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moderated A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

Arkadiusz Świętnicki
 

Hello,

As many of you probably know, JAWS identifies individual applications by their file name. This method is used to load script filers, configurations and so on. However what if we have two applications with the same file name? A wrong scripts and configurations will be loaded leading to some serious errors!

My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).

 

And how can two file names be exactly the same? Do you have an example?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arkadiusz Swietnicki
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 2:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hello,

As many of you probably know, JAWS identifies individual applications by their file name. This method is used to load script filers, configurations and so on. However what if we have two applications with the same file name? A wrong scripts and configurations will be loaded leading to some serious errors!

My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).

Arkadiusz Świętnicki
 

REAPER.exe, for instance. I have another software named REAPER.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 4:43 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

And how can two file names be exactly the same? Do you have an example?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arkadiusz Swietnicki
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 2:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hello,

As many of you probably know, JAWS identifies individual applications by their file name. This method is used to load script filers, configurations and so on. However what if we have two applications with the same file name? A wrong scripts and configurations will be loaded leading to some serious errors!

My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).

 

On Fri, May 8, 2020 at 05:35 AM, Arkadiusz Świętnicki wrote:
My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).
And my suggestion is that you take the time to contact Freedom Scientific Technical Support about this issue.  That's the only way it has any hope of actually being addressed in a timely manner, if it ends up being addressed at all.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it.
       ~ Lawrence Krauss

Glenn / Lenny
 

Two identical file names with the same extension cannot exist in the same directory, so where's the problem?
Glenn
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, May 08, 2020 9:48 AM
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

REAPER.exe, for instance. I have another software named REAPER.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 4:43 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

And how can two file names be exactly the same? Do you have an example?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arkadiusz Swietnicki
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 2:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hello,

As many of you probably know, JAWS identifies individual applications by their file name. This method is used to load script filers, configurations and so on. However what if we have two applications with the same file name? A wrong scripts and configurations will be loaded leading to some serious errors!

My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).

Arkadiusz Świętnicki
 

I didn’t say its in the same directory. It can be wherever else on the file system. OK, I will contact Vispero, sorry for the invonvenience.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Glenn / Lenny
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 5:03 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Two identical file names with the same extension cannot exist in the same directory, so where's the problem?

Glenn

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, May 08, 2020 9:48 AM

Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

REAPER.exe, for instance. I have another software named REAPER.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 4:43 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

And how can two file names be exactly the same? Do you have an example?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arkadiusz Swietnicki
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 2:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hello,

As many of you probably know, JAWS identifies individual applications by their file name. This method is used to load script filers, configurations and so on. However what if we have two applications with the same file name? A wrong scripts and configurations will be loaded leading to some serious errors!

My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).

Richard B. McDonald
 

What is “the manifest?”

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arkadiusz Swietnicki
Sent: Friday, May 08, 2020 2:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hello,

As many of you probably know, JAWS identifies individual applications by their file name. This method is used to load script filers, configurations and so on. However what if we have two applications with the same file name? A wrong scripts and configurations will be loaded leading to some serious errors!

My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).

 

On Fri, May 8, 2020 at 11:11 AM, Arkadiusz Świętnicki wrote:
OK, I will contact Vispero, sorry for the invonvenience.
It's not a matter of inconvenience, per se, but of getting something done.  User lists are fine for sharing and venting.  Technical support (or whatever bug reporting mechanism may be available) is "where the action is."

And when discussing things like manifests one can wander "into the weeds" on an end user list in short order.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it.
       ~ Lawrence Krauss

Patrick Murphy
 

Hi,

 

There is absolutely no way that two identical file names can exist in a single windows directory.

However, that being said:

You could have a file called jaws.exe and a file called JAWS.exe

Note, the second one is all capital letters.

However, even at that, you should be able to tell jaws, which app you are using. Even if the .exe file is called the same name, the app should be called something else.

pat

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Friday 8 May 2020 15:43
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

And how can two file names be exactly the same? Do you have an example?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arkadiusz Swietnicki
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 2:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hello,

As many of you probably know, JAWS identifies individual applications by their file name. This method is used to load script filers, configurations and so on. However what if we have two applications with the same file name? A wrong scripts and configurations will be loaded leading to some serious errors!

My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).

Glenn / Lenny
 

Hi Pat,
In Linux, you can distinguish between capitals, but Windows makes no distinctions.
Unless windows has changed this with Windows 10.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, May 08, 2020 10:47 AM
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

Hi,

 

There is absolutely no way that two identical file names can exist in a single windows directory.

However, that being said:

You could have a file called jaws.exe and a file called JAWS.exe

Note, the second one is all capital letters.

However, even at that, you should be able to tell jaws, which app you are using. Even if the .exe file is called the same name, the app should be called something else.

pat

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Friday 8 May 2020 15:43
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

And how can two file names be exactly the same? Do you have an example?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arkadiusz Swietnicki
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 2:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hello,

As many of you probably know, JAWS identifies individual applications by their file name. This method is used to load script filers, configurations and so on. However what if we have two applications with the same file name? A wrong scripts and configurations will be loaded leading to some serious errors!

My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).

Patrick Murphy
 

Hi Glen,

 

Ye, you are right. Sorry for the miss-leading information.

I just tried it with a file called notes.txt

I copied it and it became notes – copy.txt

I then tried to rename it to NOTES.txt (all caps), but windows prompted me to rename it as notes(2).txt

Pat

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Glenn / Lenny
Sent: Friday 8 May 2020 17:07
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hi Pat,

In Linux, you can distinguish between capitals, but Windows makes no distinctions.

Unless windows has changed this with Windows 10.

Glenn

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, May 08, 2020 10:47 AM

Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hi,

 

There is absolutely no way that two identical file names can exist in a single windows directory.

However, that being said:

You could have a file called jaws.exe and a file called JAWS.exe

Note, the second one is all capital letters.

However, even at that, you should be able to tell jaws, which app you are using. Even if the .exe file is called the same name, the app should be called something else.

pat

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Friday 8 May 2020 15:43
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

And how can two file names be exactly the same? Do you have an example?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arkadiusz Swietnicki
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 2:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hello,

As many of you probably know, JAWS identifies individual applications by their file name. This method is used to load script filers, configurations and so on. However what if we have two applications with the same file name? A wrong scripts and configurations will be loaded leading to some serious errors!

My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).

Nermin
 

Hi,
 
one place to look for files and associated scripts is a file called ConfigNames.ini, found in your users and then the JAWS directory, un to the one you want, settings\ and the corresponding language code, enu for English US, esp for spanish, and so forth.
You can find out what programme is being loaded using the command INSERT+q. CONTROL+INSERT+V will also tell you the exact programme version for a given window if needed. Pressing the commands twice quickly will virtualise the window for reviewing it later.
One such example from the ini file looks like this:
 
[ConfigNames]
TeamTalk5Classic=tt_classic
TeamTalk4Classic=tt_classic
 
T
he first part is the name of the software, and the second part is the script to be loaded if that executable is running.
In the example, both TeamTalk 4 and 5 would be using the same set of scripts.
 
Hope that helps.
 
Regards,
Nermin

JM Casey
 

Nope. Windows will *show* case in filenames, but for all intents and purposes, lower and uppercase are treated as the same characters.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Glenn / Lenny
Sent: May 8, 2020 12:07 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hi Pat,

In Linux, you can distinguish between capitals, but Windows makes no distinctions.

Unless windows has changed this with Windows 10.

Glenn

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Friday, May 08, 2020 10:47 AM

Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hi,

 

There is absolutely no way that two identical file names can exist in a single windows directory.

However, that being said:

You could have a file called jaws.exe and a file called JAWS.exe

Note, the second one is all capital letters.

However, even at that, you should be able to tell jaws, which app you are using. Even if the .exe file is called the same name, the app should be called something else.

pat

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Friday 8 May 2020 15:43
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

And how can two file names be exactly the same? Do you have an example?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arkadiusz Swietnicki
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 2:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hello,

As many of you probably know, JAWS identifies individual applications by their file name. This method is used to load script filers, configurations and so on. However what if we have two applications with the same file name? A wrong scripts and configurations will be loaded leading to some serious errors!

My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).

 

On Fri, May 8, 2020 at 12:42 PM, JM Casey wrote:
Windows will *show* case in filenames, but for all intents and purposes, lower and uppercase are treated as the same characters.
Yep.  Known in geek speak as being case insensitive.   As opposed to Linux which is case sensitive.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it.
       ~ Lawrence Krauss

Steve Matzura
 

I've been saying this for years. Filenames alone are not enough to distinguish applications.


From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arkadiusz Swietnicki

Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 2:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hello,

As many of you probably know, JAWS identifies individual applications by their file name. This method is used to load script filers, configurations and so on. However what if we have two applications with the same file name? A wrong scripts and configurations will be loaded leading to some serious errors!

My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).


Steve Matzura
 

I have in versions past. Falls on deaf ears apparently, as it's still extant.


On 5/8/2020 11:02 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Fri, May 8, 2020 at 05:35 AM, Arkadiusz Świętnicki wrote:
My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).
And my suggestion is that you take the time to contact Freedom Scientific Technical Support about this issue.  That's the only way it has any hope of actually being addressed in a timely manner, if it ends up being addressed at all.

Steve Matzura
 

Interesting that my version of this file has two entries--ONLY two. Yet dozens of programs load scripts, like the very program I'm using to write this message--namely, Thunderbird. Where is the information for loading scripts and configurations for all these other programs kept?

On 5/8/2020 12:20 PM, Nermin via groups.io wrote:
Hi,
one place to look for files and associated scripts is a file called ConfigNames.ini, found in your users and then the JAWS directory, un to the one you want, settings\ and the corresponding language code, enu for English US, esp for spanish, and so forth.
You can find out what programme is being loaded using the command INSERT+q. CONTROL+INSERT+V will also tell you the exact programme version for a given window if needed. Pressing the commands twice quickly will virtualise the window for reviewing it later.
One such example from the ini file looks like this:
[ConfigNames]
TeamTalk5Classic=tt_classic
TeamTalk4Classic=tt_classic
T
he first part is the name of the software, and the second part is the script to be loaded if that executable is running.
In the example, both TeamTalk 4 and 5 would be using the same set of scripts.
Hope that helps.
Regards,
Nermin

 

On Fri, May 8, 2020 at 08:16 PM, Steve Matzura wrote:
Falls on deaf ears apparently, as it's still extant.
As is often the case.  But the only recourse is to bring it up with those who can do something about it.  There is no guarantee they will.

For myself, this would be a very, very low priority change.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it.
       ~ Lawrence Krauss

Dave Durber
 

Pat:
 
You cannot have 2 files in the same folder with the same name. This has always been the case, no matter what the operating system.
 
Dave
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 4:47 PM
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

Hi,

 

There is absolutely no way that two identical file names can exist in a single windows directory.

However, that being said:

You could have a file called jaws.exe and a file called JAWS.exe

Note, the second one is all capital letters.

However, even at that, you should be able to tell jaws, which app you are using. Even if the .exe file is called the same name, the app should be called something else.

pat

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Friday 8 May 2020 15:43
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

And how can two file names be exactly the same? Do you have an example?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arkadiusz Swietnicki
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 2:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hello,

As many of you probably know, JAWS identifies individual applications by their file name. This method is used to load script filers, configurations and so on. However what if we have two applications with the same file name? A wrong scripts and configurations will be loaded leading to some serious errors!

My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).

Dave Durber
 

Glen:
 
This is still the case in Windows 10.
 
Dave
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 5:07 PM
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

Hi Pat,
In Linux, you can distinguish between capitals, but Windows makes no distinctions.
Unless windows has changed this with Windows 10.
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, May 08, 2020 10:47 AM
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

Hi,

 

There is absolutely no way that two identical file names can exist in a single windows directory.

However, that being said:

You could have a file called jaws.exe and a file called JAWS.exe

Note, the second one is all capital letters.

However, even at that, you should be able to tell jaws, which app you are using. Even if the .exe file is called the same name, the app should be called something else.

pat

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Friday 8 May 2020 15:43
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

And how can two file names be exactly the same? Do you have an example?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arkadiusz Swietnicki
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 2:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: A powerful JAWS flaw I have found

 

Hello,

As many of you probably know, JAWS identifies individual applications by their file name. This method is used to load script filers, configurations and so on. However what if we have two applications with the same file name? A wrong scripts and configurations will be loaded leading to some serious errors!

My suggestion therefore is to use the manifest as the identifier of the individual application, and fallback to the file name only when strictly necessary (no Manifest  present).