Topics

Chrome and passwords


Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

What is the best way to get to the “Manage Passwords settings in Google Chrome?

 

Thank you.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 


 

That depends on exactly what you want to manage (and which version of Chrome).

Under Version 69, Chrome menu, Settings, Passwords - under the People section, which is the first Section on the Settings Page.

Passwords themselves are now managed under one's Google Account at https://passwords.google.com
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

What I’m referring to is managing whether or not Chrome remembers passwords, and how to get Chrome to save a password after logging onto a website.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, September 17, 2018 8:23 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Chrome and passwords

 

That depends on exactly what you want to manage (and which version of Chrome).

Under Version 69, Chrome menu, Settings, Passwords - under the People section, which is the first Section on the Settings Page.

Passwords themselves are now managed under one's Google Account at https://passwords.google.com
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


 

Exactly where I mentioned.  After you've brought up Chrome Menu, Settings, Password -  the dialog that appears has the "Offer to save passwords" toggle as the first item.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

My question, then, is this: Are the passwords you enter for webpages like BARD, etc saved as you said in an earlier post, in

 

https://passwords.google.com

 

or are they saved on the local computer as other browsers have done in the past? I thought only passwords associated with Google would be saved at

 

https://passwords.google.com

 

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, September 17, 2018 8:42 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Chrome and passwords

 

Exactly where I mentioned.  After you've brought up Chrome Menu, Settings, Password -  the dialog that appears has the "Offer to save passwords" toggle as the first item.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Sharon
 

So, if I want to change my password for either gmail or scribd, this is where I should go. Right?

Sharon

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, September 17, 2018 11:23 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Chrome and passwords

 

That depends on exactly what you want to manage (and which version of Chrome).

Under Version 69, Chrome menu, Settings, Passwords - under the People section, which is the first Section on the Settings Page.

Passwords themselves are now managed under one's Google Account at https://passwords.google.com
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


 

Sharon,

           Yes.  When you bring up the Chrome Passwords page there is a section with the Saved Passwords list (by site) and a Never Saved section (also arranged by site).

           I cannot tell you any more than that, as I absolutely never allow any browser to save passwords.

Bill,

           I do not know what the underlying architecture is.  I infer, from what the settings now read, that the actual password storage itself is probably cloud-based, but there is no way I can be 100% certain of that.  These things get changed at the will of the developers, and since they're stored in encrypted form I wouldn't recognize them easily if they are stored locally.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Sharon
 

So if I do not want Chrome to save passwords . . .

I just wonder if any have been saved on the site if I’ve never used Chrome.

Talk about confusing.

Sharon

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 9:56 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Chrome and passwords

 

Sharon,

           Yes.  When you bring up the Chrome Passwords page there is a section with the Saved Passwords list (by site) and a Never Saved section (also arranged by site).

           I cannot tell you any more than that, as I absolutely never allow any browser to save passwords.

Bill,

           I do not know what the underlying architecture is.  I infer, from what the settings now read, that the actual password storage itself is probably cloud-based, but there is no way I can be 100% certain of that.  These things get changed at the will of the developers, and since they're stored in encrypted form I wouldn't recognize them easily if they are stored locally.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


 

Sharon,

           If you've never used Chrome it is impossible that Chrome has saved passwords.

           If you wish to use Chrome, but also wish that it never, ever even offer to remember passwords, then the first time you fire it up go to the Passwords settings and flip that toggle for offering to remember passwords to off.

           The logistics of where the setting is differs, but this is true of every modern browser.  They all can remember passwords, you can force them not to do so, and if you did save some earlier and change your mind these can be deleted.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

Hi, Brian. This is what I found on Google about Chrome. I’m not excessively security cautious, but, even to me, this is pretty scary.

 

You might want to think twice before you let someone borrow your computer.

The most obvious risk of allowing someone else access to your desktop is that they can impersonate you, using any app where you’re already signed in. They could send prank messages using your default email client, or profess your undying love for Justin Bieber using your logged-in Twitter account.

That’s annoying, but far from fatal.

But the situation becomes considerably worse if you use Google Chrome to save and sync passwords for easy logins at your favorite websites. An intruder who has unrestricted access to your computer for even a minute can view and copy all of your saved passwords just by visiting an easy-to-remember settings page: chrome://settings/passwords.

That link opens the local copy of your saved password cache, which is synchronized to every machine where you sign in with your Google account.

And the funny thing is, anyone who visits that page can see the plaintext version of every saved password just by clicking a button.

The saved password list shows the web address, username, and password for each saved set of credentials. Initially, the saved password is displayed as a row of asterisks. But if you click the masked password, you see a “Show” button that you can click to immediately display the saved password.

 

Bill White

 

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 7:24 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Chrome and passwords

 

Sharon,

           If you've never used Chrome it is impossible that Chrome has saved passwords.

           If you wish to use Chrome, but also wish that it never, ever even offer to remember passwords, then the first time you fire it up go to the Passwords settings and flip that toggle for offering to remember passwords to off.

           The logistics of where the setting is differs, but this is true of every modern browser.  They all can remember passwords, you can force them not to do so, and if you did save some earlier and change your mind these can be deleted.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back


Vlad Dragomir
 

Hello,

Sorry for chiming in here. I would simply like to try and disipate a little bit this feeling of so-called insecure environment. Dear friends, I've been using Chrome for at least two years, it saved all my passwords, and I never had the smallest problem. Commons sense is your best friend. You need a strong GMail password, make sure that no one can guess it. Apart from that, why would you let anyone use your computer, it's yours, you only need to make that clear. And if you let someone use it, it's someone you trust, not the first stranger you meet on a street. Definitely, it is up to the original poster to decide, I would personally advise against paranoia though. Don't allow your envious work colleague to use your computer, that's all you need to do! *smiles*

Best regards,

Vlad.


 

Bill,

        I am with both you, and Vlad, in certain regards.

        On "the Vlad side" is the rock solid and most basic computer security principle:   As soon as you do not have physical security over your hardware virtually nothing else matters and if you do have physical security over your hardware it prevents close to 100% of the most common compromises.

        On the "your side" there are many among us who, while we do have physical security over our hardware, also leave it running 24/7 unless we wish to force a restart.  It is always possible (not probable, but possible) that someone could break in to the location where the computer is kept and is running.  Why give them, or anyone to whom they might hand off a stolen computer, easy access to all your accounts.

         I've said it before, and I'll say it again:   Passwords are, ideally, meant to be stored in one and only one place - the password owner's brain.  Since many of us can not meet that ideal, particularly as years and numbers of passwords increase, the second option is to use a password manager that requires you to enter a password you can be sure you will remember to store all others.

          The second option is a lot safer than having a web browser, any web browser, remember login credentials.  These days most password managers will also allow you to fire up the site and auto-enter the credentials they have stored directly from within the manager, where they're locked safely away again as soon as you close it.

           I can find no reason, other than convenience, to ever have a web browser remember important login credentials (and by that I mean username and password).  If those login credentials are for anything important they simply should not be remembered by a web browser.  Having one remember your login credentials for your local newspaper's comment section, say, is a completely different thing than having it remember them for your bank account or credit card.

           For certain things, even having a browser remember nothing but the login ID is a very bad idea.

           
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back