moderated IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June 15th 2022


Dan Longmore
 

Brian,

  Nicely worded and thanks for keeping us centered.

Dan

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2021 5:08 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June 15th 2022

 

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 04:59 PM, Gerald Levy wrote:

How well did Windows 10 protect Colonial Pipeline against a ransomware attack?

-
You really need to stop trotting this out as though it means anything.  Ransomware attacks can (and do) occur on virtually any un-hardened networked system.  And all it takes is a single node to unleash it on.

Hacks happen.  They're a fact of cyber life.  There are OSes, proper, that are more resistant than others, and even in the more resistant ones, all it takes is a wee bit of carelessness, somewhere on a single computer/node in a network, for ransomware to enter.

Also, unless you have information that's not been made public, there is no definitive analysis regarding exactly what did occur in the case of Colonial.  Lot's of speculation but nothing "official" and even what's put out officially will likely be incomplete.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


 

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 05:08 PM, Jaffar Sidek wrote:
Were you personally having Ransomeware attacks?
-
Also, and there's no debate about this, Windows Security does a much better job of protecting Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 computers than Microsoft Security Essentials ever did.

Windows 10 is significantly more secure, from a design perspective.  And anyone can find many, many, many articles about security improvements in Windows 10 written by specialists in the field.

But, as you've said, and I've said, improved or better does not mean invincible.  And most attacks are the direct result of user action.  It's the very rare vector that makes it way on to a system "uninvited" these days, if modern security suites are in use.  Note that very rare is just that, very rare.  It doesn't mean that no such vectors exist.

I've posted it before, but it bears repeating.  Quietman7, a security expert who is an active contributor on Bleeping Computer, has written extensively on what you (any you) need to do to develop safe interaction habits with cyberspace.  The following four are, in my opinion, must-reads:

·         Users Themselves Are The Most Substantial Weakness In The Security Chain  (just that single message)

·         What you must understand regarding computer security  (also just this single message)

·         Best Practices for Safe Computing

·         Reflections on Antivirus/Antimalware Testing & Comparisons

I don't even come close to following each and every practice in that Best Practices for Safe Computing list.  But I'd say if you follow even half of them you're going to be worlds ahead of your average computer user.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


Bill White
 

Windows 10 didn't protect Colonial Pipeline at all, because, apparently, they were still using Windows 7.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gerald Levy via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2021 2:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June 15th 2022

 

 

How well did Windows 10 protect Colonial Pipeline against a ransomware attack?

 

Gerald

 

 

On 5/20/2021 4:17 PM, G. Gray wrote:

Thought I'd weigh in on this one.  I used Windows XP from 2004 until 2018 when my XP machine failed.  Meanwhile Win. 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 passed me by.  Constantly I'd read that XP was dangerous to use on the web and even with e-mail!! 

 

Yet through it all I had absolutely no problems and I used the web every day for lengthy periods of time.  With the MS security updates...you rarely or NEVER know what these are for.   I got no virus's or hacks, etc.

 

These 7 words I live by..."If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

 

Listening for the Shout!,

1 Thessalonians 4:16-18

 

 

George

On 5/19/2021 10:13 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:08 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:

7 is safe and still valid.

-
This sentiment is not shared, particularly the first part, by anyone who's an IT professional.

I really don't care what you, or any given individual, choose to do in your own world.  That really is entirely your choice, as you have to live with it and its consequences.

It is never, ever "safe" to use an out-of-support version of Windows.   It's just the opposite of "safe."  You may never have any issue, and very often that's just the proverbial "dumb luck."
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide

 


Error! Filename not specified.

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com




Adrian Spratt
 

Michael and list,

For someone like me, the question isn't whether Windows 10 or Edge promises something better. Windows 7 served my needs fine. IE didn't meet every need, but when it didn't, Firefox usually covered. I saw upgrading to Windows 10 as a necessary annoyance, as I did learning Edge.

Contrary to what some have written here, beyond the functions we use, security is paramount. The recent Colony pipeline hack is a misleading example. An analogy from the world of cars might put it in perspective. Many modern cars have technology that warns drivers when they might be in danger of coming too close to bumping another car or other object. Does that prevent all accidents? No, but it surely reduces the number. Airbags don't prevent all injuries, but statistics demonstrate that they reduce them substantially.

Twenty or so years ago, I relied on a browser operated by local educators intended for use by teachers. One day the operators just gave up and walked away. In no time, I had every virus under the sun on my system, which I had to replace. It takes only one security breach to make you realize how bad things can get. I was fortunate: none of my financial or other critical information was stolen. I acted in time. but replacing the PC and restoring all my programs and data in a secure fashion took time and money.

I respect those who resent losing IE because there's no question it does some things no other browser does, especially when it comes to programs that are no longer supported. I use it for only one purpose, as I explained in a recent response to Barbara's post. If I lose that ability to read email online, it will be a great inconvenience. But I'm not sure what the point is of arguing over this. When Microsoft ceases to provide security support for a browser or other feature, it puts those who continue to use it at serious risk. You may be lucky for weeks or months or, as one person posted, a decade or more, but that's the word: lucky.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Mote
Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2021 3:58 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June 15th 2022

I have enjoyed reading all of these posts. I work in the Assistive Technology business, and have been a user for over 25 years. There are some who won't like what I have to say, but I think it's important.
those of us who rely on a screen reader to interact with a computer have seen accessibility explode for us in the last quarter century. We can do things that we could only dream about a few years ago. To say that Microsoft does not care about the needs of their disabled users, as one person did, is totally out of line. Just because they don't address your favorite hot button issue doesn't mean that they don't care. I am not disagreeing that Microsoft and other tech giants make mistakes, in fact, they make lots of them. Overall though, I think the commitment to accessibility has been really good and the good does indeed outweigh the bad. IE going away has been in the works for a very long time. I'm surprised it's taken this long. Had Edge worked better for Microsoft before now, IE would have been gone before now.
It's my opinion, that we should embrace change, and enjoy the benefits instead of complaining about not being able to use the same old same old stuff that doesn't get updated with any new features like Internet Explorer. It's time to move on. Something better is coming, and if you decide to stay with Windows 7, you might miss out on something much better and much easier. Give that some thought. Everyone has the ability to do what they choose, and there is nothing wrong with it.
I'm glad we have choices in the market place. there was a time that we didn't have that luxury.

On 5/20/21, Adrian Spratt <adrian@adrianspratt.com> wrote:
Barbara,

I’m glad you brought up this example. I use the same method for
handling lengthy email messages with dozens of links. You would think
that this key sequence, alt-h, a, v, would take you to a combo box listing major browsers.
However, the only option is IE.

I’m using Outlook 2016. I don’t know if the same limitation applies to
Outlook 2019 or the ever-updated Outlook 365.

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Barbara
Sheinbein
Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2021 1:17 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective
June 15th 2022

Hi Everyone,

This IE change poses a question for me. I use other browsers than IE
with one exception. I am using Windows 10 and Office 365. I use
Outlook and from time to time I get email messages usually from a
company/organization that I have a problem with. I want to enter on a
specific link and when I do this, I am transferred to a web page not
the topic I wanted. After trying a second time to be sure I have
entered where I do want and getting the same results, I go to the next
method. With the email open I pressed alt-h, then a and finally v
which opens up in IE and the email is presented in HTML. I again find
my link and enter on it and I am taken to the correct page. I am
assuming this is some accessibility software issue beyond my
knowledge. Smile. This long winded explanation leads me to the
current thread. I assume I will still be able to do this as needed, but if there is a straightforward alternative, please let me know.

Thanks in advance for any ideas.

Barbara



From: main@jfw.groups.io<mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
<main@jfw.groups.io<mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>> On Behalf Of Joseph
Lee
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 9:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io<mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective
June 15th 2022

Hi,
At least two people pointed out on Win10 Forum that they need Internet
Explorer, and I advised them to look into IE mode in Microsoft Edge
designed for scenarios like accessing web applications that rely on IE
and its rendering engine for full functionality.
Cheers,
Joseph


From: main@jfw.groups.io<mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
<main@jfw.groups.io<mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>> On Behalf Of
kylee@timeless.net.nz<mailto:kylee@timeless.net.nz>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 7:15 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io<mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective
June 15th 2022

Um … that means that it will no longer be updated, causing increasing
holes in security.
Kylee

From: main@jfw.groups.io<mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
<main@jfw.groups.io<mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>> On Behalf Of Loy
Sent: Thursday, 20 May 2021 2:13 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io<mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective
June 15th 2022

The blog said support would end, it did not say it would be removed.

----- Original Message -----
From: Brian Vogel<mailto:britechguy@gmail.com>
To: main@jfw.groups.io<mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2021 8:41 PM
Subject: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June
15th
2022

Hello All,

Even though this message is not related to JAWS, the impact
of this change is so important, and it is so likely to affect quite a
few members who still use IE routinely, the information needs to be
shared. My intention is information sharing only, as there's really nothing to discuss.
This is a done deal.

See the article on techcommunity.microsoft.com entitled, Internet
Explorer
11 desktop app retirement
FAQ<https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/windows-it-pro-blog/internet-explorer-11-desktop-app-retirement-faq/ba-p/2366549>.

Those in business settings where they are forced to still use IE for
specific sites also should pass this information along to "the powers
that be" so that they can be aware of the change that's coming.

You need to start making plans to transition away from IE now, if you
have not done so already.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what
you are not.

~ André Gide







 

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 05:24 PM, Bill White wrote:
Colonial Pipeline
-
If, and I emphasize if, they were still using Windows 7 that's huge mistake number one, at least if they're not one of the companies forking out the big bucks to Microsoft to do ongoing support by custom contract.  There are a few that did this, and it's costing them a king's ransom, as it should.

But, even if that's the case, they also have no excuse for not having a robust backup plan in place.  Ransomware is useless if you have your systems backed up on a cycle that's as frequent as needed based on your exact business circumstances (mostly related to the generation of new information, e.g., orders).  Recovery from backups should be an hours to maybe day long process, at most, and if you do what Colonial said it did, and that was electively shutting down large segments of its network to prevent spread, you should know precisely where those backups need to be recovered to versus "safe zones."

If you're paying ransom, something's very, very wrong.  No business of any size should ever be in a position where a ransomware attack should result in the payment of ransom.  No government should, either.  Both private and public sector entities have been caught with their pants down, and you'd think by now that the cautionary lessons from same would have been learned.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


 

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 05:30 PM, Adrian Spratt wrote:
You may be lucky for weeks or months or, as one person posted, a decade or more, but that's the word: lucky.
-
Absolutely.  All it takes is one screw-up, and we all make 'em, to make all the vigilance in the world come to naught.  And that's on well guarded systems.  Most compromises are, as previously stated, the direct result of user action (which, given the compromises, are huge user errors).

I appreciate each and every word of your message.  It is incredibly cogently expressed and well thought out.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


Mario
 

having read, Internet Explorer 11 desktop app retirement FAQ,
https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/windows-it-pro-blog/internet-explorer-11-desktop-app-retirement-faq/ba-p/2366549

, mentions that, "As a result, the Internet Explorer 11 desktop application will go out of support and be retired on June 15, 2022 for certain versions of Windows 10.", as well as the article, The future of Internet Explorer on Windows 10 is in Microsoft Edge,
https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2021/05/19/the-future-of-internet-explorer-on-windows-10-is-in-microsoft-edge/

, also mentions, "... the Internet Explorer 11 desktop application will be retired and go out of support on June 15, 2022, for certain versions of Windows 10.". so this is for next year, no?

-------- Original Message --------
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Subject: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June 15th 2022
Date: Wednesday, May 19, 2021, 10:20 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 10:12 PM, Loy wrote:

The blog said support would end, it did not say it would be removed.

-
The phrase, and I quote, "go out of support and be retired."

For those of us in the IT biz, "retired" has a very clear and specific
meaning:  It be gone.

--

Brian -Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

*It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you
are not.*

           ~ André Gide


 

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 08:22 PM, Mario wrote:
so this is for next year, no?
-
Correct.  All Windows 10 users of the common versions (Home and Pro) have been given a one-year heads-up about what's coming so they can transition with grace and not need to panic.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


Mario
 

I have a suspicion that some contributors of this discussion might think this issue applies to June 15 this year?

-------- Original Message --------
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Subject: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June 15th 2022
Date: Thursday, May 20, 2021, 8:31 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 08:22 PM, Mario wrote:

so this is for next year, no?

-
Correct.  All Windows 10 users of the common versions (Home and Pro)
have been given a one-year heads-up about what's coming so they can
transition with grace and not need to panic.

--

Brian -Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

*It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you
are not.*

           ~ André Gide


James English
 

So the problem I have is exclusively with IE being removed from users
pcs. I am, at present, the owner of 28 computers that can run the
present copy of windows 10. If one of them gets messed up because of
ransomwear or some form of virus Norton hasn't picked up I can chuck
it away, open reserve laptop and continue to be fine. For me, it's a
case of whether I want to abandon the websites I've been using in IE
for ages, kill Microsoft updates, or write my own webbrowser. Right
now I'm thinking that stopping Microsoft updates is the best plan.

On 5/21/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 08:22 PM, Mario wrote:


so this is for next year, no?
-
Correct.  All Windows 10 users of the common versions (Home and Pro) have
been given a one-year heads-up about what's coming so they can transition
with grace and not need to panic.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

*It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are
not.*

~ André Gide






Glenn / Lenny
 

I'm surprised MS will allow you to turn off updates in windows 10.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
From: "James English" <james13english@gmail.com>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2021 7:42 PM
Subject: Re: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June
15th 2022


So the problem I have is exclusively with IE being removed from users
pcs. I am, at present, the owner of 28 computers that can run the
present copy of windows 10. If one of them gets messed up because of
ransomwear or some form of virus Norton hasn't picked up I can chuck
it away, open reserve laptop and continue to be fine. For me, it's a
case of whether I want to abandon the websites I've been using in IE
for ages, kill Microsoft updates, or write my own webbrowser. Right
now I'm thinking that stopping Microsoft updates is the best plan.

On 5/21/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 08:22 PM, Mario wrote:


so this is for next year, no?
-
Correct. All Windows 10 users of the common versions (Home and Pro) have
been given a one-year heads-up about what's coming so they can transition
with grace and not need to panic.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

*It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you
are
not.*

~ André Gide






 

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 08:39 PM, Mario wrote:
might think this issue applies to June 15 this year?
-
Then they missed the "effective June 15th 2022" in the topic title, and the same information in the linked Microsoft article I offered using the click-through text link,  IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June 15th 2022 

If that's been missed, well . . .
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


 

On Thu, May 20, 2021 at 08:44 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:
I'm surprised MS will allow you to turn off updates in windows 10.
-
They don't.  You can delay them, particularly in Pro.  And it would be sheer insanity to block updates to Windows 10, or any operating system.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


Randy Barnett <blindmansbluff09@...>
 

A little personal responsibility and common sense will do more than worrying about MS not supporting software... The latest greatest software wont protect you if you don't think before activating something or going to a unknown site... And incessant preaching and belittling people about this is not helpful.. Most adults can think for themselves and don't need nannies.

On 5/20/2021 1:22 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:

I think the security concerns are mainly for people who unconsously click on things.
 
----- Original Message -----
From: G. Gray
Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2021 3:17 PM
Subject: Re: IE being removed from Win 10 20H2 and later, effective June 15th 2022

Thought I'd weigh in on this one.  I used Windows XP from 2004 until 2018 when my XP machine failed.  Meanwhile Win. 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 passed me by.  Constantly I'd read that XP was dangerous to use on the web and even with e-mail!! 


Yet through it all I had absolutely no problems and I used the web every day for lengthy periods of time.  With the MS security updates...you rarely or NEVER know what these are for.   I got no virus's or hacks, etc.


These 7 words I live by..."If it ain't broke, don't fix it."


Listening for the Shout!,
1 Thessalonians 4:16-18


George
On 5/19/2021 10:13 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Wed, May 19, 2021 at 11:08 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:
7 is safe and still valid.
-
This sentiment is not shared, particularly the first part, by anyone who's an IT professional.

I really don't care what you, or any given individual, choose to do in your own world.  That really is entirely your choice, as you have to live with it and its consequences.

It is never, ever "safe" to use an out-of-support version of Windows.   It's just the opposite of "safe."  You may never have any issue, and very often that's just the proverbial "dumb luck."
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide




Avast logo

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com



Randy Barnett <blindmansbluff09@...>
 


I dont know anyone that has been hacked or had a virus in years.

On 5/20/2021 1:25 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:


 

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 01:02 AM, Randy Barnett wrote:
A little personal responsibility and common sense will do more than worrying about MS not supporting software.
-
Personal responsibility and common sense in the world of computing includes not using unsupported software except where absolutely necessary.

Working in this field, I know far better than you that "most adults" don't give this a second thought or, worse, do what happens here and go to the barricades to defend the stupid. Using unsupported software when supported alternatives are available, particularly for email clients, web browsers, and other things in constant intimate contact with cyberspace is very stupid indeed.  A word to the wise should be sufficient.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


James English
 

Is there something you fear happening to this cheap throwaway computer
that is so terrible? I believe it's possible to stop updates in
windows 10 by disabling the update service, is this no longer the
case?

On 5/21/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 01:02 AM, Randy Barnett wrote:


A little personal responsibility and common sense will do more than
worrying about MS not supporting software.
-
Personal responsibility and common sense in the world of computing includes
*not* using unsupported software except where absolutely necessary.

Working in this field, I know far better than you that "most adults" don't
give this a second thought or, worse, do what happens here and go to the
barricades to defend the stupid. Using unsupported software when supported
alternatives are available, particularly for email clients, web browsers,
and other things in constant intimate contact with cyberspace is very stupid
indeed.  A word to the wise should be sufficient.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

*It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are
not.*

~ André Gide






 

On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 10:19 AM, James English wrote:
Is there something you fear happening to this cheap throwaway computer that is so terrible? I believe it's possible to stop updates in windows 10 by disabling the update service, is this no longer the case?
-
I have zero concerns about anything happening to the computer that could not be reversed, at least as far as having a running computer goes.  Nor do most who are issuing warnings.  What we worry about is loss of data, often years worth of data, and often containing things like family photos, massive music libraries where the source material is no longer available, etc., etc., etc.    If you do a full system image backup and separate user backups routinely you come as close to completely eliminating your exposure on those counts entirely.

I will not discuss any hacks that can be done to prevent any operating system from receiving updates.  Of course these exist.  The people who created these OSes in the first place and who are the ones maintaining them are in the very best position to know what updates are necessary, and why.  No one has ever put it better than John Carrona, a BSOD (Blue Screen of Death) expert, now retired due to health issues, and who was in a far better position to speak definitively about this than I could ever hope to be:

There really isn't a point to checking for updates and not installing them. . .  It's important to install all available updates. I've been doing this since the days of DOS, and I still don't have the confidence to pick and choose among updates.  There are just too many variables involved - and most people can't evaluate the full consequences of installing/not installing updates.

        ~ John Carrona, AKA usasma on BleepingComputer.com, http://www.carrona.org/


If someone with his depth of expertise feels that he could not reliably, "evaluate the full consequences of intsalling/not installing updates," nor feel confident that he could possibly know all the variables involved in the need for them . . .
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

           ~ André Gide


James English
 

That would be great if I used this computer for anything but browsing
the web and a bit of media playback. It's the one that I travel around
with, because it's light and cheap and contains no information that I
don't have either on another computer or stored on my file server or
in the cloud. If, when I travel away for the weekend next week I left
the computer on the train, I would have another one, with all the data
from this one, available when I get home. The computer doesn't hold
any bank information, credit card information or information that
would let a stranger find me. This being the case there is no point
talking about the security implications of stopping updates to
preserve IE, or of continuing to use it as I have covered all the
bases.

So if you know a way of disabling windows updates, I would be very
happy to know despite the damage that could be done to the computer I
don't care about or the data that's backed up.

- James

On 5/21/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Fri, May 21, 2021 at 10:19 AM, James English wrote:


Is there something you fear happening to this cheap throwaway computer
that is so terrible? I believe it's possible to stop updates in windows
10
by disabling the update service, is this no longer the case?
-
I have zero concerns about anything happening to the computer that could not
be reversed, at least as far as having a running computer goes.  Nor do most
who are issuing warnings.  What we worry about is loss of data, often years
worth of data, and often containing things like family photos, massive music
libraries where the source material is no longer available, etc., etc.,
etc.    If you do a full system image backup and separate user backups
routinely you come as close to completely eliminating your exposure on those
counts entirely.

I will not discuss any hacks that can be done to prevent any operating
system from receiving updates.  Of course these exist.  The people who
created these OSes in the first place and who are the ones maintaining them
are in the very best position to know what updates are necessary, and why.
No one has ever put it better than John Carrona, a BSOD (Blue Screen of
Death) expert, now retired due to health issues, and who was in a far better
position to speak definitively about this than I could ever hope to be:

There really isn't a point to checking for updates and not installing them.
. .  It's important to install *all* available updates. I've been doing this
since the days of DOS, and I still don't have the confidence to pick and
choose among updates.  There are just too many variables involved - and most
people can't evaluate the full consequences of installing/not installing
updates.

~ John Carrona, AKA *usasma (
https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/u/35824/usasma/ )* on
BleepingComputer.com, http://www.carrona.org/ ( http://www.carrona.org/ )

If someone with his depth of expertise feels that he could not reliably,
"evaluate the full consequences of intsalling/not installing updates," nor
feel confident that he could possibly know all the variables involved in the
need for them . . .
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

*It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are
not.*

~ André Gide






Lori Lynn
 

I usually keep quiet on these long threads, but I’ve got to toss my 2 cents in.

 

“cheap throwaway computer”? You may have the money to replace your computer whenever the wind blows, but that’s just totally nuts! If you are crazy enough to turn off all the system updates and not backup your computer then you deserve whatever happens to both you and your machine. Companies like Microsoft have lots of experts who are working hard to make the systems and their components the best they can for all of us.

 

They have made the decision to eliminate a very old application in I E. They aren’t the first company to make this kind of decision and they won’t be the last. You’ve got two choices. You can either deal with it and use another browser or you can give up computers and go back to the dark ages. Me, I accepted their decision a long time ago and have moved forward. I remember the days of DOS and even before that. I will never go backwards!

 

Lori Lynn

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10