moderated Most accessible antivirus or security suite with JAWS


val and david paul <valanddavidp@...>
 

I used Eset for a couple of years, but found that it slowed down my pc, and became very unaccessible.

Now i'm quite happy with windows defender.

Why put out for an expensive anti virus when windows defender works just as well, and is very accessible.


Val.

On 20/02/2021 15:47, Richard Turner wrote:
I have found no good reason to change from using Windows Defender.
So long as it is all turned on, and one uses basic common sense, it works great!
I used to pay for Eset, until Windows 10 and Windows Defender came along not to mention the accessibility went down the tubes.
I've never had a virus, and it has caught suspicious software the few times I've downloaded something that wasn't safe.
Why spend money when it isn't necessary.



Richard

Ralph's Observation: It is a mistake to allow any mechanical object<>to realize that you are in a hurry.


My web site, www.turner42.com



-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of soner
Sent: Saturday, February 20, 2021 7:21 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Most accessible antivirus or security suite with JAWS

I use exactly the same config you do, and am pretty happy with it.

On 2/19/21, Phillip Gross <phillip_gross@outlook.com> wrote:
The subject line kind of says it all doesn't it? I've been using the
combination of MalwareBytes Premium and Windows Defender for a couple
of years. It's time to renew the Malwarebytes subscription and I
figured I would revisit my options.

From what I've learned Eset may or may not be accessible. People on
here say it isn't. Their website gives instructions on installing a
screen reader compatibility file to make it work with NVDA or JAWS. I
lean towards taking the word of the screen reader users who have actually used it.

Trend Micro and Bit Defender May or may not be accessible. There is a
government agency in Texas, I can't remember which one, that signed an
agreement for a 3rd party vender to provide them with software. This
vender provides Trend Micro and Bit Defender. This agency says it
won't use software that isn't accessible. We all know how much those
statements are worth.

I know the good and bad points of MalwareBytes and Windows Defender.

Having said all of that what do you recommend, what do you use, how
accessible is it, and what do and don't you like about it? Thanks in
advance.












Randy Barnett
 

I agree with Brian on this point. There's really no need for a third-party anti virus anymore. just as you really don't need see cleaner or any of those types of apps anymore. You can do it all within windows with built-in applications that are tested with windows.

Randy Barnett

On Feb 20, 2021, at 8:26 AM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

On Sat, Feb 20, 2021 at 06:24 AM, Phillip Gross wrote:
And believe it or not I’m really not trying to attack someone’ else’s product of choice.
-
Nor am I.

But as a working computer tech I can say, without any hesitation, that third-party security suites can often cause unanticipated issues, and no one really knows why.  I have never seen Windows Security do this, which is unsurprising, as it's part of Windows and gets tested as part of it.

My main point is that what you hear about Windows Defender, or to be completely accurate I should say Windows Defender as implemented prior to Windows 8, is not accurate when it comes to Windows Defender or Windows Security as implemented since Windows 8.  The claims that Defender was a substandard option were quite accurate up through the Windows 7 era if you wanted "maximum possible protection."  This is no longer the case.  And for anyone, who likes anything, who wants to say something like, "But {my favored product} ranked above Windows Security in {specific lab's tests at a specific time}," I say look at more testing cycles and at multiple labs.  Where products rank changes from testing cycle to testing cycle and with precisely what is being used as the test samples.  The difference between number one and number five (or even number ten) on a top ten list is likely to be negligible in real world situations.

There are lots of good products out there, and there's nothing wrong with choosing a third-party suite if that's what you prefer.  But don't make the mistake of believing that one testing ranking for one testing cycle means that your chosen product will stay in that position, because it won't.  They all shuffle around.

Quietman7, a security expert who's a very active contributor on Bleeping Computer, wrote the following, which is well worth reading: Reflections on Antivirus/Antimalware Testing & Comparisons

Then, taking what he wrote into consideration, have a look at where your chosen security suite falls in the most recent, and a couple of previous, testing results for these (or other, there are more) antivirus/security suite testing labs:

AV Test

AV Comparatives

SE Labs  (Reports Page)

MRG Effitas  (360 Protection Testing Category)

 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


 

On Sat, Feb 20, 2021 at 06:24 AM, Phillip Gross wrote:
And believe it or not I’m really not trying to attack someone’ else’s product of choice.
-
Nor am I.

But as a working computer tech I can say, without any hesitation, that third-party security suites can often cause unanticipated issues, and no one really knows why.  I have never seen Windows Security do this, which is unsurprising, as it's part of Windows and gets tested as part of it.

My main point is that what you hear about Windows Defender, or to be completely accurate I should say Windows Defender as implemented prior to Windows 8, is not accurate when it comes to Windows Defender or Windows Security as implemented since Windows 8.  The claims that Defender was a substandard option were quite accurate up through the Windows 7 era if you wanted "maximum possible protection."  This is no longer the case.  And for anyone, who likes anything, who wants to say something like, "But {my favored product} ranked above Windows Security in {specific lab's tests at a specific time}," I say look at more testing cycles and at multiple labs.  Where products rank changes from testing cycle to testing cycle and with precisely what is being used as the test samples.  The difference between number one and number five (or even number ten) on a top ten list is likely to be negligible in real world situations.

There are lots of good products out there, and there's nothing wrong with choosing a third-party suite if that's what you prefer.  But don't make the mistake of believing that one testing ranking for one testing cycle means that your chosen product will stay in that position, because it won't.  They all shuffle around.

Quietman7, a security expert who's a very active contributor on Bleeping Computer, wrote the following, which is well worth reading: Reflections on Antivirus/Antimalware Testing & Comparisons

Then, taking what he wrote into consideration, have a look at where your chosen security suite falls in the most recent, and a couple of previous, testing results for these (or other, there are more) antivirus/security suite testing labs:

AV Test

AV Comparatives

SE Labs  (Reports Page)

MRG Effitas  (360 Protection Testing Category)

 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


Richard Turner
 

I have found no good reason to change from using Windows Defender.
So long as it is all turned on, and one uses basic common sense, it works great!
I used to pay for Eset, until Windows 10 and Windows Defender came along not to mention the accessibility went down the tubes.
I've never had a virus, and it has caught suspicious software the few times I've downloaded something that wasn't safe.
Why spend money when it isn't necessary.



Richard

Ralph's Observation: It is a mistake to allow any mechanical object<>to realize that you are in a hurry.


My web site, www.turner42.com

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of soner
Sent: Saturday, February 20, 2021 7:21 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Most accessible antivirus or security suite with JAWS

I use exactly the same config you do, and am pretty happy with it.

On 2/19/21, Phillip Gross <phillip_gross@outlook.com> wrote:
The subject line kind of says it all doesn't it? I've been using the
combination of MalwareBytes Premium and Windows Defender for a couple
of years. It's time to renew the Malwarebytes subscription and I
figured I would revisit my options.

From what I've learned Eset may or may not be accessible. People on
here say it isn't. Their website gives instructions on installing a
screen reader compatibility file to make it work with NVDA or JAWS. I
lean towards taking the word of the screen reader users who have actually used it.

Trend Micro and Bit Defender May or may not be accessible. There is a
government agency in Texas, I can't remember which one, that signed an
agreement for a 3rd party vender to provide them with software. This
vender provides Trend Micro and Bit Defender. This agency says it
won't use software that isn't accessible. We all know how much those
statements are worth.

I know the good and bad points of MalwareBytes and Windows Defender.

Having said all of that what do you recommend, what do you use, how
accessible is it, and what do and don't you like about it? Thanks in
advance.






soner
 

I use exactly the same config you do, and am pretty happy with it.

On 2/19/21, Phillip Gross <phillip_gross@outlook.com> wrote:
The subject line kind of says it all doesn’t it? I’ve been using the
combination of MalwareBytes Premium and Windows Defender for a couple of
years. It’s time to renew the Malwarebytes subscription and I figured I
would revisit my options.

From what I’ve learned Eset may or may not be accessible. People on here say
it isn’t. Their website gives instructions on installing a screen reader
compatibility file to make it work with NVDA or JAWS. I lean towards taking
the word of the screen reader users who have actually used it.

Trend Micro and Bit Defender May or may not be accessible. There is a
government agency in Texas, I can’t remember which one, that signed an
agreement for a 3rd party vender to provide them with software. This vender
provides Trend Micro and Bit Defender. This agency says it won’t use
software that isn’t accessible. We all know how much those statements are
worth.

I know the good and bad points of MalwareBytes and Windows Defender.

Having said all of that what do you recommend, what do you use, how
accessible is it, and what do and don’t you like about it? Thanks in
advance.






paul lemm
 

Hi,

 

For what it’s worth I personally use Viper, it’s a paid anti-virus solution, but I’ve found it to be fairly accessible. There are a few things which don’t work perfectly, but on the whole I’ve found it more accessible than some other paid solutions I’ve tried which are out there (like Bitdefender etc). I do have to confess though honestly I don’t really often have to physically open the program and use it. mainly if I want to start or stop a scan, turn off the firewall  or for some reason want to exit viper I can do this all from its menu options from the windows system tray, but the few times I have had to open up the program I’ve been able to navigate ok, but again, I haven’t really played around with many of its more advanced features. I don’t notice any slow down when its scanning, but by the same token I have a  fairly decent PC,  so not sure how it might  be on a slower system. The other observation is when it is scanning, if you open the program you can see it is performing a scan, but you can’t see  how far through the scan it currently is. I saw a post on another forum where another screen reader user said that they are apparently very open to accessibility feedback too.

 

Paul

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Phillip Gross
Sent: 20 February 2021 11:24
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Most accessible antivirus or security suite with JAWS

 

Unfortunately I am away from home now and can’t pull up that report. I can tell you that it was the week of Christmas, not much was going on, and I hadn’t downloaded much.

Also, something I found interesting for people who use browsers other than Edge or possibly old versions of IE. The malware protection of Windows defender doesn’t extend to other browsers.


Anyway, this is an argument that has been played out on this list many times. Perhaps I phrased my question incorrectly when I asked people what they liked. I was most concerned about the accessibility of different solutions. I have used defender and I know how it works. I am not ruling out continuing to use defender. What I am doing is saying, “hey, It’s been a while. Maybe I should look at all of my solutions and see what would work best for me at this point and time.” I’m glad people like it. I’m glad it’s come a long way since I first played with it 10 or so years ago. And believe it or not I’m really not trying to attack someone’ else’s product of choice.


Phillip Gross
 

Unfortunately I am away from home now and can’t pull up that report. I can tell you that it was the week of Christmas, not much was going on, and I hadn’t downloaded much.

Also, something I found interesting for people who use browsers other than Edge or possibly old versions of IE. The malware protection of Windows defender doesn’t extend to other browsers.


Anyway, this is an argument that has been played out on this list many times. Perhaps I phrased my question incorrectly when I asked people what they liked. I was most concerned about the accessibility of different solutions. I have used defender and I know how it works. I am not ruling out continuing to use defender. What I am doing is saying, “hey, It’s been a while. Maybe I should look at all of my solutions and see what would work best for me at this point and time.” I’m glad people like it. I’m glad it’s come a long way since I first played with it 10 or so years ago. And believe it or not I’m really not trying to attack someone’ else’s product of choice.


 

On Fri, Feb 19, 2021 at 02:07 AM, Phillip Gross wrote:
only malware I have received in the past 2 years was missed by Windows Defender. Luckily a MalwareBytes scan caught it.
-
What kind of malware?

Unfortunately, because scanners catch PUPs now (Potentially Unwanted Programs), which are not malware, many see a PUP and think, malware.  That "potentially" is important.  Most things identified as PUPs are identified as such because, with the advent of the loathsome practice of software bundling, particularly for free programs, stuff ends up getting installed that wasn't done so with intent.  It is most often not malicious, but it is then, by definition, a PUP.  This is one of the reasons I strongly recommend the Unchecky utility.

The fact is that no scanner gets 100% of everything at any given moment in time.  What one catchs now, another won't catch until its next definition update.  It's the nature of the beast.  But unless you're dealing with a novel attack vector, which is the rare exception, virtually any scanner is going to catch it.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


Chris Hill
 

Well, to me, malware bytes is accessible enough and it gets the job done.  I've been using it for several years, and it generally doesn't get in the way and the price for the subscription is pretty good.



On 2/19/2021 01:07, Phillip Gross wrote:
Thanks. As I said it has been a couple of years and I was considering my options.

I studied the test results before I did anything. I realize it’s close to the top and performs well, but so do several others. There aren’t many tests out there that tell you how well something works with a screen reader and I was curious how others performed.

I realize it’s a small, hell minuscule, sample-size but the only malware I have received in the past 2 years was missed by Windows Defender. Luckily a MalwareBytes scan caught it. I’m not denouncing Windows defender because of this.


Finally, something I should have added in my original post, I use my computer for freelance work and receive files who’s origins I can’t always be 100% sure of. I don’t mind paying for peace of mind, I would rather not, but I don’t mind if I have to.


Phillip Gross
 

Thanks. As I said it has been a couple of years and I was considering my options.

I studied the test results before I did anything. I realize it’s close to the top and performs well, but so do several others. There aren’t many tests out there that tell you how well something works with a screen reader and I was curious how others performed.

I realize it’s a small, hell minuscule, sample-size but the only malware I have received in the past 2 years was missed by Windows Defender. Luckily a MalwareBytes scan caught it. I’m not denouncing Windows defender because of this.


Finally, something I should have added in my original post, I use my computer for freelance work and receive files who’s origins I can’t always be 100% sure of. I don’t mind paying for peace of mind, I would rather not, but I don’t mind if I have to.


 

On Thu, Feb 18, 2021 at 09:50 PM, Soronel Haetir wrote:
In my experience Windows Defender is perfectly accessible and does a fine job.
-
Yup.  If you're using Windows 8.1 or Windows 10 then Windows Security is the way to go.

Look at the most recent testing results from the following antivirus/security testing labs, along with the historical results from the past several years if you want to see how Windows Security/Defender has been performing.  Windows Security has been solidly in the top 10, often top 5, and frequently beats out several well-known competitors that one must pay for.

AV Test

AV Comparatives

SE Labs  (Reports Page)

MRG Effitas  (360 Protection Testing Category)

The fact that it's turn it on and forget it, for the vast majority of users, as well as being accessible makes it an ideal choice.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

One does not discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

           ~ André Gide


Soronel Haetir
 

In my experience Windows Defender is perfectly accessible and does a fine job.

On 2/18/21, Phillip Gross <phillip_gross@outlook.com> wrote:
The subject line kind of says it all doesn’t it? I’ve been using the
combination of MalwareBytes Premium and Windows Defender for a couple of
years. It’s time to renew the Malwarebytes subscription and I figured I
would revisit my options.

From what I’ve learned Eset may or may not be accessible. People on here say
it isn’t. Their website gives instructions on installing a screen reader
compatibility file to make it work with NVDA or JAWS. I lean towards taking
the word of the screen reader users who have actually used it.

Trend Micro and Bit Defender May or may not be accessible. There is a
government agency in Texas, I can’t remember which one, that signed an
agreement for a 3rd party vender to provide them with software. This vender
provides Trend Micro and Bit Defender. This agency says it won’t use
software that isn’t accessible. We all know how much those statements are
worth.

I know the good and bad points of MalwareBytes and Windows Defender.

Having said all of that what do you recommend, what do you use, how
accessible is it, and what do and don’t you like about it? Thanks in
advance.





--
Soronel Haetir
soronel.haetir@gmail.com


Phillip Gross
 

The subject line kind of says it all doesn’t it? I’ve been using the combination of MalwareBytes Premium and Windows Defender for a couple of years. It’s time to renew the Malwarebytes subscription and I figured I would revisit my options.

From what I’ve learned Eset may or may not be accessible. People on here say it isn’t. Their website gives instructions on installing a screen reader compatibility file to make it work with NVDA or JAWS. I lean towards taking the word of the screen reader users who have actually used it.

Trend Micro and Bit Defender May or may not be accessible. There is a government agency in Texas, I can’t remember which one, that signed an agreement for a 3rd party vender to provide them with software. This vender provides Trend Micro and Bit Defender. This agency says it won’t use software that isn’t accessible. We all know how much those statements are worth.

I know the good and bad points of MalwareBytes and Windows Defender.

Having said all of that what do you recommend, what do you use, how accessible is it, and what do and don’t you like about it? Thanks in advance.