antivirus program suites


p tusing <ptusing@...>
 

Hi,

 

It was  suggested one try MSE or  Windows Defender.

 

I spent hours and hours trying out antivirus and actually got AVG to work for 10 weeks though it took countless hours of work.

 

Could some one  off list tell me between  MSE and Windows Defender which is easiest to use per the antivirus   and firewall functions?

 

Thank you so very much!

 

Have a fine day.

 

 

 


Mike B. <mb69mach1@...>
 

First, we need to know what operating system you're running.  MSSE / Windows Defender are & do work differently in Windows 7 than  Windows 8 & 10.
Take care.  Mike.  Go Dodgers!
Sent from my iBarstool.
Arguing with a woman is like reading a software license agreement.  In the end you have to ignore everything, & click I agree.

----- Original Message -----
From: p tusing
Sent: Friday, June 23, 2017 1:35 PM
Subject: antivirus program suites

Hi,

 

It was  suggested one try MSE or  Windows Defender.

 

I spent hours and hours trying out antivirus and actually got AVG to work for 10 weeks though it took countless hours of work.

 

Could some one  off list tell me between  MSE and Windows Defender which is easiest to use per the antivirus   and firewall functions?

 

Thank you so very much!

 

Have a fine day.

 

 

 


 

A second for Mike B's request!!

Prior to Windows 8, Microsoft Security Essentials was the Microsoft built-in antivirus and Windows Defender was the built-in antimalware.

With the advent of Windows 8 and continuing afterward these two functions were combined into Windows Defender (and Microsoft Security Essentials disappeared).

When it comes to accessible antivirus and/or antimalware, and depending on the era of Windows, you're not going to beat Microsoft Security Essentials coupled with Windows Defender for Windows 7 and earlier or just "the new" Windows Defender for Windows 8 and later.   You will get all kinds of contentious argument that these "aren't adequate" but I have yet to see them be inadequate for anyone who exercises even the least bit of conscientiousness when interacting with the web.

There are no doubt better products depending on what your particular definition of "better" happens to be.  I have yet to hear of any of these having the ease of accessibility of the built-in Microsoft solutions.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063.413

 
If you don't like someone, the way he holds his spoon will make you furious; if you do like him, he can turn his plate over into your lap and you won't mind.     ~ Irving Becker


Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

And you’re not the only IT pro to express that sentiment to me.  I may have to quit procrastinating before long and find another ISP, and the Microsoft combo will probably be my weapon of choice.

 

Ted

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, June 23, 2017 5:02 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: antivirus program suites

 

A second for Mike B's request!!

Prior to Windows 8, Microsoft Security Essentials was the Microsoft built-in antivirus and Windows Defender was the built-in antimalware.

With the advent of Windows 8 and continuing afterward these two functions were combined into Windows Defender (and Microsoft Security Essentials disappeared).

When it comes to accessible antivirus and/or antimalware, and depending on the era of Windows, you're not going to beat Microsoft Security Essentials coupled with Windows Defender for Windows 7 and earlier or just "the new" Windows Defender for Windows 8 and later.   You will get all kinds of contentious argument that these "aren't adequate" but I have yet to see them be inadequate for anyone who exercises even the least bit of conscientiousness when interacting with the web.

There are no doubt better products depending on what your particular definition of "better" happens to be.  I have yet to hear of any of these having the ease of accessibility of the built-in Microsoft solutions.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063.413

 
If you don't like someone, the way he holds his spoon will make you furious; if you do like him, he can turn his plate over into your lap and you won't mind.     ~ Irving Becker


Gene Stevens
 


Absolutely agree. As a former LAN designer and administrator and security specialist I can tell you that if you use this solution and a bit of common sense you'll be fine. I have four computers running in this house between my self and the wife and children. We are an Internet intensive household running the spectrum from game sites to adult sites and everything in-between and I very rarely run into an issue of virus or now ware infestation using this product.

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, June 26, 2017 7:53 AM
Subject: Re: antivirus program suites

And you’re not the only IT pro to express that sentiment to me.  I may have to quit procrastinating before long and find another ISP, and the Microsoft combo will probably be my weapon of choice.

 

Ted

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, June 23, 2017 5:02 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: antivirus program suites

 

A second for Mike B's request!!

Prior to Windows 8, Microsoft Security Essentials was the Microsoft built-in antivirus and Windows Defender was the built-in antimalware.

With the advent of Windows 8 and continuing afterward these two functions were combined into Windows Defender (and Microsoft Security Essentials disappeared).

When it comes to accessible antivirus and/or antimalware, and depending on the era of Windows, you're not going to beat Microsoft Security Essentials coupled with Windows Defender for Windows 7 and earlier or just "the new" Windows Defender for Windows 8 and later.   You will get all kinds of contentious argument that these "aren't adequate" but I have yet to see them be inadequate for anyone who exercises even the least bit of conscientiousness when interacting with the web.

There are no doubt better products depending on what your particular definition of "better" happens to be.  I have yet to hear of any of these having the ease of accessibility of the built-in Microsoft solutions.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063.413


If you don't like someone, the way he holds his spoon will make you furious; if you do like him, he can turn his plate over into your lap and you won't mind.     ~ Irving Becker


Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

MSE is only for Windows 7.  Windows 10 has Defender built into it.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of p tusing
Sent: 23 June 2017 21:36
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: antivirus program suites

 

Hi,

 

It was  suggested one try MSE or  Windows Defender.

 

I spent hours and hours trying out antivirus and actually got AVG to work for 10 weeks though it took countless hours of work.

 

Could some one  off list tell me between  MSE and Windows Defender which is easiest to use per the antivirus   and firewall functions?

 

Thank you so very much!

 

Have a fine day.

 

 

 


Mike Ulrich <mulrich@...>
 

I’m running MSE with W7. Can I download and install Defender as additional protection against malware, working in conjunction with MSE?

Or is Defender strictly a w10 thing?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Nutt
Sent: Monday, June 26, 2017 7:20 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: antivirus program suites

 

Hi,

 

MSE is only for Windows 7.  Windows 10 has Defender built into it.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of p tusing
Sent: 23 June 2017 21:36
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: antivirus program suites

 

Hi,

 

It was  suggested one try MSE or  Windows Defender.

 

I spent hours and hours trying out antivirus and actually got AVG to work for 10 weeks though it took countless hours of work.

 

Could some one  off list tell me between  MSE and Windows Defender which is easiest to use per the antivirus   and firewall functions?

 

Thank you so very much!

 

Have a fine day.

 

 

 


 

Mike,

       As has been previously noted, what Windows Defender was prior to Windows 8 is not what Windows Defender is in Windows 8 and later.

       I don't have my Windows 7 machine handy, but if memory serves Windows Defender was built-in as the antimalware scanner and is accessible via the Control Panel.  It will often be turned off if you have some third-party security suite installed that does the same sort of malware scanning that it does.   If you have a straight antivirus, whether Microsoft Security Essentials or some other, it will likely be on.

       If it's not there in Control Panel let me know and I'll dig out my Windows 7 laptop later and take a look to find it.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063.413

 
If you don't like someone, the way he holds his spoon will make you furious; if you do like him, he can turn his plate over into your lap and you won't mind.     ~ Irving Becker


Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

It comes with 7.  All it needs is activation.

 

Ted

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike Ulrich
Sent: Monday, June 26, 2017 9:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: antivirus program suites

 

I’m running MSE with W7. Can I download and install Defender as additional protection against malware, working in conjunction with MSE?

Or is Defender strictly a w10 thing?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Nutt
Sent: Monday, June 26, 2017 7:20 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: antivirus program suites

 

Hi,

 

MSE is only for Windows 7.  Windows 10 has Defender built into it.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of p tusing
Sent: 23 June 2017 21:36
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: antivirus program suites

 

Hi,

 

It was  suggested one try MSE or  Windows Defender.

 

I spent hours and hours trying out antivirus and actually got AVG to work for 10 weeks though it took countless hours of work.

 

Could some one  off list tell me between  MSE and Windows Defender which is easiest to use per the antivirus   and firewall functions?

 

Thank you so very much!

 

Have a fine day.

 

 

 


Sugar Lopez <sugarsyl71@...>
 

It’s in my windows panel and it’s turn on

But I don’t know how to work it

sugar

 

‘I have loved the stars too fondly to be fearful of the

night.

 

Sugar

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, June 26, 2017 8:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: antivirus program suites

 

Mike,

       As has been previously noted, what Windows Defender was prior to Windows 8 is not what Windows Defender is in Windows 8 and later.

       I don't have my Windows 7 machine handy, but if memory serves Windows Defender was built-in as the antimalware scanner and is accessible via the Control Panel.  It will often be turned off if you have some third-party security suite installed that does the same sort of malware scanning that it does.   If you have a straight antivirus, whether Microsoft Security Essentials or some other, it will likely be on.

       If it's not there in Control Panel let me know and I'll dig out my Windows 7 laptop later and take a look to find it.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063.413

 
If you don't like someone, the way he holds his spoon will make you furious; if you do like him, he can turn his plate over into your lap and you won't mind.     ~ Irving Becker


 

One doesn't generally "do" anything with either Windows Defender (Win7) & Microsoft Security Essentials (Win7)  or Windows Defender (Win8 and later).

You might occasionally want to check if anything's been detected, but even if it has you should be notified and it should be quarantined without any user action.  These programs exemplify "set it and forget it," which is the goal of pretty much any security software worth having.  Windows Defender (all versions) and Microsoft Security Essentials (Win7 and earlier) all update themselves and their respective definition files on a regular basis.

Provided you don't have a third-party security suite all you need to do is check that they are turned on.  In the case of Microsoft Security Essentials, it isn't built in and you'd have to download it from Microsoft's site, here.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063.413

 
If you don't like someone, the way he holds his spoon will make you furious; if you do like him, he can turn his plate over into your lap and you won't mind.     ~ Irving Becker


Shannon
 

Brian,

At work we have Norton, Semantic anti-virus. Do you know if this is a problematic combination for screen readers?

I have had issues with Win 8.1 and WE and now under Win 10 I have issues with Win 10 telling me that an application has been blocked for my protection.  I can’t  tell if it was Semantic taking the component away or if it is defender. I can’t figure how to get in to see what defender has quarantined  and The Semantic screen is not very friendly. Semantic with win 8.1 would let all the components work but Win 10 will not.

I was told that a fix run on JAWS 18 didn’t work that some functions could not be repaired and wonder if it is Semantic steeling parts of JAWS or if it is Defender. I was told that my copy of JAWS on this machine is not acting like it should. So if it is Semantic I will ask the IT guys to take it off and just run with the Anti-virus anti malware in side of Win 10

Do you have an opinion one way or the other as to Norton and its compatibility with screen readers?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, June 26, 2017 12:31 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: antivirus program suites

 

One doesn't generally "do" anything with either Windows Defender (Win7) & Microsoft Security Essentials (Win7)  or Windows Defender (Win8 and later).

You might occasionally want to check if anything's been detected, but even if it has you should be notified and it should be quarantined without any user action.  These programs exemplify "set it and forget it," which is the goal of pretty much any security software worth having.  Windows Defender (all versions) and Microsoft Security Essentials (Win7 and earlier) all update themselves and their respective definition files on a regular basis.

Provided you don't have a third-party security suite all you need to do is check that they are turned on.  In the case of Microsoft Security Essentials, it isn't built in and you'd have to download it from Microsoft's site, here.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063.413

 
If you don't like someone, the way he holds his spoon will make you furious; if you do like him, he can turn his plate over into your lap and you won't mind.     ~ Irving Becker


Mike B. <mb69mach1@...>
 


Hi Shannon,
 
Chances are that Norton is the primary antivirus program, & Windows Defender has been turned off so there isn't a conflict between the 2 programs, but you should probably check with your work's I T department to make sure.
Take care.  Mike.  Go Dodgers!
Sent from my iBarstool.
Arguing with a woman is like reading a software license agreement.  In the end you have to ignore everything, & click I agree.

----- Original Message -----
From: Shannon
Sent: Monday, June 26, 2017 11:00 AM
Subject: Re: antivirus program suites

Brian,

At work we have Norton, Semantic anti-virus. Do you know if this is a problematic combination for screen readers?

I have had issues with Win 8.1 and WE and now under Win 10 I have issues with Win 10 telling me that an application has been blocked for my protection.  I can’t  tell if it was Semantic taking the component away or if it is defender. I can’t figure how to get in to see what defender has quarantined  and The Semantic screen is not very friendly. Semantic with win 8.1 would let all the components work but Win 10 will not.

I was told that a fix run on JAWS 18 didn’t work that some functions could not be repaired and wonder if it is Semantic steeling parts of JAWS or if it is Defender. I was told that my copy of JAWS on this machine is not acting like it should. So if it is Semantic I will ask the IT guys to take it off and just run with the Anti-virus anti malware in side of Win 10

Do you have an opinion one way or the other as to Norton and its compatibility with screen readers?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, June 26, 2017 12:31 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: antivirus program suites

 

One doesn't generally "do" anything with either Windows Defender (Win7) & Microsoft Security Essentials (Win7)  or Windows Defender (Win8 and later).

You might occasionally want to check if anything's been detected, but even if it has you should be notified and it should be quarantined without any user action.  These programs exemplify "set it and forget it," which is the goal of pretty much any security software worth having.  Windows Defender (all versions) and Microsoft Security Essentials (Win7 and earlier) all update themselves and their respective definition files on a regular basis.

Provided you don't have a third-party security suite all you need to do is check that they are turned on.  In the case of Microsoft Security Essentials, it isn't built in and you'd have to download it from Microsoft's site, here.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063.413


If you don't like someone, the way he holds his spoon will make you furious; if you do like him, he can turn his plate over into your lap and you won't mind.     ~ Irving Becker


 

Shannon,

           On Windows 8 and later, if you are running any third-party antivirus program (and more likely it's a security suite) that will automatically turn off Windows Defender.  You never want two antivirus products, and particularly two with realtime protection [which these days is any commercial one], to be running at the same time.

            I don't know how to respond to your issue regarding whether it's Windows itself or Norton blocking something, but I'd guess Norton before Windows 10.  Surely there is someone sighted in the office who can tell where this message is coming from if it's not being read by the screen reader.  It might be in the pop-up dialog's window frame or be presented using an image (like the Norton logo) in the message dialog that cannot be read or announced.

            In your work situation Windows Defender will not be running so there's nothing to check related to it.  I have not heard of JAWS not working when any third-party antivirus/security suite is running, and this is different than saying that said antivirus/security suite is accessible with JAWS.  Your IT folks had ought to be involved anyway, as this is likely something they are going to have to fix.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063.413

 
If you don't like someone, the way he holds his spoon will make you furious; if you do like him, he can turn his plate over into your lap and you won't mind.     ~ Irving Becker