Backup Software - Semi-Accessible


 

I'm starting this thread in it hopes that it might address an issue brought up on another thread, that of incremental backups, as well as addressing what's "accessible enough."

I'm starting this out with saying that I'm a complete realist:  The lucky among us will never need our backups, setting up backups for a given system - whether for a full system image, user data backups, or both - is typically a one-time affair, and actual recovery after a catastrophic failure is likely to be very difficult, even if 100% accessible, for the uninitiated.   Thus, my focus on accessibility when pushed will always be on the end user being able to run their backups 100% independently once they've been configured.  The configuration of backups and recovery using them will very likely require an assistant.  I hasten to add that this applies just as much to those who are sighted as those who are not.   Even if assistance is required for "the far ends" that's a far preferable way to have things, while you're maintaining your backups, than to simply avoid having backups.  The more precious your data and, probably to a lesser extent, but still, your time the more critical it is to have a backup protocol using some sort of backup software for your system itself and your user data.

Under Windows 10, for user data backup I haven't found anything I like better than File History, and I've used others.  It's about as straightforward as it comes in keeping user data backups.  You simply have to decide how frequently you wish to have your files backed up (for me, once a day is more than enough, the default is hourly), and how long you want to keep the versions of the same file that get backed up (for me three months is plenty; I've never needed any version that was older than that, and the "latest" version of files untouched will be kept forever unless you delete them, no matter when you made your final tweaks).

I would be curious about what individuals are actually using that may not be 100% accessible, end to end, but that is completely accessible for maintaining active system image backups and/or data backups.

Specifically useful would be knowing if the software was paid/free, if it's a free version whether it supports incremental and/or differential backups [and these are not the same].  For those wanting to know the difference between the two, run this duckduckgo search:  https://duckduckgo.com/?q=incremental+versus+differential+backups and look at the second returned result first (or at least that's my favorite; the first isn't bad either).  There are scads of general discussions of the differences and each of the "big boys of backup" talking about what they are and how to set them up.

There have got to be folks using not-100% accessible software to maintain backups, praying that they'll be lucky and never need them anyway.  If so, please offer your experiences.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill


Richard Turner
 

Thanks Brian,
That is very helpful.  I found a web site from How To Geek, that explains how to use File History.  I will try this later and let folks know if no one else has by then how accessible it is.

Richard



"I'll be more enthusiastic about encouraging thinking outside the box when there's evidence of any thinking going on inside it." -- Terry Pratchett



[Sent from my little hand-held computer]



On Aug 16, 2018, at 5:30 PM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

I'm starting this thread in it hopes that it might address an issue brought up on another thread, that of incremental backups, as well as addressing what's "accessible enough."

I'm starting this out with saying that I'm a complete realist:  The lucky among us will never need our backups, setting up backups for a given system - whether for a full system image, user data backups, or both - is typically a one-time affair, and actual recovery after a catastrophic failure is likely to be very difficult, even if 100% accessible, for the uninitiated.   Thus, my focus on accessibility when pushed will always be on the end user being able to run their backups 100% independently once they've been configured.  The configuration of backups and recovery using them will very likely require an assistant.  I hasten to add that this applies just as much to those who are sighted as those who are not.   Even if assistance is required for "the far ends" that's a far preferable way to have things, while you're maintaining your backups, than to simply avoid having backups.  The more precious your data and, probably to a lesser extent, but still, your time the more critical it is to have a backup protocol using some sort of backup software for your system itself and your user data.

Under Windows 10, for user data backup I haven't found anything I like better than File History, and I've used others.  It's about as straightforward as it comes in keeping user data backups.  You simply have to decide how frequently you wish to have your files backed up (for me, once a day is more than enough, the default is hourly), and how long you want to keep the versions of the same file that get backed up (for me three months is plenty; I've never needed any version that was older than that, and the "latest" version of files untouched will be kept forever unless you delete them, no matter when you made your final tweaks).

I would be curious about what individuals are actually using that may not be 100% accessible, end to end, but that is completely accessible for maintaining active system image backups and/or data backups.

Specifically useful would be knowing if the software was paid/free, if it's a free version whether it supports incremental and/or differential backups [and these are not the same].  For those wanting to know the difference between the two, run this duckduckgo search:  https://duckduckgo.com/?q=incremental+versus+differential+backups and look at the second returned result first (or at least that's my favorite; the first isn't bad either).  There are scads of general discussions of the differences and each of the "big boys of backup" talking about what they are and how to set them up.

There have got to be folks using not-100% accessible software to maintain backups, praying that they'll be lucky and never need them anyway.  If so, please offer your experiences.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill


 

Richard,

            One thing I will tell you, which sounds quite counterintuitive, but do not leave your backup drive connected to your computer at all times, particularly if you know you don't need hourly, or even daily, backups on a routine basis.

             The reason for this is the appearance of ransomware on the scene to a greater extent than in the past.  In almost all cases, if you are unfortunate enough to be hit by ransomware, each and every drive attached to the machine will be encrypted.  The last thing you want to have encrypted is your backup drive (unless you're really anal retentive, have two, and swap them out on a routine basis - which is a PITA because you have to tell File History or whatever that its target drive has changed).

              If you have File History set up, and you keep the drive disconnected, Windows 10 will nag you (and I think the interval may be based on how you set up File History frequency) about the drive having been disconnected for too long, and to connect it.  This is actually a good thing, at least as far as I'm concerned, because I can dismiss the message yet rely on it reappearing.  I respond to it as often as I feel I need to based on how much new user data has been created since I last let File History do a backup.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill


Richard Turner
 

That makes perfect sense Brian, thank you again.
I wouldn't hae left the drive plugged in, partly because I suspect there is a drop in available processing while it is backing up, but honestly I hadn't considered the Ransomware potential. Knock on wood, I have not ever had that issue, but I truly do not open things unless I am absolutely sure it is from a reliable source.  
Thanks again for your help,
Richard


"I'll be more enthusiastic about encouraging thinking outside the box when there's evidence of any thinking going on inside it." -- Terry Pratchett



[Sent from my little hand-held computer]



On Aug 16, 2018, at 6:42 PM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Richard,

            One thing I will tell you, which sounds quite counterintuitive, but do not leave your backup drive connected to your computer at all times, particularly if you know you don't need hourly, or even daily, backups on a routine basis.

             The reason for this is the appearance of ransomware on the scene to a greater extent than in the past.  In almost all cases, if you are unfortunate enough to be hit by ransomware, each and every drive attached to the machine will be encrypted.  The last thing you want to have encrypted is your backup drive (unless you're really anal retentive, have two, and swap them out on a routine basis - which is a PITA because you have to tell File History or whatever that its target drive has changed).

              If you have File History set up, and you keep the drive disconnected, Windows 10 will nag you (and I think the interval may be based on how you set up File History frequency) about the drive having been disconnected for too long, and to connect it.  This is actually a good thing, at least as far as I'm concerned, because I can dismiss the message yet rely on it reappearing.  I respond to it as often as I feel I need to based on how much new user data has been created since I last let File History do a backup.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill


Steve Matzura
 

IFW  can do all three kinds of backups--image, differential, and incremental. it does *not* do file or directory backups. Your File History program sounds like a must-have, too.

On 8/16/2018 8:30 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
I'm starting this thread in it hopes that it might address an issue brought up on another thread, that of incremental backups, as well as addressing what's "accessible enough."

I'm starting this out with saying that I'm a complete realist: The lucky among us will never need our backups, setting up backups for a given system - whether for a full system image, user data backups, or both - is typically a one-time affair, and actual recovery after a catastrophic failure is likely to be very difficult, even if 100% accessible, for the uninitiated.   Thus, my focus on accessibility when pushed will always be on the end user being able to run their backups 100% independently once they've been configured.  The configuration of backups and recovery using them will very likely require an assistant.  I hasten to add that this applies just as much to those who are sighted as those who are not.   Even if assistance is required for "the far ends" that's a far preferable way to have things, while you're maintaining your backups, than to simply avoid having backups.  The more precious your data and, probably to a lesser extent, but still, your time the more critical it is to have a backup protocol using some sort of backup software for your system itself and your user data.

Under Windows 10, for user data backup I haven't found anything I like better than File History, and I've used others.  It's about as straightforward as it comes in keeping user data backups.  You simply have to decide how frequently you wish to have your files backed up (for me, once a day is more than enough, the default is hourly), and how long you want to keep the versions of the same file that get backed up (for me three months is plenty; I've never needed any version that was older than that, and the "latest" version of files untouched will be kept forever unless you delete them, no matter when you made your final tweaks).

I would be curious about what individuals are actually using that may not be 100% accessible, end to end, but that is completely accessible for maintaining active system image backups and/or data backups.

Specifically useful would be knowing if the software was paid/free, if it's a free version whether it supports incremental and/or differential backups [and these are not the same].  For those wanting to know the difference between the two, run this duckduckgo search: https://duckduckgo.com/?q=incremental+versus+differential+backups and look at the second returned result first (or at least that's my favorite; the first isn't bad either).  There are scads of general discussions of the differences and each of the "big boys of backup" talking about what they are and how to set them up.

There have got to be folks using not-100% accessible software to maintain backups, praying that they'll be lucky and never need them anyway.  If so, please offer your experiences.


Nino Dagostino
 

Hi:

I use file history, I also have image for windows.

I have so much data to do a file backup with image for windows takes a long time.

I tried to do a backup where only the files that have changed get backuped by image for windows.

I like file history.

Thanks for all your help on the list.

Have a good day.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve Matzura
Sent: Friday, August 17, 2018 6:25 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Backup Software - Semi-Accessible

IFW can do all three kinds of backups--image, differential, and incremental. it does *not* do file or directory backups. Your File History program sounds like a must-have, too.


On 8/16/2018 8:30 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
I'm starting this thread in it hopes that it might address an issue
brought up on another thread, that of incremental backups, as well as
addressing what's "accessible enough."

I'm starting this out with saying that I'm a complete realist: The
lucky among us will never need our backups, setting up backups for a
given system - whether for a full system image, user data backups, or
both - is typically a one-time affair, and actual recovery after a
catastrophic failure is likely to be very difficult, even if 100%
accessible, for the uninitiated. Thus, my focus on accessibility
when pushed will always be on the end user being able to run their
backups 100% independently once they've been configured. The
configuration of backups and recovery using them will very likely
require an assistant. I hasten to add that this applies just as much
to those who are sighted as those who are not. Even if assistance is
required for "the far ends" that's a far preferable way to have
things, while you're maintaining your backups, than to simply avoid
having backups. The more precious your data and, probably to a lesser
extent, but still, your time the more critical it is to have a backup
protocol using some sort of backup software for your system itself and
your user data.

Under Windows 10, for user data backup I haven't found anything I like
better than File History, and I've used others. It's about as
straightforward as it comes in keeping user data backups. You simply
have to decide how frequently you wish to have your files backed up
(for me, once a day is more than enough, the default is hourly), and
how long you want to keep the versions of the same file that get
backed up (for me three months is plenty; I've never needed any
version that was older than that, and the "latest" version of files
untouched will be kept forever unless you delete them, no matter when
you made your final tweaks).

I would be curious about what individuals are actually using that may
not be 100% accessible, end to end, but that is completely accessible
for maintaining active system image backups and/or data backups.

Specifically useful would be knowing if the software was paid/free, if
it's a free version whether it supports incremental and/or
differential backups [and these are not the same]. For those wanting
to know the difference between the two, run this duckduckgo search:
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=incremental+versus+differential+backups and
look at the second returned result first (or at least that's my
favorite; the first isn't bad either). There are scads of general
discussions of the differences and each of the "big boys of backup"
talking about what they are and how to set them up.

There have got to be folks using not-100% accessible software to
maintain backups, praying that they'll be lucky and never need them
anyway. If so, please offer your experiences.