Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought


 
Edited

I generally prefer to teach keystrokes to access the required ribbon options to accomplish something, but this time I might make an exception.

Once you're in an Outlook folder you wish to search it's a simple matter to hit Ctrl+E to be thrown into the search box.  After that things become much more complicated.

If you want to search on the From field, the keystroke sequence to do this is ALT+JS+OM, then one types in the partial or full name or e-mail address one wishes to search on.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "from," open parenthesis, the partial or full name or e-mail address, and a close parenthesis directly in the search box to accomplish precisely the same thing.

If you want to get only messages that have attachments, the keystroke sequence to do this is ALT+JS+H, and that creates a search only for messages that have attachments.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "hasattachments:" followed immediately by either "yes" or "no" and can filter for messages that either do or do not have attachments directly into the search box.

If you want to filter by date, the keystroke sequence is ALT+JS+W, this brings up a drop down menu from which you can choose today, yesterday, this week, last week, this month, last month, this year, or last year.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "received:" followed by one of the previously listed single words or two-word phrases.

All of the above can, of course, be combined together.  There are also additional criteria that can be specified but I'm trying to focus on the most common and useful.

Let's say I'm trying to find an e-mail that I sent to you, last week, that has an attachment on it.  I can do one of two things after hitting CTRL+E:

1.  Immediately type "from(Brian Vogel) received:last week hasattachments:yes" in the search box by hand.

2.  Hit ALT+JS+OM and immediately type "Brian Vogel," then hit ALT+JS+W and use down arrow to go through the dropdown to find last week, then hit ALT+JS+H

The second option is, to me, much more cumbersome than the first, once you know what the search operator terms and formats are.  In addition, it is only through hand entering "hasattachments:no" that one can limit the search to messages that do not have an attachment, no keystroke sequence generates the "no" condition.

I'm sure that some of you have had to use advanced searching to filter out as much extraneous e-mail in your archives as you possibly can before trying to locate a specific message from the returned results.  What say you regarding whether it makes more sense in this case to focus on the search operators that you type yourself versus the keystrokes and typing involved to do each via the ribbon?

Brian


 

After giving this a lot more thought and consideration I decided that the preferred method in this case would definitely be teaching the search operators.  This client is a reasonably good typist and I think the operators themselves are easier to remember than the keystroke sequences.  This is what I've put in her step-by-step instruction sheet:

Microsoft Outlook

Using Advanced Search features to find specific e-mail messages, step-by-step:

1.     Navigate to the folder in Outlook that you wish to search for specific messages, e.g., inbox, sent, etc.  Make sure you’re in that folder for the correct e-mail account you wish to search, too.

2.     Hit CTRL+E to get yourself in to the search edit box

3.     Type in the following search operators, in whatever combination is appropriate to narrow down the messages returned to as few as possible, but without eliminating messages you might want:

a.     to() – Enter a partial or full name or e-mail address between the parenthesis.  For example, to(britechguy), would return only messages sent to the person with “britechguy” as part of their e-mail address. 

b.     from() – Same as to(), but looks at who the e-mail was from instead.

c.     hasattachments:yes|no – If you enter “yes” after the hasattachments: operator only messages that have attachments will be returned.  If you enter “no” then only messages without attachments will be returned.

d.     subject() – Enter a keyword or several keywords that will be searched for in the Subject of the e-mail.  Only those messages with the keyword(s) in the subject will be returned.

e.     received: - Used to filter messages based on when you received them.  Immediately after the colon on the received: operator you will enter one of the following words or two-word phrases

                                                             i.      today

                                                           ii.      yesterday

                                                        iii.      this week

                                                        iv.      last week

                                                           v.      this month

                                                        vi.      last month

                                                      vii.      this year

                                                   viii.      last year



Kimsan
 

No opinion but what about searching for contacts.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 9:40 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

After giving this a lot more thought and consideration I decided that the preferred method in this case would definitely be teaching the search operators.  This client is a reasonably good typist and I think the operators themselves are easier to remember than the keystroke sequences.  This is what I've put in her step-by-step instruction sheet:

Microsoft Outlook

Using Advanced Search features to find specific e-mail messages, step-by-step:

1.     Navigate to the folder in Outlook that you wish to search for specific messages, e.g., inbox, sent, etc.  Make sure you’re in that folder for the correct e-mail account you wish to search, too.

2.     Hit CTRL+E to get yourself in to the search edit box

3.     Type in the following search operators, in whatever combination is appropriate to narrow down the messages returned to as few as possible, but without eliminating messages you might want:

a.     to() – Enter a partial or full name or e-mail address between the parenthesis.  For example, to(britechguy), would return only messages sent to the person with “britechguy” as part of their e-mail address. 

b.     from() – Same as to(), but looks at who the e-mail was from instead.

c.     hasattachments:yes|no – If you enter “yes” after the hasattachments: operator only messages that have attachments will be returned.  If you enter “no” then only messages without attachments will be returned.

d.     subject() – Enter a keyword or several keywords that will be searched for in the Subject of the e-mail.  Only those messages with the keyword(s) in the subject will be returned.

e.     received: - Used to filter messages based on when you received them.  Immediately after the colon on the received: operator you will enter one of the following words or two-word phrases

                                                             i.      today

                                                           ii.      yesterday

                                                        iii.      this week

                                                        iv.      last week

                                                           v.      this month

                                                        vi.      last month

                                                      vii.      this year

                                                   viii.      last year

 


 

Kimsan,

           Believe it or not, I don't think she has any Contacts at all.  She's been relying on the "To:" field to pre-populate as she types based upon who has sent her e-mail or, if it's a first time message, manually entering same.

           I've briefly discussed using Contacts, which I much prefer especially over time, but it's not something she's wished to pursue.  She manages virtually all of her personal name/address/etc. contacts and her calendar via iPhone, not Outlook.  That system has been working for her.

           When it comes to what I teach, most of it is directly driven by what the client in question wants to accomplish.  I will insert certain "suggestions" that I think they had ought to consider, but if they reject a given suggestion, except in the rarest of cases, I simply respect that choice regardless of my personal feelings about the wisdom of it.

Brian


Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Your flexibility is to be commended. I say in situations like that, "it makes sense to him/her."

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 12:50 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

Kimsan,

Believe it or not, I don't think she has any Contacts at all. She's been relying on the "To:" field to pre-populate as she types based upon who has sent her e-mail or, if it's a first time message, manually entering same.

I've briefly discussed using Contacts, which I much prefer especially over time, but it's not something she's wished to pursue. She manages virtually all of her personal name/address/etc. contacts and her calendar via iPhone, not Outlook. That system has been working for her.

When it comes to what I teach, most of it is directly driven by what the client in question wants to accomplish. I will insert certain "suggestions" that I think they had ought to consider, but if they reject a given suggestion, except in the rarest of cases, I simply respect that choice regardless of my personal feelings about the wisdom of it.

Brian


Londa Peterson
 

Hi Brian, To me, neither of these methods is the simplest. The easiest way to do an advanced search is to press control + shift + F. You can then tab through the fields and fill in the ones you want. Once you press enter or spacebar on find now, you can simply press f6 to get to your list of results. As far as I know, these are all Outlook keystrokes. It's much less cumbersome, and you don't have to be a programming geek to do it.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 5:28 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

I generally prefer to teach keystrokes to access the required ribbon options to accomplish something, but this time I might make an exception.

Once you're in an Outlook folder you wish to search it's a simple matter to hit Ctrl+E to be thrown into the search box.  After that things become much more complicated.

If you want to search on the From field, the keystroke sequence to do this is ALT+JS+OM, then one types in the partial or full name or e-mail address one wishes to search on.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "from," open parenthesis, the partial or full name or e-mail address, and a close parenthesis directly in the search box to accomplish precisely the same thing.

If you want to get only messages that have attachments, the keystroke sequence to do this is ALT+JS+H, and that creates a search only for messages that have attachments.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "hasattachments:" followed immediately by either "yes" or "no" and can filter for messages that either do or do not have attachments directly into the search box.

If you want to filter by date, the keystroke sequence is ALT+JS+W, this brings up a drop down menu from which you can choose today, yesterday, this week, last week, this month, last month, this year, or last year.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "received:" followed by one of the previously listed single words or two-word phrases.

All of the above can, of course, be combined together.  There are also additional criteria that can be specified but I'm trying to focus on the most common and useful.

Let's say I'm trying to find an e-mail that I sent, last week, that has an attachment on it.  I can do one of two things after hitting CTRL+E:

1.  Immediately type "from(Brian Vogel) received:last week hasattachments:yes" in the search box by hand.

2.  Hit ALT+JS+OM and immediately type "Brian Vogel," then hit ALT+JS+W and use down arrow to go through the dropdown to find last week, then hit ALT+JS+H

The second option is, to me, much more cumbersome than the first, once you know what the search operator terms and formats are.  In addition, it is only through hand entering "hasattachments:no" that one can limit the search to messages that do not have an attachment, no keystroke sequence generates the "no" condition.

I'm sure that some of you have had to use advanced searching to filter out as much extraneous e-mail in your archives as you possibly can before trying to locate a specific message from the returned results.  What say you regarding whether it makes more sense in this case to focus on the search operators that you type yourself versus the keystrokes and typing involved to do each via the ribbon?

Brian


 

Londa,

             Thanks very, very much for this.  Sitting in Outlook right now, the CTRL+SHIFT alone causes no "next step" to reveal itself, and that's very unusual.  Typically I figure out keyboard shortcuts that I seldom or ever use by hitting the control characters one by one, or in a 2-key combination, and see what reveals itself as follow-up keystroke options on the ribbon.

              CTRL+Shift+F brings up precisely what I had hoped I'd be able to bring up, but could not find the way to do it!

Brian


Adrian Spratt
 

Londa, I agree. One small detail: You don’t need to press enter or spacebar on “find now.” Just press F6 to reach the results field.

 

From: Londa Peterson [mailto:lpeterson@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 3:34 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

Hi Brian, To me, neither of these methods is the simplest. The easiest way to do an advanced search is to press control + shift + F. You can then tab through the fields and fill in the ones you want. Once you press enter or spacebar on find now, you can simply press f6 to get to your list of results. As far as I know, these are all Outlook keystrokes. It's much less cumbersome, and you don't have to be a programming geek to do it.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 5:28 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

I generally prefer to teach keystrokes to access the required ribbon options to accomplish something, but this time I might make an exception.

Once you're in an Outlook folder you wish to search it's a simple matter to hit Ctrl+E to be thrown into the search box.  After that things become much more complicated.

If you want to search on the From field, the keystroke sequence to do this is ALT+JS+OM, then one types in the partial or full name or e-mail address one wishes to search on.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "from," open parenthesis, the partial or full name or e-mail address, and a close parenthesis directly in the search box to accomplish precisely the same thing.

If you want to get only messages that have attachments, the keystroke sequence to do this is ALT+JS+H, and that creates a search only for messages that have attachments.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "hasattachments:" followed immediately by either "yes" or "no" and can filter for messages that either do or do not have attachments directly into the search box.

If you want to filter by date, the keystroke sequence is ALT+JS+W, this brings up a drop down menu from which you can choose today, yesterday, this week, last week, this month, last month, this year, or last year.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "received:" followed by one of the previously listed single words or two-word phrases.

All of the above can, of course, be combined together.  There are also additional criteria that can be specified but I'm trying to focus on the most common and useful.

Let's say I'm trying to find an e-mail that I sent, last week, that has an attachment on it.  I can do one of two things after hitting CTRL+E:

1.  Immediately type "from(Brian Vogel) received:last week hasattachments:yes" in the search box by hand.

2.  Hit ALT+JS+OM and immediately type "Brian Vogel," then hit ALT+JS+W and use down arrow to go through the dropdown to find last week, then hit ALT+JS+H

The second option is, to me, much more cumbersome than the first, once you know what the search operator terms and formats are.  In addition, it is only through hand entering "hasattachments:no" that one can limit the search to messages that do not have an attachment, no keystroke sequence generates the "no" condition.

I'm sure that some of you have had to use advanced searching to filter out as much extraneous e-mail in your archives as you possibly can before trying to locate a specific message from the returned results.  What say you regarding whether it makes more sense in this case to focus on the search operators that you type yourself versus the keystrokes and typing involved to do each via the ribbon?

Brian


 

On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 02:56 pm, Adrian Spratt <adrian@...> wrote:
You don’t need to press enter or spacebar on “find now.” Just press F6 to reach the results field.

 You're correct about not having to land on the Find Now button, but you do have to hit Enter after you've entered all the fields you want to use to actually perform the search.  The F6 then does take you straight to the search results list.

Is there an easy way to jump between the three tabs that does not involve having to use the TAB key to get back to the actual tab label, "Message", "More Choices", or "Advanced."  In this case the client needs to use the "only items with" checkbox with "one or more attachments" combo box choice that's on the "More Choices" tab, but by the time you've filled in what you need to on the "Message" tab it takes forever to make one's way back to the dialog box tabs that one moves between with CTRL+TAB when resting on any one of them.

Brian


Londa Peterson
 

 Thanks. I just learned something new that will make it even easier. Never ever stop learning.  

 

From: Adrian Spratt [mailto:Adrian@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 5:57 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

Londa, I agree. One small detail: You don’t need to press enter or spacebar on “find now.” Just press F6 to reach the results field.

 

From: Londa Peterson [mailto:lpeterson@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 3:34 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

Hi Brian, To me, neither of these methods is the simplest. The easiest way to do an advanced search is to press control + shift + F. You can then tab through the fields and fill in the ones you want. Once you press enter or spacebar on find now, you can simply press f6 to get to your list of results. As far as I know, these are all Outlook keystrokes. It's much less cumbersome, and you don't have to be a programming geek to do it.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 20, 2016 5:28 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

I generally prefer to teach keystrokes to access the required ribbon options to accomplish something, but this time I might make an exception.

Once you're in an Outlook folder you wish to search it's a simple matter to hit Ctrl+E to be thrown into the search box.  After that things become much more complicated.

If you want to search on the From field, the keystroke sequence to do this is ALT+JS+OM, then one types in the partial or full name or e-mail address one wishes to search on.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "from," open parenthesis, the partial or full name or e-mail address, and a close parenthesis directly in the search box to accomplish precisely the same thing.

If you want to get only messages that have attachments, the keystroke sequence to do this is ALT+JS+H, and that creates a search only for messages that have attachments.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "hasattachments:" followed immediately by either "yes" or "no" and can filter for messages that either do or do not have attachments directly into the search box.

If you want to filter by date, the keystroke sequence is ALT+JS+W, this brings up a drop down menu from which you can choose today, yesterday, this week, last week, this month, last month, this year, or last year.  By contrast, one can enter the search operator "received:" followed by one of the previously listed single words or two-word phrases.

All of the above can, of course, be combined together.  There are also additional criteria that can be specified but I'm trying to focus on the most common and useful.

Let's say I'm trying to find an e-mail that I sent, last week, that has an attachment on it.  I can do one of two things after hitting CTRL+E:

1.  Immediately type "from(Brian Vogel) received:last week hasattachments:yes" in the search box by hand.

2.  Hit ALT+JS+OM and immediately type "Brian Vogel," then hit ALT+JS+W and use down arrow to go through the dropdown to find last week, then hit ALT+JS+H

The second option is, to me, much more cumbersome than the first, once you know what the search operator terms and formats are.  In addition, it is only through hand entering "hasattachments:no" that one can limit the search to messages that do not have an attachment, no keystroke sequence generates the "no" condition.

I'm sure that some of you have had to use advanced searching to filter out as much extraneous e-mail in your archives as you possibly can before trying to locate a specific message from the returned results.  What say you regarding whether it makes more sense in this case to focus on the search operators that you type yourself versus the keystrokes and typing involved to do each via the ribbon?

Brian


Londa Peterson
 

Control Tab works from anywhere in the box. The only trouble is that JAWS doesn't speak the change. You have to know what's on each tab to know that you have indeed switched.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 21, 2016 9:10 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

On Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 02:56 pm, Adrian Spratt <adrian@...> wrote:

You don’t need to press enter or spacebar on “find now.” Just press F6 to reach the results field.

 You're correct about not having to land on the Find Now button, but you do have to hit Enter after you've entered all the fields you want to use to actually perform the search.  The F6 then does take you straight to the search results list.

Is there an easy way to jump between the three tabs that does not involve having to use the TAB key to get back to the actual tab label, "Message", "More Choices", or "Advanced."  In this case the client needs to use the "only items with" checkbox with "one or more attachments" combo box choice that's on the "More Choices" tab, but by the time you've filled in what you need to on the "Message" tab it takes forever to make one's way back to the dialog box tabs that one moves between with CTRL+TAB when resting on any one of them.

Brian


 

On Fri, Jan 22, 2016 at 05:51 am, Londa Peterson <lpeterson@...> wrote:
Control Tab works from anywhere in the box. The only trouble is that JAWS doesn't speak the change.

 I'll have to try this again.  Not only does it not speak the change, it doesn't cause Windows to show that the tab has changed, either.  It does show the tab change if you are sitting on one of the tab headings and hit CTRL+TAB then.

When JAWS neither speaks nor causes Windows to show were you've jumped to you're more than a little in limbo, whether you can see or not.  We're also still using beginner level verbosity, too.

Brian


Londa Peterson
 

 Well, the fact that you don't see the change probably explains why JAWS doesn't read it. That's so strange. Try tabbing after you press the control tab and see if it changes then. The other possibility, now that I think of it, is that I'm using Outlook 2007 here. I'll try it on my machine that has 2013 and see if it behaves any differently.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, January 22, 2016 10:15 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

On Fri, Jan 22, 2016 at 05:51 am, Londa Peterson <lpeterson@...> wrote:

Control Tab works from anywhere in the box. The only trouble is that JAWS doesn't speak the change.

 I'll have to try this again.  Not only does it not speak the change, it doesn't cause Windows to show that the tab has changed, either.  It does show the tab change if you are sitting on one of the tab headings and hit CTRL+TAB then.

When JAWS neither speaks nor causes Windows to show were you've jumped to you're more than a little in limbo, whether you can see or not.  We're also still using beginner level verbosity, too.

Brian


 
Edited

On Fri, Jan 22, 2016 at 08:08 am, Londa Peterson <lpeterson@...> wrote:
The other possibility, now that I think of it, is that I'm using Outlook 2007 here. I'll try it on my machine that has 2013 and see if it behaves any differently.

Londa,

            Thanks so much.  What will be funny is if it behaves the same way in 2013, because what I'm using with this client and what I have on my own machine is Outlook 2010.

            Over time I've actually been surprised at what JAWS chooses, and doesn't choose, to read at various points.  In JAWS 14 (I haven't retried in JAWS 17) if you are in a browse dialog and entered the first character or two of a file name you typically get the equivalent of a dropdown box that lists all the files in that folder that begin with those characters.  However, when you use down arrow to go through that list of files JAWS did not say a blessed thing.  If ever there were a place where announcement is needed, that's it.

Brian


Londa Peterson
 

 It would certainly be easier if that worked. My solution is to press shift + tab until I get to the list view. Then I can type the first letter, or several letters if I want, and I'll get fairly close. Hope this helps.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, January 22, 2016 11:15 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

On Fri, Jan 22, 2016 at 08:08 am, Londa Peterson <lpeterson@...> wrote:

The other possibility, now that I think of it, is that I'm using Outlook 2007 here. I'll try it on my machine that has 2013 and see if it behaves any differently.

Londa,

            Thanks so much.  What will be funny is if it behaves the same way in 2013, because what I'm using with this client and what I have on my own machine and this client has on hers.

            Over time I've actually been surprised at what JAWS chooses, and doesn't choose, to read at various points.  In JAWS 14 (I haven't retried in JAWS 17) if you are in a browse dialog and entered the first character or two of a file name you typically get the equivalent of a dropdown box that lists all the files in that folder that begin with those characters.  However, when you use down arrow to go through that list of files JAWS did not say a blessed thing.  If ever there were a place where announcement is needed, that's it.

Brian


 

On Fri, Jan 22, 2016 at 08:20 am, Londa Peterson <lpeterson@...> wrote:
Then I can type the first letter, or several letters if I want, and I'll get fairly close. Hope this helps.

 Londa,

           Is there a trick to getting several letters to work?   I have never been able, on any version of JAWS I've worked with, to get it to recognize the second through nth characters of a file name.  This would be so handy such that if you knew you had a file named file1.txt and file2.txt that you could type in file2 and have JAWS zoom right to the correct one.

           One of the reasons I've started teaching clients how to use Search Everything and the Copy-Paste technique of attaching files is because it's just far less tedious when they know enough of a file name to get search results that are either the single file or very few files, and those will be found anywhere they happen to be on the computer.  The amount of time saved with navigating via browsing when the files in question are nowhere near each other in the folder tree is huge.

Brian 


Adrian Spratt
 

I’ve just tested Londa’s method. The following steps will find messages with attachments in Outlook 2010, and JAWS verbalizes each step :

 

Place focus at the desired message list.

Control-shift-f once to the “Categories” button.

Do not press enter, even though there’s an ellipsis inviting you to do so. Instead, press tab three times.

You land in a checkbox labeled Only items with…” Press spacebar.

Tab once, and “One or more attachments” is the first item in the combo box.

Press enter.

Wait for JAWS to announce “Find Now,” then press F6 to enter the list of search results.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, January 22, 2016 11:29 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

On Fri, Jan 22, 2016 at 08:20 am, Londa Peterson <lpeterson@...> wrote:

Then I can type the first letter, or several letters if I want, and I'll get fairly close. Hope this helps.

 Londa,

           Is there a trick to getting several letters to work?   I have never been able, on any version of JAWS I've worked with, to get it to recognize the second through nth characters of a file name.  This would be so handy such that if you knew you had a file named file1.txt and file2.txt that you could type in file2 and have JAWS zoom right to the correct one.

           One of the reasons I've started teaching clients how to use Search Everything and the Copy-Paste technique of attaching files is because it's just far less tedious when they know enough of a file name to get search results that are either the single file or very few files, and those will be found anywhere they happen to be on the computer.  The amount of time saved with navigating via browsing when the files in question are nowhere near each other in the folder tree is huge.

Brian 


Londa Peterson
 

 The only trick is that you have to type them very quickly. If you stop, you're sunk.  

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, January 22, 2016 11:29 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

On Fri, Jan 22, 2016 at 08:20 am, Londa Peterson <lpeterson@...> wrote:

Then I can type the first letter, or several letters if I want, and I'll get fairly close. Hope this helps.

 Londa,

           Is there a trick to getting several letters to work?   I have never been able, on any version of JAWS I've worked with, to get it to recognize the second through nth characters of a file name.  This would be so handy such that if you knew you had a file named file1.txt and file2.txt that you could type in file2 and have JAWS zoom right to the correct one.

           One of the reasons I've started teaching clients how to use Search Everything and the Copy-Paste technique of attaching files is because it's just far less tedious when they know enough of a file name to get search results that are either the single file or very few files, and those will be found anywhere they happen to be on the computer.  The amount of time saved with navigating via browsing when the files in question are nowhere near each other in the folder tree is huge.

Brian 


 

Londa,

           Thanks.  The "type it fast" thing will work for some clients and not for others, but it's great to know that the option exists.

           On a semi-related note, this sort of "you've got to do it with precisely the right, and fast, timing" thing applies to the screen curtain on the iPhone, too.  It's a great feature for someone who's blind because keeping the screen off extends your battery life per charge by a huge amount.  But if you need someone to assist you it's also pretty imperative that you can turn the screen curtain off.  Getting the exact timing for the triple-finger triple-tap is no mean feat, let me tell you!

Brian


Londa Peterson
 

I have clients that I won't even make aware of this trick because they'll just get frustrated. Incidentally, the speech on and off gesture on IOS is the same way. It might even be worse than the screen curtain, but that's highly off topic for this list. We probably should move this thread to private email.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Friday, January 22, 2016 1:16 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Advanced Searching in Outlook 2010 - Opinions Sought

 

Londa,

           Thanks.  The "type it fast" thing will work for some clients and not for others, but it's great to know that the option exists.

           On a semi-related note, this sort of "you've got to do it with precisely the right, and fast, timing" thing applies to the screen curtain on the iPhone, too.  It's a great feature for someone who's blind because keeping the screen off extends your battery life per charge by a huge amount.  But if you need someone to assist you it's also pretty imperative that you can turn the screen curtain off.  Getting the exact timing for the triple-finger triple-tap is no mean feat, let me tell you!

Brian