moderated back ups


Justin Williams
 

 

 

I'm thinking of buying a back up hard drive today, or tomorrow.  But othe other then that,  what other back up services would you suggest?

 

Thanks,

 

Justin

 

 

I use Microsoft one drive for my school and business stuff. I pay for the yearly subscription to Microsoft office and use that as my back up. Other than that, I don’t have an actual hard drive that I back up on. 

 

 


Chris Hill
 

I suggest a good backup program.  Terabyte imae for windows has served me well for many years.  Each backup goes into its own file, which you can easily browse with windows-like commands if you just need to retrieve one file.  The restore is something you hope you'll never nedd, but I've used that too as well.  Last time I had to do it, I didn't want to worry about my machine booting into something I couldn't read so I just did it using a second computer.  I'm prety sure that one could make their bootable environment talk, but I haven't bothered doing so.  The greatest thing about them is that if I'm doing something complex like moving from a larger to smaller drive, I can either try the simple mode which often just does what I want, or if not sure, emailing tech support has always given me the help I need.

On 2/14/2022 08:33, Justin Williams wrote:

 

 

I'm thinking of buying a back up hard drive today, or tomorrow.  But othe other then that,  what other back up services would you suggest?

 

Thanks,

 

Justin

 

 

I use Microsoft one drive for my school and business stuff. I pay for the yearly subscription to Microsoft office and use that as my back up. Other than that, I don’t have an actual hard drive that I back up on. 

 

 



James Homuth
 

I use Backblaze, personally. The install’s accessible, as is the interface after install, and it basically backs everything up automatically. And if your drive fails, you have the option of having them send you your backup on an external drive.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Justin Williams
Sent: February 14, 2022 9:33 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: back ups

 

 

 

I'm thinking of buying a back up hard drive today, or tomorrow.  But othe other then that,  what other back up services would you suggest?

 

Thanks,

 

Justin

 

 

I use Microsoft one drive for my school and business stuff. I pay for the yearly subscription to Microsoft office and use that as my back up. Other than that, I don’t have an actual hard drive that I back up on. 

 

 


 

Using Macrium Reflect Free with a Screen Reader

--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


Mich Verrier
 

Hi is backblaze free? And if not what is the cost? From Mich.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Homuth
Sent: February 14, 2022 10:58 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

 

I use Backblaze, personally. The install’s accessible, as is the interface after install, and it basically backs everything up automatically. And if your drive fails, you have the option of having them send you your backup on an external drive.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Justin Williams
Sent: February 14, 2022 9:33 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: back ups

 

 

 

I'm thinking of buying a back up hard drive today, or tomorrow.  But othe other then that,  what other back up services would you suggest?

 

Thanks,

 

Justin

 

 

I use Microsoft one drive for my school and business stuff. I pay for the yearly subscription to Microsoft office and use that as my back up. Other than that, I don’t have an actual hard drive that I back up on. 

 

 


James Homuth
 

$5 US per month per computer. Unlimited backups on that computer.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mich Verrier
Sent: February 14, 2022 11:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

 

Hi is backblaze free? And if not what is the cost? From Mich.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Homuth
Sent: February 14, 2022 10:58 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

 

I use Backblaze, personally. The install’s accessible, as is the interface after install, and it basically backs everything up automatically. And if your drive fails, you have the option of having them send you your backup on an external drive.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Justin Williams
Sent: February 14, 2022 9:33 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: back ups

 

 

 

I'm thinking of buying a back up hard drive today, or tomorrow.  But othe other then that,  what other back up services would you suggest?

 

Thanks,

 

Justin

 

 

I use Microsoft one drive for my school and business stuff. I pay for the yearly subscription to Microsoft office and use that as my back up. Other than that, I don’t have an actual hard drive that I back up on. 

 

 


 

Not that I don't think cloud-based backup isn't a great idea, because it is, but before anyone considers going that route you need to have very fast internet service indeed if you have any substantial amount of data to back-up.

My own system disk contains about 600 GB of data, and that takes hours to back up at USB 3.0 speeds to a local hard drive, and those speeds are virtually certain to be much faster than a very great many of us have with our internet service.

If you've got gigabit service, then, by all means, consider cloud-based backup.  It gives you the double advantage of having a backup and having that backup not colocated with the machine being backed up, so if disaster strikes with something like a house fire, you are not nearly so likely to lose your backup as you are if you have it only on a local drive (even if you store that drive in a fireproof safe).  But if you have slow-ish to truly slow internet service and substantial data to back up, cloud-based backup is not likely going to be a good fit.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


James Homuth
 

I do not have super fast internet, and several TB of data to back up. What’s more important? Speed, or reliability? Sure it took a while, but that several TB of data is backed up now. If any single one of my drives fails, I’m covered.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: February 14, 2022 12:23 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

 

Not that I don't think cloud-based backup isn't a great idea, because it is, but before anyone considers going that route you need to have very fast internet service indeed if you have any substantial amount of data to back-up.

My own system disk contains about 600 GB of data, and that takes hours to back up at USB 3.0 speeds to a local hard drive, and those speeds are virtually certain to be much faster than a very great many of us have with our internet service.

If you've got gigabit service, then, by all means, consider cloud-based backup.  It gives you the double advantage of having a backup and having that backup not colocated with the machine being backed up, so if disaster strikes with something like a house fire, you are not nearly so likely to lose your backup as you are if you have it only on a local drive (even if you store that drive in a fireproof safe).  But if you have slow-ish to truly slow internet service and substantial data to back up, cloud-based backup is not likely going to be a good fit.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


 

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 12:35 PM, James Homuth wrote:
What’s more important? Speed, or reliability?
-
Both.

Many of us don't have 15 hours to let our machines sit and try to backup to the cloud.  Local backups are also not unreliable, either.

Almost any computer user will, at some point in their life, have at least one system drive failure.  Having a full system image backup, on any media, is far more important insurance than the choice of media is.  That's one of the reasons I have two backup drives and alternate between them each month.  Belt and braces approach, but all local, which is my preference, but need not be anyone else's.

I don't get why the reaction to what I posted anyway.  It is a consideration, and a legitimate one.  I didn't tell anyone where their personal dividing line for the tradeoff should be, just that they need to be aware of the tradeoff.  Now they are.  Let the decision fall with the decision-makers.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


Chris Hill
 

Online backups are fine if all you need to back up is data and you have a good Internet connection.  I often recommend them to my clients mainly because I know they won’t do anything more. Personally I use Brian‘s approach mainly because my Internet is slow DSL and I often wanna restore a whole system not just the data on it


On Feb 14, 2022, at 11:45, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 12:35 PM, James Homuth wrote:
What’s more important? Speed, or reliability?
-
Both.

Many of us don't have 15 hours to let our machines sit and try to backup to the cloud.  Local backups are also not unreliable, either.

Almost any computer user will, at some point in their life, have at least one system drive failure.  Having a full system image backup, on any media, is far more important insurance than the choice of media is.  That's one of the reasons I have two backup drives and alternate between them each month.  Belt and braces approach, but all local, which is my preference, but need not be anyone else's.

I don't get why the reaction to what I posted anyway.  It is a consideration, and a legitimate one.  I didn't tell anyone where their personal dividing line for the tradeoff should be, just that they need to be aware of the tradeoff.  Now they are.  Let the decision fall with the decision-makers.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


 

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 01:38 PM, Chris Hill wrote:
I often wanna restore a whole system not just the data on it
-
If someone is to have only "one type of backup" the only type I recommend is full system images.  While one's data is absolutely precious, so is all the time and effort and money you've put in to creating a computing environment to suit yourself.

Getting every scrap of your data back is only part of the equation, at least for most people.  They really want to be able to "pick up exactly where I was" when a backup was taken if the need to recover ever arises.  And the only way to do that is with full system image backups.

I learned this, personally, the very hard way when I was young and stupid and still believed, "Oh, a drive failure/electrical surge/etc. will never happen to me!"  And the sheer pleasure it's been to be "back up and fully running" after less than an hour once replacement parts (usually a drive) have been sourced is indescribable.  [Several of my clients who have experienced a catastrophic failure after I got them turned on to doing regular, cyclic full system image backups have said the same.  One, in particular, who was a screen reader user.]
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


Glenn / Lenny
 


Another way to make easy backups is to use a hypervisor, like VmWare player, and install windows 10 as a virtual machine.
You can let VmWare do snapshots, or you can do like I do and once in a while zip up the windows folder that is in the VmWare folder, and that can be copied anywhere.
You can even unzip it onto a thumb drive, and boot to that if your HD fails.
One might want an SSD with a cable for faster performance, but a class 10 flash card would work, it would be a bit slower booting up.
I'm running windows 7 and Linux in a VM, after I boot to windows 10.
Also, if an operating system in a virtual machine gets infected, it cannot migrate out to the host operating system.
So if something happens to my windows 7, I can move it out of the VmWare folder and unzip the good copy and boot up.
VmWare is free for personal use.
 
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2022 12:49 PM
Subject: Re: back ups

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 01:38 PM, Chris Hill wrote:
I often wanna restore a whole system not just the data on it
-
If someone is to have only "one type of backup" the only type I recommend is full system images.  While one's data is absolutely precious, so is all the time and effort and money you've put in to creating a computing environment to suit yourself.

Getting every scrap of your data back is only part of the equation, at least for most people.  They really want to be able to "pick up exactly where I was" when a backup was taken if the need to recover ever arises.  And the only way to do that is with full system image backups.

I learned this, personally, the very hard way when I was young and stupid and still believed, "Oh, a drive failure/electrical surge/etc. will never happen to me!"  And the sheer pleasure it's been to be "back up and fully running" after less than an hour once replacement parts (usually a drive) have been sourced is indescribable.  [Several of my clients who have experienced a catastrophic failure after I got them turned on to doing regular, cyclic full system image backups have said the same.  One, in particular, who was a screen reader user.]
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


Glenn / Lenny
 


Here's a youtube on the beauty of virtual machines, which I believe is the best route, businesses are using them for backups.
The guy in this video is using VirtualBox, and I don't know if it is as accessible as VmWare, which is the one I use, but they do the same thing.
Also, he shows a way to change the BIOS, but I have never had to do that to
my BIOS to run a virtual machine.
Here's the link:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wX75Z-4MEoM

Glenn
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2022 1:08 PM
Subject: Re: back ups

Another way to make easy backups is to use a hypervisor, like VmWare player, and install windows 10 as a virtual machine.
You can let VmWare do snapshots, or you can do like I do and once in a while zip up the windows folder that is in the VmWare folder, and that can be copied anywhere.
You can even unzip it onto a thumb drive, and boot to that if your HD fails.
One might want an SSD with a cable for faster performance, but a class 10 flash card would work, it would be a bit slower booting up.
I'm running windows 7 and Linux in a VM, after I boot to windows 10.
Also, if an operating system in a virtual machine gets infected, it cannot migrate out to the host operating system.
So if something happens to my windows 7, I can move it out of the VmWare folder and unzip the good copy and boot up.
VmWare is free for personal use.
 
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2022 12:49 PM
Subject: Re: back ups

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 01:38 PM, Chris Hill wrote:
I often wanna restore a whole system not just the data on it
-
If someone is to have only "one type of backup" the only type I recommend is full system images.  While one's data is absolutely precious, so is all the time and effort and money you've put in to creating a computing environment to suit yourself.

Getting every scrap of your data back is only part of the equation, at least for most people.  They really want to be able to "pick up exactly where I was" when a backup was taken if the need to recover ever arises.  And the only way to do that is with full system image backups.

I learned this, personally, the very hard way when I was young and stupid and still believed, "Oh, a drive failure/electrical surge/etc. will never happen to me!"  And the sheer pleasure it's been to be "back up and fully running" after less than an hour once replacement parts (usually a drive) have been sourced is indescribable.  [Several of my clients who have experienced a catastrophic failure after I got them turned on to doing regular, cyclic full system image backups have said the same.  One, in particular, who was a screen reader user.]
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


John Covici
 

You need both a backup drive and a cloud backup to be safe. What
happens if there is a fire or flood in your house to the backup drive?

On Mon, 14 Feb 2022 12:35:15 -0500,
James Homuth wrote:

[1 <text/plain; utf-8 (quoted-printable)>]
I do not have super fast internet, and several TB of data to back up. What’s more important? Speed, or reliability? Sure it took a while, but that several TB of data is backed up now. If any single one of my drives fails, I’m covered.



From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: February 14, 2022 12:23 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups



Not that I don't think cloud-based backup isn't a great idea, because it is, but before anyone considers going that route you need to have very fast internet service indeed if you have any substantial amount of data to back-up.

My own system disk contains about 600 GB of data, and that takes hours to back up at USB 3.0 speeds to a local hard drive, and those speeds are virtually certain to be much faster than a very great many of us have with our internet service.

If you've got gigabit service, then, by all means, consider cloud-based backup. It gives you the double advantage of having a backup and having that backup not colocated with the machine being backed up, so if disaster strikes with something like a house fire, you are not nearly so likely to lose your backup as you are if you have it only on a local drive (even if you store that drive in a fireproof safe). But if you have slow-ish to truly slow internet service and substantial data to back up, cloud-based backup is not likely going to be a good fit.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

~ Kim Chernin








[2 <text/html; utf-8 (quoted-printable)>]
--
Your life is like a penny. You're going to lose it. The question is:
How do
you spend it?

John Covici wb2una
covici@...


James Homuth
 

>Many of us don't have 15 hours to let our machines sit and try to backup to the cloud.  Local backups are also not unreliable, either.

 

Unless you’re one of those folks who turns off their machine when they’re not using it, which is actually not great for the machine, the machine’s going to be connected for that 15 hours. It may as well be backing up.

 

Also: what reaction? I was simply stating the problem isn’t as significant as your post made it sound.


 

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 02:48 PM, James Homuth wrote:
Unless you’re one of those folks who turns off their machine when they’re not using it, which is actually not great for the machine, the machine’s going to be connected for that 15 hours. It may as well be backing up.
-
My computer is up and running 24/7 most days, but when I'm using it I don't need an ongoing backup slowing things down, and it does because of all of the disk I/O.

I kick off my system image backups before I retire for the evening so that they will occur while I'm asleep, and be completely done before I am sitting in front of the computer again.  That would never be the case, for me (and, for many others), were I to be using cloud-based backup.

But with this, I'm done.  The speed issue, and what it means, has been addressed.  People now are making an informed decision.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


 

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 02:39 PM, John Covici wrote:
You need both a backup drive and a cloud backup to be safe. What happens if there is a fire or flood in your house to the backup drive?
-
Actually, you don't, but if you want to be entirely safe you would want one backup that you have stored at a location that's not the same as your computer, even if the one at the same location is in a fireproof box.

I actually know of people who have one backup drive sitting in their desks and another that they keep in the trunk of their car, or in their detached garage, or the like.  After they take their backup they copy the image file off of "the drive that stays home" on to the other one and promptly stash it "not at home."

Heaven knows that cloud backup is a lot more convenient if you've got sufficient upload speed for the throughput required.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin


James Bentley
 

I use 3 small fire proof boxes to store all of my external drives. These
small fire proof boxes are then placed in a large heavy duty fire proof box.

I hope I do not have to have a fire to find out if two fire boxes really
work.

James B

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Covici
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2022 1:39 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

You need both a backup drive and a cloud backup to be safe. What
happens if there is a fire or flood in your house to the backup drive?

On Mon, 14 Feb 2022 12:35:15 -0500,
James Homuth wrote:

[1 <text/plain; utf-8 (quoted-printable)>]
I do not have super fast internet, and several TB of data to back up.
What?s more important? Speed, or reliability? Sure it took a while, but that
several TB of data is backed up now. If any single one of my drives fails,
I?m covered.



From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: February 14, 2022 12:23 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups



Not that I don't think cloud-based backup isn't a great idea, because it
is, but before anyone considers going that route you need to have very fast
internet service indeed if you have any substantial amount of data to
back-up.

My own system disk contains about 600 GB of data, and that takes hours to
back up at USB 3.0 speeds to a local hard drive, and those speeds are
virtually certain to be much faster than a very great many of us have with
our internet service.

If you've got gigabit service, then, by all means, consider cloud-based
backup. It gives you the double advantage of having a backup and having
that backup not colocated with the machine being backed up, so if disaster
strikes with something like a house fire, you are not nearly so likely to
lose your backup as you are if you have it only on a local drive (even if
you store that drive in a fireproof safe). But if you have slow-ish to
truly slow internet service and substantial data to back up, cloud-based
backup is not likely going to be a good fit.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

~ Kim Chernin








[2 <text/html; utf-8 (quoted-printable)>]
--
Your life is like a penny. You're going to lose it. The question is:
How do
you spend it?

John Covici wb2una
covici@...


James Bentley
 

If I backed up two laptops and one iPhone twice a month, I would probably get a warning from my ISP telling me that I went over my data limit for the month.

 

James B 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of James Homuth
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2022 1:48 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

 

>Many of us don't have 15 hours to let our machines sit and try to backup to the cloud.  Local backups are also not unreliable, either.

 

Unless you’re one of those folks who turns off their machine when they’re not using it, which is actually not great for the machine, the machine’s going to be connected for that 15 hours. It may as well be backing up.

 

Also: what reaction? I was simply stating the problem isn’t as significant as your post made it sound.


Justin Williams
 

Okay, then I really should spend the 18 dollars for a terabyte harddrive to get the most out of a back up?

 

Which is fine with me, I have no problem with doing that.

 

Justin

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, February 14, 2022 4:34 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: back ups

 

On Mon, Feb 14, 2022 at 02:48 PM, James Homuth wrote:

Unless you’re one of those folks who turns off their machine when they’re not using it, which is actually not great for the machine, the machine’s going to be connected for that 15 hours. It may as well be backing up.

-
My computer is up and running 24/7 most days, but when I'm using it I don't need an ongoing backup slowing things down, and it does because of all of the disk I/O.

I kick off my system image backups before I retire for the evening so that they will occur while I'm asleep, and be completely done before I am sitting in front of the computer again.  That would never be the case, for me (and, for many others), were I to be using cloud-based backup.

But with this, I'm done.  The speed issue, and what it means, has been addressed.  People now are making an informed decision.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Friendship. . . Intimacy, untroubled by eros.

         ~ Kim Chernin