moderated Windows updates


Denise J Moses
 

How do I find out what version of Windows I have?  Is there a way to turn off automatic updates?  Every time it updates it screws up something with JAWS.  Now in Excel I can’t get it to read the title name of each column.  I go under quick settings & turn it on but it won’t stay checked on.  I am using the latest version of JAWS 2018 with Windows 10.

Thank you for the help.

Denise


 

To find out what Version and Build of Windows 10 you're running hit the Windows Key and immediately type winver then hit Enter.  If you prefer, you can hit WinKey+R and enter winver in run box then hit enter.

Turning off automatic updates is a very, very bad idea.

What version of Office are you using?  
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer


James Homuth
 

You also don’t get to actually turn off automatic updates unless you’re running I believe it’s pro. The Win10 home laptop I have access to (not mine, but I helped set it up) only gives you the option of delaying the inevitable.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: August-31-19 8:17 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

To find out what Version and Build of Windows 10 you're running hit the Windows Key and immediately type winver then hit Enter.  If you prefer, you can hit WinKey+R and enter winver in run box then hit enter.

Turning off automatic updates is a very, very bad idea.

What version of Office are you using?  
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer


 

You can't permanently turn off updates regardless of the version you're running (if you're a consumer, not a government or similar).

As of version 1903, all editions of Windows 10 give quite a bit more control about how and when updates are downloaded and applied.  What I find perversely funny is now that the control (or at least a large part of it) that many were crying for has been given, there is now an equally vocal group decrying the fact that updates are not as automatic as they were in earlier versions of Windows 10.

When it comes to update methodology, Microsoft is damned if they do and damned if they don't.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer


Denise J Moses
 

Brian,

 

Thank you for the directions to find out the Windows version.  I tried it & got it.  I am using Office 16.  Do you get Windows notifications when they are going to updates?  Sometimes I am on the computer & something pops up to tell me there is an update & I can restart to update.  Does it not update until you restart your computer or does it do it if you aren’t around to tell it what to do?

Denise

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, August 31, 2019 6:17 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

To find out what Version and Build of Windows 10 you're running hit the Windows Key and immediately type winver then hit Enter.  If you prefer, you can hit WinKey+R and enter winver in run box then hit enter.

Turning off automatic updates is a very, very bad idea.

What version of Office are you using?  
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer


 

Hi,

And it could get a bit easy… or rather, a bit hard to explain the ins and outs of recent changes, because we (Windows Insiders) are dealing with not one, not two, but three preview build series at once. Basically, not everyone on a given cohort (ring) are testing Version 1909 features, and if they do, they can’t switch to other preview cohort. This is because of the nature of Version 1909: it’ll be a different build number than Version 1903, but as far as servicing goes, it’ll be identical to 1903; a given cumulative update package for both releases will be able to resolve bugs in both releases at the same time. The difference comes down to internal flags used to enable or disable 1909 specific features, the most obvious feature for screen reader users being the ability to mute notification sound without resorting to enabling focus assist.

As for an update and restart notification: yes, Windows will notify you.

As for turning off updates through various means: no, not even a stock installation of Pro will do it; you need Enterprise or Education, or get a Pro machine hooked up to a Windows Server domain where updates are distributed by computers running Windows Server operating systems (via Windows Server Update Services or System Center Configuration Manager). As far as editions go, Pro is considered a “consumer-level product” – additional features on top of Home, such as ability to join a Windows Server domain, Hyper-V, and as of version 1903, Windows Sandbox. Just like Home, a given feature update for Pro will get 18 months of support, by end of which you will find your computer is running whichever feature update is out by then; as someone stated best, “you’ll get the inevitable”. On the other hand, Enterprise and Education will get at least 18 months (note the difference in my phrasing); that is, some feature updates will get 18 months of support, while others will get a longer support duration; there is a specialized version of Enterprise that will see a feature update supported for up to ten years, but that is because Enterprise LTSC (long-term servicing channel) is meant for mission-critical devices.

As for updates messing up JAWS settings: multiple factors might be involved, including hardware drivers, JAWS not reacting to change quickly enough, or Vispero knowing about bugs but needing time to resolve and test fixes. Part of the reason why you get frequent JAWS updates is to keep up with changes, which is happening in a flash; the flash will go off faster on Insider Preview builds because things come and go without notice (if you want proof, just follow me on Twitter; I guarantee that almost every week, you’ll see me post announcements about Preview builds and some assistive technologies).

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, August 31, 2019 6:16 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

You can't permanently turn off updates regardless of the version you're running (if you're a consumer, not a government or similar).

As of version 1903, all editions of Windows 10 give quite a bit more control about how and when updates are downloaded and applied.  What I find perversely funny is now that the control (or at least a large part of it) that many were crying for has been given, there is now an equally vocal group decrying the fact that updates are not as automatic as they were in earlier versions of Windows 10.

When it comes to update methodology, Microsoft is damned if they do and damned if they don't.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer


Jason White
 

I have a laptop from Lenovo that is running Windows 10 Pro for Workstations. So far, I’ve had no problems with Windows updates.

 

I keep Windows up to date. I also keep the firmware and drivers up to date via the Lenovo Vantage tool. I make sure that JAWS and NVDA are both running the latest versions; the same for Office 365 and Web browsers such as Chrome.

 

I don’t know how long my good luck will last, but it’s holding so far. I am not running Insider versions, as I don’t want to be a beta tester on this machine.

 

From: <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...>
Reply-To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, August 31, 2019 at 23:35
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

Hi,

And it could get a bit easy… or rather, a bit hard to explain the ins and outs of recent changes, because we (Windows Insiders) are dealing with not one, not two, but three preview build series at once. Basically, not everyone on a given cohort (ring) are testing Version 1909 features, and if they do, they can’t switch to other preview cohort. This is because of the nature of Version 1909: it’ll be a different build number than Version 1903, but as far as servicing goes, it’ll be identical to 1903; a given cumulative update package for both releases will be able to resolve bugs in both releases at the same time. The difference comes down to internal flags used to enable or disable 1909 specific features, the most obvious feature for screen reader users being the ability to mute notification sound without resorting to enabling focus assist.

As for an update and restart notification: yes, Windows will notify you.

As for turning off updates through various means: no, not even a stock installation of Pro will do it; you need Enterprise or Education, or get a Pro machine hooked up to a Windows Server domain where updates are distributed by computers running Windows Server operating systems (via Windows Server Update Services or System Center Configuration Manager). As far as editions go, Pro is considered a “consumer-level product” – additional features on top of Home, such as ability to join a Windows Server domain, Hyper-V, and as of version 1903, Windows Sandbox. Just like Home, a given feature update for Pro will get 18 months of support, by end of which you will find your computer is running whichever feature update is out by then; as someone stated best, “you’ll get the inevitable”. On the other hand, Enterprise and Education will get at least 18 months (note the difference in my phrasing); that is, some feature updates will get 18 months of support, while others will get a longer support duration; there is a specialized version of Enterprise that will see a feature update supported for up to ten years, but that is because Enterprise LTSC (long-term servicing channel) is meant for mission-critical devices.

As for updates messing up JAWS settings: multiple factors might be involved, including hardware drivers, JAWS not reacting to change quickly enough, or Vispero knowing about bugs but needing time to resolve and test fixes. Part of the reason why you get frequent JAWS updates is to keep up with changes, which is happening in a flash; the flash will go off faster on Insider Preview builds because things come and go without notice (if you want proof, just follow me on Twitter; I guarantee that almost every week, you’ll see me post announcements about Preview builds and some assistive technologies).

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, August 31, 2019 6:16 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

You can't permanently turn off updates regardless of the version you're running (if you're a consumer, not a government or similar).

As of version 1903, all editions of Windows 10 give quite a bit more control about how and when updates are downloaded and applied.  What I find perversely funny is now that the control (or at least a large part of it) that many were crying for has been given, there is now an equally vocal group decrying the fact that updates are not as automatic as they were in earlier versions of Windows 10.

When it comes to update methodology, Microsoft is damned if they do and damned if they don't.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer


 

On Sat, Aug 31, 2019 at 10:26 PM, Denise J Moses wrote:
Does it not update until you restart your computer or does it do it if you aren’t around to tell it what to do?
Denise, what I suggest is the next time this message comes up that you take the time to read the entire message text, as there have been (and probably will continue to be) some changes recently.

In virtually all cases, it will tell you that a restart is required and that you can elect to restart now or, if you don't, the computer will restart itself outside active hours.   You set active hours in Settings, Update & Security, Windows Update pane.   If you're on Version 1903 there is a button for Change active hours, if memory serves prior to 1903 it is a link that has the same click-through text as the button does.   If either is activated, you are taken to a dialog where you tell Windows the hours during which you do not ever want the computer to restart itself for an update if a restart is required.   It will only restart itself outside those hours.   Personally, I very seldom wait for the automatic restart outside of active hours.  I prefer to gracefully close what I'm doing if that's reasonable and do the restart myself.

Also, with the advent of Version 1903 you get a lot more control over updates in general.   Right now there is an optional cumulative update (KB4152941) that has a Download and Install link on the Windows Update pane not unlike what's being presented for Feature Updates now, which allows the user to decide if they want to do exactly what the link says.

Mind you, if you put off updates again and again and again there will come a time when they will be applied automatically by Windows.   This is part and parcel of Windows as a Service and, as a service technician, I strongly support that measure by Microsoft.   A huge number of the smoldering heaps of what remained of systems I have been called to fix in the era prior to Windows 10 could be traced to having blocked updates, many of which are essential.   It's never been put better than this:

There really isn't a point to checking for updates and not installing them. . .  It's important to install all available updates. I've been doing this since the days of DOS, and I still don't have the confidence to pick and choose among updates.  There are just too many variables involved - and most people can't evaluate the full consequences of installing/not installing updates.

        ~ John Carrona, AKA usasma on BleepingComputer.com, http://www.carrona.org/

Also, if you are having repeated issues after updates are applied, that strongly suggests issues in your current Windows 10 installation that need to be addressed.   The easiest way to do this, though it is work, is to do a completely clean reinstall of Windows 10 so that you know you have a solid foundation upon which ongoing updates can be placed:

           a) Completely Clean Win10 (Re)install Using MCT to Download Win10 ISO File

           b) Completely Clean Win10 (Re)install Using MCT to Create a Bootable USB Drive

It's a major effort at the outset, but it makes life so much easier going forward that it's very much worth doing.

 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer


Jason White
 

It’s also important to recognize that those who delay the installation of updates are more vulnerable to the exploitation of security issues that are fixed by the updates.

 

From: <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Reply-To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Date: Sunday, September 1, 2019 at 11:17
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

On Sat, Aug 31, 2019 at 10:26 PM, Denise J Moses wrote:

Does it not update until you restart your computer or does it do it if you aren’t around to tell it what to do?

Denise, what I suggest is the next time this message comes up that you take the time to read the entire message text, as there have been (and probably will continue to be) some changes recently.

In virtually all cases, it will tell you that a restart is required and that you can elect to restart now or, if you don't, the computer will restart itself outside active hours.   You set active hours in Settings, Update & Security, Windows Update pane.   If you're on Version 1903 there is a button for Change active hours, if memory serves prior to 1903 it is a link that has the same click-through text as the button does.   If either is activated, you are taken to a dialog where you tell Windows the hours during which you do not ever want the computer to restart itself for an update if a restart is required.   It will only restart itself outside those hours.   Personally, I very seldom wait for the automatic restart outside of active hours.  I prefer to gracefully close what I'm doing if that's reasonable and do the restart myself.

Also, with the advent of Version 1903 you get a lot more control over updates in general.   Right now there is an optional cumulative update (KB4152941) that has a Download and Install link on the Windows Update pane not unlike what's being presented for Feature Updates now, which allows the user to decide if they want to do exactly what the link says.

Mind you, if you put off updates again and again and again there will come a time when they will be applied automatically by Windows.   This is part and parcel of Windows as a Service and, as a service technician, I strongly support that measure by Microsoft.   A huge number of the smoldering heaps of what remained of systems I have been called to fix in the era prior to Windows 10 could be traced to having blocked updates, many of which are essential.   It's never been put better than this:

There really isn't a point to checking for updates and not installing them. . .  It's important to install all available updates. I've been doing this since the days of DOS, and I still don't have the confidence to pick and choose among updates.  There are just too many variables involved - and most people can't evaluate the full consequences of installing/not installing updates.

        ~ John Carrona, AKA usasma on BleepingComputer.com, http://www.carrona.org/

Also, if you are having repeated issues after updates are applied, that strongly suggests issues in your current Windows 10 installation that need to be addressed.   The easiest way to do this, though it is work, is to do a completely clean reinstall of Windows 10 so that you know you have a solid foundation upon which ongoing updates can be placed:

           a) Completely Clean Win10 (Re)install Using MCT to Download Win10 ISO File

           b) Completely Clean Win10 (Re)install Using MCT to Create a Bootable USB Drive

It's a major effort at the outset, but it makes life so much easier going forward that it's very much worth doing.

 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer


 

Hi,

This is more so now for two reasons:

  • Windows 7 and 8.1: numerous security flaws, along with Microsoft requiring everyone to install signed updates from now on to harden security.
  • Windows 10: security issues with unsupported feature updates (and even on supported ones) and due to the nature of Windows as a Service. This November, Version 1803 (April 2018 Update), considered one of the stable feature updates in recent memory, will go out of support for millions of consumers.

 

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jason White via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, September 1, 2019 9:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

It’s also important to recognize that those who delay the installation of updates are more vulnerable to the exploitation of security issues that are fixed by the updates.

 

From: <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Reply-To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Date: Sunday, September 1, 2019 at 11:17
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

On Sat, Aug 31, 2019 at 10:26 PM, Denise J Moses wrote:

Does it not update until you restart your computer or does it do it if you aren’t around to tell it what to do?

Denise, what I suggest is the next time this message comes up that you take the time to read the entire message text, as there have been (and probably will continue to be) some changes recently.

In virtually all cases, it will tell you that a restart is required and that you can elect to restart now or, if you don't, the computer will restart itself outside active hours.   You set active hours in Settings, Update & Security, Windows Update pane.   If you're on Version 1903 there is a button for Change active hours, if memory serves prior to 1903 it is a link that has the same click-through text as the button does.   If either is activated, you are taken to a dialog where you tell Windows the hours during which you do not ever want the computer to restart itself for an update if a restart is required.   It will only restart itself outside those hours.   Personally, I very seldom wait for the automatic restart outside of active hours.  I prefer to gracefully close what I'm doing if that's reasonable and do the restart myself.

Also, with the advent of Version 1903 you get a lot more control over updates in general.   Right now there is an optional cumulative update (KB4152941) that has a Download and Install link on the Windows Update pane not unlike what's being presented for Feature Updates now, which allows the user to decide if they want to do exactly what the link says.

Mind you, if you put off updates again and again and again there will come a time when they will be applied automatically by Windows.   This is part and parcel of Windows as a Service and, as a service technician, I strongly support that measure by Microsoft.   A huge number of the smoldering heaps of what remained of systems I have been called to fix in the era prior to Windows 10 could be traced to having blocked updates, many of which are essential.   It's never been put better than this:

There really isn't a point to checking for updates and not installing them. . .  It's important to install all available updates. I've been doing this since the days of DOS, and I still don't have the confidence to pick and choose among updates.  There are just too many variables involved - and most people can't evaluate the full consequences of installing/not installing updates.

        ~ John Carrona, AKA usasma on BleepingComputer.com, http://www.carrona.org/

Also, if you are having repeated issues after updates are applied, that strongly suggests issues in your current Windows 10 installation that need to be addressed.   The easiest way to do this, though it is work, is to do a completely clean reinstall of Windows 10 so that you know you have a solid foundation upon which ongoing updates can be placed:

           a) Completely Clean Win10 (Re)install Using MCT to Download Win10 ISO File

           b) Completely Clean Win10 (Re)install Using MCT to Create a Bootable USB Drive

It's a major effort at the outset, but it makes life so much easier going forward that it's very much worth doing.

 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer


Jim Pursley
 

I didn't see an answer to your Excel question.  I  think that since beginning with JAWS 2018 column and row headers in Excel are managed through the ribbon menus or, more handily, on the applications key adjacent to the right control key.  The new method is taken from Excel itself and offers a permanent fix.   When in Excel position the cursor on the intersection of row and column (upper left corner).  Hit the applications key and arrow upward maybe four positions to Define Name.  Hit enter and type titleregion1..()and your right hand corner ending cell address).  This command sets the range of the rows and columns you are trying to hear.  tab through the other positions and hit OK.  Your headers should read normally.  When you save the spreadsheet you will save your column and row header verbosity.  Occasionally as in an older Excel spreadsheet the applications key won't have the Define Name option.  You'll need to go into the formulas menu and arrow down to Define Name and put the info mentioned above in the Name Manager.


Note that you can label the headings in a spreadsheet with multiple regions by specifying the far upper left and far lower right cell coordinates of each region.  Just position your cursor on the upper left intersection of row and column.


Earlier versions of JAWS used alt + control and R or C to specify row and column headers in addition to Quick Settings.   The R and C keystroke combo no longer works well in JAWS 2019 and above, maybe not in 2018 either; I don't recall when the changeover occurred.


The new method is vastly superior to any of the older methods as it's a permanent (until deleted) setting for your spreadsheet.  A spreadsheet originator can define names, too, so the readers need not go through the exercise.

On 8/31/2019 8:58 PM, Denise J Moses wrote:

How do I find out what version of Windows I have?  Is there a way to turn off automatic updates?  Every time it updates it screws up something with JAWS.  Now in Excel I can’t get it to read the title name of each column.  I go under quick settings & turn it on but it won’t stay checked on.  I am using the latest version of JAWS 2018 with Windows 10.

Thank you for the help.

Denise


 

Jim,

           Thank you for mentioning the row/column header feature of Excel.   I have been trying to get folks to use this for a long time now both because it's permanent and it is screen reader agnostic as well.

Excel - Assigning a Title Row or Column.docx
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer