moderated Blocking mouse buttons:


Angel
 

I will ask a direct question, then.  I have a single computer in my home.  Do you have parental controls installed on your computers; for the occasions your grand children visit?  If not, how do you prevent them from using your computers to visit unwanted sites?  Or from accessing social media sites on your computers.  I just thought the easiest way to prevent such unfortunate behaviors from occurring was to be able to prevent the grand children from employing the use of the mouse.  While not inconveniencing  a keyboard user to terribly much.  I don’t want to inconvenience myself to much just to prevent the undesired use of occasional users.   

 

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Glenn / Lenny
 


Angel,
I would create a user for when they want to use the computer, you could create one for each one, and don't give it administrator permissions.
This way you can check on the history of each user as well.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
From: Angel
Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2022 5:12 PM
Subject: Blocking mouse buttons:

I will ask a direct question, then.  I have a single computer in my home.  Do you have parental controls installed on your computers; for the occasions your grand children visit?  If not, how do you prevent them from using your computers to visit unwanted sites?  Or from accessing social media sites on your computers.  I just thought the easiest way to prevent such unfortunate behaviors from occurring was to be able to prevent the grand children from employing the use of the mouse.  While not inconveniencing  a keyboard user to terribly much.  I don’t want to inconvenience myself to much just to prevent the undesired use of occasional users.   

 

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Gene Warner
 

If I am going to have guests that I don't want using my computer, I put a password on it and keep it locked or turned off unless I am using it. After they leave I remove the password.

Gene...

On 8/7/2022 6:12 PM, Angel wrote:
I will ask a direct question, then.  I have a single computer in my home.  Do you have parental controls installed on your computers; for the occasions your grand children visit?  If not, how do you prevent them from using your computers to visit unwanted sites?  Or from accessing social media sites on your computers.  I just thought the easiest way to prevent such unfortunate behaviors from occurring was to be able to prevent the grand children from employing the use of the mouse.  While not inconveniencing  a keyboard user to terribly much.  I don’t want to inconvenience myself to much just to prevent the undesired use of occasional users.
Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows
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Truly, the easiest way is to forbid the use of your computer and enforce it.

Kids are both very clever and very determined, not to mention what non-assistive-technology users can screw up on a machine of an AT user are just too many to mention.

I have a lot of clients where not only may their kids, grandkids, etc., not use their computers but their respective spouses are forbidden as well.  It can, and generally does, save a lot of heartache.

If you absolutely can't go that route, then I would create a separate Windows 10 user account, with only standard permissions (not admin), and turn on parental controls for it and make sure that's the account that's logged on prior to the kids sitting down at the machine.  But, personally, I believe the "keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Glenn / Lenny
 

Another trick, is just turn on keyboard help, insert + #1.
If they aren't a screenreader user, they probably won't figure out how to
toggle it off.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene Warner" <genewarner3@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2022 5:19 PM
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:


If I am going to have guests that I don't want using my computer, I put
a password on it and keep it locked or turned off unless I am using it.
After they leave I remove the password.

Gene...


On 8/7/2022 6:12 PM, Angel wrote:
I will ask a direct question, then. I have a single computer in my
home. Do you have parental controls installed on your computers; for
the occasions your grand children visit? If not, how do you prevent
them from using your computers to visit unwanted sites? Or from
accessing social media sites on your computers. I just thought the
easiest way to prevent such unfortunate behaviors from occurring was to
be able to prevent the grand children from employing the use of the
mouse. While not inconveniencing a keyboard user to terribly much. I
don’t want to inconvenience myself to much just to prevent the undesired
use of occasional users.

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows



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On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 06:22 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:
Another trick, is just turn on keyboard help, insert + #1.
-
That is an insanely clever trick.  My hat's off to you!

It also has the added advantage that if you forbade the use of your computer, it's instantly obvious if someone's trying to use it.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Glenn / Lenny
 


Numerous times, before Jaws included the screen refresh audio feature, I would have to try to get audio back on a client's computer, because rather than unloading the screenreader, a family member just  muted the sound and didn't turn it on when they were done.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2022 5:20 PM
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

Truly, the easiest way is to forbid the use of your computer and enforce it.

Kids are both very clever and very determined, not to mention what non-assistive-technology users can screw up on a machine of an AT user are just too many to mention.

I have a lot of clients where not only may their kids, grandkids, etc., not use their computers but their respective spouses are forbidden as well.  It can, and generally does, save a lot of heartache.

If you absolutely can't go that route, then I would create a separate Windows 10 user account, with only standard permissions (not admin), and turn on parental controls for it and make sure that's the account that's logged on prior to the kids sitting down at the machine.  But, personally, I believe the "keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


David Diamond
 

"keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.  Perhaps however, when I was growing up and used a magnification device, my family would literally stand about 10 feet behind me and read what I was looking at.  Going as far as to make comments. One blind parent, his children would constantly mute the sound because they did not know how to turn jaws off.   

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: August 7, 2022 3:20 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

 

Truly, the easiest way is to forbid the use of your computer and enforce it.

Kids are both very clever and very determined, not to mention what non-assistive-technology users can screw up on a machine of an AT user are just too many to mention.

I have a lot of clients where not only may their kids, grandkids, etc., not use their computers but their respective spouses are forbidden as well.  It can, and generally does, save a lot of heartache.

If you absolutely can't go that route, then I would create a separate Windows 10 user account, with only standard permissions (not admin), and turn on parental controls for it and make sure that's the account that's logged on prior to the kids sitting down at the machine.  But, personally, I believe the "keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Sharon S
 

Hi, I had a student in one of my high school classes that use to sit behind me and loudly point out my spelling mistakes to all the class. At the time I didn’t have an option of a screen shade and I was using a magnifier rather then a screen reader. Since I didn’t need to read what I was typing at the time I turned my font into one that displayed only shapes. However, when the teacher next came by they asked me to go back to normal font so they could see what I was doing. The screen was one that you couldn’t read easily from the side but since the student was sitting directly behind me she had no issues seeing the screen. I think in the end I just lowered the screen a bit so it couldn’t be easily seen by the other student. I was taught touch typing at an early age so most of the time I didn’t need to see what I was typing so I didn’t need to see the screen. At least this was until I needed to spell check.

 

From Shaz.

Canberra, Australia.

 

I don’t suffer from insanity; I enjoy every minute.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Diamond
Sent: Monday, 8 August 2022 11:20 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

 

"keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.  Perhaps however, when I was growing up and used a magnification device, my family would literally stand about 10 feet behind me and read what I was looking at.  Going as far as to make comments. One blind parent, his children would constantly mute the sound because they did not know how to turn jaws off.   

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: August 7, 2022 3:20 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

 

Truly, the easiest way is to forbid the use of your computer and enforce it.

Kids are both very clever and very determined, not to mention what non-assistive-technology users can screw up on a machine of an AT user are just too many to mention.

I have a lot of clients where not only may their kids, grandkids, etc., not use their computers but their respective spouses are forbidden as well.  It can, and generally does, save a lot of heartache.

If you absolutely can't go that route, then I would create a separate Windows 10 user account, with only standard permissions (not admin), and turn on parental controls for it and make sure that's the account that's logged on prior to the kids sitting down at the machine.  But, personally, I believe the "keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Glenn / Lenny
 


The teacher should have reprimanded the other student.
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Sharon S
Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2022 11:55 PM
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

Hi, I had a student in one of my high school classes that use to sit behind me and loudly point out my spelling mistakes to all the class. At the time I didn’t have an option of a screen shade and I was using a magnifier rather then a screen reader. Since I didn’t need to read what I was typing at the time I turned my font into one that displayed only shapes. However, when the teacher next came by they asked me to go back to normal font so they could see what I was doing. The screen was one that you couldn’t read easily from the side but since the student was sitting directly behind me she had no issues seeing the screen. I think in the end I just lowered the screen a bit so it couldn’t be easily seen by the other student. I was taught touch typing at an early age so most of the time I didn’t need to see what I was typing so I didn’t need to see the screen. At least this was until I needed to spell check.

 

From Shaz.

Canberra, Australia.

 

I don’t suffer from insanity; I enjoy every minute.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Diamond
Sent: Monday, 8 August 2022 11:20 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

 

"keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.  Perhaps however, when I was growing up and used a magnification device, my family would literally stand about 10 feet behind me and read what I was looking at.  Going as far as to make comments. One blind parent, his children would constantly mute the sound because they did not know how to turn jaws off.   

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: August 7, 2022 3:20 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

 

Truly, the easiest way is to forbid the use of your computer and enforce it.

Kids are both very clever and very determined, not to mention what non-assistive-technology users can screw up on a machine of an AT user are just too many to mention.

I have a lot of clients where not only may their kids, grandkids, etc., not use their computers but their respective spouses are forbidden as well.  It can, and generally does, save a lot of heartache.

If you absolutely can't go that route, then I would create a separate Windows 10 user account, with only standard permissions (not admin), and turn on parental controls for it and make sure that's the account that's logged on prior to the kids sitting down at the machine.  But, personally, I believe the "keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Glenn / Lenny
 


Another idea that could have been employed to this situation, would be to tape just the top edge of a sheet of paper over the screen, and if the teacher need to check the student's work, the teacher could easily flip the paper up to look at the screen.
So this could be used if Jaws screen shade is not available.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2022 8:55 AM
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

The teacher should have reprimanded the other student.
 
----- Original Message -----
From: Sharon S
Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2022 11:55 PM
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

Hi, I had a student in one of my high school classes that use to sit behind me and loudly point out my spelling mistakes to all the class. At the time I didn’t have an option of a screen shade and I was using a magnifier rather then a screen reader. Since I didn’t need to read what I was typing at the time I turned my font into one that displayed only shapes. However, when the teacher next came by they asked me to go back to normal font so they could see what I was doing. The screen was one that you couldn’t read easily from the side but since the student was sitting directly behind me she had no issues seeing the screen. I think in the end I just lowered the screen a bit so it couldn’t be easily seen by the other student. I was taught touch typing at an early age so most of the time I didn’t need to see what I was typing so I didn’t need to see the screen. At least this was until I needed to spell check.

 

From Shaz.

Canberra, Australia.

 

I don’t suffer from insanity; I enjoy every minute.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Diamond
Sent: Monday, 8 August 2022 11:20 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

 

"keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.  Perhaps however, when I was growing up and used a magnification device, my family would literally stand about 10 feet behind me and read what I was looking at.  Going as far as to make comments. One blind parent, his children would constantly mute the sound because they did not know how to turn jaws off.   

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: August 7, 2022 3:20 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

 

Truly, the easiest way is to forbid the use of your computer and enforce it.

Kids are both very clever and very determined, not to mention what non-assistive-technology users can screw up on a machine of an AT user are just too many to mention.

I have a lot of clients where not only may their kids, grandkids, etc., not use their computers but their respective spouses are forbidden as well.  It can, and generally does, save a lot of heartache.

If you absolutely can't go that route, then I would create a separate Windows 10 user account, with only standard permissions (not admin), and turn on parental controls for it and make sure that's the account that's logged on prior to the kids sitting down at the machine.  But, personally, I believe the "keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Glenn / Lenny
 


Even better, rather than just a piece of paper, you can print a picture of you sticking out your tongue and it would be like a pre-tech screensaver.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2022 9:17 AM
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

Another idea that could have been employed to this situation, would be to tape just the top edge of a sheet of paper over the screen, and if the teacher need to check the student's work, the teacher could easily flip the paper up to look at the screen.
So this could be used if Jaws screen shade is not available.
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2022 8:55 AM
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

The teacher should have reprimanded the other student.
 
----- Original Message -----
From: Sharon S
Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2022 11:55 PM
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

Hi, I had a student in one of my high school classes that use to sit behind me and loudly point out my spelling mistakes to all the class. At the time I didn’t have an option of a screen shade and I was using a magnifier rather then a screen reader. Since I didn’t need to read what I was typing at the time I turned my font into one that displayed only shapes. However, when the teacher next came by they asked me to go back to normal font so they could see what I was doing. The screen was one that you couldn’t read easily from the side but since the student was sitting directly behind me she had no issues seeing the screen. I think in the end I just lowered the screen a bit so it couldn’t be easily seen by the other student. I was taught touch typing at an early age so most of the time I didn’t need to see what I was typing so I didn’t need to see the screen. At least this was until I needed to spell check.

 

From Shaz.

Canberra, Australia.

 

I don’t suffer from insanity; I enjoy every minute.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Diamond
Sent: Monday, 8 August 2022 11:20 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

 

"keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.  Perhaps however, when I was growing up and used a magnification device, my family would literally stand about 10 feet behind me and read what I was looking at.  Going as far as to make comments. One blind parent, his children would constantly mute the sound because they did not know how to turn jaws off.   

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: August 7, 2022 3:20 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Blocking mouse buttons:

 

Truly, the easiest way is to forbid the use of your computer and enforce it.

Kids are both very clever and very determined, not to mention what non-assistive-technology users can screw up on a machine of an AT user are just too many to mention.

I have a lot of clients where not only may their kids, grandkids, etc., not use their computers but their respective spouses are forbidden as well.  It can, and generally does, save a lot of heartache.

If you absolutely can't go that route, then I would create a separate Windows 10 user account, with only standard permissions (not admin), and turn on parental controls for it and make sure that's the account that's logged on prior to the kids sitting down at the machine.  But, personally, I believe the "keep yer mitts off" approach is both easier and safer.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall