Jaws and Microsoft Publisher


Shane clark
 

Hi guys,

I wrote in a few weeks ago, but I don't think I got a clear answer. So I wanted to ask again, does anyone know if Jaws is accessible with Microsoft Publisher? Upon doing a Google research, from what I read so far it's not. But just wanted to ask on the list to be Shore. Thanks, Shane.

--

Thanks, Shane.


 

Shane,

          It would be helpful to know what version of JAWS and MS-Publisher you're trying to use together, as this could make a difference.

          In my 10-second testing with Publisher 2010 and JAWS 18 I would say that it is not accessible using JAWS in any meaningful sense of the word accessible.  When I'm tabbing through objects all I get announced is "Tab" with no subsequent announcement of what object is actually selected.  If I select a text box via mouse JAWS will endlessly repeat the first character typed in that text box until I kill speech.

           None of the above may be true if you're using a later version of Publisher or, less likely, a different version of JAWS but I have no way to test that out.  NVDA and Window-Eyes are slightly different, but no better.  I certainly would not be able to make heads nor tails out of what I was doing in Publisher 2010 using any of the previously mentioned screen readers.
--
Brian

        Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.


Lauren Snyder
 

I tried on 2016 version of Publisher. Unfortunately, the application remains as it always has been: you can type in in a text box if a sighted person places you there. Otherwise, it is not accessible with Jaws.

Sincerely,

Lauren Snyder, Ph.D.  
Sent from my iPhone

On May 12, 2017, at 1:55 PM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Shane,

          It would be helpful to know what version of JAWS and MS-Publisher you're trying to use together, as this could make a difference.

          In my 10-second testing with Publisher 2010 and JAWS 18 I would say that it is not accessible using JAWS in any meaningful sense of the word accessible.  When I'm tabbing through objects all I get announced is "Tab" with no subsequent announcement of what object is actually selected.  If I select a text box via mouse JAWS will endlessly repeat the first character typed in that text box until I kill speech.

           None of the above may be true if you're using a later version of Publisher or, less likely, a different version of JAWS but I have no way to test that out.  NVDA and Window-Eyes are slightly different, but no better.  I certainly would not be able to make heads nor tails out of what I was doing in Publisher 2010 using any of the previously mentioned screen readers.
--
Brian

        Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.


Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

Brian, is it possible to do the heavy lifting in Word, then import the result to Publisher?  I seem to recall that from somewhere.

 

Ted

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2017 1:56 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Jaws and Microsoft Publisher

 

Shane,

          It would be helpful to know what version of JAWS and MS-Publisher you're trying to use together, as this could make a difference.

          In my 10-second testing with Publisher 2010 and JAWS 18 I would say that it is not accessible using JAWS in any meaningful sense of the word accessible.  When I'm tabbing through objects all I get announced is "Tab" with no subsequent announcement of what object is actually selected.  If I select a text box via mouse JAWS will endlessly repeat the first character typed in that text box until I kill speech.

           None of the above may be true if you're using a later version of Publisher or, less likely, a different version of JAWS but I have no way to test that out.  NVDA and Window-Eyes are slightly different, but no better.  I certainly would not be able to make heads nor tails out of what I was doing in Publisher 2010 using any of the previously mentioned screen readers.
--
Brian

        Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.


 

Ted,

        One could copy and paste text from any other application to Publisher, and I could get JAWS to read me the text in a given box once I got the text box not selected as an object but with myself placed within it.

         That being said, and at the risk of causing a war [and not by intention, I am willing to be educated], the entire focus of Publisher revolves around the physical visual layout of content.  It's whole reason for being is as a visual design tool.  It's not that I don't think that someone who's blind is incapable of writing copy, discussing what may be wanted as far as layout, etc., but the actual laying out of all the elements that Publisher was meant to be laying out is truly a visual task at its core.  If someone can explain how this could be done (and I'm not talking about filling in a template) by someone who cannot see the result of what they're actually doing, even if they can imagine precisely what they'd like, I'd love to hear it.   This is a case where it seems like the nature of the task itself is primarily visual.

          I've done more work with Publisher than I care to recount and, in fact, used it this afternoon to make labels to create a "nearly invisible" correction to the phone number on my business cards, which has changed since they were printed.
--
Brian

        Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.


Nicole Massey <nyyki@...>
 

If proper layout can be done in Sibelius it can be done in Publisher, though from what folks are saying here it'll probably require some scripts to make it work out, since Publisher is one of those Microsoft products that doesn't like us. (/me gives a sideways glance to Project) That said, scripting isn't trivial. And I'm sort of questioning how vital it is to do this in Publisher, as most of what it does can be done in Word, and it turns out some ugly (from a screen reader perspective) PDF documents.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2017 3:51 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Jaws and Microsoft Publisher

Ted,

One could copy and paste text from any other application to Publisher, and I could get JAWS to read me the text in a given box once I got the text box not selected as an object but with myself placed within it.

That being said, and at the risk of causing a war [and not by intention, I am willing to be educated], the entire focus of Publisher revolves around the physical visual layout of content. It's whole reason for being is as a visual design tool. It's not that I don't think that someone who's blind is incapable of writing copy, discussing what may be wanted as far as layout, etc., but the actual laying out of all the elements that Publisher was meant to be laying out is truly a visual task at its core. If someone can explain how this could be done (and I'm not talking about filling in a template) by someone who cannot see the result of what they're actually doing, even if they can imagine precisely what they'd like, I'd love to hear it. This is a case where it seems like the nature of the task itself is primarily visual.

I've done more work with Publisher than I care to recount and, in fact, used it this afternoon to make labels to create a "nearly invisible" correction to the phone number on my business cards, which has changed since they were printed.
--
Brian

Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.


 

On Fri, May 12, 2017 at 02:06 pm, Nicole Massey wrote:
If proper layout can be done in Sibelius it can be done in Publisher

If basic layout is all that's being sought then I'd definitely go for a tool other than Publisher.

Desktop publishing is about a lot more than simple layout, which can be accomplished with many more accessible tools such as MS-Word.

Fitting the tool to both the user and the actual task, for any user and any actual task, is always a good idea.   Putting someone in the cockpit of a commercial airliner and telling them to fly it when what you're looking for is a paper airplane tossed across a room makes no sense.
--
Brian

        Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.


Nicole Massey <nyyki@...>
 

Yes, of course. And yes, there are a lot more steps in doing desktop layout with Word than with Publisher, as Word isn't optimized for such things. This is why I drew the parallel with Sibelius, which also has some pretty specific layout requirements and *has* been made accessible enough to turn out stuff sighted folks can process into usable information.
I always preferred Framemaker to Publisher myself back in the days when I could see.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2017 4:12 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Jaws and Microsoft Publisher

On Fri, May 12, 2017 at 02:06 pm, Nicole Massey wrote:


If proper layout can be done in Sibelius it can be done in Publisher

If basic layout is all that's being sought then I'd definitely go for a tool other than Publisher.

Desktop publishing is about a lot more than simple layout, which can be accomplished with many more accessible tools such as MS-Word.

Fitting the tool to both the user and the actual task, for any user and any actual task, is always a good idea. Putting someone in the cockpit of a commercial airliner and telling them to fly it when what you're looking for is a paper airplane tossed across a room makes no sense.
--
Brian

Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.


Richard B. McDonald
 

Hi Shane,

 

A few weeks ago, I tried using Publisher 2007 with JAWS 13 and 15.  I found it totally inaccessible.

 

Best,

Richard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Shane clark
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2017 8:24 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Jaws and Microsoft Publisher

 

Hi guys,

I wrote in a few weeks ago, but I don't think I got a clear answer. So I wanted to ask again, does anyone know if Jaws is accessible with Microsoft Publisher? Upon doing a Google research, from what I read so far it's not. But just wanted to ask on the list to be Shore. Thanks, Shane.

--

Thanks, Shane.


Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

If A project absolutely required a tool such as Publisher, one could prepare a reasonable draft in Word, and then turn it over to a pro--just as some of us routinely did in the days before desktop PC's took all the drudgery out of typing.

Ted

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nicole Massey
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2017 5:24 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Jaws and Microsoft Publisher

Yes, of course. And yes, there are a lot more steps in doing desktop layout with Word than with Publisher, as Word isn't optimized for such things. This is why I drew the parallel with Sibelius, which also has some pretty specific layout requirements and *has* been made accessible enough to turn out stuff sighted folks can process into usable information.
I always preferred Framemaker to Publisher myself back in the days when I could see.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, May 12, 2017 4:12 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Jaws and Microsoft Publisher

On Fri, May 12, 2017 at 02:06 pm, Nicole Massey wrote:


If proper layout can be done in Sibelius it can be done in Publisher

If basic layout is all that's being sought then I'd definitely go for a tool other than Publisher.

Desktop publishing is about a lot more than simple layout, which can be accomplished with many more accessible tools such as MS-Word.

Fitting the tool to both the user and the actual task, for any user and any actual task, is always a good idea. Putting someone in the cockpit of a commercial airliner and telling them to fly it when what you're looking for is a paper airplane tossed across a room makes no sense.
--
Brian

Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.