System Tray Icons, How to Rearrange in Windows 10


Mike B
 


Hi Bill & All,
 
Sorry, but forgot to change the subject line.
Here's how I rearrange the system tray icons  running Windows 10 Pro Version 1809 (OS Build 17763.379) & all installed versions of Jaws.
1. Windows key + I, for Settings, tab 1 time to System, right arrow to Personalization, and press enter.
2. Navigate to, Taskbar and press enter.
3. Tab several times to, Select which icons appear on the taskbar Link, and press enter.
4. Okay now to put the System Tray in the order you want it in.  Tab through all the icons making a note of which ones you have checked / turned on because you're going to uncheck all of them.
5. Uncheck all the icons.  Now you will go through and check the icons in the order you want them in but keep in mind, they will appear in the reverse order that they are checked.  What I mean is, the 1st one yu check will be at the bottom of the list, the 2nd will be 2nd from the bottom, the 3rd will be 3rd from the bottom etc. etc....  After you're done open the system tray to make sure it's the way you want it and Alt + F4 if it is.
Take care.  Mike.  Sennt from my iBarstool.
Book: a utensil used to pass time while waiting for the computer repairman!

----- Original Message -----
From: Bill White
Sent: Friday, March 15, 2019 8:52 AM
Subject: Re: Rearranging icons on the taskbar.

Hi, Chris. What I want to do is rearrange things in System Tray, not actually in the Taskbar, so unpinning things in the Taskbar won't work in this instance. What is actually happening is that I used to have an icon for Eset NOD32, my antivirus program, which was one of the first icons in System Tray. Now, in order to find this icon I must turn on all icons in System Tray, or, use the Notification Icon to go to the overflow section of icons in System Tray. What I want to do is rearrange the icons so that the Eset NOD32 icon is where it used to be.

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris Hill
Sent: Friday, March 15, 2019 8:22 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Rearranging icons on the taskbar.

I tried using drag and drop.  Although it made the appropriate noises on
my windows 10 computer, it didn't actually work.  If you want to do this
the simplest way I can think of, do the following.
unpin everything from the taskbar by right-clicking or the equivalent on
each item and choosing unpin.  Now, open the run box with windows+r and
type shell:appsvolder and press enter.  This will open a folder with
shortcuts to all your apps.  Do the equivalent of right click and pin
any you want on the taskbar in the order in which you want them.


CH









Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

Hi, Mike. I tried your steps, and after doing them, I invoked JAWS Key plus F11, and the system tray icons still appear in the order, and in the case of Eset NOD32, the absence of which they appeared before. Thanks for the steps, though.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike B
Sent: Friday, March 15, 2019 11:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: System Tray Icons, How to Rearrange in Windows 10

 

Hi Bill & All,

 

Sorry, but forgot to change the subject line.

Here's how I rearrange the system tray icons  running Windows 10 Pro Version 1809 (OS Build 17763.379) & all installed versions of Jaws.

1. Windows key + I, for Settings, tab 1 time to System, right arrow to Personalization, and press enter.
2. Navigate to, Taskbar and press enter.
3. Tab several times to, Select which icons appear on the taskbar Link, and press enter.
4. Okay now to put the System Tray in the order you want it in.  Tab through all the icons making a note of which ones you have checked / turned on because you're going to uncheck all of them.
5. Uncheck all the icons.  Now you will go through and check the icons in the order you want them in but keep in mind, they will appear in the reverse order that they are checked.  What I mean is, the 1st one yu check will be at the bottom of the list, the 2nd will be 2nd from the bottom, the 3rd will be 3rd from the bottom etc. etc....  After you're done open the system tray to make sure it's the way you want it and Alt + F4 if it is.

Take care.  Mike.  Sennt from my iBarstool.
Book: a utensil used to pass time while waiting for the computer repairman!

----- Original Message -----

From: Bill White

Sent: Friday, March 15, 2019 8:52 AM

Subject: Re: Rearranging icons on the taskbar.

 

Hi, Chris. What I want to do is rearrange things in System Tray, not actually in the Taskbar, so unpinning things in the Taskbar won't work in this instance. What is actually happening is that I used to have an icon for Eset NOD32, my antivirus program, which was one of the first icons in System Tray. Now, in order to find this icon I must turn on all icons in System Tray, or, use the Notification Icon to go to the overflow section of icons in System Tray. What I want to do is rearrange the icons so that the Eset NOD32 icon is where it used to be.

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris Hill
Sent: Friday, March 15, 2019 8:22 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Rearranging icons on the taskbar.

I tried using drag and drop.  Although it made the appropriate noises on
my windows 10 computer, it didn't actually work.  If you want to do this
the simplest way I can think of, do the following.
unpin everything from the taskbar by right-clicking or the equivalent on
each item and choosing unpin.  Now, open the run box with windows+r and
type shell:appsvolder and press enter.  This will open a folder with
shortcuts to all your apps.  Do the equivalent of right click and pin
any you want on the taskbar in the order in which you want them.


CH








Mike B
 


Hi Bill,
 
I'm sorry the steps didn't work for you but, these same steps have worked for me since I started using Win10.  I must have another setting different than yours but, which setting or settings I don't know.
Take care.  Mike.  Sennt from my iBarstool.
Book: a utensil used to pass time while waiting for the computer repairman!

----- Original Message -----
From: Bill White
Sent: Friday, March 15, 2019 11:55 AM
Subject: Re: System Tray Icons, How to Rearrange in Windows 10

Hi, Mike. I tried your steps, and after doing them, I invoked JAWS Key plus F11, and the system tray icons still appear in the order, and in the case of Eset NOD32, the absence of which they appeared before. Thanks for the steps, though.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike B
Sent: Friday, March 15, 2019 11:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: System Tray Icons, How to Rearrange in Windows 10

 

Hi Bill & All,

 

Sorry, but forgot to change the subject line.

Here's how I rearrange the system tray icons  running Windows 10 Pro Version 1809 (OS Build 17763.379) & all installed versions of Jaws.

1. Windows key + I, for Settings, tab 1 time to System, right arrow to Personalization, and press enter.
2. Navigate to, Taskbar and press enter.
3. Tab several times to, Select which icons appear on the taskbar Link, and press enter.
4. Okay now to put the System Tray in the order you want it in.  Tab through all the icons making a note of which ones you have checked / turned on because you're going to uncheck all of them.
5. Uncheck all the icons.  Now you will go through and check the icons in the order you want them in but keep in mind, they will appear in the reverse order that they are checked.  What I mean is, the 1st one yu check will be at the bottom of the list, the 2nd will be 2nd from the bottom, the 3rd will be 3rd from the bottom etc. etc....  After you're done open the system tray to make sure it's the way you want it and Alt + F4 if it is.

Take care.  Mike.  Sennt from my iBarstool.
Book: a utensil used to pass time while waiting for the computer repairman!

----- Original Message -----

From: Bill White

Sent: Friday, March 15, 2019 8:52 AM

Subject: Re: Rearranging icons on the taskbar.

 

Hi, Chris. What I want to do is rearrange things in System Tray, not actually in the Taskbar, so unpinning things in the Taskbar won't work in this instance. What is actually happening is that I used to have an icon for Eset NOD32, my antivirus program, which was one of the first icons in System Tray. Now, in order to find this icon I must turn on all icons in System Tray, or, use the Notification Icon to go to the overflow section of icons in System Tray. What I want to do is rearrange the icons so that the Eset NOD32 icon is where it used to be.

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris Hill
Sent: Friday, March 15, 2019 8:22 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Rearranging icons on the taskbar.

I tried using drag and drop.  Although it made the appropriate noises on
my windows 10 computer, it didn't actually work.  If you want to do this
the simplest way I can think of, do the following.
unpin everything from the taskbar by right-clicking or the equivalent on
each item and choosing unpin.  Now, open the run box with windows+r and
type shell:appsvolder and press enter.  This will open a folder with
shortcuts to all your apps.  Do the equivalent of right click and pin
any you want on the taskbar in the order in which you want them.


CH








Steve Matzura
 

You and Mike B have a confusion. You want to rearrange system tray icons. This is not possible. Mike B explained how to arrange taskbar icons. This is absolutely possible, with one caveat: Any new program you run is added to the end of the icon chain appearing on the taskbar. The only thing you can change is the order of icons that are pinned to the taskbar, and the only way to change that order is to unpin everything and pin it back in the desired order. For example, on all my systems, I have browsers pinned to 1, 2,and 3. Then come my media players on 4 and 5. Any program I open will become position 6. If I open a second program and close the first, that program I opened which was at position 7 moves back to 6, and I can't change that because it's not a permanently pinned program.


Hope this helps.


 

On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 10:10 AM, Steve Matzura wrote:
You want to rearrange system tray icons. This is not possible.
That is not technically correct.   I still haven't found a way via the keyboard, even using emulated drag and drop, but it can be done via actual drag and drop.  If something is driving you absolutely mad because it's "too far down the icon parade" on the system tray then if you can get a sighted assistant they can drag it to any position relative to the other displayed icons you wish.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Steve Matzura
 

I'm not even sure what the objective is here. When the System Tray is opened with JAWS Key + F11, you can use first-letter navigation to find anything. Is it that critical to have the icons arranged in a certain order if you're using JAWS?


On 3/16/2019 10:54 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 10:10 AM, Steve Matzura wrote:
You want to rearrange system tray icons. This is not possible.
That is not technically correct.   I still haven't found a way via the keyboard, even using emulated drag and drop, but it can be done via actual drag and drop.  If something is driving you absolutely mad because it's "too far down the icon parade" on the system tray then if you can get a sighted assistant they can drag it to any position relative to the other displayed icons you wish.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


 

Steve,

          "Critical" is in the eye of the beholder.   Also, a great many people prefer to use a "screen reader agnostic" access method to the system tray, WinKey+B, then right arrow through.

          There are many roads that lead to the proverbial Rome as far as accessing the system tray.   Some people like to be able to impose a display order for the functions that they intentionally keep on permanent display there.

          I have no opinion as to whether it's critical or not, but the information being shared about what's possible, both via keyboard manipulation or requiring a mouse and sight, should be accurate.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

Yes, it is, because if you have Show All Icons in System Tray turned off, not all icons show up in JAWS Key plus F11. If you don’t have them show up, and something goes haywire, such as you need the Safely Remove Hardware icon to show up, and it isn’t there, then you must shut down your system to safely remove the inserted hardware.

 

I worked with Mike, and we found out that if Show Badges on Taskbar buttons is turned off, you are able to move System Tray icons by unchecking them, and then checking them again in the reverse order in which you want them to appear in the System Tray. Mike tandemmed into my computer, and was able to confirm that this is possible.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Steve Matzura
Sent: Saturday, March 16, 2019 9:27 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: System Tray Icons, How to Rearrange in Windows 10

 

I'm not even sure what the objective is here. When the System Tray is opened with JAWS Key + F11, you can use first-letter navigation to find anything. Is it that critical to have the icons arranged in a certain order if you're using JAWS?

 

On 3/16/2019 10:54 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 10:10 AM, Steve Matzura wrote:

You want to rearrange system tray icons. This is not possible.

That is not technically correct.   I still haven't found a way via the keyboard, even using emulated drag and drop, but it can be done via actual drag and drop.  If something is driving you absolutely mad because it's "too far down the icon parade" on the system tray then if you can get a sighted assistant they can drag it to any position relative to the other displayed icons you wish.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Mike B
 


Hi Steve,
 
With all due respect, System Tray icons can be rearranged!  I just learned that the Badges option needs to be turned off and here are my corrected steps:
 
Here's how I rearrange the system tray icons  running Windows 10 Pro Version 1809 (OS Build 17763.379) & all installed versions of Jaws.
1. Windows key + I, for Settings, tab 1 time to System, right arrow to Personalization, and press enter.
2. Navigate to, Taskbar and press enter.
3. Tab several times to, Show Badges on Taskbar..., and make sure this is, Off / unchecked.
4. Tab a few times to, Notification Area, Select which icons appear on the taskbar Link, and press enter.
5. Okay now to put the System Tray in the order you want it in.  Tab through all the icons making a note of which ones you have checked / turned on because you're going to uncheck all of them.
6. Uncheck all the icons.  Now you will go through and check the icons in the order you want them in but keep in mind, they will appear in the reverse order that they are checked.  What I mean is, the 1st one yu check will be at the bottom of the list, the 2nd will be 2nd from the bottom, the 3rd will be 3rd from the bottom etc. etc....  After you're done open the system tray to make sure it's the way you want it and Alt + F4 if it is.
Take care.  Mike.  Sennt from my iBarstool.
Book: a utensil used to pass time while waiting for the computer repairman!

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, March 16, 2019 7:08 AM
Subject: Re: System Tray Icons, How to Rearrange in Windows 10

You and Mike B have a confusion. You want to rearrange system tray
icons. This is not possible. Mike B explained how to arrange taskbar
icons. This is absolutely possible, with one caveat: Any new program you
run is added to the end of the icon chain appearing on the taskbar. The
only thing you can change is the order of icons that are pinned to the
taskbar, and the only way to change that order is to unpin everything
and pin it back in the desired order. For example, on all my systems, I
have browsers pinned to 1, 2,and 3. Then come my media players on 4 and
5. Any program I open will become position 6. If I open a second program
and close the first, that program I opened which was at position 7 moves
back to 6, and I can't change that because it's not a permanently pinned
program.


Hope this helps.





 

On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 02:22 PM, Bill White wrote:
Safely Remove Hardware icon to show up, and it isn’t there, then you must shut down your system to safely remove the inserted hardware.
I'm not arguing with anything else but this.   The Eject/Safely Remove Hardware function is an anachronism in all but the very rarest of circumstances.  All the way back to Windows 7 Microsoft changed the default behavior for USB connected devices to stop caching writes, because people were doing "the natural thing" and pulling out jump drives and external USB drives once it appeared all activity had ceased.  The problem was if the last activity had been write, the final block of data might not be written unless you ejected.

I just went through all this in the topic, Ejecting Hard Drives and Flash Drives ....., on Bleeping Computer when it came up the other day.  It won't hurt to use Eject, but it's utterly unnecessary on most systems unless someone has done customizations to go back to write caching for USB devices.  You can verify this for yourself for any USB drive you happen to have plugged in by bringing up its Properties, Hardware Tab, Properties button in the Hardware Tab, General Tab in that Properties dialog, Change Settings button, then, finally, the Policies tab in this final Properties dialog.  The radio button for, Quick Removal (default), will be chosen unless someone has tweaked the Windows installation defaults, and this is described as:  Disables write caching on the device and in Windows, but you can disconnect the device safely without using the Safely Remove Hardware notification icon.

I haven't used the eject function literally in decades provided I know that there is no active writing going on to a given thumb drive or external HDD connected via USB.  It's an extra step that, while it won't hurt, generally does nothing unless you were to be in the process of actively writing to the drive, then the eject will not be permitted until that's done.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

Maybe so, but I have seen SD cards corrupted because someone didn’t use the Safely Remove Hardware option. And their system wasn’t customized.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, March 16, 2019 11:44 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: System Tray Icons, How to Rearrange in Windows 10

 

On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 02:22 PM, Bill White wrote:

Safely Remove Hardware icon to show up, and it isn’t there, then you must shut down your system to safely remove the inserted hardware.

I'm not arguing with anything else but this.   The Eject/Safely Remove Hardware function is an anachronism in all but the very rarest of circumstances.  All the way back to Windows 7 Microsoft changed the default behavior for USB connected devices to stop caching writes, because people were doing "the natural thing" and pulling out jump drives and external USB drives once it appeared all activity had ceased.  The problem was if the last activity had been write, the final block of data might not be written unless you ejected.

I just went through all this in the topic, Ejecting Hard Drives and Flash Drives ....., on Bleeping Computer when it came up the other day.  It won't hurt to use Eject, but it's utterly unnecessary on most systems unless someone has done customizations to go back to write caching for USB devices.  You can verify this for yourself for any USB drive you happen to have plugged in by bringing up its Properties, Hardware Tab, Properties button in the Hardware Tab, General Tab in that Properties dialog, Change Settings button, then, finally, the Policies tab in this final Properties dialog.  The radio button for, Quick Removal (default), will be chosen unless someone has tweaked the Windows installation defaults, and this is described as:  Disables write caching on the device and in Windows, but you can disconnect the device safely without using the Safely Remove Hardware notification icon.

I haven't used the eject function literally in decades provided I know that there is no active writing going on to a given thumb drive or external HDD connected via USB.  It's an extra step that, while it won't hurt, generally does nothing unless you were to be in the process of actively writing to the drive, then the eject will not be permitted until that's done.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Maria Campbell
 

An external drive is easy to tell if activity has stopped, for ejection purposes, but not other devices, such as thumb drives or the VR Stream.  As a sighted person you may tell by looking, but we, the blind, have to tell by vibration.

  

Maria Campbell
lucky1inct@...

Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.
~ Blaise Pascal ~

On 3/16/2019 2:44 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 02:22 PM, Bill White wrote:
Safely Remove Hardware icon to show up, and it isn’t there, then you must shut down your system to safely remove the inserted hardware.
I'm not arguing with anything else but this.   The Eject/Safely Remove Hardware function is an anachronism in all but the very rarest of circumstances.  All the way back to Windows 7 Microsoft changed the default behavior for USB connected devices to stop caching writes, because people were doing "the natural thing" and pulling out jump drives and external USB drives once it appeared all activity had ceased.  The problem was if the last activity had been write, the final block of data might not be written unless you ejected.

I just went through all this in the topic, Ejecting Hard Drives and Flash Drives ....., on Bleeping Computer when it came up the other day.  It won't hurt to use Eject, but it's utterly unnecessary on most systems unless someone has done customizations to go back to write caching for USB devices.  You can verify this for yourself for any USB drive you happen to have plugged in by bringing up its Properties, Hardware Tab, Properties button in the Hardware Tab, General Tab in that Properties dialog, Change Settings button, then, finally, the Policies tab in this final Properties dialog.  The radio button for, Quick Removal (default), will be chosen unless someone has tweaked the Windows installation defaults, and this is described as:  Disables write caching on the device and in Windows, but you can disconnect the device safely without using the Safely Remove Hardware notification icon.

I haven't used the eject function literally in decades provided I know that there is no active writing going on to a given thumb drive or external HDD connected via USB.  It's an extra step that, while it won't hurt, generally does nothing unless you were to be in the process of actively writing to the drive, then the eject will not be permitted until that's done.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


 

On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 02:46 PM, Bill White wrote:
I have seen SD cards corrupted because someone didn’t use the Safely Remove Hardware option.
Which can only occur if you pull while a write process is active, period, as far as the end-user action being able to cause an issue.  They're not write-cached, either, as they're considered USB devices.  And I just checked that on my own machine, where I have an SD card that I routinely pull without ejecting without any ill effects.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


 

On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 02:50 PM, Maria Campbell wrote:
As a sighted person you may tell by looking, but we, the blind, have to tell by vibration.
I actually seldom use anything on the drive itself as far as thumb drives or SD cards go to determine whether a task is finished writing.  Virtually anything where I'm copying, saving, etc., to a drive (be it a HDD or thumb/SD) gives a status that it's done.   Saving something like a word file, unless it were to be a multi-thousand page tome, is always over before you could even move your hand to pull the plug.

I'm not telling anyone that they should not use Eject if they so choose.  But what I am saying is that if you are confident that there is no write activity currently in process for a USB connected storage device that using Eject gains you nothing.  Some will always use it just for the comfort factor, and that's fine.   Just don't panic if you have to pull a drive without being able to do so that you know was not being written to at the time.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Maria Campbell
 

I ask again, sort of, how do we know a write task is done without sight?


Maria Campbell
lucky1inct@...

Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.
~ Blaise Pascal ~

On 3/16/2019 2:56 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 02:50 PM, Maria Campbell wrote:
As a sighted person you may tell by looking, but we, the blind, have to tell by vibration.
I actually seldom use anything on the drive itself as far as thumb drives or SD cards go to determine whether a task is finished writing.  Virtually anything where I'm copying, saving, etc., to a drive (be it a HDD or thumb/SD) gives a status that it's done.   Saving something like a word file, unless it were to be a multi-thousand page tome, is always over before you could even move your hand to pull the plug.

I'm not telling anyone that they should not use Eject if they so choose.  But what I am saying is that if you are confident that there is no write activity currently in process for a USB connected storage device that using Eject gains you nothing.  Some will always use it just for the comfort factor, and that's fine.   Just don't panic if you have to pull a drive without being able to do so that you know was not being written to at the time.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

Hi, Brian. I inserted a thumb drive. I brought up the properties, switched to the hardware tab, clicked the device properties button, clicked the Change settings button, and there was no policies tab. I am using Microsoft Windows

Version 1809 (OS Build 17763.379) home version.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, March 16, 2019 11:56 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: System Tray Icons, How to Rearrange in Windows 10

 

On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 02:50 PM, Maria Campbell wrote:

As a sighted person you may tell by looking, but we, the blind, have to tell by vibration.

I actually seldom use anything on the drive itself as far as thumb drives or SD cards go to determine whether a task is finished writing.  Virtually anything where I'm copying, saving, etc., to a drive (be it a HDD or thumb/SD) gives a status that it's done.   Saving something like a word file, unless it were to be a multi-thousand page tome, is always over before you could even move your hand to pull the plug.

I'm not telling anyone that they should not use Eject if they so choose.  But what I am saying is that if you are confident that there is no write activity currently in process for a USB connected storage device that using Eject gains you nothing.  Some will always use it just for the comfort factor, and that's fine.   Just don't panic if you have to pull a drive without being able to do so that you know was not being written to at the time.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


 

On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 02:59 PM, Maria Campbell wrote:
I ask again, sort of, how do we know a write task is done without sight?
I'll answer again, as best I can.   For virtually any write task that involves a single small file, or even a few small files.  It's just done before you or I or any human being could possibly move our hands to pull the drive connection.   If you've ever done a cut and paste that doesn't involve many, many files you have experienced this directly.  Also, in the case of File Explorer or Windows Explorer, if it is something that's taking a long time you should get a progress dialog.  You can try to force this, too, by trying to cut and paste a folder you know contains thousands upon thousands of files to a USB storage device.  A status box comes up giving you time estimate to completion as well as percent complete.

If I'm doing, say, a full system image backup to an external HDD, the backup utility has a status monitor that I go back and look at to see if it has completed, and whether it completed successfully.

While I access all of the above visually, they are equally accessible via screen reader.  And if you go to try to find a status box for a copy, and none is there, it's done, which it is in the vast majority of cases where a few files are being shuffled around.

What I was trying to get at is I do not rely on blinking activity lights and the like because it's entirely hit or miss whether a given USB thumb drive even has one, SD cards definitely don't, and HDDs vary as to what they show depending on the brand.  My Toshiba external backup drive happens to have an indicator light that tells me not only if there's any read/write activity going on, but whether it's at USB 2.0 (or lower) or USB 3.0 speeds.  My Western Digital drive, by contrast, has a constantly blinking light if it's connected and has power, which gives me nothing of use to go on.  Thus, the presence of an ongoing status from a long running program like a full system image backup, or the absence of a status box from something like a copy/paste or cut/paste, tells me what I need to know about whether there's any ongoing activity to a given drive.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


 

On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 03:03 PM, Bill White wrote:
switched to the hardware tab
Sorry, Bill, I skipped an essential step here.  Don't ask me why, but even if you open the hardware tab by opening a given device's properties, there is a hardware list at the top of that tab, and often the first thing or several things listed are not the actual drive you're looking at.

For instance, if I get to the Hardware tab for my SD card, the label above the list is "All Disk Drives," and the SDHC card is actually the second one in that list.  You've got to navigate to the drive you're actually trying to look at again in this particular tab before continuing on with the rest of the instructions.

I apologize for the oversight.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Mario
 

I know why. you seem to get ticked off when someone says to use the
feature. even if the person who has the question doesn't have enough
functional vision to see like you can.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@gmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, March 16, 2019, 3:16 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: System Tray Icons, How to Rearrange in Windows 10

On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 03:03 PM, Bill White wrote:

switched to the hardware tab

Sorry, Bill, I skipped an essential step here.  Don't ask me why, but
even if you open the hardware tab by opening a given device's
properties, there is a hardware list at the top of that tab, and often
the first thing or several things listed are not the actual drive you're
looking at.

For instance, if I get to the Hardware tab for my SD card, the label
above the list is "All Disk Drives," and the SDHC card is actually the
second one in that list.  You've got to navigate to the drive you're
actually trying to look at again in this particular tab before
continuing on with the rest of the instructions.

I apologize for the oversight.

--

Brian *-*Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*/   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always
a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong./*

~ H.L. Mencken, AKA /The Sage of Baltimore/


Dave...
 


Maria,
 
Best advice is to simply close Windows Explorer, or the program that is writing to your thumb drive. That ensures there is no writing left. If the window refuses to close due to drive activity, then wait. As Brian says, most file writing is extremely fast and when you have a prompt back in whatever program, you're usually already long done with the file writing.
 
Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, March 16, 2019 11:59
Subject: Re: System Tray Icons, How to Rearrange in Windows 10

I ask again, sort of, how do we know a write task is done without sight?


Maria Campbell
lucky1inct@...

Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.
~ Blaise Pascal ~

On 3/16/2019 2:56 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 02:50 PM, Maria Campbell wrote:
As a sighted person you may tell by looking, but we, the blind, have to tell by vibration.
I actually seldom use anything on the drive itself as far as thumb drives or SD cards go to determine whether a task is finished writing.  Virtually anything where I'm copying, saving, etc., to a drive (be it a HDD or thumb/SD) gives a status that it's done.   Saving something like a word file, unless it were to be a multi-thousand page tome, is always over before you could even move your hand to pull the plug.

I'm not telling anyone that they should not use Eject if they so choose.  But what I am saying is that if you are confident that there is no write activity currently in process for a USB connected storage device that using Eject gains you nothing.  Some will always use it just for the comfort factor, and that's fine.   Just don't panic if you have to pull a drive without being able to do so that you know was not being written to at the time.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore