moderated IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June 15th 2022


Don Mauck
 

Well said!! Stay up with the times or get left in the dark!!

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Lori Lynn
Sent: Friday, May 21, 2021 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [External] : Re: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June 15th 2022

 

I usually keep quiet on these long threads, but I’ve got to toss my 2 cents in.

 

“cheap throwaway computer”? You may have the money to replace your computer whenever the wind blows, but that’s just totally nuts! If you are crazy enough to turn off all the system updates and not backup your computer then you deserve whatever happens to both you and your machine. Companies like Microsoft have lots of experts who are working hard to make the systems and their components the best they can for all of us.

 

They have made the decision to eliminate a very old application in I E. They aren’t the first company to make this kind of decision and they won’t be the last. You’ve got two choices. You can either deal with it and use another browser or you can give up computers and go back to the dark ages. Me, I accepted their decision a long time ago and have moved forward. I remember the days of DOS and even before that. I will never go backwards!

 

Lori Lynn

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


 

For those who want to ensure access to IE into the foreseeable future, you would be far better off to acquire either an old Windows 7 machine or Windows 8.1 machine for this purpose, if possible.

Windows 7 is already out of support and well past its official end of life date, and IE will never be removed.  Given the nature of the announcement, and that Windows 8.1 is nearing end of life in January 2023, it's improbable that it will end up being removed under that version of Windows, either.  

It's still possible to find refurbished machines out there with Windows 7 on them and 8.1 is somewhat easier to find.  At the moment, though, prices have risen due to demand related to all the stay-at-home from the pandemic.

If you need IE, your best bet is to have a purpose-dedicated machine where it, and its operating system, are encased in amber.  Of course, one would use it only for accessing IE-dependent sites, and pretty much nothing else.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


 

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 08:42 PM, James English wrote:
For me, it's a case of whether I want to abandon the websites I've been using in IE for ages
-
You, and anyone else in this situation, also owe it to themselves to try Edge in IE-mode.  See:  What is Internet Explorer mode? | Microsoft Docs

And, yes, it's a PITA to configure for specific sites, and if you have Win10 Home you won't have Group Policy editor.  But it should be a PITA to configure for specific sites, as those sites should have updated long, long ago.  But if you're still needing to access a site that has been abandoned for years as far as any updating goes, and that uses soon-to-be-defunct code that is tightly bound to the IE era, Microsoft is giving a mechanism to do that in Edge itself.  But it's not automatic, it must be configured on a site-by-site basis.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


 

And as I think it was pointed out in the article, Edge has an IE mode for old websites. In any case, if IE actually goes away for good and somebody who hasn't updated their website to a newer standard they will surely do so fairly quickly if they still want people to use it.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James English
Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2021 5:42 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June 15th 2022

So the problem I have is exclusively with IE being removed from users pcs. I am, at present, the owner of 28 computers that can run the present copy of windows 10. If one of them gets messed up because of ransomwear or some form of virus Norton hasn't picked up I can chuck it away, open reserve laptop and continue to be fine. For me, it's a case of whether I want to abandon the websites I've been using in IE for ages, kill Microsoft updates, or write my own webbrowser. Right now I'm thinking that stopping Microsoft updates is the best plan.

On 5/21/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 08:22 PM, Mario wrote:


so this is for next year, no?
-
Correct.  All Windows 10 users of the common versions (Home and Pro)
have been given a one-year heads-up about what's coming so they can
transition with grace and not need to panic.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

*It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what
you are
not.*

~ André Gide






 

Yes,, and every year thousands of people fall for one scam or another and you really wonder how this can happen given how often such things get mentioned in the newspapers and online. Just read in our little local newspaper (I live in a town of 6,000 in fairly remote Northwestern British Columbia) that our RCMP detachment here received a fraud complaint. The person who I assume was from here received a phone call. The caller said he was a lawyer from Vancouver and he was representing the guy's son. According to him the son had been involved in a car accident and since he was drunk he was now in jail and a $5,000 bail payment was required for him to get out. Then apparently a second guy was patched in who claimed to be the son and who crying and begging asked for the help. How a father won't recognize his own son I don't know, but even without that I am baffled how somebody could fall for this and apparently the victim here send two $5,000 payments to the specified bank account.

 

Best regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2021 2:35 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June 15th 2022

 

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 05:24 PM, Bill White wrote:

Colonial Pipeline

-
If, and I emphasize if, they were still using Windows 7 that's huge mistake number one, at least if they're not one of the companies forking out the big bucks to Microsoft to do ongoing support by custom contract.  There are a few that did this, and it's costing them a king's ransom, as it should.

But, even if that's the case, they also have no excuse for not having a robust backup plan in place.  Ransomware is useless if you have your systems backed up on a cycle that's as frequent as needed based on your exact business circumstances (mostly related to the generation of new information, e.g., orders).  Recovery from backups should be an hours to maybe day long process, at most, and if you do what Colonial said it did, and that was electively shutting down large segments of its network to prevent spread, you should know precisely where those backups need to be recovered to versus "safe zones."

If you're paying ransom, something's very, very wrong.  No business of any size should ever be in a position where a ransomware attack should result in the payment of ransom.  No government should, either.  Both private and public sector entities have been caught with their pants down, and you'd think by now that the cautionary lessons from same would have been learned.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


 

If said computer is so unimportant and cheap and you have so many others like it then why not simply stick with Windows 7 on it, then you have iE and you don't have to worry about updates.

----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James English
Sent: Friday, May 21, 2021 7:52 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June 15th 2022

That would be great if I used this computer for anything but browsing the web and a bit of media playback. It's the one that I travel around with, because it's light and cheap and contains no information that I don't have either on another computer or stored on my file server or in the cloud. If, when I travel away for the weekend next week I left the computer on the train, I would have another one, with all the data from this one, available when I get home. The computer doesn't hold any bank information, credit card information or information that would let a stranger find me. This being the case there is no point talking about the security implications of stopping updates to preserve IE, or of continuing to use it as I have covered all the bases.

So if you know a way of disabling windows updates, I would be very happy to know despite the damage that could be done to the computer I don't care about or the data that's backed up.

- James

On 5/21/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 10:19 AM, James English wrote:


Is there something you fear happening to this cheap throwaway
computer that is so terrible? I believe it's possible to stop updates
in windows
10
by disabling the update service, is this no longer the case?
-
I have zero concerns about anything happening to the computer that
could not be reversed, at least as far as having a running computer
goes.  Nor do most who are issuing warnings.  What we worry about is
loss of data, often years worth of data, and often containing things
like family photos, massive music libraries where the source material
is no longer available, etc., etc., etc.    If you do a full system
image backup and separate user backups routinely you come as close to
completely eliminating your exposure on those counts entirely.

I will not discuss any hacks that can be done to prevent any operating
system from receiving updates.  Of course these exist.  The people who
created these OSes in the first place and who are the ones maintaining
them are in the very best position to know what updates are necessary, and why.
No one has ever put it better than John Carrona, a BSOD (Blue Screen
of
Death) expert, now retired due to health issues, and who was in a far
better position to speak definitively about this than I could ever hope to be:

There really isn't a point to checking for updates and not installing them.
. .  It's important to install *all* available updates. I've been
doing this since the days of DOS, and I still don't have the
confidence to pick and choose among updates.  There are just too many
variables involved - and most people can't evaluate the full
consequences of installing/not installing updates.

~ John Carrona, AKA *usasma (
https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/u/35824/usasma/ )* on
BleepingComputer.com, http://www.carrona.org/ (
http://www.carrona.org/ )

If someone with his depth of expertise feels that he could not
reliably, "evaluate the full consequences of intsalling/not installing
updates," nor feel confident that he could possibly know all the
variables involved in the need for them . . .
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

*It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what
you are
not.*

~ André Gide






 

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 11:51 AM, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:
Yes, and every year thousands of people fall for one scam or another and you really wonder how this can happen given how often such things get mentioned in the newspapers and online.

And, at least in my area, on the local TV news, particularly when a specific scam seems to be "making the rounds" in the area.

I have become convinced that some people are utterly clueless and others have a limited capacity of what they can store in their heads and for which they have "easy retrieval access in the wetware."  And I am intentionally ignoring cognitive impairments, which are a thing of their own.  I'm talking strictly about the great masses that are within the first standard deviation to 1.5 standard deviations of the whole population who are neurotypical.

I haven't seen or heard of a scam that doesn't have an entirely familiar form in many years now.  And I'm including phone scams, "Nigerian Prince Type" email scams, I'm in trouble can you send me money scams, etc., etc., etc.   They've all made the rounds, many times, and been reported on many times with the entirely predictable results.  It amazes me that those getting sucked into these things these days don't seem to have even the slightest warning bell go off when something so familiar, well-publicized in the popular press, and virtually identical in form lands in their laps.  It's as though they're completely blank slates.

And it's not just the unsophisticated and uneducated.  Very recently an acquaintance of mine who was a practicing veterinarian for decades and taught vet tech courses at the local community college for decades after that fell for the oldie-but-goodie pop-up saying, "You've got an infected system, call {insert scammers number here}," and for some ungodly reason, he did.  Luckily, he almost instantly had the nagging feeling he shouldn't have done this, and called me.  I told him to call the credit card company and immediately stop payment on the $300 he'd authorized (it hadn't yet posted, and they closed his account and issued a new card) and to shut the computer down immediately and do not use it again, for anything, until a "nuke and pave" or a restore from a full system image backup taken before the incident was done.  In the end he went the "nuke and pave" route of a completely clean reinstall of Windows 10.

No legitimate tech company will ever cold-call you or ever display a pop-up in your web browser saying you're infected.  It really is that simple.  Hang up or close that window/shut down the machine immediately.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


Hope Williamson <webspinner@...>
 

Back in the Windows 10 1903 era, I disabled wuaserv, because of all the problems with that particular update. I even installed it, and had to roll back.

    I did this as a temporary measure. I emphasize temporary!! Once the problem issues were fixed, about 3-4 months later, I was able to get all the updates, and install 1903. However if you think this is a permanent thing, and you do this for more than a little while, you could end up with your identity stolen. By more than a little while, I mean 3-4 months. If you can't transition away from IE by 6/15/2022, there's no reason to stop Windows from updating, because you'll never be able to do it in the first place.

On 5/21/2021 7:54 AM, Don Mauck wrote:

Well said!! Stay up with the times or get left in the dark!!

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Lori Lynn
Sent: Friday, May 21, 2021 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: [External] : Re: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June 15th 2022

 

I usually keep quiet on these long threads, but I’ve got to toss my 2 cents in.

 

“cheap throwaway computer”? You may have the money to replace your computer whenever the wind blows, but that’s just totally nuts! If you are crazy enough to turn off all the system updates and not backup your computer then you deserve whatever happens to both you and your machine. Companies like Microsoft have lots of experts who are working hard to make the systems and their components the best they can for all of us.

 

They have made the decision to eliminate a very old application in I E. They aren’t the first company to make this kind of decision and they won’t be the last. You’ve got two choices. You can either deal with it and use another browser or you can give up computers and go back to the dark ages. Me, I accepted their decision a long time ago and have moved forward. I remember the days of DOS and even before that. I will never go backwards!

 

Lori Lynn

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Marty Hutchings
 

This is getting old.  Can we just move on?

On 5/21/2021 10:12 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 11:51 AM, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:
Yes, and every year thousands of people fall for one scam or another and you really wonder how this can happen given how often such things get mentioned in the newspapers and online.

And, at least in my area, on the local TV news, particularly when a specific scam seems to be "making the rounds" in the area.

I have become convinced that some people are utterly clueless and others have a limited capacity of what they can store in their heads and for which they have "easy retrieval access in the wetware."  And I am intentionally ignoring cognitive impairments, which are a thing of their own.  I'm talking strictly about the great masses that are within the first standard deviation to 1.5 standard deviations of the whole population who are neurotypical.

I haven't seen or heard of a scam that doesn't have an entirely familiar form in many years now.  And I'm including phone scams, "Nigerian Prince Type" email scams, I'm in trouble can you send me money scams, etc., etc., etc.   They've all made the rounds, many times, and been reported on many times with the entirely predictable results.  It amazes me that those getting sucked into these things these days don't seem to have even the slightest warning bell go off when something so familiar, well-publicized in the popular press, and virtually identical in form lands in their laps.  It's as though they're completely blank slates.

And it's not just the unsophisticated and uneducated.  Very recently an acquaintance of mine who was a practicing veterinarian for decades and taught vet tech courses at the local community college for decades after that fell for the oldie-but-goodie pop-up saying, "You've got an infected system, call {insert scammers number here}," and for some ungodly reason, he did.  Luckily, he almost instantly had the nagging feeling he shouldn't have done this, and called me.  I told him to call the credit card company and immediately stop payment on the $300 he'd authorized (it hadn't yet posted, and they closed his account and issued a new card) and to shut the computer down immediately and do not use it again, for anything, until a "nuke and pave" or a restore from a full system image backup taken before the incident was done.  In the end he went the "nuke and pave" route of a completely clean reinstall of Windows 10.

No legitimate tech company will ever cold-call you or ever display a pop-up in your web browser saying you're infected.  It really is that simple.  Hang up or close that window/shut down the machine immediately.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


 

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 04:07 PM, Marty Hutchings wrote:
Can we just move on?
-
Can you just use the "Mute this topic?" feature rather than complaining?
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


Jaffar Sidek
 

He is requesting, not complaining.  I would have thought you'd know the difference.

On 22/5/2021 5:12 am, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 04:07 PM, Marty Hutchings wrote:
Can we just move on?
-
Can you just use the "Mute this topic?" feature rather than complaining?
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


 

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 05:43 PM, Jaffar Sidek wrote:
He is requesting, not complaining.
-
So say you.

Regardless, I am sick to death of any members demanding/requesting/complaining that a topic that's clearly of interest to quite a few others be brought to a close.  You have the ability to hit the shut up button, better known as the "Mute this Topic" link, for any topic that has worn out it's welcome for you.  It's one of the gifts of Groups.io.  For the love of heaven, learn to use it!
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


Jaffar Sidek
 

indeed!

On 22/5/2021 5:46 am, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 05:43 PM, Jaffar Sidek wrote:
He is requesting, not complaining.
-
So say you.

Regardless, I am sick to death of any members demanding/requesting/complaining that a topic that's clearly of interest to quite a few others be brought to a close.  You have the ability to hit the shut up button, better known as the "Mute this Topic" link, for any topic that has worn out it's welcome for you.  It's one of the gifts of Groups.io.  For the love of heaven, learn to use it!
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide