A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it


Brad Martin
 

A couple of years ago we had a discussion on this list about tax preparation software that was accessible. At the time, I recommended MyFreeTaxes.com as basically accessible, with the exception of a captcha at the end and a few flakey buttons here and there. Then last year, my colleagues at United Way Worldwide heard me, and pushed the software provider to do something about it, and we got an audio captcha. That might have actually happened two years ago.

Anyway, fast forward to this year. Tonight I filed my taxes using MyFreeTaxes.com. There was a "captcha" frame, but interestingly, it didn't have a captcha. It had a checkbox I had to check (with the space bar as usual) that said something like, "I'm not a robot." It seems like I've seen this once or twice before, but it makes you wonder why more companies don't use it.

I must say I was happy with the solution, which served my purposes, cost me nothing, and was 100% accessible with JAWS 15, Firefox and Windows 7. In previous years, I think I eventually had to switch to Internet Explorer to finish the job for some reason or another, but not this year. Indeed this was the smoothest experience I have had using MyFreeTaxes, and this is my fourth year to use it.

For those who need to know, the income limit is $62,000 this year, and it really is a smooth experience from start to finish with JAWS. How often can we say that?

Hope this helps you.

Brad


 

Brad,

         What you describe is the reCaptcha.  It has been on tap to replace Captchas for some time now, but will take time to migrate out and become the default.

Brian


Dave...
 


Brad,
 
I guess my real "wow" reaction is that you already filed your taxes. I haven't even gotten all my 1099 yet, much less the preparation. I'm jealous.
 
Dave Carlson
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2016 08:58 PM
Subject: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

A couple of years ago we had a discussion on this list about tax preparation software that was accessible. At the time, I recommended MyFreeTaxes.com as basically accessible, with the exception of a captcha at the end and a few flakey buttons here and there. Then last year, my colleagues at United Way Worldwide heard me, and pushed the software provider to do something about it, and we got an audio captcha. That might have actually happened two years ago.

Anyway, fast forward to this year. Tonight I filed my taxes using MyFreeTaxes.com. There was a "captcha" frame, but interestingly, it didn't have a captcha. It had a checkbox I had to check (with the space bar as usual) that said something like, "I'm not a robot." It seems like I've seen this once or twice before, but it makes you wonder why more companies don't use it.

I must say I was happy with the solution, which served my purposes, cost me nothing, and was 100% accessible with JAWS 15, Firefox and Windows 7. In previous years, I think I eventually had to switch to Internet Explorer to finish the job for some reason or another, but not this year. Indeed this was the smoothest experience I have had using MyFreeTaxes, and this is my fourth year to use it.

For those who need to know, the income limit is $62,000 this year, and it really is a smooth experience from start to finish with JAWS. How often can we say that?

Hope this helps you.

Brad


Brad Martin
 

And now that you mention it, that's exactly what the frame said. "Recaptcha frame". At least, that's how JAWS read it. They can call it whatever they want, so long as it works.

Brad

On 1/23/2016 11:07 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Brad,

         What you describe is the reCaptcha.  It has been on tap to replace Captchas for some time now, but will take time to migrate out and become the default.

Brian



Peter Donahue
 

Good evening everyone,

 

                I encountered a captcha like this on another Website but can’t remember what it was. Glad someone came to their senses and figured out a simple solution to the issues we’ve had with captchas. This system is usable by both blind and deafblind computer users. This is not true of audio captchas. Even people with normal hearing such as my wife have trouble understanding those audio captchas.

 

Peter Donahue

 

 

 

From: Brad Martin [mailto:brad@...]
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2016 10:58 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

 

A couple of years ago we had a discussion on this list about tax preparation software that was accessible. At the time, I recommended MyFreeTaxes.com as basically accessible, with the exception of a captcha at the end and a few flakey buttons here and there. Then last year, my colleagues at United Way Worldwide heard me, and pushed the software provider to do something about it, and we got an audio captcha. That might have actually happened two years ago.

Anyway, fast forward to this year. Tonight I filed my taxes using MyFreeTaxes.com. There was a "captcha" frame, but interestingly, it didn't have a captcha. It had a checkbox I had to check (with the space bar as usual) that said something like, "I'm not a robot." It seems like I've seen this once or twice before, but it makes you wonder why more companies don't use it.

I must say I was happy with the solution, which served my purposes, cost me nothing, and was 100% accessible with JAWS 15, Firefox and Windows 7. In previous years, I think I eventually had to switch to Internet Explorer to finish the job for some reason or another, but not this year. Indeed this was the smoothest experience I have had using MyFreeTaxes, and this is my fourth year to use it.

For those who need to know, the income limit is $62,000 this year, and it really is a smooth experience from start to finish with JAWS. How often can we say that?

Hope this helps you.

Brad


Cristóbal
 

I’ve come across it with a few of my accounts. Ting Mobile and so on. Convenient and completely accessible.

 

From: Brad Martin [mailto:brad@...]
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2016 9:36 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

 

And now that you mention it, that's exactly what the frame said. "Recaptcha frame". At least, that's how JAWS read it. They can call it whatever they want, so long as it works.

Brad

On 1/23/2016 11:07 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Brad,

         What you describe is the reCaptcha.  It has been on tap to replace Captchas for some time now, but will take time to migrate out and become the default.

Brian

 


Gerald Levy
 

 
The last time I encountered one of these check boxes labeled “I am not a robot” and checked it, I was confronted with an image captcha, anyway.  So this system is not foolproof.
 
Gerald
 
 
 

Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2016 11:58 PM
Subject: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it
 
A couple of years ago we had a discussion on this list about tax preparation software that was accessible. At the time, I recommended MyFreeTaxes.com as basically accessible, with the exception of a captcha at the end and a few flakey buttons here and there. Then last year, my colleagues at United Way Worldwide heard me, and pushed the software provider to do something about it, and we got an audio captcha. That might have actually happened two years ago.

Anyway, fast forward to this year. Tonight I filed my taxes using MyFreeTaxes.com. There was a "captcha" frame, but interestingly, it didn't have a captcha. It had a checkbox I had to check (with the space bar as usual) that said something like, "I'm not a robot." It seems like I've seen this once or twice before, but it makes you wonder why more companies don't use it.

I must say I was happy with the solution, which served my purposes, cost me nothing, and was 100% accessible with JAWS 15, Firefox and Windows 7. In previous years, I think I eventually had to switch to Internet Explorer to finish the job for some reason or another, but not this year. Indeed this was the smoothest experience I have had using MyFreeTaxes, and this is my fourth year to use it.

For those who need to know, the income limit is $62,000 this year, and it really is a smooth experience from start to finish with JAWS. How often can we say that?

Hope this helps you.

Brad


Peter Tesar
 

Hello,

 

I’m sure that there are ways to accommodate screen reader users to get around the captcha obstacle.

 

The presence of the statement:

   I am not a robot, check box

 

Is something that screen reader users could be made aware of.

 

Text is put in the alt tag field, which is associated with every image, and screen readers read it.

 

Some years ago I came across a web page with this first line statement:

  Screen Reader users, click here

 

This link was not visible to the sighted. Perhaps the link (and text) had the same foreground and background colors.

 

I’m sure that variations of this technique could be made available for which only screen reader users would know how to handle.

 

Peter T.



-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it
Date: Sun, 24 Jan 2016 06:07:09 -0500
From: Gerald Levy <bwaylimited@...>
Reply-To: jfw@groups.io
To: jfw@groups.io


 
The last time I encountered one of these check boxes labeled “I am not a robot” and checked it, I was confronted with an image captcha, anyway.  So this system is not foolproof.
 
Gerald
 
 
 



Marianne Denning
 

I was helping someone set up a Skype account recently and the audio
version was very easy to understand. That comes from a person who has
never been able to understand the audio in the past.

On 1/24/16, Peter Tesar <ptesar@ca.inter.net> wrote:
Hello,

I’m sure that there are ways to accommodate screen reader users to get
around the captcha obstacle.

The presence of the statement:

I am not a robot, check box

Is something that screen reader users could be made aware of.

Text is put in the alt tag field, which is associated with every image,
and screen readers read it.

Some years ago I came across a web page with this first line statement:

Screen Reader users, click here

This link was not visible to the sighted. Perhaps the link (and text)
had the same foreground and background colors.

I’m sure that variations of this technique could be made available for
which only screen reader users would know how to handle.

Peter T.



-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it
Date: Sun, 24 Jan 2016 06:07:09 -0500
From: Gerald Levy <bwaylimited@verizon.net>
Reply-To: jfw@groups.io
To: jfw@groups.io



The last time I encountered one of these check boxes labeled “I am not a
robot” and checked it, I was confronted with an image captcha, anyway.
So this system is not foolproof.
Gerald


--
Marianne Denning, TVI, MA
Teacher of students who are blind or visually impaired
(513) 607-6053


Tony
 

Fewer sites use Alt-Tags every day.  The more recently a site is created or updated the more likely it will be at least partially unaccessible.

 

I frequently bring this matter to the attention of site owners/programmers and they act like they don’t know what I am talking about.

 

Tony

 

From: Peter Tesar [mailto:ptesar@...]
Sent: Sunday, January 24, 2016 9:43 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

 

Hello,

 

I’m sure that there are ways to accommodate screen reader users to get around the captcha obstacle.

 

The presence of the statement:

   I am not a robot, check box

 

Is something that screen reader users could be made aware of.

 

Text is put in the alt tag field, which is associated with every image, and screen readers read it.

 

Some years ago I came across a web page with this first line statement:

  Screen Reader users, click here

 

This link was not visible to the sighted. Perhaps the link (and text) had the same foreground and background colors.

 

I’m sure that variations of this technique could be made available for which only screen reader users would know how to handle.

 

Peter T.



-------- Forwarded Message --------

Subject:

Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Date:

Sun, 24 Jan 2016 06:07:09 -0500

From:

Gerald Levy <bwaylimited@...>

Reply-To:

jfw@groups.io

To:

jfw@groups.io

 

 

The last time I encountered one of these check boxes labeled “I am not a robot” and checked it, I was confronted with an image captcha, anyway.  So this system is not foolproof.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

 

 


Brent Harding
 


Maybe, but what they're trying to prevent is automated means of creating lots of accounts, or posting spam. Those bots can probably easily read alt tags. I'm not sure what they are doing with the checkbox thing to prevent them from just checking it.
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, January 24, 2016 9:42 AM
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Hello,

I’m sure that there are ways to accommodate screen reader users to get around the captcha obstacle.

The presence of the statement:

   I am not a robot, check box

Is something that screen reader users could be made aware of.

Text is put in the alt tag field, which is associated with every image, and screen readers read it.

Some years ago I came across a web page with this first line statement:

  Screen Reader users, click here

This link was not visible to the sighted. Perhaps the link (and text) had the same foreground and background colors.

I’m sure that variations of this technique could be made available for which only screen reader users would know how to handle.

Peter T.



-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it
Date: Sun, 24 Jan 2016 06:07:09 -0500
From: Gerald Levy <bwaylimited@...>
Reply-To: jfw@groups.io
To: jfw@groups.io


 
The last time I encountered one of these check boxes labeled “I am not a robot” and checked it, I was confronted with an image captcha, anyway.  So this system is not foolproof.
 
Gerald
 
 
 



Tony
 

If that was their intent they would find another way to provide accessibility.

 

They simply do not consider the need, or worse, they don’t care.  After all, it would take a minute or two to do it properly.

 

Tony

 

 

From: Brent Harding [mailto:brent@...]
Sent: Sunday, January 24, 2016 1:00 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

 

Maybe, but what they're trying to prevent is automated means of creating lots of accounts, or posting spam. Those bots can probably easily read alt tags. I'm not sure what they are doing with the checkbox thing to prevent them from just checking it.

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Sunday, January 24, 2016 9:42 AM

Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

 

Hello,

I’m sure that there are ways to accommodate screen reader users to get around the captcha obstacle.

The presence of the statement:

   I am not a robot, check box

Is something that screen reader users could be made aware of.

Text is put in the alt tag field, which is associated with every image, and screen readers read it.

Some years ago I came across a web page with this first line statement:

  Screen Reader users, click here

This link was not visible to the sighted. Perhaps the link (and text) had the same foreground and background colors.

I’m sure that variations of this technique could be made available for which only screen reader users would know how to handle.

Peter T.



-------- Forwarded Message --------

Subject:

Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Date:

Sun, 24 Jan 2016 06:07:09 -0500

From:

Gerald Levy <bwaylimited@...>

Reply-To:

jfw@groups.io

To:

jfw@groups.io

 

 

The last time I encountered one of these check boxes labeled “I am not a robot” and checked it, I was confronted with an image captcha, anyway.  So this system is not foolproof.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

 

 


HAMILTON
 

Brad: From the name, "Ting Mobile", I wonder if this is intended for use only with "mobile" devices. Is it also available to use on a PC. Also, is there a version for IE11? Thanks. Jim H


Brent Harding
 


It's a cellular provider, where they may have found a captcha to deal with.
 

----- Original Message -----
From: HAMILTON
Sent: Tuesday, January 26, 2016 10:18 AM
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Brad: From the name, "Ting Mobile", I wonder if this is intended for use only with "mobile" devices. Is it also available to use on a PC. Also, is there a version for IE11? Thanks. Jim H


Brad Martin
 

Huh? I didn't write anything about Ting Mobile. Sounds like T-Mobile, but I don't know the context for the question.

Brad

On 1/26/2016 10:18 AM, HAMILTON wrote:
Brad: >From the name, "Ting Mobile", I wonder if this is intended for use only with "mobile" devices. Is it also available to use on a PC. Also, is there a version for IE11? Thanks. Jim H