How to see what I have running in background - svchost.exe (netsvcs)?


Richard B. McDonald
 

Recently, this weird process called "svchost.exe (netsvcs)" began to load-up on my laptop.  I am unsure what it is, what it does or what causes it to run.  However, it takes up like 20% of my CPU, causes my laptop to heat up and its fans run fast and drains a full battery in about 1.5 hours.  Usually, a full battery lasts about six hours.  So, I wonder if this may be the culprit?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 12:46 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background?

 

I probably should have given a bit more info.

 

I’m running Windows 7 64-bit Pro on a SSD with a second, small SSd paging drive, 3 2tb spinning drive and 8gb ram which is the max on my Dell desktop with an I3 at 3.3ghz

 

At runtime I start Jaws 16 and MS Security Essentials.  Others, like Adobe, Itunes, printer and scanner management I have set to load only when needed, which is rairly.

 

Cpu usage is less than 2% at this point.

 

I usually load uTorrent which brings the usage up to 10-15 percent.

 

The system may idle at this level for days, approaching 100% when running 7-zip or audio processing programs.  It returns to the 10-15% level when those programs finish.

 

Occasionally, the idle usage goes to 50-60% with uTorrent running and to 30-40% after uTorrent is terminated and with only a browser or two open.

 

Closing all applications in the Task Manager list and the uTorrent process drops the usage to either near zero or to 30-40%.  I have not been able to determine any reason for the difference or a way to predict when the higher level will occur.  

 

Checking the Task Manager Process list shows many of the previously running processes still loaded but at most 1 or 2 processes at 1% usage and a status line entry of 30-40% total usage.

 

I have run MS Security Essentials, which has protected me for years and nothing shows.  I haven’t been able to find a version of MalWare Bytes that I can run successfully.

 

Keyboard delay is barely noticeable at 30-40% usage, noticeable at 60% and terrible at 70+%.  Probably a good pard of that is Jaws related, especially when memory load is high and paging is likely to be occurring.

 

I tend to keep multiple projects running.  I have seen 90+ entries in the process list and 25+ in the applications list.  Most are static displays but many are active with high cpu and i/o demands.  Terminating all of these programs sometimes results in essentially no cpu usage while at other times it still shows 30-40% usage.

 

Tony

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 1:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background?

 

A bunch of general notes:

·         40% CPU usage is nowhere near to "high."  If you're experiencing bad lagging at 40% CPU usage you need to see if something is thrashing your hard disc.  A machine should be flying along at 40% CPU usage if nothing else is preventing it from doing so.

·         The 64-bit Windows environment still uses lots of 32-bit processes.  Many programs that come in 32 and 64 bit will even install 32-bit by default unless instructed otherwise on a 64-bit system.

·         Many programs, whether part of the Windows OS or not (Chrome being one example) run many simultaneous processes.  In the case of Chrome it's one per tab plus a couple more (I can't remember the exact count)

·         If you are having horrible lag at system start this can very often be the result of an orphan entry in the registry or startup folder that's trying to start something that's no longer on your system.  Some programs are notorious for not cleaning up after themselves well when they are uninstalled while others can end up this way if uninstalled incorrectly.  Windows will keep trying and trying and trying to start up processes/programs that are specified as part of boot up even when they are no longer present, and it hangs waiting for a response and, after some ungodly long period of time without response, will try again to start whatever it happens to be.  (At least this has been the case for as long as I've been working with Windows.  This might have changed with Windows 10, but I doubt it.

--
Brian


A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.

         ~ William James


Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 


It could very well be, if it is a new process which didn't run before. Are you using a new browser such as Chrome that could be initiating this process? If not, use the following diagnostic tool:
 
Press Windows Key plus R for the "Run" dialog. Once the diagnostic program starts, use the Tab key to get to the "Services Tab. Uncheck
 
"svchost.exe (netsvcs)"
 
If it shows up in your MSconfig serves after you reboot, it is being initiated by another program you are using.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 5:50 AM
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background - svchost.exe (netsvcs)?

Recently, this weird process called "svchost.exe (netsvcs)" began to load-up on my laptop.  I am unsure what it is, what it does or what causes it to run.  However, it takes up like 20% of my CPU, causes my laptop to heat up and its fans run fast and drains a full battery in about 1.5 hours.  Usually, a full battery lasts about six hours.  So, I wonder if this may be the culprit?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 12:46 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background?

 

I probably should have given a bit more info.

 

I’m running Windows 7 64-bit Pro on a SSD with a second, small SSd paging drive, 3 2tb spinning drive and 8gb ram which is the max on my Dell desktop with an I3 at 3.3ghz

 

At runtime I start Jaws 16 and MS Security Essentials.  Others, like Adobe, Itunes, printer and scanner management I have set to load only when needed, which is rairly.

 

Cpu usage is less than 2% at this point.

 

I usually load uTorrent which brings the usage up to 10-15 percent.

 

The system may idle at this level for days, approaching 100% when running 7-zip or audio processing programs.  It returns to the 10-15% level when those programs finish.

 

Occasionally, the idle usage goes to 50-60% with uTorrent running and to 30-40% after uTorrent is terminated and with only a browser or two open.

 

Closing all applications in the Task Manager list and the uTorrent process drops the usage to either near zero or to 30-40%.  I have not been able to determine any reason for the difference or a way to predict when the higher level will occur.  

 

Checking the Task Manager Process list shows many of the previously running processes still loaded but at most 1 or 2 processes at 1% usage and a status line entry of 30-40% total usage.

 

I have run MS Security Essentials, which has protected me for years and nothing shows.  I haven’t been able to find a version of MalWare Bytes that I can run successfully.

 

Keyboard delay is barely noticeable at 30-40% usage, noticeable at 60% and terrible at 70+%.  Probably a good pard of that is Jaws related, especially when memory load is high and paging is likely to be occurring.

 

I tend to keep multiple projects running.  I have seen 90+ entries in the process list and 25+ in the applications list.  Most are static displays but many are active with high cpu and i/o demands.  Terminating all of these programs sometimes results in essentially no cpu usage while at other times it still shows 30-40% usage.

 

Tony

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 1:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background?

 

A bunch of general notes:

·         40% CPU usage is nowhere near to "high."  If you're experiencing bad lagging at 40% CPU usage you need to see if something is thrashing your hard disc.  A machine should be flying along at 40% CPU usage if nothing else is preventing it from doing so.

·         The 64-bit Windows environment still uses lots of 32-bit processes.  Many programs that come in 32 and 64 bit will even install 32-bit by default unless instructed otherwise on a 64-bit system.

·         Many programs, whether part of the Windows OS or not (Chrome being one example) run many simultaneous processes.  In the case of Chrome it's one per tab plus a couple more (I can't remember the exact count)

·         If you are having horrible lag at system start this can very often be the result of an orphan entry in the registry or startup folder that's trying to start something that's no longer on your system.  Some programs are notorious for not cleaning up after themselves well when they are uninstalled while others can end up this way if uninstalled incorrectly.  Windows will keep trying and trying and trying to start up processes/programs that are specified as part of boot up even when they are no longer present, and it hangs waiting for a response and, after some ungodly long period of time without response, will try again to start whatever it happens to be.  (At least this has been the case for as long as I've been working with Windows.  This might have changed with Windows 10, but I doubt it.

--
Brian


A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.

         ~ William James



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 14154 (20160921) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com


__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 14154 (20160921) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com


Douglas C. DeCamp
 

SVCHOST is called by a number of processes to provide services.  One I have had trouble with on occasion in the past few months is Windows Update.  If for some reason it fails to download properly at startup it will put a SVCHOST task in a loop.  The only way I could stop it was to disable automatic updates and re-boot and then try to make individual updates based on the list of failed updates in the Windows update list.  This is not an easy process.  Alternatively, one time I just turned off auto updates and left it for a couple of weeks and then came back and re-ran the Windows update process to successful completion.  You can test your system to see if this is the problem by going to windows update and pressing the update button.  If it just sits there and cannot do the updates this is probably why you are seeing the SVCHOST loop.
--HTH---
Doug



From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 8:57 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background - svchost.exe (netsvcs)?

It could very well be, if it is a new process which didn't run before. Are you using a new browser such as Chrome that could be initiating this process? If not, use the following diagnostic tool:
 
Press Windows Key plus R for the "Run" dialog. Once the diagnostic program starts, use the Tab key to get to the "Services Tab. Uncheck
 
"svchost.exe (netsvcs)"
 
If it shows up in your MSconfig serves after you reboot, it is being initiated by another program you are using.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 5:50 AM
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background - svchost.exe (netsvcs)?

Recently, this weird process called "svchost.exe (netsvcs)" began to load-up on my laptop.  I am unsure what it is, what it does or what causes it to run.  However, it takes up like 20% of my CPU, causes my laptop to heat up and its fans run fast and drains a full battery in about 1.5 hours.  Usually, a full battery lasts about six hours.  So, I wonder if this may be the culprit?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 12:46 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background?

 

I probably should have given a bit more info.

 

I’m running Windows 7 64-bit Pro on a SSD with a second, small SSd paging drive, 3 2tb spinning drive and 8gb ram which is the max on my Dell desktop with an I3 at 3.3ghz

 

At runtime I start Jaws 16 and MS Security Essentials.  Others, like Adobe, Itunes, printer and scanner management I have set to load only when needed, which is rairly.

 

Cpu usage is less than 2% at this point.

 

I usually load uTorrent which brings the usage up to 10-15 percent.

 

The system may idle at this level for days, approaching 100% when running 7-zip or audio processing programs.  It returns to the 10-15% level when those programs finish.

 

Occasionally, the idle usage goes to 50-60% with uTorrent running and to 30-40% after uTorrent is terminated and with only a browser or two open.

 

Closing all applications in the Task Manager list and the uTorrent process drops the usage to either near zero or to 30-40%.  I have not been able to determine any reason for the difference or a way to predict when the higher level will occur.  

 

Checking the Task Manager Process list shows many of the previously running processes still loaded but at most 1 or 2 processes at 1% usage and a status line entry of 30-40% total usage.

 

I have run MS Security Essentials, which has protected me for years and nothing shows.  I haven’t been able to find a version of MalWare Bytes that I can run successfully.

 

Keyboard delay is barely noticeable at 30-40% usage, noticeable at 60% and terrible at 70+%.  Probably a good pard of that is Jaws related, especially when memory load is high and paging is likely to be occurring.

 

I tend to keep multiple projects running.  I have seen 90+ entries in the process list and 25+ in the applications list.  Most are static displays but many are active with high cpu and i/o demands.  Terminating all of these programs sometimes results in essentially no cpu usage while at other times it still shows 30-40% usage.

 

Tony

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 1:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background?

 

A bunch of general notes:

·         40% CPU usage is nowhere near to "high."  If you're experiencing bad lagging at 40% CPU usage you need to see if something is thrashing your hard disc.  A machine should be flying along at 40% CPU usage if nothing else is preventing it from doing so.

·         The 64-bit Windows environment still uses lots of 32-bit processes.  Many programs that come in 32 and 64 bit will even install 32-bit by default unless instructed otherwise on a 64-bit system.

·         Many programs, whether part of the Windows OS or not (Chrome being one example) run many simultaneous processes.  In the case of Chrome it's one per tab plus a couple more (I can't remember the exact count)

·         If you are having horrible lag at system start this can very often be the result of an orphan entry in the registry or startup folder that's trying to start something that's no longer on your system.  Some programs are notorious for not cleaning up after themselves well when they are uninstalled while others can end up this way if uninstalled incorrectly.  Windows will keep trying and trying and trying to start up processes/programs that are specified as part of boot up even when they are no longer present, and it hangs waiting for a response and, after some ungodly long period of time without response, will try again to start whatever it happens to be.  (At least this has been the case for as long as I've been working with Windows.  This might have changed with Windows 10, but I doubt it.

--
Brian


A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.

         ~ William James



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 14154 (20160921) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com


__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 14154 (20160921) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com


Richard B. McDonald
 

Thanks for your below.  It is very helpful.  I will give it a try!

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Douglas C. DeCamp
Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 7:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background - svchost.exe (netsvcs)?

 

SVCHOST is called by a number of processes to provide services.  One I have had trouble with on occasion in the past few months is Windows Update.  If for some reason it fails to download properly at startup it will put a SVCHOST task in a loop.  The only way I could stop it was to disable automatic updates and re-boot and then try to make individual updates based on the list of failed updates in the Windows update list.  This is not an easy process.  Alternatively, one time I just turned off auto updates and left it for a couple of weeks and then came back and re-ran the Windows update process to successful completion.  You can test your system to see if this is the problem by going to windows update and pressing the update button.  If it just sits there and cannot do the updates this is probably why you are seeing the SVCHOST loop.

--HTH---

Doug

 


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 8:57 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background - svchost.exe (netsvcs)?

It could very well be, if it is a new process which didn't run before. Are you using a new browser such as Chrome that could be initiating this process? If not, use the following diagnostic tool:

 

Press Windows Key plus R for the "Run" dialog. Once the diagnostic program starts, use the Tab key to get to the "Services Tab. Uncheck

 

"svchost.exe (netsvcs)"

 

If it shows up in your MSconfig serves after you reboot, it is being initiated by another program you are using.

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 5:50 AM

Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background - svchost.exe (netsvcs)?

 

Recently, this weird process called "svchost.exe (netsvcs)" began to load-up on my laptop.  I am unsure what it is, what it does or what causes it to run.  However, it takes up like 20% of my CPU, causes my laptop to heat up and its fans run fast and drains a full battery in about 1.5 hours.  Usually, a full battery lasts about six hours.  So, I wonder if this may be the culprit?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 12:46 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background?

 

I probably should have given a bit more info.

 

I’m running Windows 7 64-bit Pro on a SSD with a second, small SSd paging drive, 3 2tb spinning drive and 8gb ram which is the max on my Dell desktop with an I3 at 3.3ghz

 

At runtime I start Jaws 16 and MS Security Essentials.  Others, like Adobe, Itunes, printer and scanner management I have set to load only when needed, which is rairly.

 

Cpu usage is less than 2% at this point.

 

I usually load uTorrent which brings the usage up to 10-15 percent.

 

The system may idle at this level for days, approaching 100% when running 7-zip or audio processing programs.  It returns to the 10-15% level when those programs finish.

 

Occasionally, the idle usage goes to 50-60% with uTorrent running and to 30-40% after uTorrent is terminated and with only a browser or two open.

 

Closing all applications in the Task Manager list and the uTorrent process drops the usage to either near zero or to 30-40%.  I have not been able to determine any reason for the difference or a way to predict when the higher level will occur.  

 

Checking the Task Manager Process list shows many of the previously running processes still loaded but at most 1 or 2 processes at 1% usage and a status line entry of 30-40% total usage.

 

I have run MS Security Essentials, which has protected me for years and nothing shows.  I haven’t been able to find a version of MalWare Bytes that I can run successfully.

 

Keyboard delay is barely noticeable at 30-40% usage, noticeable at 60% and terrible at 70+%.  Probably a good pard of that is Jaws related, especially when memory load is high and paging is likely to be occurring.

 

I tend to keep multiple projects running.  I have seen 90+ entries in the process list and 25+ in the applications list.  Most are static displays but many are active with high cpu and i/o demands.  Terminating all of these programs sometimes results in essentially no cpu usage while at other times it still shows 30-40% usage.

 

Tony

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 1:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background?

 

A bunch of general notes:

·         40% CPU usage is nowhere near to "high."  If you're experiencing bad lagging at 40% CPU usage you need to see if something is thrashing your hard disc.  A machine should be flying along at 40% CPU usage if nothing else is preventing it from doing so.

·         The 64-bit Windows environment still uses lots of 32-bit processes.  Many programs that come in 32 and 64 bit will even install 32-bit by default unless instructed otherwise on a 64-bit system.

·         Many programs, whether part of the Windows OS or not (Chrome being one example) run many simultaneous processes.  In the case of Chrome it's one per tab plus a couple more (I can't remember the exact count)

·         If you are having horrible lag at system start this can very often be the result of an orphan entry in the registry or startup folder that's trying to start something that's no longer on your system.  Some programs are notorious for not cleaning up after themselves well when they are uninstalled while others can end up this way if uninstalled incorrectly.  Windows will keep trying and trying and trying to start up processes/programs that are specified as part of boot up even when they are no longer present, and it hangs waiting for a response and, after some ungodly long period of time without response, will try again to start whatever it happens to be.  (At least this has been the case for as long as I've been working with Windows.  This might have changed with Windows 10, but I doubt it.

--
Brian


A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.

         ~ William James



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 14154 (20160921) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 14154 (20160921) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com


Richard B. McDonald
 

Super!  I'll give this a try too!

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 6:56 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background - svchost.exe (netsvcs)?

 

It could very well be, if it is a new process which didn't run before. Are you using a new browser such as Chrome that could be initiating this process? If not, use the following diagnostic tool:

 

Press Windows Key plus R for the "Run" dialog. Once the diagnostic program starts, use the Tab key to get to the "Services Tab. Uncheck

 

"svchost.exe (netsvcs)"

 

If it shows up in your MSconfig serves after you reboot, it is being initiated by another program you are using.

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 5:50 AM

Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background - svchost.exe (netsvcs)?

 

Recently, this weird process called "svchost.exe (netsvcs)" began to load-up on my laptop.  I am unsure what it is, what it does or what causes it to run.  However, it takes up like 20% of my CPU, causes my laptop to heat up and its fans run fast and drains a full battery in about 1.5 hours.  Usually, a full battery lasts about six hours.  So, I wonder if this may be the culprit?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 12:46 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background?

 

I probably should have given a bit more info.

 

I’m running Windows 7 64-bit Pro on a SSD with a second, small SSd paging drive, 3 2tb spinning drive and 8gb ram which is the max on my Dell desktop with an I3 at 3.3ghz

 

At runtime I start Jaws 16 and MS Security Essentials.  Others, like Adobe, Itunes, printer and scanner management I have set to load only when needed, which is rairly.

 

Cpu usage is less than 2% at this point.

 

I usually load uTorrent which brings the usage up to 10-15 percent.

 

The system may idle at this level for days, approaching 100% when running 7-zip or audio processing programs.  It returns to the 10-15% level when those programs finish.

 

Occasionally, the idle usage goes to 50-60% with uTorrent running and to 30-40% after uTorrent is terminated and with only a browser or two open.

 

Closing all applications in the Task Manager list and the uTorrent process drops the usage to either near zero or to 30-40%.  I have not been able to determine any reason for the difference or a way to predict when the higher level will occur.  

 

Checking the Task Manager Process list shows many of the previously running processes still loaded but at most 1 or 2 processes at 1% usage and a status line entry of 30-40% total usage.

 

I have run MS Security Essentials, which has protected me for years and nothing shows.  I haven’t been able to find a version of MalWare Bytes that I can run successfully.

 

Keyboard delay is barely noticeable at 30-40% usage, noticeable at 60% and terrible at 70+%.  Probably a good pard of that is Jaws related, especially when memory load is high and paging is likely to be occurring.

 

I tend to keep multiple projects running.  I have seen 90+ entries in the process list and 25+ in the applications list.  Most are static displays but many are active with high cpu and i/o demands.  Terminating all of these programs sometimes results in essentially no cpu usage while at other times it still shows 30-40% usage.

 

Tony

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 1:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background?

 

A bunch of general notes:

·         40% CPU usage is nowhere near to "high."  If you're experiencing bad lagging at 40% CPU usage you need to see if something is thrashing your hard disc.  A machine should be flying along at 40% CPU usage if nothing else is preventing it from doing so.

·         The 64-bit Windows environment still uses lots of 32-bit processes.  Many programs that come in 32 and 64 bit will even install 32-bit by default unless instructed otherwise on a 64-bit system.

·         Many programs, whether part of the Windows OS or not (Chrome being one example) run many simultaneous processes.  In the case of Chrome it's one per tab plus a couple more (I can't remember the exact count)

·         If you are having horrible lag at system start this can very often be the result of an orphan entry in the registry or startup folder that's trying to start something that's no longer on your system.  Some programs are notorious for not cleaning up after themselves well when they are uninstalled while others can end up this way if uninstalled incorrectly.  Windows will keep trying and trying and trying to start up processes/programs that are specified as part of boot up even when they are no longer present, and it hangs waiting for a response and, after some ungodly long period of time without response, will try again to start whatever it happens to be.  (At least this has been the case for as long as I've been working with Windows.  This might have changed with Windows 10, but I doubt it.

--
Brian


A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.

         ~ William James



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 14154 (20160921) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 14154 (20160921) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com


Richard B. McDonald
 

this worked!

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard B. McDonald
Sent: Thursday, September 22, 2016 3:29 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background - svchost.exe (netsvcs)?

 

Thanks for your below.  It is very helpful.  I will give it a try!

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Douglas C. DeCamp
Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 7:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background - svchost.exe (netsvcs)?

 

SVCHOST is called by a number of processes to provide services.  One I have had trouble with on occasion in the past few months is Windows Update.  If for some reason it fails to download properly at startup it will put a SVCHOST task in a loop.  The only way I could stop it was to disable automatic updates and re-boot and then try to make individual updates based on the list of failed updates in the Windows update list.  This is not an easy process.  Alternatively, one time I just turned off auto updates and left it for a couple of weeks and then came back and re-ran the Windows update process to successful completion.  You can test your system to see if this is the problem by going to windows update and pressing the update button.  If it just sits there and cannot do the updates this is probably why you are seeing the SVCHOST loop.

--HTH---

Doug

 


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 8:57 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background - svchost.exe (netsvcs)?

It could very well be, if it is a new process which didn't run before. Are you using a new browser such as Chrome that could be initiating this process? If not, use the following diagnostic tool:

 

Press Windows Key plus R for the "Run" dialog. Once the diagnostic program starts, use the Tab key to get to the "Services Tab. Uncheck

 

"svchost.exe (netsvcs)"

 

If it shows up in your MSconfig serves after you reboot, it is being initiated by another program you are using.

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2016 5:50 AM

Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background - svchost.exe (netsvcs)?

 

Recently, this weird process called "svchost.exe (netsvcs)" began to load-up on my laptop.  I am unsure what it is, what it does or what causes it to run.  However, it takes up like 20% of my CPU, causes my laptop to heat up and its fans run fast and drains a full battery in about 1.5 hours.  Usually, a full battery lasts about six hours.  So, I wonder if this may be the culprit?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 12:46 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background?

 

I probably should have given a bit more info.

 

I’m running Windows 7 64-bit Pro on a SSD with a second, small SSd paging drive, 3 2tb spinning drive and 8gb ram which is the max on my Dell desktop with an I3 at 3.3ghz

 

At runtime I start Jaws 16 and MS Security Essentials.  Others, like Adobe, Itunes, printer and scanner management I have set to load only when needed, which is rairly.

 

Cpu usage is less than 2% at this point.

 

I usually load uTorrent which brings the usage up to 10-15 percent.

 

The system may idle at this level for days, approaching 100% when running 7-zip or audio processing programs.  It returns to the 10-15% level when those programs finish.

 

Occasionally, the idle usage goes to 50-60% with uTorrent running and to 30-40% after uTorrent is terminated and with only a browser or two open.

 

Closing all applications in the Task Manager list and the uTorrent process drops the usage to either near zero or to 30-40%.  I have not been able to determine any reason for the difference or a way to predict when the higher level will occur.  

 

Checking the Task Manager Process list shows many of the previously running processes still loaded but at most 1 or 2 processes at 1% usage and a status line entry of 30-40% total usage.

 

I have run MS Security Essentials, which has protected me for years and nothing shows.  I haven’t been able to find a version of MalWare Bytes that I can run successfully.

 

Keyboard delay is barely noticeable at 30-40% usage, noticeable at 60% and terrible at 70+%.  Probably a good pard of that is Jaws related, especially when memory load is high and paging is likely to be occurring.

 

I tend to keep multiple projects running.  I have seen 90+ entries in the process list and 25+ in the applications list.  Most are static displays but many are active with high cpu and i/o demands.  Terminating all of these programs sometimes results in essentially no cpu usage while at other times it still shows 30-40% usage.

 

Tony

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 1:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: How to see what I have running in background?

 

A bunch of general notes:

·         40% CPU usage is nowhere near to "high."  If you're experiencing bad lagging at 40% CPU usage you need to see if something is thrashing your hard disc.  A machine should be flying along at 40% CPU usage if nothing else is preventing it from doing so.

·         The 64-bit Windows environment still uses lots of 32-bit processes.  Many programs that come in 32 and 64 bit will even install 32-bit by default unless instructed otherwise on a 64-bit system.

·         Many programs, whether part of the Windows OS or not (Chrome being one example) run many simultaneous processes.  In the case of Chrome it's one per tab plus a couple more (I can't remember the exact count)

·         If you are having horrible lag at system start this can very often be the result of an orphan entry in the registry or startup folder that's trying to start something that's no longer on your system.  Some programs are notorious for not cleaning up after themselves well when they are uninstalled while others can end up this way if uninstalled incorrectly.  Windows will keep trying and trying and trying to start up processes/programs that are specified as part of boot up even when they are no longer present, and it hangs waiting for a response and, after some ungodly long period of time without response, will try again to start whatever it happens to be.  (At least this has been the case for as long as I've been working with Windows.  This might have changed with Windows 10, but I doubt it.

--
Brian


A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.

         ~ William James



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 14154 (20160921) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 14154 (20160921) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com