key if your keyboard happens to have one, or SHIFT + F10 if it does not.  Neither of these involve any emulation and Windows recognizes both.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Mike B.
 


If you're using a laptop without a NumPad:
Left Mouse Button / Click   =   CAPS LOCK+8 
 
Right Mouse Button / Click  =  CAPS LOCK+9 
 
 
 
 
Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, August 05, 2022 12:35 PM
Subject: Re: preforming a right click

By far and away the most reliable method is either using the applications/context menu key if your keyboard happens to have one, or SHIFT + F10 if it does not.  Neither of these involve any emulation and Windows recognizes both.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


 

On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 03:59 PM, Mike B. wrote:
If you're using a laptop without a NumPad:
Left Mouse Button / Click   =   CAPS LOCK+8 
 
Right Mouse Button / Click  =  CAPS LOCK+9 
 
-
But, again, this relies on JAWS emulation.  And whether it's JAWS or any other screen reader, mouse button emulation is very frequently hit or miss.

Best practice is the applications/context menu key, or SHIFT + F10, both of which are native Windows commands that are analogous to a physical right mouse button click.  There's really no point in introducing any uncertainty when it's just not necessary.

Each can do as he or she sees fit, but only once the issues surrounding the various choices are clear.  That's an informed choice.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Gene Warner
 

Another reason to use windows native key strokes, they often require fewer fingers to do or don't require your hands to be contortionists.

Gene...

On 8/5/2022 4:02 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 03:59 PM, Mike B. wrote:
If you're using a laptop without a NumPad:
Left Mouse Button / Click   = CAPS LOCK+8
Right Mouse Button / Click  = CAPS LOCK+9
-
But, again, this relies on JAWS emulation.  And whether it's JAWS or any other screen reader, mouse button emulation is very frequently hit or miss.
Best practice is the applications/context menu key, or SHIFT + F10, both of which are native Windows commands that are analogous to a physical right mouse button click.  There's really no point in introducing any uncertainty when it's just not necessary.
Each can do as he or she sees fit, but only once the issues surrounding the various choices are clear.  That's an informed choice.
--
Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044
*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.
*     ~ Lauren Bacall


K0LNY
 


There are hundreds of native Windows keyboard shortcuts, and I have forgotten more than what many even know about.
Most folks seem to think all the commands they use are Jaws commands, when they are just windows commands.
It wouldn't hurt to review the windows list of keyboard shortcuts, some are more useful than Jaws shortcuts.
For example, windows + B will give you more context options than the Jaws insert F11.
So most of what people are doing with the keyboard could be done without a screenreader installed.
The screenreaders add layers of commands which can give us access which in some cases, the windows keyboard commands are lacking.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, August 05, 2022 3:02 PM
Subject: Re: preforming a right click

On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 03:59 PM, Mike B. wrote:
If you're using a laptop without a NumPad:
Left Mouse Button / Click   =   CAPS LOCK+8 
 
Right Mouse Button / Click  =  CAPS LOCK+9 
 
-
But, again, this relies on JAWS emulation.  And whether it's JAWS or any other screen reader, mouse button emulation is very frequently hit or miss.

Best practice is the applications/context menu key, or SHIFT + F10, both of which are native Windows commands that are analogous to a physical right mouse button click.  There's really no point in introducing any uncertainty when it's just not necessary.

Each can do as he or she sees fit, but only once the issues surrounding the various choices are clear.  That's an informed choice.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


 

On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 04:05 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
Another reason to use windows native key strokes, they often require fewer fingers to do or don't require your hands to be contortionists.
-
Indeed.

But my biggest thing is that it really is essential to know "who controls what."  Is the thing you're doing a Windows command, versus a screen reader command, versus an application command.  And when you have the option to use a native command (and presuming it's not a physical issue to do so) you know, absolutely, that it works and it works the same way each and every time.  As soon as emulation is introduced, uncertainty is as well.

There are those occasions, though, where certain native keystroke combinations can be more than a bit of a reach, but Applications/Context Menu Key, when present, is a single key press and SHIFT + F10 using the right hand is a thumb and your preferred choice of other finger with almost zero stretching or can be a two hand, no stretch, with left holding SHIFT and right hitting F10.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Gene Warner
 

One of the things I found most interesting after loosing my vision was that if you take the time to learn the Windows keystrokes, you can be much more effecient than you are using a mouse. A mouse makes things easy, but it also slows you down.

Gene...

On 8/5/2022 4:11 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:

There are hundreds of native Windows keyboard shortcuts, and I have forgotten more than what many even know about.
Most folks seem to think all the commands they use are Jaws commands, when they are just windows commands.
It wouldn't hurt to review the windows list of keyboard shortcuts, some are more useful than Jaws shortcuts.
For example, windows + B will give you more context options than the Jaws insert F11.
So most of what people are doing with the keyboard could be done without a screenreader installed.
The screenreaders add layers of commands which can give us access which in some cases, the windows keyboard commands are lacking.
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Brian Vogel <mailto:britechguy@...>
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
*Sent:* Friday, August 05, 2022 3:02 PM
*Subject:* Re: preforming a right click
On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 03:59 PM, Mike B. wrote:
If you're using a laptop without a NumPad:
Left Mouse Button / Click   = CAPS LOCK+8
Right Mouse Button / Click = CAPS LOCK+9
-
But, again, this relies on JAWS emulation.  And whether it's JAWS or any other screen reader, mouse button emulation is very frequently hit or miss.
Best practice is the applications/context menu key, or SHIFT + F10, both of which are native Windows commands that are analogous to a physical right mouse button click. There's really no point in introducing any uncertainty when it's just not necessary.
Each can do as he or she sees fit, but only once the issues surrounding the various choices are clear.  That's an informed choice.
--
Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044
*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.
*   ~ Lauren Bacall


Gene Warner
 

Yup! I've been learning that from web sites, I've encountered many web sites where I have to use the insert+3 JAWS command to pass a key through to get it to work.

JAWS has a command where you can turn speech on and off, there have been times when I wished there was something similar for its keyboard processing too.

Gene...

On 8/5/2022 4:11 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 04:05 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
Another reason to use windows native key strokes, they often require
fewer fingers to do or don't require your hands to be contortionists.
-
Indeed.
But my biggest thing is that it really is essential to know "who controls what."  Is the thing you're doing a Windows command, versus a screen reader command, versus an application command.  And when you have the option to use a native command (and presuming it's not a physical issue to do so) you know, absolutely, that it works and it works the same way each and every time.  As soon as emulation is introduced, uncertainty is as well.
There are those occasions, though, where certain native keystroke combinations can be more than a bit of a reach, but Applications/Context Menu Key, when present, is a single key press and SHIFT + F10 using the right hand is a thumb and your preferred choice of other finger with almost zero stretching or can be a two hand, no stretch, with left holding SHIFT and right hitting F10.
--
Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044
*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.
*     ~ Lauren Bacall


 

On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 04:11 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:
So most of what people are doing with the keyboard could be done without a screen reader installed.
-
Abso-friggin'-lutely!  Most of the keyboard commands issues by any screen reader user are not screen reader commands.  The number of Windows or application program shortcuts used in day-to-day activities far outstrips actual screen reader commands for any user I've ever observed or tutored.

It's funny, too, but the blind and low-vision community often has no appreciation how much of an accident accessibility by keyboard commands is.  These were essential in the days of DOS and before WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) software such as MS-Word and similar came on the scene under Windows.  But they were carried over into Windows only because, at that time, sighted people were used to using these almost exclusively because windows and windowed environments did not exist and you learned them.  It would have been so, so easy for the decision to have been made where all the keyboard shortcuts would have been jettisoned rather than maintained.  By the luck of the draw and circumstances, the opposite decision was made, so keyboard shortcuts still exist for the vast majority of actions even though the vast majority of sighted users have not a clue of what any of these might be since point and click really did take over.  There are notable exceptions, though.  CTRL + C (Copy), CTRL + X (Cut), and CTRL + V (Paste) are still very, very widely used.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Madison Martin
 

Okay, the problem is that when I bring up the context menu the option to remove an entry doesn’t show up even though I was told by others who us Microsoft 365 that the option is there

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: August 5, 2022 2:36 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: preforming a right click

 

By far and away the most reliable method is either using the applications/context menu key if your keyboard happens to have one, or SHIFT + F10 if it does not.  Neither of these involve any emulation and Windows recognizes both.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


 

On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 04:14 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
A mouse makes things easy, but it also slows you down.
-
Another abso-friggin'-lutely.  You have to remove a hand from the keyboard to use it, and when you're doing that hundreds of times per day that time adds up.  I'd say the only time it makes things faster is with selection of text within documents.  Swipe over selection is the fastest way to select, with precision, that I've ever encountered.  Selection via keyboard can be done, and quickly, but generally with less precision or with more time involved in limiting the selection at the end of the "chunk" to only what one wants.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


K0LNY
 


Madison,
Being context sensitive, I wonder if the item you want to perform an action on, is no longer selected.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, August 05, 2022 3:21 PM
Subject: Re: preforming a right click

Okay, the problem is that when I bring up the context menu the option to remove an entry doesn’t show up even though I was told by others who us Microsoft 365 that the option is there

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: August 5, 2022 2:36 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: preforming a right click

 

By far and away the most reliable method is either using the applications/context menu key if your keyboard happens to have one, or SHIFT + F10 if it does not.  Neither of these involve any emulation and Windows recognizes both.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Karen Reynolds
 

Is there somewhere we can go to find these Windows commands? I had a link for them on 7, but haven’t found the one for 10 or 11.

 

Karen

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Glenn / Lenny
Sent: Friday, August 5, 2022 4:11 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: preforming a right click

 

There are hundreds of native Windows keyboard shortcuts, and I have forgotten more than what many even know about.

Most folks seem to think all the commands they use are Jaws commands, when they are just windows commands.

It wouldn't hurt to review the windows list of keyboard shortcuts, some are more useful than Jaws shortcuts.

For example, windows + B will give you more context options than the Jaws insert F11.

So most of what people are doing with the keyboard could be done without a screenreader installed.

The screenreaders add layers of commands which can give us access which in some cases, the windows keyboard commands are lacking.

Glenn

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, August 05, 2022 3:02 PM

Subject: Re: preforming a right click

 

On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 03:59 PM, Mike B. wrote:

If you're using a laptop without a NumPad:

Left Mouse Button / Click   =   CAPS LOCK+8 

 

Right Mouse Button / Click  =  CAPS LOCK+9 

 

-
But, again, this relies on JAWS emulation.  And whether it's JAWS or any other screen reader, mouse button emulation is very frequently hit or miss.

Best practice is the applications/context menu key, or SHIFT + F10, both of which are native Windows commands that are analogous to a physical right mouse button click.  There's really no point in introducing any uncertainty when it's just not necessary.

Each can do as he or she sees fit, but only once the issues surrounding the various choices are clear.  That's an informed choice.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


JM Casey
 

Hey.

Not that I disagree with the gist of what you’re saying, and nlot that I’m not thankful that it’s true – but I do think that the admitted minority of sighted users who use the keyboard *more than the average user* would have had something to say about this. They are a pretty loud minority. I’m sure you know how many youtube videos as well as written pages online have titles like “20 keyboard commands you’re a moron for not using”, etc. These aren’t done witht eh blind in mind, that’s for sure. Sighted use them too, or can learn to use them – I’ve certainly had quite a few sighted people tell me that they’d like to do some of the things my way as it’d be more efficient – whether they actually do, well, maybe that’s another story. Still, the less point-and-click reliant sighted folks are certainly out there and I’m willing to put a little bit of capital into the idea that many developers are exactly this type of person. I’d be interested to know if and what ideas Microsoft (and perhaps others) had about retiring keyboard commands on the table in the past.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: August 5, 2022 04:19 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: preforming a right click

 

On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 04:11 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:

So most of what people are doing with the keyboard could be done without a screen reader installed.

-
Abso-friggin'-lutely!  Most of the keyboard commands issues by any screen reader user are not screen reader commands.  The number of Windows or application program shortcuts used in day-to-day activities far outstrips actual screen reader commands for any user I've ever observed or tutored.

It's funny, too, but the blind and low-vision community often has no appreciation how much of an accident accessibility by keyboard commands is.  These were essential in the days of DOS and before WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) software such as MS-Word and similar came on the scene under Windows.  But they were carried over into Windows only because, at that time, sighted people were used to using these almost exclusively because windows and windowed environments did not exist and you learned them.  It would have been so, so easy for the decision to have been made where all the keyboard shortcuts would have been jettisoned rather than maintained.  By the luck of the draw and circumstances, the opposite decision was made, so keyboard shortcuts still exist for the vast majority of actions even though the vast majority of sighted users have not a clue of what any of these might be since point and click really did take over.  There are notable exceptions, though.  CTRL + C (Copy), CTRL + X (Cut), and CTRL + V (Paste) are still very, very widely used.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Gene Warner
 

That's why I reassigned the JAWS commands to mark the beginning and ending of text to much easier to use and remember keys, once I have set the beginning and ending markers, then I hit cut or copy. That way I don't have one tied down to a shift key.

Gene...

On 8/5/2022 4:22 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 04:14 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
A mouse makes things easy, but it also slows you down.
-
Another abso-friggin'-lutely.  You have to remove a hand from the keyboard to use it, and when you're doing that hundreds of times per day that time adds up.  I'd say the only time it makes things faster is with selection of text within documents.  Swipe over selection is the fastest way to select, with precision, that I've ever encountered.  Selection via keyboard can be done, and quickly, but generally with less precision or with more time involved in limiting the selection at the end of the "chunk" to only what one wants.
--
Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044
*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.
*     ~ Lauren Bacall


Madison Martin
 

I can’t get them selected though… When I hold down shift and press the down arrow all Jaws says is that space is selected

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Glenn / Lenny
Sent: August 5, 2022 3:23 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: preforming a right click

 

Madison,

Being context sensitive, I wonder if the item you want to perform an action on, is no longer selected.

Glenn

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, August 05, 2022 3:21 PM

Subject: Re: preforming a right click

 

Okay, the problem is that when I bring up the context menu the option to remove an entry doesn’t show up even though I was told by others who us Microsoft 365 that the option is there

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: August 5, 2022 2:36 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: preforming a right click

 

By far and away the most reliable method is either using the applications/context menu key if your keyboard happens to have one, or SHIFT + F10 if it does not.  Neither of these involve any emulation and Windows recognizes both.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall