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moderated accessibility and on line courses


Cynthia Bruce
 

Hi All,

 

In my current university context, I am teaching a course developed by a company that is external to the university. I keep running into things that are not easily accessible, and they have told me they are only testing accessibility with NVDA. So, my question, is it likely that I will find incompatibility with JAWS when they only test with NVDA?

 

Thanks for any info – I want to be able to give them some feedback.

 

Cynthia


Cohn, Jonathan
 

OFten times, people try to develop accessibility without understanding how accessibility  tools are used by a disabled person. Generally, an accessible web site wil work with NVDA, JAWS and VoiceOver. Sometimes developers think that the only way blind users navigate is with the tab key.  Other times they don’t understand browse mode vs forms mode.
Is any of their site visible to non-paying client?  

On Oct 27, 2020, at 4:49 PM, Cynthia Bruce <cynthia.bruce@...> wrote:

Hi All,
 
In my current university context, I am teaching a course developed by a company that is external to the university. I keep running into things that are not easily accessible, and they have told me they are only testing accessibility with NVDA. So, my question, is it likely that I will find incompatibility with JAWS when they only test with NVDA?
 
Thanks for any info – I want to be able to give them some feedback.
 
Cynthia


David Goldfield <david.goldfield@...>
 

This is a fair question. While there are occasionally some differences in the way that JAWS and NVDA conveys information about what's on a Web page it's reasonably safe to say that pages which pass a manual audit with NVDA would likely do so with JAWS. If anything, if they only tested with JAWS and not NVDA I'd actually be a bit more concerned due to the fact that JAWS has a tendency to guess what should be read with forms that may not properly conform to current standards. This is actually great for the user but can give false positives to the one doing the testing. As long as their code is properly written and marked up you should be OK.



David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
www.DavidGoldfield.org
On 10/27/2020 4:49 PM, Cynthia Bruce wrote:

Hi All,

 

In my current university context, I am teaching a course developed by a company that is external to the university. I keep running into things that are not easily accessible, and they have told me they are only testing accessibility with NVDA. So, my question, is it likely that I will find incompatibility with JAWS when they only test with NVDA?

 

Thanks for any info – I want to be able to give them some feedback.

 

Cynthia


Cynthia Bruce
 

I think what I’m finding is all of the ways I can navigate quickly are not always available when they don’t test with jaws.


On Oct 27, 2020, at 5:58 PM, David Goldfield <david.goldfield@...> wrote:



This is a fair question. While there are occasionally some differences in the way that JAWS and NVDA conveys information about what's on a Web page it's reasonably safe to say that pages which pass a manual audit with NVDA would likely do so with JAWS. If anything, if they only tested with JAWS and not NVDA I'd actually be a bit more concerned due to the fact that JAWS has a tendency to guess what should be read with forms that may not properly conform to current standards. This is actually great for the user but can give false positives to the one doing the testing. As long as their code is properly written and marked up you should be OK.



David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
www.DavidGoldfield.org
On 10/27/2020 4:49 PM, Cynthia Bruce wrote:

Hi All,

 

In my current university context, I am teaching a course developed by a company that is external to the university. I keep running into things that are not easily accessible, and they have told me they are only testing accessibility with NVDA. So, my question, is it likely that I will find incompatibility with JAWS when they only test with NVDA?

 

Thanks for any info – I want to be able to give them some feedback.

 

Cynthia


mike mcglashon
 

Ms cynthia:

 

Couldn’t you pul rank,

You are a professor, (I am teahing…);

This means,

That you could in fact,

Say that I I want to do it all via email;

And not even use the suspect system?

 

 

Please advise as you like.

 

Mike M.

 

Mike mcglashon

Email: Michael.mcglashon@...

Ph: 618 783 9331

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Cynthia Bruce
Sent: Tuesday, October 27, 2020 4:49 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: accessibility and on line courses

 

Hi All,

 

In my current university context, I am teaching a course developed by a company that is external to the university. I keep running into things that are not easily accessible, and they have told me they are only testing accessibility with NVDA. So, my question, is it likely that I will find incompatibility with JAWS when they only test with NVDA?

 

Thanks for any info – I want to be able to give them some feedback.

 

Cynthia


Cohn, Jonathan
 

Hello,
Both NVDA and JAWS have single key navigation and unless you are using flowto or main region quick nav then NVDA has pretty much the same quick navigation keys. I don’t believe however that web developers who are told to turn on a screen reader and see if everything talks would know  these commands unless they review one of the tutorials on an accessibility web site or employ disabled people.
Most training courses   I have experienced have the other difficulty that they like to use animations on screen to demonstrate how to do something. Generally, these animations show up to screen readers as either a large graphic or a flash movie. It is possible to add accessibile elements that mirror the animated information, but this is generally only done when the required by the contract.
Best Wishes,
Jonathan Cohn
 

On Oct 27, 2020, at 5:23 PM, Cynthia Bruce <cynthia.bruce@...> wrote:

I think what I’m finding is all of the ways I can navigate quickly are not always available when they don’t test with jaws.


On Oct 27, 2020, at 5:58 PM, David Goldfield <david.goldfield@...> wrote:



This is a fair question. While there are occasionally some differences in the way that JAWS and NVDA conveys information about what's on a Web page it's reasonably safe to say that pages which pass a manual audit with NVDA would likely do so with JAWS. If anything, if they only tested with JAWS and not NVDA I'd actually be a bit more concerned due to the fact that JAWS has a tendency to guess what should be read with forms that may not properly conform to current standards. This is actually great for the user but can give false positives to the one doing the testing. As long as their code is properly written and marked up you should be OK.



David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
www.DavidGoldfield.org
On 10/27/2020 4:49 PM, Cynthia Bruce wrote:

Hi All,

 

In my current university context, I am teaching a course developed by a company that is external to the university. I keep running into things that are not easily accessible, and they have told me they are only testing accessibility with NVDA. So, my question, is it likely that I will find incompatibility with JAWS when they only test with NVDA?

 

Thanks for any info – I want to be able to give them some feedback.

 

Cynthia



John Covici
 

I have seen this, try doing a lot of things with linode.com, they say
they have tested with nvda, but Jaws does not like the site at all.

On Tue, 27 Oct 2020 17:23:20 -0400,
Cynthia Bruce wrote:

[1 <text/plain; utf-8 (quoted-printable)>]
I think what I’m finding is all of the ways I can navigate quickly are not always available when they don’t test with jaws.
On Oct 27, 2020, at 5:58 PM, David Goldfield <david.goldfield@outlook.com> wrote:


This is a fair question. While there are occasionally some differences in the way that JAWS and NVDA conveys information about what's on a Web page it's reasonably safe to say that pages which pass a manual audit with NVDA would likely do so with JAWS. If anything, if they only tested with JAWS and not NVDA I'd actually be a bit more concerned due to the fact that JAWS has a tendency to guess what should be read with forms that may not properly conform to current standards. This is actually great for the user but can give false positives to the one doing the testing. As long as their code is properly written and marked up you should be OK.





David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
www.DavidGoldfield.org
On 10/27/2020 4:49 PM, Cynthia Bruce wrote:
Hi All,



In my current university context, I am teaching a course developed by a company that is external to the university. I keep running into things that are not easily accessible, and they have told me they are only testing accessibility with NVDA. So, my question, is it likely that I will find incompatibility with JAWS when they only test with NVDA?



Thanks for any info – I want to be able to give them some feedback.



Cynthia




[2 <text/html; utf-8 (quoted-printable)>]
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