moderated Locking the mouse buttons:


Angel
 

I was wondering if both mouse buttons are locked whether sighted people would not be able to use the computer.  Unless they were familiar with the use of the keyboard.  I would think if the mouse buttons were locked, this would make it impossible to use the mouse successfully, while Jaws was turned on.  I should think this technic would be easier than turning off the mouse via the control panel.   

 

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David Diamond
 

why not just enable screen shade. This way they won't be able to see the screen. A lot easier than locking the mouse keys. I would think. That and you could suggest that maybe they broke your computer.


 

Emulated mouse button locking works (or is supposed to) just like using the real keys - it stays on only until the "drop" part of the command is completed or when something else is done that causes a locked mouse to release.

David Diamond is correct that the easiest thing to do is to turn on the screen shade/curtain, as even the most screen-reader educated sighted person generally does not even try to use a screen reader without vision being present.  "Flying blind" is just not generally something we can do, because we just don't have to do it in day to day life in general.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Angel
 

I am using Jaws 18, conjoined with windows 10.  In view of this:  Where is the screen shade-Curtin, and how does one employ it.  Eric Damery, employed by Freedom Scientific,  uses Jaws and the keyboard exclusively, and is fully sighted.  I read, once, he did so, because his dear father was totally blind, and had familiarized him with blindness alternative technics.  When I was learning the Braille code over 65 years ago:  Our fully sighted teachers read Braille exclusively using their fingers.  They learned the code in order to instruct blinded world war II veterans.  The thery, then, was, to best instruct us blind, and physically challenged  users of a particular skill one ought to be proficient in the use of that skill using the same technics used by those using the skills every day.  In 98, when I got my first computer, my instructor was totally blind.  I don’t know whether I would trust a sight dependent person to teach me anything, truly.  Because I would doubt he had the confidence in his own ability to properly instruct and to empathize with me, were he forced to depend on his sight to teach a skill I would be using independent of the  sense of sight.

 

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K0LNY
 


If one is not using a laptop, the monitor can always be turned off too.
When I took typing in high school, the teacher made everyone tape a sheet of typing paper over the keyboard and we had to type with our hands under the paper.
My plumber is a volunteer fireman and he told me that he had to train getting out of buildings with a blindfold on.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
From: Angel
Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2022 12:56 PM
Subject: Locking the mouse buttons:

I am using Jaws 18, conjoined with windows 10.  In view of this:  Where is the screen shade-Curtin, and how does one employ it.  Eric Damery, employed by Freedom Scientific,  uses Jaws and the keyboard exclusively, and is fully sighted.  I read, once, he did so, because his dear father was totally blind, and had familiarized him with blindness alternative technics.  When I was learning the Braille code over 65 years ago:  Our fully sighted teachers read Braille exclusively using their fingers.  They learned the code in order to instruct blinded world war II veterans.  The thery, then, was, to best instruct us blind, and physically challenged  users of a particular skill one ought to be proficient in the use of that skill using the same technics used by those using the skills every day.  In 98, when I got my first computer, my instructor was totally blind.  I don’t know whether I would trust a sight dependent person to teach me anything, truly.  Because I would doubt he had the confidence in his own ability to properly instruct and to empathize with me, were he forced to depend on his sight to teach a skill I would be using independent of the  sense of sight.

 

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Gene Warner
 

Totally agree! After I lost my vision, I signed up for a JAWS class at the local Lighthouse for the blind, the instructor was sighted and his method of instruction was to ask, "What do you want to learn?" I never went back to that class and learned JAWS on my own, it was hard without help and took me about a year before I felt even the slightest bit comfortable with it.

Gene...


Gene...

On 8/7/2022 1:56 PM, Angel wrote:
I am using Jaws 18, conjoined with windows 10.  In view of this:  Where is the screen shade-Curtin, and how does one employ it.  Eric Damery, employed by Freedom Scientific,  uses Jaws and the keyboard exclusively, and is fully sighted.  I read, once, he did so, because his dear father was totally blind, and had familiarized him with blindness alternative technics.  When I was learning the Braille code over 65 years ago:  Our fully sighted teachers read Braille exclusively using their fingers. They learned the code in order to instruct blinded world war II veterans.  The thery, then, was, to best instruct us blind, and physically challenged  users of a particular skill one ought to be proficient in the use of that skill using the same technics used by those using the skills every day.  In 98, when I got my first computer, my instructor was totally blind.  I don’t know whether I would trust a sight dependent person to teach me anything, truly.  Because I would doubt he had the confidence in his own ability to properly instruct and to empathize with me, were he forced to depend on his sight to teach a skill I would be using independent of the  sense of sight.
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JM Casey
 

There is no screen curtain in JAWS 18, unfortunately. I believe it was introduced in JAWS 2019, which is two versions later than the one you have.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Angel
Sent: August 7, 2022 01:56 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Locking the mouse buttons:

 

I am using Jaws 18, conjoined with windows 10.  In view of this:  Where is the screen shade-Curtin, and how does one employ it.  Eric Damery, employed by Freedom Scientific,  uses Jaws and the keyboard exclusively, and is fully sighted.  I read, once, he did so, because his dear father was totally blind, and had familiarized him with blindness alternative technics.  When I was learning the Braille code over 65 years ago:  Our fully sighted teachers read Braille exclusively using their fingers.  They learned the code in order to instruct blinded world war II veterans.  The thery, then, was, to best instruct us blind, and physically challenged  users of a particular skill one ought to be proficient in the use of that skill using the same technics used by those using the skills every day.  In 98, when I got my first computer, my instructor was totally blind.  I don’t know whether I would trust a sight dependent person to teach me anything, truly.  Because I would doubt he had the confidence in his own ability to properly instruct and to empathize with me, were he forced to depend on his sight to teach a skill I would be using independent of the  sense of sight.

 

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Mike B.
 


Hi Angel,
 
The Screen Shade feature is only available in Jaws2018 and newer running Windows 10.  I'm not sure, but possibly Windows 8.1 as well.
 
 
Take care.  Mike.  Sent from my iBarstool.

----- Original Message -----
From: Angel
Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2022 10:56 AM
Subject: Locking the mouse buttons:

I am using Jaws 18, conjoined with windows 10.  In view of this:  Where is the screen shade-Curtin, and how does one employ it.  Eric Damery, employed by Freedom Scientific,  uses Jaws and the keyboard exclusively, and is fully sighted.  I read, once, he did so, because his dear father was totally blind, and had familiarized him with blindness alternative technics.  When I was learning the Braille code over 65 years ago:  Our fully sighted teachers read Braille exclusively using their fingers.  They learned the code in order to instruct blinded world war II veterans.  The thery, then, was, to best instruct us blind, and physically challenged  users of a particular skill one ought to be proficient in the use of that skill using the same technics used by those using the skills every day.  In 98, when I got my first computer, my instructor was totally blind.  I don’t know whether I would trust a sight dependent person to teach me anything, truly.  Because I would doubt he had the confidence in his own ability to properly instruct and to empathize with me, were he forced to depend on his sight to teach a skill I would be using independent of the  sense of sight.

 

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On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 01:56 PM, Angel wrote:
Because I would doubt he had the confidence in his own ability to properly instruct and to empathize with me, were he forced to depend on his sight to teach a skill I would be using independent of the  sense of sight.
-
Eric Damry, and bless him, is an outlier (in the extreme positive and skilled end of the bell curve) of sighted screen reader users/instructors.

A very great many instructors of the blind, regardless of the specific skill, are not blind themselves and never attempt to simulate blindness for themselves for any extended period.  For myself, my personal opinion is that my sight is "value added" during instruction because one can often see exactly what went wrong, and instruct on how to fix and/or avoid that in the future, rather than spending a lot of time trying to figure out what just happened.

I've also often said, and believe, that there is nothing better than a skilled blind tutor for a blind student.  I will and can never know many aspects of "living blind," and would have to be insane were I to claim I did.  My expertise, what there is of it, is related to the technologies with what I do know about "living blind" coming from friendships and working with clients.

But when it comes to selecting your own instructors, it always comes down to picking the ones best suited to you.  I wouldn't have anyone do otherwise.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


 

On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 02:10 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
Totally agree! After I lost my vision, I signed up for a JAWS class at the local Lighthouse for the blind, the instructor was sighted and his method of instruction was to ask, "What do you want to learn?"
-
Well, then, you'd definitely not want me as an instructor, either.  Most of my clients are adults who have lost their vision as adults.  I am there to instruct on using a screen reader, but I find that allowing the client to choose what they want to do/learn while learning the screen reader is best left up to them.  I can't know what programs a given client might want to use or, if trying to teach screen reader skills with a web browser, what it is they'd prefer to read, research, etc.

One of the things I have had the hardest time getting certain field counselors in the Virginia Department for the Blind and Visually Impaired to understand is that you cannot teach how to use a screen reader as a stand alone thing.  A screen reader has, as its reason for being, accessing something else.  And I'd rather the client tell me, at least for the most part, what the "something elses" are in their lives.  

I can't even begin to imagine what, "What do you want to learn?," even means when it comes to instructing on a screen reader since they don't function in isolation.  I interpret it as, "What do you need or want to learn how to use with a screen reader?"  And I want my students to tell me that, and I'll focus accordingly.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


David Diamond
 

I think in this case the sighted person did not draw the client out and the client did not tell the teacher exactly what she needed to learn.  Sorry, some people’s communication skills are lacking.  The enquirer doesn’t know how to draw the person out and the student doesn’t know how to communicate properly what they want.  Then there is the other thought, audio skills are lacking as well, I E the teacher is not listening to his or her student.  Indirectly related.  A person asked me a question and I did not understand what he wanted, I asked for clarification and all he said was, “The question is clear enough.” If it was clear enough, I’d not have to ask.  Smile. A good teacher should know how to draw their students out, not asking or giving vague questions or answers.  If a blind person asks where something is in a store, the person they ask should not say, “Over there or, over that way.” True they’ve answered the question however not in a way that the blind person can understand.      

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: August 7, 2022 1:14 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

 

On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 02:10 PM, Gene Warner wrote:

Totally agree! After I lost my vision, I signed up for a JAWS class at the local Lighthouse for the blind, the instructor was sighted and his method of instruction was to ask, "What do you want to learn?"

-
Well, then, you'd definitely not want me as an instructor, either.  Most of my clients are adults who have lost their vision as adults.  I am there to instruct on using a screen reader, but I find that allowing the client to choose what they want to do/learn while learning the screen reader is best left up to them.  I can't know what programs a given client might want to use or, if trying to teach screen reader skills with a web browser, what it is they'd prefer to read, research, etc.

One of the things I have had the hardest time getting certain field counselors in the Virginia Department for the Blind and Visually Impaired to understand is that you cannot teach how to use a screen reader as a stand alone thing.  A screen reader has, as its reason for being, accessing something else.  And I'd rather the client tell me, at least for the most part, what the "something elses" are in their lives.  

I can't even begin to imagine what, "What do you want to learn?," even means when it comes to instructing on a screen reader since they don't function in isolation.  I interpret it as, "What do you need or want to learn how to use with a screen reader?"  And I want my students to tell me that, and I'll focus accordingly.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Gene Warner
 

You are right, I wouldn't want you as an instructor because you would be a lousy one. The class was supposed to be a class on using JAWS. If you can't teach that without needing the student to tell you what his goal is, you have no business being an instructor.

Gene...

On 8/7/2022 5:13 PM, David Diamond wrote:
I think in this case the sighted person did not draw the client out and the client did not tell the teacher exactly what she needed to learn. Sorry, some people’s communication skills are lacking.  The enquirer doesn’t know how to draw the person out and the student doesn’t know how to communicate properly what they want.  Then there is the other thought, audio skills are lacking as well, I E the teacher is not listening to his or her student.  Indirectly related.  A person asked me a question and I did not understand what he wanted, I asked for clarification and all he said was, “The question is clear enough.” If it was clear enough, I’d not have to ask.  Smile. A good teacher should know how to draw their students out, not asking or giving vague questions or answers.  If a blind person asks where something is in a store, the person they ask should not say, “Over there or, over that way.” True they’ve answered the question however not in a way that the blind person can understand.
*From:* main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Brian Vogel
*Sent:* August 7, 2022 1:14 PM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: Locking the mouse buttons:
On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 02:10 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
Totally agree! After I lost my vision, I signed up for a JAWS class
at the local Lighthouse for the blind, the instructor was sighted
and his method of instruction was to ask, "What do you want to learn?"
-
Well, then, you'd definitely not want me as an instructor, either.  Most of my clients are adults who have lost their vision as adults.  I am there to instruct on using a screen reader, but I find that allowing the client to choose what they want to do/learn while learning the screen reader is best left up to them.  I can't know what programs a given client might want to use or, if trying to teach screen reader skills with a web browser, what it is they'd prefer to read, research, etc.
One of the things I have had the hardest time getting certain field counselors in the Virginia Department for the Blind and Visually Impaired to understand is that you cannot teach how to use a screen reader as a stand alone thing.  A screen reader has, as its reason for being, accessing something else.  And I'd rather the client tell me, at least for the most part, what the "something elses" are in their lives.
I can't even begin to imagine what, "What do you want to learn?," even means when it comes to instructing on a screen reader since they don't function in isolation.  I interpret it as, "What do you need or want to learn how to use with a screen reader?"  And I want my students to tell me that, and I'll focus accordingly.
--
Brian *-*Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044
*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.**
*     ~ Lauren Bacall


 

On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 05:22 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
The class was supposed to be a class on using JAWS. If you can't teach that without needing the student to tell you what his goal is, you have no business being an instructor.
-
Then I have no business being an instructor.  In the context of one-on-one tutoring, which is what I do, I absolutely do not set the goals, the client does.  And it's been working beautifully for over 10 years now.

Were I trying to do a class, I would still, for the most part, be asking clients to pick, say websites that they have an interest in rather than my picking a single one except for the basic instruction at the outset.  But one-on-one, I prefer to go in precisely the direction the client wishes to be taken.

To each his or her own.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


K0LNY
 


I think you both may be correct.
There are basics that always have to be addressed first.
Like in typing lessons for example.
But ultimately, teaching things are best directed with the student's goals in mind.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, August 07, 2022 4:32 PM
Subject: Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 05:22 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
The class was supposed to be a class on using JAWS. If you can't teach that without needing the student to tell you what his goal is, you have no business being an instructor.
-
Then I have no business being an instructor.  In the context of one-on-one tutoring, which is what I do, I absolutely do not set the goals, the client does.  And it's been working beautifully for over 10 years now.

Were I trying to do a class, I would still, for the most part, be asking clients to pick, say websites that they have an interest in rather than my picking a single one except for the basic instruction at the outset.  But one-on-one, I prefer to go in precisely the direction the client wishes to be taken.

To each his or her own.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Gene Warner
 

Exactly, that's what I was expecting, starting off with screen reader basics that everyone needs to learn, just as there are basics of Windows that everyone, regardless of the final goals, needs to learn. But this instructor started with students knowing nothing about screen readers except that they needed to learn how to use one, and were asked that question from the very start. He would then tell you what he wants you to do, then he'd go to his desk and play games and not pay any attention to the students until someone gets enough courage to ask him for help.

So I went home and started working my way through Freedom Scientific's training, with some telephone help from the to get me started.

Gene...

On 8/7/2022 5:36 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:

I think you both may be correct.
There are basics that always have to be addressed first.
Like in typing lessons for example.
But ultimately, teaching things are best directed with the student's goals in mind.
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Brian Vogel <mailto:britechguy@...>
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
*Sent:* Sunday, August 07, 2022 4:32 PM
*Subject:* Re: Locking the mouse buttons:
On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 05:22 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
The class was supposed to be a class on using JAWS. If you can't
teach that without needing the student to tell you what his goal is,
you have no business being an instructor.
-
Then I have no business being an instructor.  In the context of one-on-one tutoring, which is what I do, I absolutely do not set the goals, the client does.  And it's been working beautifully for over 10 years now.
Were I trying to do a class, I would still, for the most part, be asking clients to pick, say websites that they have an interest in rather than my picking a single one except for the basic instruction at the outset. But one-on-one, I prefer to go in precisely the direction the client wishes to be taken.
To each his or her own.
--
Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044
*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.
*   ~ Lauren Bacall


 

Gene,

You stated that you walked out of that class and never went back.  And then you have the unmitigated gall to project what you believe the instructor might have done.

Sorry, but no.  Hell no.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Lori Lynn
 

Brian, I completely agree with you. In my past life I managed a large training contract where JAWS was one of our largest training groups. Yes, there were basics that all the trainers started out teaching. But before their scheduled training was over, they focused on specific applications and web pages that the student needed to focus on. The trainer can not be expected to know all things about all trainees. To be a successful trainer you must get feedback and input from the student.

 

When I first got a computer at home with JAWS, I chose web pages that I thought would be fun or interesting. Exploring them helped me to become the proficient JAWS user that I now am.

 

Lori Lynn

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2022 4:33 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

 

On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 05:22 PM, Gene Warner wrote:

The class was supposed to be a class on using JAWS. If you can't teach that without needing the student to tell you what his goal is, you have no business being an instructor.

-
Then I have no business being an instructor.  In the context of one-on-one tutoring, which is what I do, I absolutely do not set the goals, the client does.  And it's been working beautifully for over 10 years now.

Were I trying to do a class, I would still, for the most part, be asking clients to pick, say websites that they have an interest in rather than my picking a single one except for the basic instruction at the outset.  But one-on-one, I prefer to go in precisely the direction the client wishes to be taken.

To each his or her own.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
     ~ Lauren Bacall


Gene Warner
 

I agree, first you teach the basics that everyone needs to know, then you ask what the student's goals are. That's not what this instructor did, he assumed that you already knew the basics even though the class was labeled as a beginning JAWS class.

Gene...

On 8/7/2022 7:01 PM, Lori Lynn wrote:
Brian, I completely agree with you. In my past life I managed a large training contract where JAWS was one of our largest training groups. Yes, there were basics that all the trainers started out teaching. But before their scheduled training was over, they focused on specific applications and web pages that the student needed to focus on. The trainer can not be expected to know all things about all trainees. To be a successful trainer you must get feedback and input from the student.
When I first got a computer at home with JAWS, I chose web pages that I thought would be fun or interesting. Exploring them helped me to become the proficient JAWS user that I now am.
Lori Lynn
*From:* main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Brian Vogel
*Sent:* Sunday, August 7, 2022 4:33 PM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: Locking the mouse buttons:
On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 05:22 PM, Gene Warner wrote:
The class was supposed to be a class on using JAWS. If you can't
teach that without needing the student to tell you what his goal is,
you have no business being an instructor.
-
Then I have no business being an instructor.  In the context of one-on-one tutoring, which is what I do, I absolutely do not set the goals, the client does.  And it's been working beautifully for over 10 years now.
Were I trying to do a class, I would still, for the most part, be asking clients to pick, say websites that they have an interest in rather than my picking a single one except for the basic instruction at the outset. But one-on-one, I prefer to go in precisely the direction the client wishes to be taken.
To each his or her own.
--
Brian *-*Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044
*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.**
*     ~ Lauren Bacall


Don Walls
 

Harsh! Do you really need to be so rude? It seems reasonable that an instructor ask a student about the student's goals and needs.

Don

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene Warner
Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2022 2:22 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

You are right, I wouldn't want you as an instructor because you would be
a lousy one. The class was supposed to be a class on using JAWS. If you
can't teach that without needing the student to tell you what his goal
is, you have no business being an instructor.

Gene...


On 8/7/2022 5:13 PM, David Diamond wrote:
I think in this case the sighted person did not draw the client out and the client did not tell the teacher exactly what she needed to learn. Sorry, some people’s communication skills are lacking. The enquirer doesn’t know how to draw the person out and the student doesn’t know how to communicate properly what they want. Then there is the other thought, audio skills are lacking as well, I E the teacher is not listening to his or her student. Indirectly related. A person asked me a question and I did not understand what he wanted, I asked for clarification and all he said was, “The question is clear enough.” If it was clear enough, I’d not have to ask. Smile. A good teacher should know how to draw their students out, not asking or giving vague questions or answers. If a blind person asks where something is in a store, the person they ask should not say, “Over there or, over that way.” True they’ve answered the question however not in a way that the blind person can understand.

*From:* main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Brian Vogel
*Sent:* August 7, 2022 1:14 PM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 02:10 PM, Gene Warner wrote:

Totally agree! After I lost my vision, I signed up for a JAWS class
at the local Lighthouse for the blind, the instructor was sighted
and his method of instruction was to ask, "What do you want to learn?"

-
Well, then, you'd definitely not want me as an instructor, either. Most of my clients are adults who have lost their vision as adults. I am there to instruct on using a screen reader, but I find that allowing the client to choose what they want to do/learn while learning the screen reader is best left up to them. I can't know what programs a given client might want to use or, if trying to teach screen reader skills with a web browser, what it is they'd prefer to read, research, etc.

One of the things I have had the hardest time getting certain field counselors in the Virginia Department for the Blind and Visually Impaired to understand is that you cannot teach how to use a screen reader as a stand alone thing. A screen reader has, as its reason for being, accessing something else. And I'd rather the client tell me, at least for the most part, what the "something elses" are in their lives.

I can't even begin to imagine what, "What do you want to learn?," even means when it comes to instructing on a screen reader since they don't function in isolation. I interpret it as, "What do you need or want to learn how to use with a screen reader?" And I want my students to tell me that, and I'll focus accordingly.
--

Brian *-*Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.**
* ~ Lauren Bacall


Gene Warner
 

If the course was an intermediate or advanced level course then I would agree that the best way to begin is to know where your students are and where they want to go. But this was supposed to be a beginning level course where the basics everyone needs to know were to be taught and that does not need any knowledge of what the students goals are because those goals have no bearing on learning the basics. Is that so difficult to understand?

Oh, but I forget, you would probably want to do critical analysis of Shakespeare's writings in a kindergarten level reading class.

Gene...

On 8/7/2022 10:03 PM, Don Walls wrote:
Harsh!  Do you really need to be so rude?  It seems reasonable that an instructor ask a student about the student's goals and needs.
Don
-----Original Message----- From: Gene Warner
Sent: Sunday, August 7, 2022 2:22 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Locking the mouse buttons:
You are right, I wouldn't want you as an instructor because you would be
a lousy one. The class was supposed to be a class on using JAWS. If you
can't teach that without needing the student to tell you what his goal
is, you have no business being an instructor.
Gene...
On 8/7/2022 5:13 PM, David Diamond wrote:
I think in this case the sighted person did not draw the client out and the client did not tell the teacher exactly what she needed to learn. Sorry, some people’s communication skills are lacking.  The enquirer doesn’t know how to draw the person out and the student doesn’t know how to communicate properly what they want.  Then there is the other thought, audio skills are lacking as well, I E the teacher is not listening to his or her student.  Indirectly related. A person asked me a question and I did not understand what he wanted, I asked for clarification and all he said was, “The question is clear enough.” If it was clear enough, I’d not have to ask.  Smile. A good teacher should know how to draw their students out, not asking or giving vague questions or answers.  If a blind person asks where something is in a store, the person they ask should not say, “Over there or, over that way.” True they’ve answered the question however not in a way that the blind person can understand.

*From:* main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Brian Vogel
*Sent:* August 7, 2022 1:14 PM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: Locking the mouse buttons:

On Sun, Aug 7, 2022 at 02:10 PM, Gene Warner wrote:

    Totally agree! After I lost my vision, I signed up for a JAWS class
    at the local Lighthouse for the blind, the instructor was sighted
    and his method of instruction was to ask, "What do you want to learn?"

-
Well, then, you'd definitely not want me as an instructor, either. Most of my clients are adults who have lost their vision as adults.  I am there to instruct on using a screen reader, but I find that allowing the client to choose what they want to do/learn while learning the screen reader is best left up to them.  I can't know what programs a given client might want to use or, if trying to teach screen reader skills with a web browser, what it is they'd prefer to read, research, etc.

One of the things I have had the hardest time getting certain field counselors in the Virginia Department for the Blind and Visually Impaired to understand is that you cannot teach how to use a screen reader as a stand alone thing.  A screen reader has, as its reason for being, accessing something else.  And I'd rather the client tell me, at least for the most part, what the "something elses" are in their lives.

I can't even begin to imagine what, "What do you want to learn?," even means when it comes to instructing on a screen reader since they don't function in isolation.  I interpret it as, "What do you need or want to learn how to use with a screen reader?"  And I want my students to tell me that, and I'll focus accordingly.
--

Brian *-*Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.**
*     ~ Lauren Bacall