Using Access


Kevin Meyers <kevinmeyers@...>
 

Hello, I finally got Access 2016. I have tried using some key strokes I found on the internet and they don’t work to well. Does anyone know of some documentation that is written coming from the perspective of a screen reader? I’m using Jaws 2018 and Windows10. Thanks, Kevin


Ann Byrne
 

One thing to do is to go to JAWS help for all all applications, for MS Office, and read everything they have. Not a lot, I know; but more than nothing.

I have an excellent tutorial for Access 2002, which would help a little--but only a little.

I know there are hot keys, because my Access-user son talked me through building a database a couple of years ago, but not sure where to find them.

At 08:29 PM 12/11/2018, you wrote:
Hello, I finally got Access 2016. I have tried using some key strokes I found on the internet and they don't work to well. Does anyone know of some documentation that is written coming from the perspective of a screen reader? I'm using Jaws 2018 and Windows10. Thanks, Kevin


Ben Humphreys <brhbrhbrh@...>
 

Hi Kevin,

I went through this earlier this year and gave up. Here are the things I tried:
1. Reading all the Jaws help on Access; many of the JAWS commands previously implemented for Access 2003 have been removed since later versions of Access are supposed to have baked-in accessibility
2. Searching the web for articles on Access 2016 accessibility; found a couple articles from Microsoft on how to do simple things
3. Purchased Microsoft training guide: MOS 2016 Study Guide for Microsoft Access
4. Attempted to go through Chapter 1 of this book
5. Contacted Microsoft Disability Help Desk for further resources and provided a very detailed summary of about 4 example things where Microsoft Access was not accessible or useable from Chapter 1 of the above guide

And then... Nothing.

To be fair, I think Microsoft Disability Help Desk is a good resource and I've always received professional service from them. But they can only deliver what the Access developers implemented.

This is a real shame, since Access is so much more straightforward than heavyweight solutions like Visual Studio and SQL Server Management Studio.

However, Visual Studio has received a lot of accessibility love from Microsoft lately, and I've found the latest versions far more accessible than Access. SQL Management Studio is also very good.

I get the impression that Access is on the way out and although Microsoft is making good accessibility improvements elsewhere, Access is not a priority.

Hope this helps,

Ben

At 09:29 PM 12/11/2018, you wrote:
Hello, I finally got Access 2016. I have tried using some key strokes I found on the internet and they don't work to well. Does anyone know of some documentation that is written coming from the perspective of a screen reader? I'm using Jaws 2018 and Windows10. Thanks, Kevin