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moderated Listening to text with JAWS and reproducing it simultaneously: 3 specific questions


Rahul Bajaj
 

Hello,

I have the following questions:

First, I normally listen to JAWS at 65%. Even after slowing it down,
if I try to listen to the text line-by-line, I find that by the time I
am done reading and have to speak, I am only able to retain 40-50% of
what I have heard. So I end up losing some content.
On the other hand, if I listen to JAWS one word at a time, I find that
I end up being much too slow, such that my speech sounds disjointed
and halting.

Second, I am wondering how your experience differs between verbally
reproducing new content [i.e. material you have never read before]
versus content you are already familiar with.
Put simply, would it pay to familiarize oneself with the content to be
reproduced beforehand?

Third and lastly, can you suggest some pointers for building up one's
capacity, to be able to get better at doing this i.e. listening to
JAWS and speaking out what it is reading at the same time?


Best,
Rahul
--
--
Rahul Bajaj
Judicial Law Clerk to Dr. Justice D.Y. Chandrachud, Supreme Court of India
Rhodes Scholar (India and Linacre 2018)
University of Oxford


Soronel Haetir
 

I assume you are talking about something like a phone script for a
call center or the like.

If so I suspect that is a tough one. I might suggest you find some
list dedicated to simultaneous language translation (that is, people
who can listen to someone speak and at the same time translate to some
other language).

If there is some way to learn that rather than some people can while
others simply can't then however they manage to get both parts of
their brain to not override would seem to apply to this situation as
well.

On 1/15/21, Rahul Bajaj <rahul.bajaj1038@gmail.com> wrote:
Hello,

I have the following questions:

First, I normally listen to JAWS at 65%. Even after slowing it down,
if I try to listen to the text line-by-line, I find that by the time I
am done reading and have to speak, I am only able to retain 40-50% of
what I have heard. So I end up losing some content.
On the other hand, if I listen to JAWS one word at a time, I find that
I end up being much too slow, such that my speech sounds disjointed
and halting.

Second, I am wondering how your experience differs between verbally
reproducing new content [i.e. material you have never read before]
versus content you are already familiar with.
Put simply, would it pay to familiarize oneself with the content to be
reproduced beforehand?

Third and lastly, can you suggest some pointers for building up one's
capacity, to be able to get better at doing this i.e. listening to
JAWS and speaking out what it is reading at the same time?


Best,
Rahul
--
--
Rahul Bajaj
Judicial Law Clerk to Dr. Justice D.Y. Chandrachud, Supreme Court of India
Rhodes Scholar (India and Linacre 2018)
University of Oxford





--
Soronel Haetir
soronel.haetir@gmail.com


NFB Lab 4
 

Keep slowing down your speech until it is about the same speed as you speak or slightly less. This is known as an audio prompter

On Jan 15, 2021, at 10:43 AM, Rahul Bajaj <rahul.bajaj1038@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello,

I have the following questions:

First, I normally listen to JAWS at 65%. Even after slowing it down,
if I try to listen to the text line-by-line, I find that by the time I
am done reading and have to speak, I am only able to retain 40-50% of
what I have heard. So I end up losing some content.
On the other hand, if I listen to JAWS one word at a time, I find that
I end up being much too slow, such that my speech sounds disjointed
and halting.

Second, I am wondering how your experience differs between verbally
reproducing new content [i.e. material you have never read before]
versus content you are already familiar with.
Put simply, would it pay to familiarize oneself with the content to be
reproduced beforehand?

Third and lastly, can you suggest some pointers for building up one's
capacity, to be able to get better at doing this i.e. listening to
JAWS and speaking out what it is reading at the same time?


Best,
Rahul
--
--
Rahul Bajaj
Judicial Law Clerk to Dr. Justice D.Y. Chandrachud, Supreme Court of India
Rhodes Scholar (India and Linacre 2018)
University of Oxford





Loy <loyrg2845@...>
 

Just curious, why would you want to do this?

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rahul Bajaj" <rahul.bajaj1038@gmail.com>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 15, 2021 10:43 AM
Subject: Listening to text with JAWS and reproducing it simultaneously: 3
specific questions


Hello,

I have the following questions:

First, I normally listen to JAWS at 65%. Even after slowing it down,
if I try to listen to the text line-by-line, I find that by the time I
am done reading and have to speak, I am only able to retain 40-50% of
what I have heard. So I end up losing some content.
On the other hand, if I listen to JAWS one word at a time, I find that
I end up being much too slow, such that my speech sounds disjointed
and halting.

Second, I am wondering how your experience differs between verbally
reproducing new content [i.e. material you have never read before]
versus content you are already familiar with.
Put simply, would it pay to familiarize oneself with the content to be
reproduced beforehand?

Third and lastly, can you suggest some pointers for building up one's
capacity, to be able to get better at doing this i.e. listening to
JAWS and speaking out what it is reading at the same time?


Best,
Rahul
--
--
Rahul Bajaj
Judicial Law Clerk to Dr. Justice D.Y. Chandrachud, Supreme Court of India
Rhodes Scholar (India and Linacre 2018)
University of Oxford


Richard Turner
 

Well, the best way would be to be able to read braille at the rate you wish to sound good. That is what most call center employees do.

Next would be doing what you said, and practice, practice, practice.
You are trying to build up the skills like someone who does simultaneous translation like they do at the United Nations and have the speeches given translated by people in a ton of languages and the listener just has to select the correct channel on their headphones for their language.

Only, you are just wanting to repeat the same language.
It takes a huge amount of concentration which is very tiring.
You probably also want to be sure you are getting enough physical exercise as that helps as well with mental stamina.




Richard

Ralph's Observation: It is a mistake to allow any mechanical object<>to realize that you are in a hurry.


My web site, www.turner42.com

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rahul Bajaj
Sent: Friday, January 15, 2021 7:43 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Listening to text with JAWS and reproducing it simultaneously: 3 specific questions

Hello,

I have the following questions:

First, I normally listen to JAWS at 65%. Even after slowing it down, if I try to listen to the text line-by-line, I find that by the time I am done reading and have to speak, I am only able to retain 40-50% of what I have heard. So I end up losing some content.
On the other hand, if I listen to JAWS one word at a time, I find that I end up being much too slow, such that my speech sounds disjointed and halting.

Second, I am wondering how your experience differs between verbally reproducing new content [i.e. material you have never read before] versus content you are already familiar with.
Put simply, would it pay to familiarize oneself with the content to be reproduced beforehand?

Third and lastly, can you suggest some pointers for building up one's capacity, to be able to get better at doing this i.e. listening to JAWS and speaking out what it is reading at the same time?


Best,
Rahul
--
--
Rahul Bajaj
Judicial Law Clerk to Dr. Justice D.Y. Chandrachud, Supreme Court of India Rhodes Scholar (India and Linacre 2018) University of Oxford


Dan Longmore
 

It takes some practice. I’ve been doing this for a number of years, I am a pastor, and use voiceover for my notes on Sunday. The concept would be the same with jaws however. Couple of things, be familiar with the content as much as you can before you start and if you can format the document in such a way that jazz only reads a small portion of any one time. Just before you are ready to start your next section advanced jazz and allow what you hear to be slightly ahead of what you’re speaking. You can do it be patient with yourself as it takes as I said quite a bit of practice.

On Jan 15, 2021, at 10:43 AM, Rahul Bajaj <rahul.bajaj1038@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello,

I have the following questions:

First, I normally listen to JAWS at 65%. Even after slowing it down,
if I try to listen to the text line-by-line, I find that by the time I
am done reading and have to speak, I am only able to retain 40-50% of
what I have heard. So I end up losing some content.
On the other hand, if I listen to JAWS one word at a time, I find that
I end up being much too slow, such that my speech sounds disjointed
and halting.

Second, I am wondering how your experience differs between verbally
reproducing new content [i.e. material you have never read before]
versus content you are already familiar with.
Put simply, would it pay to familiarize oneself with the content to be
reproduced beforehand?

Third and lastly, can you suggest some pointers for building up one's
capacity, to be able to get better at doing this i.e. listening to
JAWS and speaking out what it is reading at the same time?


Best,
Rahul
--
--
Rahul Bajaj
Judicial Law Clerk to Dr. Justice D.Y. Chandrachud, Supreme Court of India
Rhodes Scholar (India and Linacre 2018)
University of Oxford





Marty Hutchings
 

Rahul, If you have access to your written text as in a word or text document, you might try editing it in such a way that manageable chunks are on one line. I do this with voice over scripts. I will only have a few words on a line, usually ending where a natural break in the speech would be like where a coma or period exists. Then I have JAWS read at a speed that is confortable and use my down arrow to read line by line and speak as I hear a few words. This does take some practice, but it can be done as I know some broadcasters that do this very thing.
HTH.


Love in Christ
Marty
If we view this present life as our primary goal, we will agree with William Shakespeare who said: “Life is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.” From TODAY IN THE WORD June 1, 2020

-----Original Message-----
From: Soronel Haetir
Sent: Friday, January 15, 2021 10:27 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Listening to text with JAWS and reproducing it simultaneously: 3 specific questions

I assume you are talking about something like a phone script for a
call center or the like.

If so I suspect that is a tough one. I might suggest you find some
list dedicated to simultaneous language translation (that is, people
who can listen to someone speak and at the same time translate to some
other language).

If there is some way to learn that rather than some people can while
others simply can't then however they manage to get both parts of
their brain to not override would seem to apply to this situation as
well.

On 1/15/21, Rahul Bajaj <rahul.bajaj1038@gmail.com> wrote:
Hello,

I have the following questions:

First, I normally listen to JAWS at 65%. Even after slowing it down,
if I try to listen to the text line-by-line, I find that by the time I
am done reading and have to speak, I am only able to retain 40-50% of
what I have heard. So I end up losing some content.
On the other hand, if I listen to JAWS one word at a time, I find that
I end up being much too slow, such that my speech sounds disjointed
and halting.

Second, I am wondering how your experience differs between verbally
reproducing new content [i.e. material you have never read before]
versus content you are already familiar with.
Put simply, would it pay to familiarize oneself with the content to be
reproduced beforehand?

Third and lastly, can you suggest some pointers for building up one's
capacity, to be able to get better at doing this i.e. listening to
JAWS and speaking out what it is reading at the same time?


Best,
Rahul
--
--
Rahul Bajaj
Judicial Law Clerk to Dr. Justice D.Y. Chandrachud, Supreme Court of India
Rhodes Scholar (India and Linacre 2018)
University of Oxford






--
Soronel Haetir
soronel.haetir@gmail.com


Zel Iscel
 

Yes, I second all this.
You have to find a speed that works for you. If Jaws is ahead of you and you get stuck somewhere, you can quickly navigate to the particular spot that's giving you trouble and keep going.
It does take practise though.

image001.jpg

Zel Iscel
Disability Specialist
Inclusive World
Mobile: 0413813885
Email: zel@inclusiveworld.com.au

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dan Longmore
Sent: Saturday, 16 January 2021 5:48 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Listening to text with JAWS and reproducing it simultaneously: 3 specific questions

It takes some practice. I’ve been doing this for a number of years, I am a pastor, and use voiceover for my notes on Sunday. The concept would be the same with jaws however. Couple of things, be familiar with the content as much as you can before you start and if you can format the document in such a way that jazz only reads a small portion of any one time. Just before you are ready to start your next section advanced jazz and allow what you hear to be slightly ahead of what you’re speaking. You can do it be patient with yourself as it takes as I said quite a bit of practice.
On Jan 15, 2021, at 10:43 AM, Rahul Bajaj <rahul.bajaj1038@gmail.com> wrote:

Hello,

I have the following questions:

First, I normally listen to JAWS at 65%. Even after slowing it down,
if I try to listen to the text line-by-line, I find that by the time I
am done reading and have to speak, I am only able to retain 40-50% of
what I have heard. So I end up losing some content.
On the other hand, if I listen to JAWS one word at a time, I find that
I end up being much too slow, such that my speech sounds disjointed
and halting.

Second, I am wondering how your experience differs between verbally
reproducing new content [i.e. material you have never read before]
versus content you are already familiar with.
Put simply, would it pay to familiarize oneself with the content to be
reproduced beforehand?

Third and lastly, can you suggest some pointers for building up one's
capacity, to be able to get better at doing this i.e. listening to
JAWS and speaking out what it is reading at the same time?


Best,
Rahul
--
--
Rahul Bajaj
Judicial Law Clerk to Dr. Justice D.Y. Chandrachud, Supreme Court of
India Rhodes Scholar (India and Linacre 2018) University of Oxford