Using the Everything Search in conjunction with JAWS & Windows Live Mail


 

I believe I have posted about the Everything Search program on these forums before, but if not, here goes.  Everything can be downloaded in 32-bit and 64-bit versions from .voidtools.com.  It is an absolutely marvelous tool that does exactly what it says it will:  searches everything, based upon the file name, on the fixed drives on your computer.  Since I'm old school I generally remember what I've called files, at least important ones, and have far more reason to search for a "lost file" using its name, or part of it, than by using Windows Search to search based on either file name or text in a file.

If you are good about remembering your file names Everything can make adding multiple attachments to an e-mail that reside in a bunch of different folders much faster than having to navigate repeatedly in the Open dialog.

This can be done as follows:

1.  Use Everything to search for the file you want.  You can narrow your options very quickly using their simple search syntax.  For example, if you have a filename that includes spaces and named "Evaluation of Stock Markets in Different Parts of the World.docx" you will probably find it by entering, "eval* stock world".  The spaces in the search string are important.

2.  After entering your search criteria, either hit TAB or DOWN ARROW to take JAWS to the list of files returned.

3.  Go through that list using your preferred method in JAWS until you find the file in the search results you want.

4.  Hit CTRL+C to copy the file to the clipboard.  This also places the full path to the file on the clipboard in case that's what's needed, and in this case it is.

5.  In your e-mail program, open the attach dialog, and simply hit CTRL+V to paste the full path to the file into the "File" field, then close the dialog as necessary to actually attach the file.

The above works like a charm in Windows Live Mail when a variety of files, from a variety of locations, whose names you know need to be attached to an e-mail message.  It is far, far faster to use Everything to locate the individual files with the Cut/Paste technique for the full file path into the open dialog File edit box than it is to navigate all over the place for each and every one of these files if they're not in either the same folder or folders very "close" to one another in the tree structure.

Brian 


Kimsan <kimsansong@...>
 

As far as file names are concerned, am I needing to put the file extention when typing what I’m looking for?

 

 

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Saturday, January 16, 2016 12:33 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Using the Everything Search in conjunction with JAWS & Windows Live Mail

 

I believe I have posted about the Everything Search program on these forums before, but if not, here goes.  Everything can be downloaded in 32-bit and 64-bit versions from .voidtools.com.  It is an absolutely marvelous tool that does exactly what it says it will:  searches everything, based upon the file name, on the fixed drives on your computer.  Since I'm old school I generally remember what I've called files, at least important ones, and have far more reason to search for a "lost file" using its name, or part of it, than by using Windows Search to search based on either file name or text in a file.

If you are good about remembering your file names Everything can make adding multiple attachments to an e-mail that reside in a bunch of different folders much faster than having to navigate repeatedly in the Open dialog.

This can be done as follows:

1.  Use Everything to search for the file you want.  You can narrow your options very quickly using their simple search syntax.  For example, if you have a filename that includes spaces and named "Evaluation of Stock Markets in Different Parts of the World.docx" you will probably find it by entering, "eval* stock world".  The spaces in the search string are important.

2.  After entering your search criteria, either hit TAB or DOWN ARROW to take JAWS to the list of files returned.

3.  Go through that list using your preferred method in JAWS until you find the file in the search results you want.

4.  Hit CTRL+C to copy the file to the clipboard.  This also places the full path to the file on the clipboard in case that's what's needed, and in this case it is.

5.  In your e-mail program, open the attach dialog, and simply hit CTRL+V to paste the full path to the file into the "File" field, then close the dialog as necessary to actually attach the file.

The above works like a charm in Windows Live Mail when a variety of files, from a variety of locations, whose names you know need to be attached to an e-mail message.  It is far, far faster to use Everything to locate the individual files with the Cut/Paste technique for the full file path into the open dialog File edit box than it is to navigate all over the place for each and every one of these files if they're not in either the same folder or folders very "close" to one another in the tree structure.

Brian 


 

Kimsan,

         No.  I very seldom use extensions as part of my searches.  The great thing is that you can include spaces in your search criteria and it "AND"s the various parts in the search.  Below is the comprehensive search syntax, if you're not using regular expressions.  You can also set the search to use regular expressions rather than the default search syntax.  If you don't know what they are don't worry about it, but for those who've used them for long periods of time, Linux users in particular, this is a big, big plus.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Operators:

space AND

| OR

! NOT

< > Grouping

" " Search for an exact phrase.


Wildcards:

* Matches zero or more characters.

? Matches one character.

*.* Same as *


Macros:

quot: Literal double quote (")

apos: Literal apostrophe (')

amp: Literal ampersand (&)

lt: Literal less than (<)

gt: Literal greater than (>)

#x: Literal unicode character x code.


Modifiers:

ascii: Enable fast ASCII case comparisons.

case: Match case.

diacritics: Match diacritical marks.

file: Match files only.

folder: Match folders only.

noascii: Disable fast ASCII case comparisons.

nocase: Do not match case.

nodiacritics: Do not match diacritical marks.

nofileonly: Do not allow files only.

nofolderonly: Do not allow folders only.

nopath: Do not match path.

noregex: Disable regex.

nowfn: Do not match the whole filename.

nowholefilename: Do not match the whole filename.

nowholeword: Do not match whole words only.

nowildcards: Disable wildcards.

noww: Do not match whole words only.

path: Match path and file name.

regex: Enable regex.

utf8: Disable fast ASCII case comparisons.

wfn: Match the whole filename.

wholefilename: Match the whole filename.

wholeword: Match whole words only.

wildcards: Enable wildcards.

ww: Match whole words only.


Functions:

ansicontent:<text> Search ANSI file content for text.

attrib:<attributes> Search for files and folders with the specified file attributes.

attributes:<attributes> Search for files and folders with the specified file attributes.

child:<filename> Search for folders that contain a child with a matching filename.

childcount:<count> Search for folders that contain the specified number of subfolders and files.

childfilecount:<count> Search for folders that contain the specified number of files.

childfoldercount:<cnt> Search for folders that contain the specified number of subfolders.

content:<text> Search file content for text.

dateaccessed:<date> Search for files and folders with the specified date accessed.

datecreated:<date> Search for files and folders with the specified date created.

datemodified:<date> Search for files and folders with the specified date modified.

daterun:<date> Search for files and folders with the specified date run.

da:<date> Search for files and folders with the specified date accessed.

dc:<date> Search for files and folders with the specified date created.

dm:<date> Search for files and folders with the specified date modified.

dr:<date> Search for files and folders with the specified date run.

dupe: Search for duplicated filenames.

empty: Search for empty folders.

endwith:<text> Filenames (including extension) ending with text.

ext:<list> Search for files with a matching extension in the specified semi-colon delimited extension list.

filelist:<fn1|fn2|...> Search for a list of file names.

filelistfilename:<name> Search for files and folders belonging to the file list filename.

fsi:<index> Search for files and folders in the specified zero based internal file system index.

infolder:<path> Search for files and folders in the specified path, excluding subfolders.

len:<length> Search for files and folders that match the specified filename length.

parent:<path> Search for files and folders in the specified path, excluding subfolders.

parents:<count> Search for files and folders with the specified number of parent folders.

rc:<date> Search for files and folders with the specified recently changed date.

recentchange:<date> Search for files and folders with the specified recently changed date.

root: Search for files and folders with no parent folders.

runcount:<count> Search for files and folders with the specified run count.

size:<size> Search for files with the specified size in bytes.

sizedupe: Search for duplicated sizes.

startwith:<text> Filenames starting with text.

type:<type> Search for files and folders with the specified type.

utf16content:<text> Search UTF-16 file content for text.

utf16becontent:<text> Search UTF-16 Big Endian file content for text.

utf8content:<text> Search UTF-8 file content for text.


Function Syntax:

function:value Equal to value.

function:<=value Less than or equal to value.

function:<value Less than value.

function:=value Equal to value.

function:>value Greater than value.

function:>=value Greater than or equal to value.

function:start..end Is in the range of values from start to end.

function:start-end Is in the range of values from start to end.


Size Syntax:

size[kb|mb|gb]


Size Constants:

empty

tiny 0 KB < size <= 10 KB

small 10 KB < size <= 100 KB

medium 100 KB < size <= 1 MB

large 1 MB < size <= 16 MB

huge 16 MB < size <= 128 MB

gigantic size > 128 MB

unknown


Date Syntax:

year

month/year or year/month depending on locale settings

day/month/year, month/day/year or year/month/day depending on locale settings


Date Constants:

today

yesterday

tomorrow

<last|past|prev|current|this|coming|next><year|month|week>

<last|past|prev|coming|next><x><years|months|weeks|hours|minutes|mins|seconds|secs>

january|february|march|april|may|june|july|august|september|october|november|december

jan|feb|mar|apr|may|jun|jul|aug|sep|oct|nov|dec

sunday|monday|tuesday|wednesday|thursday|friday|saturday

sun|mon|tue|wed|thu|fri|sat

unknown


Attribute Constants:

A Archive

C Compressed

D Directory

E Encrypted

H Hidden

I Content indexed

L Reparse point

N Normal

O Offline

P Sparse file

R Read only

S System

T Temporary

V Device


Kimsan <kimsansong@...>
 

So I have this file in excel called notes of course with the excel extention.

 

I searched for it, a bunch of stuff relating to notes came up but not the excel file. I then went back and did excel.xls and there it was.

I keep forgetting where that file is stored, so I downloaded the program you distributed to see if I could locate it much quicker.

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Saturday, January 16, 2016 5:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Using the Everything Search in conjunction with JAWS & Windows Live Mail

 

Kimsan,

         No.  I very seldom use extensions as part of my searches.  The great thing is that you can include spaces in your search criteria and it "AND"s the various parts in the search.  Below is the comprehensive search syntax, if you're not using regular expressions.  You can also set the search to use regular expressions rather than the default search syntax.  If you don't know what they are don't worry about it, but for those who've used them for long periods of time, Linux users in particular, this is a big, big plus.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Operators:

            space   AND

            |           OR

            !           NOT

            < >       Grouping

            " "        Search for an exact phrase.

 

Wildcards:

            *          Matches zero or more characters.

            ?          Matches one character.

            *.*       Same as *

 

Macros:

            quot:    Literal double quote (")

            apos:    Literal apostrophe (')

            amp:    Literal ampersand (&)

            lt:         Literal less than (<)

            gt:        Literal greater than (>)

            #x:       Literal unicode character x code.

 

Modifiers:

            ascii:    Enable fast ASCII case comparisons.

            case:    Match case.

            diacritics:         Match diacritical marks.

            file:      Match files only.

            folder: Match folders only.

            noascii:            Disable fast ASCII case comparisons.

            nocase: Do not match case.

            nodiacritics:     Do not match diacritical marks.

            nofileonly:       Do not allow files only.

            nofolderonly:  Do not allow folders only.

            nopath:            Do not match path.

            noregex:          Disable regex.

            nowfn: Do not match the whole filename.

            nowholefilename:        Do not match the whole filename.

            nowholeword: Do not match whole words only.

            nowildcards:   Disable wildcards.

            noww: Do not match whole words only.

            path:    Match path and file name.

            regex:  Enable regex.

            utf8:    Disable fast ASCII case comparisons.

            wfn:     Match the whole filename.

            wholefilename:            Match the whole filename.

            wholeword:     Match whole words only.

            wildcards:       Enable wildcards.

            ww:     Match whole words only.

 

Functions:

            ansicontent:<text>      Search ANSI file content for text.

            attrib:<attributes>       Search for files and folders with the specified file attributes.

            attributes:<attributes> Search for files and folders with the specified file attributes.

            child:<filename>         Search for folders that contain a child with a matching filename.

            childcount:<count>     Search for folders that contain the specified number of subfolders and files.

            childfilecount:<count>           Search for folders that contain the specified number of files.

            childfoldercount:<cnt>           Search for folders that contain the specified number of subfolders.

            content:<text> Search file content for text.

            dateaccessed:<date>   Search for files and folders with the specified date accessed.

            datecreated:<date>     Search for files and folders with the specified date created.

            datemodified:<date>  Search for files and folders with the specified date modified.

            daterun:<date>           Search for files and folders with the specified date run.

            da:<date>        Search for files and folders with the specified date accessed.

            dc:<date>        Search for files and folders with the specified date created.

            dm:<date>      Search for files and folders with the specified date modified.

            dr:<date>        Search for files and folders with the specified date run.

            dupe:   Search for duplicated filenames.

            empty: Search for empty folders.

            endwith:<text>           Filenames (including extension) ending with text.

            ext:<list>         Search for files with a matching extension in the specified semi-colon delimited extension list.

            filelist:<fn1|fn2|...>     Search for a list of file names.

            filelistfilename:<name>          Search for files and folders belonging to the file list filename.

            fsi:<index>      Search for files and folders in the specified zero based internal file system index.

            infolder:<path>           Search for files and folders in the specified path, excluding subfolders.

            len:<length>    Search for files and folders that match the specified filename length.

            parent:<path>  Search for files and folders in the specified path, excluding subfolders.

            parents:<count>          Search for files and folders with the specified number of parent folders.

            rc:<date>         Search for files and folders with the specified recently changed date.

            recentchange:<date>   Search for files and folders with the specified recently changed date.

            root:     Search for files and folders with no parent folders.

            runcount:<count>       Search for files and folders with the specified run count.

            size:<size>       Search for files with the specified size in bytes.

            sizedupe:         Search for duplicated sizes.

            startwith:<text>          Filenames starting with text.

            type:<type>     Search for files and folders with the specified type.

            utf16content:<text>    Search UTF-16 file content for text.

            utf16becontent:<text>            Search UTF-16 Big Endian file content for text.

            utf8content:<text>      Search UTF-8 file content for text.

 

Function Syntax:

            function:value Equal to value.

            function:<=value         Less than or equal to value.

            function:<value           Less than value.

            function:=value           Equal to value.

            function:>value           Greater than value.

            function:>=value         Greater than or equal to value.

            function:start..end       Is in the range of values from start to end.

            function:start-end       Is in the range of values from start to end.

 

Size Syntax:

            size[kb|mb|gb]

 

Size Constants:

            empty

            tiny      0 KB < size <= 10 KB

            small    10 KB < size <= 100 KB

            medium           100 KB < size <= 1 MB

            large    1 MB < size <= 16 MB

            huge    16 MB < size <= 128 MB

            gigantic           size > 128 MB

            unknown

 

Date Syntax:

            year

            month/year or year/month depending on locale settings

            day/month/year, month/day/year or year/month/day depending on locale settings

 

Date Constants:

            today

            yesterday

            tomorrow

            <last|past|prev|current|this|coming|next><year|month|week>

            <last|past|prev|coming|next><x><years|months|weeks|hours|minutes|mins|seconds|secs>

            january|february|march|april|may|june|july|august|september|october|november|december

            jan|feb|mar|apr|may|jun|jul|aug|sep|oct|nov|dec

            sunday|monday|tuesday|wednesday|thursday|friday|saturday

            sun|mon|tue|wed|thu|fri|sat

            unknown

 

Attribute Constants:

            A         Archive

            C         Compressed

            D         Directory

            E          Encrypted

            H         Hidden

            I           Content indexed

            L          Reparse point

            N         Normal

            O         Offline

            P          Sparse file

            R         Read only

            S          System

            T          Temporary

            V         Device


 

Kimsan,

           I'm not quite sure what you're telling us here.   If the file is actually named "notes.xls" then using "notes" (without quotes) in either a Windows search or using Everything should find it.  In the case of a Windows search it will also find any files containing the text "notes" as well whereas Everything will just return files with "notes" somewhere in their names prior to the file extension.

           You say you went back and did "excel.xls" and there it was, but that simply cannot be if the file has "notes" as part of its name, unless the file excel.xls has the word "notes" contained within it and you're using Windows search, in which case it would be among the search results.

           Since Everything deals with file name as the primary search criteria it is generally far, far faster than Windows search because it does not try to examine file content.  If, however, you add the content:<word or words you want in the file> function this will add content searching in addition to file name and it does slow things down for obvious reasons.

Brian


mike mcglashon
 

where is this everything program?
 
also, can it search folders or different drives and folders within them?
so if I had a flash drive and I opened a folder on it can it search just that specific folders and its sub folders?
 
 

Sent: Saturday, January 16, 2016 9:30 PM
Subject: Re: Using the Everything Search in conjunction with JAWS & Windows Live Mail
 

Kimsan,

           I'm not quite sure what you're telling us here.   If the file is actually named "notes.xls" then using "notes" (without quotes) in either a Windows search or using Everything should find it.  In the case of a Windows search it will also find any files containing the text "notes" as well whereas Everything will just return files with "notes" somewhere in their names prior to the file extension.

           You say you went back and did "excel.xls" and there it was, but that simply cannot be if the file has "notes" as part of its name, unless the file excel.xls has the word "notes" contained within it and you're using Windows search, in which case it would be among the search results.

           Since Everything deals with file name as the primary search criteria it is generally far, far faster than Windows search because it does not try to examine file content.  If, however, you add the content:<word or words you want in the file> function this will add content searching in addition to file name and it does slow things down for obvious reasons.

Brian


 

Mike,

          I posted the link, voidtools.com, in the first post and there it is again.  

          You ask, "can it search folders or different drives and folders within them?," and the only way to answer that is, "Yes and no."  As its name implies, Everything searches everything on a given drive that you have it set up to monitor, but, you can choose to exclude either hidden files and folders and/or system files and folders and/or specific folders you specify in the exclude list.  The only one of these options that's enabled by default is looking at the exclude list, which is empty by default at the outset, so it actually searches Everything on a drive.

           It appears to only index and search NTFS or ReFS file system types.  I see no support for FAT32, but I haven't had a machine with FAT32 on it for years now.  You can also set it up to index removable volumes that use either one of the previously mentioned file system types.

           Everything is, to put it mildly, highly configurable.  I've been using it in its "out of the box" configuration for some years now.  The only customization I've done was to include one of my backup drives in the index at one point, which I regretted very shortly after having done so.  If I wanted to try that again I'd probably go with the "Automatically include new removable volumes" option to see if the search results for the removable volume would appear or disappear depending on whether its connected or not.  If you add it to the main index those results will appear all the time, whether the drive is connected or not at the moment, and that's a PITA when it's not there.

            Since every thumb/flash/jump drive I've ever dealt with, as well as SD Cards and similar, are still formatted as FAT32 by default these are not indexable by Everything.  However, Windows search can be used to find what you're looking for on these drives.

Brian