Topics

Drop Down List in Excel


Scott Rumery
 

Hello,

 

Is there a way for me to quickly jump to an item in a drop down list in Excel? I am having to work with a spreadsheet that has several drop downs that are very long and if I could quickly jump to a particular part of the list then it would make my job a little easier.

 

Thank You,

 

Scott Rumery


Dave...
 

Does first-letter navigation work, once the box is opened?
 
Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, February 16, 2019 08:15
Subject: Drop Down List in Excel

Hello,

 

Is there a way for me to quickly jump to an item in a drop down list in Excel? I am having to work with a spreadsheet that has several drop downs that are very long and if I could quickly jump to a particular part of the list then it would make my job a little easier.

 

Thank You,

 

Scott Rumery


 

It's also important to know the exact Excel Object Type.  A true dropdown is different than a text list box is different than a combo box.

The combo box is the easiest to deal with, in my opinion.

I know you have no control over how the spreadsheets have been created, but there are slight differences depending on which of the above is actually being used.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Jay <jcoffin@...>
 

Hi.

 

I’ve forwarded this message to Vispero Technical support. I’ll reply back to the list when I have an answer.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2019 9:06 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Drop Down List in Excel

 

It's also important to know the exact Excel Object Type.  A true dropdown is different than a text list box is different than a combo box.

The combo box is the easiest to deal with, in my opinion.

I know you have no control over how the spreadsheets have been created, but there are slight differences depending on which of the above is actually being used.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Scott Rumery
 

No it doesn’t. It would seem as though the only way to navigate a drop down list in Excel is either with the up and down arrows or by going to the beginning or end of the list with the home or end keys on the keyboard. You can also use the page up or page down keys, but you cannot quickly jump to an item in the list. I have even tried using the Jaws Find command but it doesn’t work in a drop list.

 

 

Scott

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2019 10:29 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Drop Down List in Excel

 

Does first-letter navigation work, once the box is opened?

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 16, 2019 08:15

Subject: Drop Down List in Excel

 

Hello,

 

Is there a way for me to quickly jump to an item in a drop down list in Excel? I am having to work with a spreadsheet that has several drop downs that are very long and if I could quickly jump to a particular part of the list then it would make my job a little easier.

 

Thank You,

 

Scott Rumery


Scott Rumery
 

Jaws is saying that these are combo boxes.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2019 12:06 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Drop Down List in Excel

 

It's also important to know the exact Excel Object Type.  A true dropdown is different than a text list box is different than a combo box.

The combo box is the easiest to deal with, in my opinion.

I know you have no control over how the spreadsheets have been created, but there are slight differences depending on which of the above is actually being used.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


 

Combo boxes are, by their very nature, a hybrid between a text box that allows you to type in data and a dropdown box that allows you to select it.  As a general rule, typing the first character will get you the first item with that character (if there is more than one), if you then type the second character it will limit the choices to those that share those first two characters.

If you know what the values are in these long lists just start typing, you should soon be limited to one.

The best analogy I can give outside excel of the same behavior is the state box in a USPS ZIP Code lookup.  If you go to, https://tools.usps.com/zip-code-lookup.htm?bycitystate,  Then enter anything in the city, tab over to the state, and pick any state where you know that there are multiples that start with the same letter.  In my case, Virginia.  If I type V in that field the first thing that pops up is "VT - Vermont," if I hit V again it shows "VI - Virgin Islands," and if I hit V again finally "VA - Virginia."  If, though I actually type VA it instantly closes to Virginia.   This is the sort of behavior you typically see in a combo box, regardless of the context.

If you had a Combo Box where the four choices were the male names, "Alexander, Bradley, Brian, Christopher," typing an A would instantly close on the first and a C on the last.  A single B would start with Bradley and if you hit it again, shift to Brian.  Since both of the B names start with BR you'd get even the same thing typing the first two characters.  But typing B R A would immediately bring up only Bradley.

In any case, once you're familiar with the entries you typically use, just typing enough of the characters necessary to close on the correct choice is usually the fastest way to get it if the list is very long.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore