Topics

moderated Ideas for handling color coded spreadsheets

Van Lant, Robin
 

Hi all,

Using JAWS 2019 with Office 365 and Windows 10.

I seem to be working with more people, including my new manager, who really like color coding in Excel.  I totally get it, as I can clearly understand how this visually makes looking at a large spreadsheet file easier, especially on calendar or schedule files.  The first project I had for my new manager was to take a color coded calendar she had from last summer and update it for this year, color coding each event based on whether I was able to secure the necessary room reservation.  My approach in this case was to hunt for color coded cells, and copy the color into a place off to the side, then clear all the colors and then paste the colors back in to new cells as I made the room reservations.  This is just an example.

 

Hear my question with the lens of someone who is losing more usable vision and adjusting to new leadership in my role.  I’m feeling a bit insecure about my abilities and am wondering if there are any tips from others who share spreadsheet files with sighted colleagues on managing colors and/or fancier layouts.  I’m intimidated by these large files my new manager is sending.  I’ve typically been the one creating the spreadsheet, so I could lay it out in my own way, but I’m taking on new job duties and inheriting files with lots of data that is just just a simple grid.

 

I guess I just need to hear of there are any tips or empathy out there. 

 

 

 

 

Robin Van Lant, Sr. Program Manager, Strategy & Performance Management

Key Equipment Finance | 720-304-1060 |  www.keyequipmentfinance.com 

 

This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy. This communication may contain nonpublic personal information about consumers subject to the restrictions of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. You may not directly or indirectly reuse or redisclose such information for any purpose other than to provide the services for which you are receiving the information.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114

If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key, send an email to mailto:DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.

Rayn Darren
 

Hi Robin,

Right off the bat, Aira is your friend! If that isn't an option and you still are able to use your vision, hold control down and roll the wheel on your mouse, it will enlarge the screen and hopefully you'll be able to see the colored cell. Barring that, pressing numpad 5 twice rapidly should tell you the color of the cell as well.

Don't give up hope, there's a solution out there!

I personally have to run in high contrast since the white of the screens trigger migraines, but I'm a website designer and use color all the time. I use Be My Eyes, Aira, or in a pinch a sighted helper to make sure all the colors I've used mesh. I also have a cheat sheet with many of the most popular, I think there's around two hundred  hex codes with descriptive names attached for ease of access. I know this doesn't quite fit your situation, just sharing ways that color can be accessed still. ~smile

HTH,

Sarah

On 2/13/2020 1:24 PM, Van Lant, Robin via Groups.Io wrote:
Hi all,
Using JAWS 2019 with Office 365 and Windows 10.
I seem to be working with more people, including my new manager, who really like color coding in Excel. I totally get it, as I can clearly understand how this visually makes looking at a large spreadsheet file easier, especially on calendar or schedule files. The first project I had for my new manager was to take a color coded calendar she had from last summer and update it for this year, color coding each event based on whether I was able to secure the necessary room reservation. My approach in this case was to hunt for color coded cells, and copy the color into a place off to the side, then clear all the colors and then paste the colors back in to new cells as I made the room reservations. This is just an example.

Hear my question with the lens of someone who is losing more usable vision and adjusting to new leadership in my role. I'm feeling a bit insecure about my abilities and am wondering if there are any tips from others who share spreadsheet files with sighted colleagues on managing colors and/or fancier layouts. I'm intimidated by these large files my new manager is sending. I've typically been the one creating the spreadsheet, so I could lay it out in my own way, but I'm taking on new job duties and inheriting files with lots of data that is just just a simple grid.

I guess I just need to hear of there are any tips or empathy out there.




Robin Van Lant, Sr. Program Manager, Strategy & Performance Management
Key Equipment Finance | 720-304-1060 | www.keyequipmentfinance.com<http://www.keyequipmentfinance.com/>

This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy. This communication may contain nonpublic personal information about consumers subject to the restrictions of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. You may not directly or indirectly reuse or redisclose such information for any purpose other than to provide the services for which you are receiving the information.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114

If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key, send an email to mailto:DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.


Glenn / Lenny
 

Hi Robin,
Does insert + #5 (above the R key) tell you what you need?
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 13, 2020 3:24 PM
Subject: Ideas for handling color coded spreadsheets

Hi all,

Using JAWS 2019 with Office 365 and Windows 10.

I seem to be working with more people, including my new manager, who really like color coding in Excel.  I totally get it, as I can clearly understand how this visually makes looking at a large spreadsheet file easier, especially on calendar or schedule files.  The first project I had for my new manager was to take a color coded calendar she had from last summer and update it for this year, color coding each event based on whether I was able to secure the necessary room reservation.  My approach in this case was to hunt for color coded cells, and copy the color into a place off to the side, then clear all the colors and then paste the colors back in to new cells as I made the room reservations.  This is just an example.

 

Hear my question with the lens of someone who is losing more usable vision and adjusting to new leadership in my role.  I’m feeling a bit insecure about my abilities and am wondering if there are any tips from others who share spreadsheet files with sighted colleagues on managing colors and/or fancier layouts.  I’m intimidated by these large files my new manager is sending.  I’ve typically been the one creating the spreadsheet, so I could lay it out in my own way, but I’m taking on new job duties and inheriting files with lots of data that is just just a simple grid.

 

I guess I just need to hear of there are any tips or empathy out there. 

 

 

 

 

Robin Van Lant, Sr. Program Manager, Strategy & Performance Management

Key Equipment Finance | 720-304-1060 |  www.keyequipmentfinance.com 

 

This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy. This communication may contain nonpublic personal information about consumers subject to the restrictions of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. You may not directly or indirectly reuse or redisclose such information for any purpose other than to provide the services for which you are receiving the information.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114

If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key, send an email to mailto:DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.

David Goldfield
 

Robin,

Please bear in mind that I have no personal experience in dealing with color-coded spreadsheets but I believe I can get you started on finding some possible solutions.

First, Excel's Find command, available via the ctrl-F hotkey, contains an Options button within this dialog. When you activate this button you will be in another  dialog. From this dialog, navigate with the tab key and look for the Format button. Once you activate the Format button you will be in a multi-page dialog box. One of these tabs is a Font tab. Within the font page is a color picker, where you can specify a specific color that you're looking for. Once you perform a color search it is likely that activating the Find Next command, which is probably f3, will search for the next cell containing the color you previously searched for. Along with that you could also use the Speech and Sounds Manager, found within Settings Center, to set JAWS to behave in a certain way when you move to a cell containing a specific color. As an example, it should be possible to tell JAWS to play a certain sound when you move into a cell containing red text or you could have JAWS identify that color by speaking its name when it gains focus. You can even tell JAWS to read text in a specific color in a different voice. For red text you could set JAWS to read it with a lower pitch voice, as an example. The instructions in how to do this would be in the JAWS help system and you have many options from which to choose. I wish that JAWS would have keystrokes where you could bring up a list of cells with specific color attributes, such as all cells with red text. I don't believe that this capability exists with the current set of Excel scripts. I think this is something which FS should add and it might be worth writing to suggestions@... to ask them to add this. It could likely be done with scripting.

I hope this helps.


David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org
On 2/13/2020 4:24 PM, Van Lant, Robin via Groups.Io wrote:

Hi all,

Using JAWS 2019 with Office 365 and Windows 10.

I seem to be working with more people, including my new manager, who really like color coding in Excel.  I totally get it, as I can clearly understand how this visually makes looking at a large spreadsheet file easier, especially on calendar or schedule files.  The first project I had for my new manager was to take a color coded calendar she had from last summer and update it for this year, color coding each event based on whether I was able to secure the necessary room reservation.  My approach in this case was to hunt for color coded cells, and copy the color into a place off to the side, then clear all the colors and then paste the colors back in to new cells as I made the room reservations.  This is just an example.

 

Hear my question with the lens of someone who is losing more usable vision and adjusting to new leadership in my role.  I’m feeling a bit insecure about my abilities and am wondering if there are any tips from others who share spreadsheet files with sighted colleagues on managing colors and/or fancier layouts.  I’m intimidated by these large files my new manager is sending.  I’ve typically been the one creating the spreadsheet, so I could lay it out in my own way, but I’m taking on new job duties and inheriting files with lots of data that is just just a simple grid.

 

I guess I just need to hear of there are any tips or empathy out there. 

 

 

 

 

Robin Van Lant, Sr. Program Manager, Strategy & Performance Management

Key Equipment Finance | 720-304-1060 |  www.keyequipmentfinance.com 

 

This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy. This communication may contain nonpublic personal information about consumers subject to the restrictions of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. You may not directly or indirectly reuse or redisclose such information for any purpose other than to provide the services for which you are receiving the information.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114

If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key, send an email to mailto:DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.

Glenn / Lenny
 

I did not know that Jaws could be set to play a sound file when moving into a cell of a specific color.
If so, one could make up your own WAV files saying things like blue cell or red cell.
 
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 13, 2020 9:02 PM
Subject: Re: Ideas for handling color coded spreadsheets

Robin,

Please bear in mind that I have no personal experience in dealing with color-coded spreadsheets but I believe I can get you started on finding some possible solutions.

First, Excel's Find command, available via the ctrl-F hotkey, contains an Options button within this dialog. When you activate this button you will be in another  dialog. From this dialog, navigate with the tab key and look for the Format button. Once you activate the Format button you will be in a multi-page dialog box. One of these tabs is a Font tab. Within the font page is a color picker, where you can specify a specific color that you're looking for. Once you perform a color search it is likely that activating the Find Next command, which is probably f3, will search for the next cell containing the color you previously searched for. Along with that you could also use the Speech and Sounds Manager, found within Settings Center, to set JAWS to behave in a certain way when you move to a cell containing a specific color. As an example, it should be possible to tell JAWS to play a certain sound when you move into a cell containing red text or you could have JAWS identify that color by speaking its name when it gains focus. You can even tell JAWS to read text in a specific color in a different voice. For red text you could set JAWS to read it with a lower pitch voice, as an example. The instructions in how to do this would be in the JAWS help system and you have many options from which to choose. I wish that JAWS would have keystrokes where you could bring up a list of cells with specific color attributes, such as all cells with red text. I don't believe that this capability exists with the current set of Excel scripts. I think this is something which FS should add and it might be worth writing to suggestions@... to ask them to add this. It could likely be done with scripting.

I hope this helps.


David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org
On 2/13/2020 4:24 PM, Van Lant, Robin via Groups.Io wrote:

Hi all,

Using JAWS 2019 with Office 365 and Windows 10.

I seem to be working with more people, including my new manager, who really like color coding in Excel.  I totally get it, as I can clearly understand how this visually makes looking at a large spreadsheet file easier, especially on calendar or schedule files.  The first project I had for my new manager was to take a color coded calendar she had from last summer and update it for this year, color coding each event based on whether I was able to secure the necessary room reservation.  My approach in this case was to hunt for color coded cells, and copy the color into a place off to the side, then clear all the colors and then paste the colors back in to new cells as I made the room reservations.  This is just an example.

 

Hear my question with the lens of someone who is losing more usable vision and adjusting to new leadership in my role.  I’m feeling a bit insecure about my abilities and am wondering if there are any tips from others who share spreadsheet files with sighted colleagues on managing colors and/or fancier layouts.  I’m intimidated by these large files my new manager is sending.  I’ve typically been the one creating the spreadsheet, so I could lay it out in my own way, but I’m taking on new job duties and inheriting files with lots of data that is just just a simple grid.

 

I guess I just need to hear of there are any tips or empathy out there. 

 

 

 

 

Robin Van Lant, Sr. Program Manager, Strategy & Performance Management

Key Equipment Finance | 720-304-1060 |  www.keyequipmentfinance.com 

 

This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy. This communication may contain nonpublic personal information about consumers subject to the restrictions of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. You may not directly or indirectly reuse or redisclose such information for any purpose other than to provide the services for which you are receiving the information.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114

If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key, send an email to mailto:DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.

David Goldfield
 

Hi. I've never tried using JAWS to behave in a specific way when dealing with colors in Excel but the feature works in other programs and so I don't see any reason why it would not work in Excel when it detects a specific color when you move to a cell containing text in that color. I don't have enough time to actually try it but I may experiment with it this coming weekend.

David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org
On 2/13/2020 10:09 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:

I did not know that Jaws could be set to play a sound file when moving into a cell of a specific color.
If so, one could make up your own WAV files saying things like blue cell or red cell.
 
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, February 13, 2020 9:02 PM
Subject: Re: Ideas for handling color coded spreadsheets

Robin,

Please bear in mind that I have no personal experience in dealing with color-coded spreadsheets but I believe I can get you started on finding some possible solutions.

First, Excel's Find command, available via the ctrl-F hotkey, contains an Options button within this dialog. When you activate this button you will be in another  dialog. From this dialog, navigate with the tab key and look for the Format button. Once you activate the Format button you will be in a multi-page dialog box. One of these tabs is a Font tab. Within the font page is a color picker, where you can specify a specific color that you're looking for. Once you perform a color search it is likely that activating the Find Next command, which is probably f3, will search for the next cell containing the color you previously searched for. Along with that you could also use the Speech and Sounds Manager, found within Settings Center, to set JAWS to behave in a certain way when you move to a cell containing a specific color. As an example, it should be possible to tell JAWS to play a certain sound when you move into a cell containing red text or you could have JAWS identify that color by speaking its name when it gains focus. You can even tell JAWS to read text in a specific color in a different voice. For red text you could set JAWS to read it with a lower pitch voice, as an example. The instructions in how to do this would be in the JAWS help system and you have many options from which to choose. I wish that JAWS would have keystrokes where you could bring up a list of cells with specific color attributes, such as all cells with red text. I don't believe that this capability exists with the current set of Excel scripts. I think this is something which FS should add and it might be worth writing to suggestions@... to ask them to add this. It could likely be done with scripting.

I hope this helps.


David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org
On 2/13/2020 4:24 PM, Van Lant, Robin via Groups.Io wrote:

Hi all,

Using JAWS 2019 with Office 365 and Windows 10.

I seem to be working with more people, including my new manager, who really like color coding in Excel.  I totally get it, as I can clearly understand how this visually makes looking at a large spreadsheet file easier, especially on calendar or schedule files.  The first project I had for my new manager was to take a color coded calendar she had from last summer and update it for this year, color coding each event based on whether I was able to secure the necessary room reservation.  My approach in this case was to hunt for color coded cells, and copy the color into a place off to the side, then clear all the colors and then paste the colors back in to new cells as I made the room reservations.  This is just an example.

 

Hear my question with the lens of someone who is losing more usable vision and adjusting to new leadership in my role.  I’m feeling a bit insecure about my abilities and am wondering if there are any tips from others who share spreadsheet files with sighted colleagues on managing colors and/or fancier layouts.  I’m intimidated by these large files my new manager is sending.  I’ve typically been the one creating the spreadsheet, so I could lay it out in my own way, but I’m taking on new job duties and inheriting files with lots of data that is just just a simple grid.

 

I guess I just need to hear of there are any tips or empathy out there. 

 

 

 

 

Robin Van Lant, Sr. Program Manager, Strategy & Performance Management

Key Equipment Finance | 720-304-1060 |  www.keyequipmentfinance.com 

 

This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy. This communication may contain nonpublic personal information about consumers subject to the restrictions of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. You may not directly or indirectly reuse or redisclose such information for any purpose other than to provide the services for which you are receiving the information.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114

If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key, send an email to mailto:DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.

Judy Redlich
 

Great ideas.  Will have to explore and think through them to maybe implement.   I know how to and use color a lot when making corrections and edits for others to see.   

Judy

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Glenn / Lenny
Sent: Thursday, February 13, 2020 9:09 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Ideas for handling color coded spreadsheets

 

I did not know that Jaws could be set to play a sound file when moving into a cell of a specific color.

If so, one could make up your own WAV files saying things like blue cell or red cell.

 

Glenn

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, February 13, 2020 9:02 PM

Subject: Re: Ideas for handling color coded spreadsheets

 

Robin,

Please bear in mind that I have no personal experience in dealing with color-coded spreadsheets but I believe I can get you started on finding some possible solutions.

First, Excel's Find command, available via the ctrl-F hotkey, contains an Options button within this dialog. When you activate this button you will be in another  dialog. From this dialog, navigate with the tab key and look for the Format button. Once you activate the Format button you will be in a multi-page dialog box. One of these tabs is a Font tab. Within the font page is a color picker, where you can specify a specific color that you're looking for. Once you perform a color search it is likely that activating the Find Next command, which is probably f3, will search for the next cell containing the color you previously searched for. Along with that you could also use the Speech and Sounds Manager, found within Settings Center, to set JAWS to behave in a certain way when you move to a cell containing a specific color. As an example, it should be possible to tell JAWS to play a certain sound when you move into a cell containing red text or you could have JAWS identify that color by speaking its name when it gains focus. You can even tell JAWS to read text in a specific color in a different voice. For red text you could set JAWS to read it with a lower pitch voice, as an example. The instructions in how to do this would be in the JAWS help system and you have many options from which to choose. I wish that JAWS would have keystrokes where you could bring up a list of cells with specific color attributes, such as all cells with red text. I don't believe that this capability exists with the current set of Excel scripts. I think this is something which FS should add and it might be worth writing to suggestions@... to ask them to add this. It could likely be done with scripting.

I hope this helps.

 

David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019
 
WWW.DavidGoldfield.org

On 2/13/2020 4:24 PM, Van Lant, Robin via Groups.Io wrote:

Hi all,

Using JAWS 2019 with Office 365 and Windows 10.

I seem to be working with more people, including my new manager, who really like color coding in Excel.  I totally get it, as I can clearly understand how this visually makes looking at a large spreadsheet file easier, especially on calendar or schedule files.  The first project I had for my new manager was to take a color coded calendar she had from last summer and update it for this year, color coding each event based on whether I was able to secure the necessary room reservation.  My approach in this case was to hunt for color coded cells, and copy the color into a place off to the side, then clear all the colors and then paste the colors back in to new cells as I made the room reservations.  This is just an example.

 

Hear my question with the lens of someone who is losing more usable vision and adjusting to new leadership in my role.  I’m feeling a bit insecure about my abilities and am wondering if there are any tips from others who share spreadsheet files with sighted colleagues on managing colors and/or fancier layouts.  I’m intimidated by these large files my new manager is sending.  I’ve typically been the one creating the spreadsheet, so I could lay it out in my own way, but I’m taking on new job duties and inheriting files with lots of data that is just just a simple grid.

 

I guess I just need to hear of there are any tips or empathy out there. 

 

 

 

 

Robin Van Lant, Sr. Program Manager, Strategy & Performance Management

Key Equipment Finance | 720-304-1060 |  www.keyequipmentfinance.com 

 

This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy. This communication may contain nonpublic personal information about consumers subject to the restrictions of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. You may not directly or indirectly reuse or redisclose such information for any purpose other than to provide the services for which you are receiving the information.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114

If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key, send an email to mailto:DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.

Cohn, Jonathan
 

Hello,
Since colors are being based on status, I think it would be a good idea to add a column for this status and then have an excel color filter that adjusts the color based on this field. This could make it easier for you to filter, and also provides support for color blind individuals. The column could be hidden by default if it bothers the aesthetics of the owner. 
I was also wondering if the JAWS skim reading utility works within Excel, while it is generally used to search for paragraphs with a specific word and then read the beginning of the paragraph or similar type functions, I am fairly confident it has a way to detect colors also. I have only tried using it on web sites and word processing documents.
Great question:
Jonathan  

David Goldfield
 

Jonathan, you raise a valid concern regarding using color coding to convey status. This not only presents challenges to screen reader users but it's totally unhelpful for someone who may not require a screen reader or enlarger but who may be color-blind. In this case, placing text in a certain color to convey status is useless and should be avoided.

David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org
On 2/14/2020 12:54 PM, Cohn, Jonathan wrote:

Hello,
Since colors are being based on status, I think it would be a good idea to add a column for this status and then have an excel color filter that adjusts the color based on this field. This could make it easier for you to filter, and also provides support for color blind individuals. The column could be hidden by default if it bothers the aesthetics of the owner. 
I was also wondering if the JAWS skim reading utility works within Excel, while it is generally used to search for paragraphs with a specific word and then read the beginning of the paragraph or similar type functions, I am fairly confident it has a way to detect colors also. I have only tried using it on web sites and word processing documents.
Great question:
Jonathan  

Mark Fisher
 

Hi 
 
Another option depending on how the data has been layed out would be to also use the Filter option in excel where you can filter by colour. Wouldn't always work but might quikcly tell you all the colours which exists in a particular column of data. 
Otherwise I agree with the sounds scheme option - just might take some time to set it up. 

Mark 

Van Lant, Robin
 

Thanks for the ideas.  I’m going to play with using the Find Command, Filtering and other suggestions.   I am new to using the JAWS speech Schemes and see how this works well in Word, but I’m not getting them to work in Excel.  That might have been really helpful and maybe I’ll find a way to get it to work.

 

I’ll type up some questions and also call Microsoft Accessibility to see if they have any ideas.  It doesn’t’ help that there are just so many colors available in Office products.  The file I got from a coworker last week is using a background color called Khaki1.  She suggested that I could update the cells I edited, but I’m not even sure how to find this color when I need to fill appropriate cells.  I think I’ll ask some of the executive assistants around here for tips.  Even without the blindness aspect, maybe I can gain some best practices and tricks that might make my work easier when I need to add colors to a file.

 

Robin

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Goldfield
Sent: Thursday, February 13, 2020 8:02 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Ideas for handling color coded spreadsheets

 

Robin,

Please bear in mind that I have no personal experience in dealing with color-coded spreadsheets but I believe I can get you started on finding some possible solutions.

First, Excel's Find command, available via the ctrl-F hotkey, contains an Options button within this dialog. When you activate this button you will be in another  dialog. From this dialog, navigate with the tab key and look for the Format button. Once you activate the Format button you will be in a multi-page dialog box. One of these tabs is a Font tab. Within the font page is a color picker, where you can specify a specific color that you're looking for. Once you perform a color search it is likely that activating the Find Next command, which is probably f3, will search for the next cell containing the color you previously searched for. Along with that you could also use the Speech and Sounds Manager, found within Settings Center, to set JAWS to behave in a certain way when you move to a cell containing a specific color. As an example, it should be possible to tell JAWS to play a certain sound when you move into a cell containing red text or you could have JAWS identify that color by speaking its name when it gains focus. You can even tell JAWS to read text in a specific color in a different voice. For red text you could set JAWS to read it with a lower pitch voice, as an example. The instructions in how to do this would be in the JAWS help system and you have many options from which to choose. I wish that JAWS would have keystrokes where you could bring up a list of cells with specific color attributes, such as all cells with red text. I don't believe that this capability exists with the current set of Excel scripts. I think this is something which FS should add and it might be worth writing to suggestions@... to ask them to add this. It could likely be done with scripting.

I hope this helps.

 

David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019
 
WWW.DavidGoldfield.org

On 2/13/2020 4:24 PM, Van Lant, Robin via Groups.Io wrote:

Hi all,

Using JAWS 2019 with Office 365 and Windows 10.

I seem to be working with more people, including my new manager, who really like color coding in Excel.  I totally get it, as I can clearly understand how this visually makes looking at a large spreadsheet file easier, especially on calendar or schedule files.  The first project I had for my new manager was to take a color coded calendar she had from last summer and update it for this year, color coding each event based on whether I was able to secure the necessary room reservation.  My approach in this case was to hunt for color coded cells, and copy the color into a place off to the side, then clear all the colors and then paste the colors back in to new cells as I made the room reservations.  This is just an example.

 

Hear my question with the lens of someone who is losing more usable vision and adjusting to new leadership in my role.  I’m feeling a bit insecure about my abilities and am wondering if there are any tips from others who share spreadsheet files with sighted colleagues on managing colors and/or fancier layouts.  I’m intimidated by these large files my new manager is sending.  I’ve typically been the one creating the spreadsheet, so I could lay it out in my own way, but I’m taking on new job duties and inheriting files with lots of data that is just just a simple grid.

 

I guess I just need to hear of there are any tips or empathy out there. 

 

 

 

 

Robin Van Lant, Sr. Program Manager, Strategy & Performance Management

Key Equipment Finance | 720-304-1060 |  www.keyequipmentfinance.com 

 

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Ann Byrne
 

Be aware that when you change a color in Office, the color JAWS reports when you are moving through the colors dialog is *not what it reports when the color is applied. I chose orange from the color grid, and when it was in a cell JAWS called it "antique white". "Dark Blue" became "slate grey".

Van Lant, Robin
 

Ann,
Wow, that is crazy. It seems like Office used to report colors in plain names, but now the option in the ribbon will often read the hex code number, which is not really helpful to me. I found that when I went to edit the file that was reporting Khaki1 as the cell color, I was later hearing cells as Grey 50. So confusing. Part of for me is that I work in high contrast and I wonder if that messes up the color reporting for JAWS. I cannot see that a cell is colored, but JAWS will report a background color, but maybe it's not reporting the correct one. Ugh.

Robin

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ann Byrne
Sent: Monday, February 17, 2020 3:28 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Ideas for handling color coded spreadsheets

Be aware that when you change a color in Office, the color JAWS reports when you are moving through the colors dialog is *not what it reports when the color is applied. I chose orange from the color grid, and when it was in a cell JAWS called it "antique white". "Dark Blue" became "slate grey".




This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy. This communication may contain nonpublic personal information about consumers subject to the restrictions of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. You may not directly or indirectly reuse or redisclose such information for any purpose other than to provide the services for which you are receiving the information.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114

If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key, send an email to mailto:DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.