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moderated Academic writing and JAWS


Mark
 

Does anyone have advice on features of Word and JAWS that are helpful with academic writing, such as submitting an article to a journal? I would think Word's style features would help. And I've heard JAWS text analyzer is helpful for proofreading. Thoughts on this? Or perhaps other features to try?


Leo
 

Hello,

Listing grammatical  errors, Jaws key plus shift plus g.

Listing misspelled words, alt plus shift plus l

These are desktop commands, but they probably work in a laptop layout.

And definitely, since academic papers require citations and references, the speech and sounds scheme feature is very helpful.

If you’re not acquainted  with such a feature, you can google it, and you will find the Freedom Scientific section that explains how this feature works.

As for unity and coherence, there is not such an advanced technological tool that can help you with that other than revising and editing over and over.

Best,

     Leo Bado.

 

"It seems to me that I will always be happy in the place where I am not." Paul Auster. "City of Glass"

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark
Sent: Sunday, January 17, 2021 5:03 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Academic writing and JAWS

 

Does anyone have advice on features of Word and JAWS that are helpful with academic writing, such as submitting an article to a journal? I would think Word's style features would help. And I've heard JAWS text analyzer is helpful for proofreading. Thoughts on this? Or perhaps other features to try?


Terrie Terlau
 

I turn on every possible Jaws indicator  for Word, the Word processor that I use. I have capitals noted by pitch change in letters, words, and Say All. I have indentations, styles, font, font characteristics, and Grammar and Spell check on as well. I would go through all the Word settings and set them so that Jaws tells you everything possible about the format.

After you note down all the requirements of the journal to which you are sending the article, create headings/styles to match the required type, font, and font face of headings. I don’t recall whether Word has a checker for MLA or APA or whatever other style your journal wants, but if so, try using it. I did my dissertation on an Apple 2C with Prowords  and made the heading levels and styles using Prowords commands. I did my statistics tables this way. It was very tedious but doable.

Hope some of this is helpful. Please let us know what you learn about best Jaws settings as this will probably help lots of us.
Terrie Terlau

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark
Sent: Sunday, January 17, 2021 6:03 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Academic writing and JAWS

 

Does anyone have advice on features of Word and JAWS that are helpful with academic writing, such as submitting an article to a journal? I would think Word's style features would help. And I've heard JAWS text analyzer is helpful for proofreading. Thoughts on this? Or perhaps other features to try?


Jason White
 


On 17/1/21 6:30 pm, Terrie Terlau wrote:
I did my dissertation on an Apple 2C with Prowords  and made the heading levels and styles using Prowords commands. I did my statistics tables this way. It was very tedious but doable.

I wrote mine in LaTeX, which handled all of the formatting as well as the automatic citation and bibliography generation.

This is also what I now use when writing scholarship (e.g., a journal article or a book chapter).

Some people prefer Markdown instead (using Pandoc to convert it to other formats. However, I find that there are usually features I need which Pandoc Markdown lacks, but which are supported by LaTeX or by one of its numerous packages.

If you're using Windows/JAWS, then Notepad++ is probably the most similar text editor to what you're used to. Of course, if you prefer UNIX/Linux-style editors, as I do, then Emacs and Vim can be installed - even on a Windows system.

For bibliography generation, I maintain BibTeX files in a text editor. I tried Zotero at one point, but it wasn't as accessible or as convenient as I had hoped it would be. I've read that some people have had success with EndNote.

Zotero supports LaTeX, Microsoft Word and LibreOffice. It's definitely worth revisiting if the accessibility issues are addressed.



Mark
 

Terrie, thanks.  I've put a note in my calendar to share what I've learned.  I think we are on a similar page, although I'm not certain about the easiest and most reliable way of applying a Word style after it is created.  The ability to verify the correct formatting has been applied too is nice.


Mark
 

Jason,

Thanks for the tips. I know LaTex is loved in the computer sciences and I'm hearing more about Markdown.   Would you be the Jason White who co-authored WCAG? 

Mark


Cohn, Jonathan
 

Hello,
To switch styles in word on Windows, use the keystroke control-shift-S. This should give you a field where you can either arrow around styles, or type the style name you want to use. Also, you are aware that JAWS will read when styles change if you want? This is in the Quick Settings dialog.
Jonathan Cohn
 

On Jan 18, 2021, at 07:14, Mark <mweiler@...> wrote:

Terrie, thanks.  I've put a note in my calendar to share what I've learned.  I think we are on a similar page, although I'm not certain about the easiest and most reliable way of applying a Word style after it is created.  The ability to verify the correct formatting has been applied too is nice.


David Kingsbury
 

Hi Mark,

 

Sorry to promote my own book (Format Your Word Documents with JAWS and NVDA: A Guide for Students and Professionals), but it is the only place where you can get comprehensive guidance on how to use JAWS and NVDA to apply APA, MLA, and Chicago academic style guidance  to Word documents. You can get it in various formats for $18 at:

http://www.nbp.org/ic/nbp/WORD-FORMAT.html?id=M8Kz6eGi

 

David


Mark
 

Hi Jonathan,  can you please describe the procedure with Quick Settings dialog to make JAWS announce the change in style?  I'm not familiar with it. 


Mark
 

Thanks David, I'll look into. I appreciate you telling us about it.


Cohn, Jonathan
 

While in a word document, press insert-V. Then you will be in a search box  for quick settings. If you enter style here, I believe there will be one entry, moving to that entry and hitting space will toggle you through the possibilities.


On Jan 18, 2021, at 13:38, Mark <mweiler@...> wrote:

Hi Jonathan,  can you please describe the procedure with Quick Settings dialog to make JAWS announce the change in style?  I'm not familiar with it.