Logitech K860 Wireless ergonomic keyboard for Windows/android or Mac/iOS, updated info about the Applications key


Richard Turner
 

Logitech K860 Wireless ergonomic keyboard for Windows/android or Mac/iOS

 

I needed a new keyboard as my 15-year-old USB keyboard was starting to have problems with a few keys and my old hands are deciding that it is time to go back to an ergonomic keyboard.

So, after doing some research, I settled on what is rated as one of the better ergonomic keyboards.

 

I was not set on wireless, but that is the way the world is going and since I like Logitech products in general, I went with this one.

Logitech K860 Split wireless Ergonomic keyboard.  It is pricy at $130.

I'll start with the negatives.

 

Cons:

(When I first wrote this up, I thought there was no Applications Key, but there is, listed as number 8 under Pros.)

1.  Only one Windows key on the left.

2.  No accessible documentation.  And no true documentation about the hieroglyphic symbols   used on some of the keys.

3.  It is too easy to toggle to the media functions for the function keys.

4.  It is pretty large.  Left to right it is the same width as my standard Wired USB keyboard.  Front to back it is about 1.5 times as deep.  And, of course, much higher off the desk at the front edge due to the curve for the ergonomics of the thing.

5.  *Not really a con, just the nature of ergonomic keyboards, but the split is between the 6 and 7, (and f6 and f7) keys, so for touch typists, the habit of hitting the 6and F6 with your right index finger has to be retrained.

 

Pros:

1.  It is probably the most comfortable keyboard I have ever typed on.  The wrist rest is quite comfortable, and for me, at the right height Plus, it has feet under the front edge so you can raise it up to a more level arrangement which fits me perfectly.  It is already on a slight angle so no real need for feet in the back.

2.  Easy setup with or without the Logitech Options package.  I plugged in the USB receiver turned on the keyboard and Windows 10 had no trouble communicating with it.  There is a little key next to the f12 key that toggles you between standard function keys and the media function keys.  Easy to press accidentally.

3.  It takes two triple A batteries, and they say that they will last 2 years.  I believe it based on my experience with the K480.

4.  This is a full-sized keyboard with the number pad.

5.  If I used the Windows Calculator more, this has a designated key above the Num-lock key to launch the Windows Calculator.

6.  It can connect to 3 devices.  Either 3 Bluetooth devices or 1 USB and 2 Bluetooth, and/or possibly 2 USB devices and one Bluetooth, that isn't clear.  Connecting it to my iPhone was easy after I called their support line.

The three keys for switching between devices are right above the 6 pack, making it a 9 pack.

It is tremendously easy to switch devices.  I wanted to check a key function on my iPhone while I was writing this, so I tapped the iPhone key, (for me device 3)  did my checking, tapped the computer key, (device 1), and finished writing this in Word on my computer.

7.  It has a physical on/off switch located on the back edge and slightly under it.  If you feel where the split is between f6 and f7, and slide your finger straight back, you are on it.  Flipped to the right is on.

8.  There is an Applications key after all, it is the second key from the top right most key..  It is easy to toggle between the standard function keys and the media function keys.  I know, I listed this under the cons, but for some it would also be a pro.

 

For anyone else who has, or ends up with this keyboard, here is the key layout that involves the missing or extra keys.

 

ON the very top row, it is mostly standard, but here goes starting from the top left key:

Escape

F1

f2

f3

f4

f5

f6

f7

f8

f9

f10

f11

f12

The Function Toggle

Print Screen, which is longer than the other keys.

Device 1

Device 2

Device 3

Calculator key

Battery indicator with one of the hieroglyphic symbols my wife couldn't identify).

I am guessing that is for use with the Logitech Options software.

App Menu, Applications Key

Windows Lock key.  This key allows you to lock your computer, so you need the password to get back into it, also accomplished with WindowsKey+l.

* Note that the Function Toggle key is directly above the left edge of the backspace key, and the print screen key is above the rest of the backspace key.

 

The first row where the space bar is located is laid out like this:

Control Key

Windows/Options Key

Alt/Command Key

Spacebar with the split in the middle

Alt/Command Key

Function key, which also seems to have the word Options, probably for Mac/iOS/iPadOS usage.

Control Key

Then your standard arrow keys followed by the standard numpad.

 

 

Richard

"The highest reward for a person's toil is not what they get for it, but what they become by it."

- John Ruskin, 1819-1900

 

Web site: www.turner42.com