How to insert a row in Excell using the ribbons?


Peter Tesar
 

Hello,


I noticed the "Insert" in the upper ribbon.

From this point, I tried moving down, left, right and tabbing.

I couldn't find rows.


Any help will be appreciated.


Thank  you,


Peter T.


Ann Byrne
 

Press the applications key and arrow down to insert and press enter. There you will have the choice of cells, columns, or rows.

Alt+i, then r, will also insert a row.

At 07:44 PM 1/2/2019, you wrote:

Hello,


I noticed the "Insert" in the upper ribbon.

From this point, I tried moving down, left, right and tabbing.

I couldn't find rows.


Any help will be appreciated.


Thank you,


Peter T.


 

The Insert tab and ribbon is not meant for inserting rows, which is typically done while you're in a worksheet and focused on the row (or rows) that you wish to insert rows above or below [the same applies to column(s), except substitute left/right for above/below].

The Insert tab and ribbon is for inserting objects of various sorts into a spreadsheet.  The Groups in the Insert ribbon are Tables, Illustrations, Charts, Tours, Sparklines, Filters, Links, Text, and Symbols.  Once you hit ALT+N to activate the Insert Tab, you can either brute force TAB and SHIFT+TAB through all the controls.  CTRL+Right or Left Arrow will move you between groups quickly, then you can tab among its controls.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


 

Peter,

            By the way, the insert controls for cells (which includes rows and columns) is a group of its own on the Home tab/ribbon.  It's the sixth group from the leftmost group, and the shortcuts in Excel 2016 are:

                            ALT+H, followed by I for insert  (then you get a dropdown for rows, columns, cells, etc.)
                                                            D for delete
                                                            O for format


                        
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Dave...
 


Brian,
 
Clear as mud...don't we all love how the ribbon made life so much easier for us?
 
Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, January 02, 2019 18:05
Subject: Re: How to insert a row in Excell using the ribbons?

Peter,

            By the way, the insert controls for cells (which includes rows and columns) is a group of its own on the Home tab/ribbon.  It's the sixth group from the leftmost group, and the shortcuts in Excel 2016 are:

                            ALT+H, followed by I for insert  (then you get a dropdown for rows, columns, cells, etc.)
                                                            D for delete
                                                            O for format


                        
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


 

Dave,

           I really don't get all the complaining about the ribbon interface.  It's a menu, just laid out more visually for those who can see, and more "horizontally" than vertically.

           When you have a program like Word, or Excel, or any complex piece of software that has hundreds through thousands of functions there is no way to make keyboard shortcuts "intuitive."  They've never been intuitive.  You find your own set of "greatest hits" that you use all the time, over time, and commit them to memory.

            I don't find it any more difficult to think of the Home Tab/Ribbon, Insert (or Delete or Format) commands than I did when they were arranged as dropdown menus.  People just don't want to even think about it, but that's too bad, as the Ribbon interface is not going away anytime soon and the old Menu interface is gone for good.  It just is not all that difficult to use the ribbons, but it certainly is if you resist them, and some have been resisting them for well over a decade now.  What a waste of time and effort.  It's easier, and more sensible, to learn how they work.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Dave...
 


Brian,
 
Yes, I learned to work with the ribbon years ago, and have learned several quick Alt+ keystrokes to get the job done. But from my perspective, the menus were more intuitive overall. Can't help saying that, but for me, it was true.
 
Of course I don't use those virtual ribbons provided by JAWS -- just a crutch.
 
Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, January 02, 2019 21:30
Subject: Re: How to insert a row in Excell using the ribbons?

Dave,

           I really don't get all the complaining about the ribbon interface.  It's a menu, just laid out more visually for those who can see, and more "horizontally" than vertically.

           When you have a program like Word, or Excel, or any complex piece of software that has hundreds through thousands of functions there is no way to make keyboard shortcuts "intuitive."  They've never been intuitive.  You find your own set of "greatest hits" that you use all the time, over time, and commit them to memory.

            I don't find it any more difficult to think of the Home Tab/Ribbon, Insert (or Delete or Format) commands than I did when they were arranged as dropdown menus.  People just don't want to even think about it, but that's too bad, as the Ribbon interface is not going away anytime soon and the old Menu interface is gone for good.  It just is not all that difficult to use the ribbons, but it certainly is if you resist them, and some have been resisting them for well over a decade now.  What a waste of time and effort.  It's easier, and more sensible, to learn how they work.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


CJ &AA MAY <chrisalismay@...>
 

I use the context key (f10). Arrow down to insert, press enter and then arrow down to whether you want to insert a row, colmn etc.

Alison

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Peter Tesar
Sent: 03 January 2019 01:44
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: How to insert a row in Excell using the ribbons?

 

Hello,

 

I noticed the "Insert" in the upper ribbon.

From this point, I tried moving down, left, right and tabbing.

I couldn't find rows.

 

Any help will be appreciated.

 

Thank  you,

 

Peter T.


CJ &AA MAY <chrisalismay@...>
 

I find this much the simplest way to achieve this.
Alison

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ann Byrne
Sent: 03 January 2019 01:55
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to insert a row in Excell using the ribbons?

Press the applications key and arrow down to insert and press enter. There
you will have the choice of cells, columns, or rows.

Alt+i, then r, will also insert a row.


At 07:44 PM 1/2/2019, you wrote:

Hello,


I noticed the "Insert" in the upper ribbon.

From this point, I tried moving down, left, right and tabbing.

I couldn't find rows.


Any help will be appreciated.


Thank you,


Peter T.


 

On Thu, Jan 3, 2019 at 12:51 AM, Dave... wrote:
the menus were more intuitive overall. Can't help saying that, but for me, it was true.
I think that was true for a lot of us.  But I also think that calling the menus "intuitive" is a side effect of having used them for years, too.  There has never been a complex program I've worked with, when it was completely new to me, that I'd call intuitive even though that's a term that gets tossed around alot.  They're all puzzles one has to work one's way through, and once one has one often wonders how they ever "didn't get that."

The ribbon interface does seem to be more "visually intuitive" to some, but for others such as myself it's a messy clutter compared to a menu-submenu system.  But for people who can see it does have the advantage of putting a very great many of the most frequently used features "front and center" if you can wade through the clutter.
 
When it comes to inserting rows/columns, though, I've always done that via the context menu.  It just makes sense to me to "work over/under for rows or left/right for columns" of where I currently am.  I also have a tendency to want to add blocks of rows at a time, so I'll often select several rows then do an insert rows command.  Adding 4 blocks of 5 rows is much faster than doing 20 individual rows.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore