Topics

moderated Converting/Saving audio media

Justin Mcdevitt
 

Hello,

 

I am currently going through a fair number of cassette tapes, containing spoken conversations, as well as  audio CDS many of them containing various XM radio music programs and specials.

Using JAWS, what programs are available where I could insert the CD in my PC and convert them to MP3 files, where I can store multiple CDS on one single MP3 disc.

Related to this issue, I have an older CD player though I am not sure if it has the capacity to create MP3 files. I would guess there is a program that can help make this happen. In truth, I really have not converted any media to an MP3 format, so would appreciate some direction/assistance from those of you who are familiar with this process.

Regarding the cassette tapes, I have an old cassette deck, which I could use to transfer specific content onto an MP3 disc. Again, assistance with regard to this process is really appreciated.

I would really like to preserve some of this content, both spoken word and audio as it is a part of my personal history.

 

Best to all, Justin  

 

For media already on CD, and that was not commercially produced, you need to check what format is actually used on the CD itself.  A very great many will have used MP3 to begin with.

VLC is good for saving out existing audio files from one format to another.  I haven't done that in a very, very long while, as I've been using MP3 exclusively for myself for years now.

As far as converting audio tape to MP3, when I've needed to do that I've used Audacity.  I simply play the tape while Audacity "listens and records" then, once it's done, save the Audacity project out as an MP3 file.  At one time you had to manually add the LAME libraries to Audacity in order to do this, but I believe they may "come with" these days.  Someone who uses Audacity much more frequently than I do, and who's installed a recent version, can speak to that.

I have a cassette tape of my grandfather talking about the family history that I digitized using the previously mentioned technique.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Tolerance is the positive and cordial effort to understand another's beliefs, practices, and habits without necessarily sharing or accepting them.

        ~ Joshua Liebman

Richard Turner
 

I find that GoldWave does a very good job.

It is free for the quite a few uses, then it asks you to Pay $50 for unlimited use.

I’ve used it since its early beginnings and find it to be my most versatile audio recording/converting program.

www.goldwave.com

 

You can also use Windows Media player, though it is very tricky since the various dialogs are not screen reader friendly.

 

As for burning an MP3 disc when you have the files, AnyBurn is free and easy to use for burning data discs, which is what an MP3 disc is, or burning regular 80 minutes CD audio that can play in any CD player.

http://www.anyburn.com/

 

HTH,

 

Richard

"There's a nap for that."

- an anonymous cat in a window in Portland, Oregon.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Justin Mcdevitt
Sent: Monday, March 23, 2020 6:13 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Converting/Saving audio media

 

Hello,

 

I am currently going through a fair number of cassette tapes, containing spoken conversations, as well as  audio CDS many of them containing various XM radio music programs and specials.

Using JAWS, what programs are available where I could insert the CD in my PC and convert them to MP3 files, where I can store multiple CDS on one single MP3 disc.

Related to this issue, I have an older CD player though I am not sure if it has the capacity to create MP3 files. I would guess there is a program that can help make this happen. In truth, I really have not converted any media to an MP3 format, so would appreciate some direction/assistance from those of you who are familiar with this process.

Regarding the cassette tapes, I have an old cassette deck, which I could use to transfer specific content onto an MP3 disc. Again, assistance with regard to this process is really appreciated.

I would really like to preserve some of this content, both spoken word and audio as it is a part of my personal history.

 

Best to all, Justin  

Nermin
 

Hi, Justin,
 
adding to Brian’s post, if the CDs are real audio CDs, so-called CD ripping programmes will do what you want, making the process seamless and fast.
One example of such software is CDex, but I believe later versions come with a lot of junkware. Windows Media Player can also rip CDs.
 
As far as tapes go, Audacity may work. I’d recommend installing the latest version, though. I think you still need to download the MP3 encoder separately if you want MP3 files. this is a licensing issue since the Lame encoder is proprietary software and Audacity is an open source project.
 
There’s also a programme called Goldwave, which is pretty accessible.
Goldwave has the benefit of being a decent audio editor with some effects that may help you with audio restauration. You will sometimes have pretty heavy audio artefacts, depending on the age and recorder model used at the time of recording.
Audacity also has restauration plugins, but I don’t know how accessible those are.
 
Lastly, there’s Magics Sound Forge, but that may be a bit over the top for what you want. It’s quite costly, but a very powerful audio studio.
 
Regards,
Nermin

 

I don't use Goldwave, but "that other screen reader" has a Goldwave add-on.  I have no idea whether scripts for JAWS exist for Goldwave or not.

I decided to do a quick check on Audacity with regard to MP3:  "Audacity 2.3.2 replaces all previous versions for Windows, macOS and Linux.  Improvements: Audacity now includes the LAME mp3 encoder. Previously, due to now expired patents, you had to download it separately."

Nermin is absolutely correct that Windows Media Player can rip commercially produced CDs, which employ cda audio "under the hood," to MP3.  That's how I do it.  There are lots of other options as well, but WMP is probably the easiest.

I also love and recommend Anyburn for creating CDs.  That being said, it is far more important that you keep backups of this newly digitized material.  If you do not currently own an external USB backup drive, and are not taking routine full system image backups of your system, along with separate user data backups, now would be the time to institute that practice.  Burnable optical media is notorious for being unstable over long periods of time, not to mention that optical drives are rapidly becoming a thing of the past.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Tolerance is the positive and cordial effort to understand another's beliefs, practices, and habits without necessarily sharing or accepting them.

        ~ Joshua Liebman

Richard Turner
 

There are Jaws scripts for GoldWave.

 

However, I did the bulk of my CD ripping with iTunes and backed all that up on an external drive.

 

But if you are not an iTunes user, then any of those other programs will work fine.

 

We decided we didn’t need 700 physical CD’s taking up space, because, as my wife says, “There are no luggage racks on a hearse.”

 

 

 

 

Richard

"There's a nap for that." - an anonymous cat in a window in Portland, Oregon.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, March 23, 2020 7:52 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Converting/Saving audio media

 

I don't use Goldwave, but "that other screen reader" has a Goldwave add-on.  I have no idea whether scripts for JAWS exist for Goldwave or not.

I decided to do a quick check on Audacity with regard to MP3:  "Audacity 2.3.2 replaces all previous versions for Windows, macOS and Linux.  Improvements: Audacity now includes the LAME mp3 encoder. Previously, due to now expired patents, you had to download it separately."

Nermin is absolutely correct that Windows Media Player can rip commercially produced CDs, which employ cda audio "under the hood," to MP3.  That's how I do it.  There are lots of other options as well, but WMP is probably the easiest.

I also love and recommend Anyburn for creating CDs.  That being said, it is far more important that you keep backups of this newly digitized material.  If you do not currently own an external USB backup drive, and are not taking routine full system image backups of your system, along with separate user data backups, now would be the time to institute that practice.  Burnable optical media is notorious for being unstable over long periods of time, not to mention that optical drives are rapidly becoming a thing of the past.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Tolerance is the positive and cordial effort to understand another's beliefs, practices, and habits without necessarily sharing or accepting them.

        ~ Joshua Liebman

R&J
 

I have used ExpressRip from NCH Audio for many years and it is extremely accessible and user friendly.  www.nch.com.au/rip/index.html

Ron

Mich Verrier
 

Cd ex works well for this. From Mich.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Justin Mcdevitt
Sent: March 23, 2020 9:13 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Converting/Saving audio media

 

Hello,

 

I am currently going through a fair number of cassette tapes, containing spoken conversations, as well as  audio CDS many of them containing various XM radio music programs and specials.

Using JAWS, what programs are available where I could insert the CD in my PC and convert them to MP3 files, where I can store multiple CDS on one single MP3 disc.

Related to this issue, I have an older CD player though I am not sure if it has the capacity to create MP3 files. I would guess there is a program that can help make this happen. In truth, I really have not converted any media to an MP3 format, so would appreciate some direction/assistance from those of you who are familiar with this process.

Regarding the cassette tapes, I have an old cassette deck, which I could use to transfer specific content onto an MP3 disc. Again, assistance with regard to this process is really appreciated.

I would really like to preserve some of this content, both spoken word and audio as it is a part of my personal history.

 

Best to all, Justin  

Mario
 

I heard there is some "junk" that gets installed if the installer is
used. true?

the portable version might be a better choice.
https://cdex.mu/download

-------- Original Message --------
From: Mich Verrier [mailto:michv@...]
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>, <jfw@groups.io>
Date: Monday, March 23, 2020, 9:50 AM
Subject: Converting/Saving audio media
Cd ex works well for this. From Mich.

*From:*main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Justin
Mcdevitt
*Sent:* March 23, 2020 9:13 AM
*To:* jfw@groups.io
*Subject:* Converting/Saving audio media

Hello,

I am currently going through a fair number of cassette tapes, containing
spoken conversations, as well as  audio CDS many of them containing
various XM radio music programs and specials.

Using JAWS, what programs are available where I could insert the CD in
my PC and convert them to MP3 files, where I can store multiple CDS on
one single MP3 disc.

Related to this issue, I have an older CD player though I am not sure if
it has the capacity to create MP3 files. I would guess there is a
program that can help make this happen. In truth, I really have not
converted any media to an MP3 format, so would appreciate some
direction/assistance from those of you who are familiar with this process.

Regarding the cassette tapes, I have an old cassette deck, which I could
use to transfer specific content onto an MP3 disc. Again, assistance
with regard to this process is really appreciated.

I would really like to preserve some of this content, both spoken word
and audio as it is a part of my personal history.

Best to all, Justin