locked Subject Change: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity


Dave...
 


Cindy, that's a very good question. And then ask yourself the same...
 
Dave Carlson
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

----- Original Message -----
From: Cindy Ray
Sent: Tuesday, February 09, 2016 12:40 PM
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

How come you all don’t change the subject lines on these messages?

Cindy Lou Ray

 

 

From: Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS) [mailto:Ted.Lisle@...]
Sent: Tuesday, February 9, 2016 2:20 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

Uh huh!

 

From: David Moore [mailto:jesusloves1966@...]
Sent: Monday, February 08, 2016 4:30 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

Hi Ted,

When my alarm goes off, instead of 49, I feel 63 Lol! Have a great one.

 

 

Sent: Monday, February 8, 2016 11:55 AM

Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

Hope so, I’m 63.  I don’t feel it, except at 4:00 A.M. , when I respond to that darn alarm; then I feel every minute of it!

 

Ted

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, February 05, 2016 11:52 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

 

On Fri, Feb 5, 2016 at 02:45 am, Angel <angel238@...> wrote:

do so with arrogance

Sincerely, physician, heal thyself.

Also, I don't think that 53 years is "youthful" in any common sense of the term.


 

Asked and answered on the original thread.

I doubt that people are thankful for the creation of a thread to complain about another thread that's been suffering thread drift for some days now.  It could lead to some "interesting" snowballing were people to do that on a routine basis.  Not changing the subject allows people to avoid uninteresting content far more easily.  If there's actually another serious subject, then create a new thread.

Brian


Nicole Massey <nyyki@...>
 

I think that changing a subject line to reflect the current topic is both helpful and respectful to the other members of the group. Assuming topic drift is a lot to ask, and any threading code worth its salt should be able to keep threads in the same conversation using message header data. (Even Outlook Express could do this back in 1995) That said, it's also very helpful if old threads are referenced in the subject line to let folks know it's drift from the prior topic. This has been the standard for netiquette dating back from the BBS and DARPANet days.
Here's an example of such a subject line:
Subject: USB Lego Interface (Was: Accessible Chutes and Ladders Diagnostics)
This both preserves thread awareness while also giving folks who may have dropped the thread a chance to return to it if they're interested. And it also helps moderators in monitoring topicality of a thread.

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Wednesday, February 10, 2016 9:44 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Subject Change: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

Asked and answered on the original thread.

I doubt that people are thankful for the creation of a thread to complain about another thread that's been suffering thread drift for some days now. It could lead to some "interesting" snowballing were people to do that on a routine basis. Not changing the subject allows people to avoid uninteresting content far more easily. If there's actually another serious subject, then create a new thread.

Brian


 

On Wed, Feb 10, 2016 at 08:12 am, Nicole Massey <nyyki@...> wrote:
I think that changing a subject line to reflect the current topic is both helpful and respectful to the other members of the group.

 And I don't think that anyone would argue that fact provided the new subject might possibly have any interest to the broader group.  If you've dropped reading the originally referenced thread I will pretty much assure you that things like discussing our experience of age, how many 'c's are in Al Pacino's name, and a plethora of trivial sidebars are entirely unlikely to be subjects worthy of their own threads.

There's a balance to be struck, and so far not renaming most of the drifted contributions seems entirely reasonable based upon their very content.  They're not topics that warrant a separate thread and most likely would result in wailing about "off topic posts."  This very thread has the very real danger of starting that type of wailing, but here I am!

As far as moderators go, I'm in favor of hands-off except in case of flame war.  I've seen way more than one lively list, with mostly on-topic posts, die because a moderator enforced their own purity tests rather than letting the cohort posting decide what was OK and what was not.

Brian


Nicole Massey <nyyki@...>
 

In the cases you've described, simply adding an OT: to the Subject would probably let the readers know it's gotten far afield of the list's topic range. And yes, I've seen and encountered many examples of over-moderation and also selective moderation too.

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Wednesday, February 10, 2016 10:20 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Subject Change: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

On Wed, Feb 10, 2016 at 08:12 am, Nicole Massey <nyyki@...> wrote:


I think that changing a subject line to reflect the current topic is both helpful and respectful to the other members of the group.

And I don't think that anyone would argue that fact provided the new subject might possibly have any interest to the broader group. If you've dropped reading the originally referenced thread I will pretty much assure you that things like discussing our experience of age, how many 'c's are in Al Pacino's name, and a plethora of trivial sidebars are entirely unlikely to be subjects worthy of their own threads.

There's a balance to be struck, and so far not renaming most of the drifted contributions seems entirely reasonable based upon their very content. They're not topics that warrant a separate thread and most likely would result in wailing about "off topic posts." This very thread has the very real danger of starting that type of wailing, but here I am!

As far as moderators go, I'm in favor of hands-off except in case of flame war. I've seen way more than one lively list, with mostly on-topic posts, die because a moderator enforced their own purity tests rather than letting the cohort posting decide what was OK and what was not.

Brian


James Homuth
 

This thread in particular is a candidate for a closing. A little topic drift is expected on a mailing list this large. That's why I moved the list to groups.io - people who have no interest in the thread can, therefore, not be included in that thread. I've been keeping an eye on the original thread and a few others. For the moment, nothing has happened that's warranted me stepping in. Please keep it that way. In the meantime, if anyone has problems with something on the list, please refer to the policies.
 
James,
List Admin


From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: February-10-16 11:20 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Subject Change: Improving my teaching approach and/or sensitivity

On Wed, Feb 10, 2016 at 08:12 am, Nicole Massey <nyyki@...> wrote:
I think that changing a subject line to reflect the current topic is both helpful and respectful to the other members of the group.

 And I don't think that anyone would argue that fact provided the new subject might possibly have any interest to the broader group.  If you've dropped reading the originally referenced thread I will pretty much assure you that things like discussing our experience of age, how many 'c's are in Al Pacino's name, and a plethora of trivial sidebars are entirely unlikely to be subjects worthy of their own threads.

There's a balance to be struck, and so far not renaming most of the drifted contributions seems entirely reasonable based upon their very content.  They're not topics that warrant a separate thread and most likely would result in wailing about "off topic posts."  This very thread has the very real danger of starting that type of wailing, but here I am!

As far as moderators go, I'm in favor of hands-off except in case of flame war.  I've seen way more than one lively list, with mostly on-topic posts, die because a moderator enforced their own purity tests rather than letting the cohort posting decide what was OK and what was not.

Brian