Navigating in PowerPoint


Elise Berkley
 

Hello, all.
I recieved powerpoints from my professor, and I cannot navigate very well. I cannot seem to open a slide to read the information line by line, word by word, etc. I am missing alot of vital information in detail. Can anyone help me with this? Thanks very much.
Elise Berkley


Ann Byrne
 

The easiest way to get all the content from a PowerPoint presentation is to export it to .pdf or .rtf.

1. Press alt+f to get to the files menu and backstage view.
2. Press 'e' or arrow to "export".
3. Press tab. The first choice is to export to .pdf or .xps. Tab a second time and press enter to activate this, or
4. don't tab a second time and arrow down to other export choices.
5. if you want .rtf, choose "other" at the end of the export list, and .rtf will be there.

the awesome thing is that all the presentation text is available!

good luck!

ann


Ashleigh Piccinino
 

Ms. Berkeley,
You can also, while in PowerPoint, hit F5. This is the slideshow tab, and press space to cycle through the slides. If you accidentally hit escape well in the slideshow, press shift plus F5 to get back to the slideshow and your current slide. Hope this also helps.
Thank you for asking,
Ashleigh Piccinino


From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Ann Byrne <annakb@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 16, 2018 6:18:39 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Navigating in PowerPoint
 
The easiest way to get all the content from a PowerPoint presentation
is to export it to .pdf or .rtf.

1. Press alt+f to get to the files menu and backstage view.
2. Press 'e' or arrow to "export".
3. Press tab.  The first choice is to export to .pdf or .xps.  Tab a
second time and press enter to activate this, or
4. don't tab a second time and arrow down to other export choices.
5. if you want .rtf, choose "other" at the end of the export list,
and .rtf will be there.

the awesome thing is that all the presentation text is available!

good luck!

ann





Sharon
 

I have never been able to figure Power Point out, so directions would be very much appreciated.

I’ve always found it to be a complete mystery, rather like Excel. No matter how much I try to work with it, I just can’t figure it out!

Sharon

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Elise Berkley
Sent: Thursday, August 16, 2018 6:51 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Navigating in PowerPoint

 

Hello, all.

I recieved powerpoints from my professor, and I cannot navigate very well. I cannot seem to open a slide to read the information line by line, word by word, etc. I am missing alot of vital information in detail. Can anyone help me with this? Thanks very much.

Elise Berkley


Shai
 

Hello,
If you press alt with w and then the letter d, you should be in the
slide show and able to view it as described. To move to the next
slide, press the space bar or page down key; to move to the previous
slide, press the page up key.
Hope this helps

On 8/16/18, Elise Berkley <bravaegf@hotmail.com> wrote:
Hello, all.
I recieved powerpoints from my professor, and I cannot navigate very well. I
cannot seem to open a slide to read the information line by line, word by
word, etc. I am missing alot of vital information in detail. Can anyone help
me with this? Thanks very much.
Elise Berkley




 

I second Ann Byrne's suggestion when you want to be able to easily pore over the content of a slide show in detail.

That being said, most, not all, but most of the commands you will use in any MS-Office program are not screen reader commands, but commands for the Office program itself.  Those that are screen reader specific, like dealing with making the screen reader announce row or column titles in Excel, are documented in the screen reader documentation.

The following can prove to be handy when you want to play around with any of the Office programs, particularly for the more obscure features:

Keyboard Shortcuts for Microsoft Office Programs

Keystrokes for Office programs from Microsoft Support Pages:

Word

Excel

Outlook

PowerPoint

Access

 

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill


Van Lant, Robin
 

Slideshow view really is the best way to review slide content.  The normal slide view involves text boxes you need to tab between.  If I am editing a slide, I must tab to the text box I want, press enter, then use the arrow keys to navigate within the text area.  Pressing Escape then takes you out of the edit mode so you can tab to the next text box you need.  Page up and page down move you to the next slides. 

Be aware that people often design slide shows to be visually appealing, which means they either use animation or will insert graphics containing text that you will not read with JAWS in slide show view.  There may be ways to use the OCR function in JAWS for this, but I havent’ tried.  In these cases where there are pictures containing text, I will save the slideshow as a PDF and open in in an OCR software such as Kurzweil or probably now the JAWS OCR function. 

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Thursday, August 16, 2018 7:42 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Navigating in PowerPoint

 

I second Ann Byrne's suggestion when you want to be able to easily pore over the content of a slide show in detail.

That being said, most, not all, but most of the commands you will use in any MS-Office program are not screen reader commands, but commands for the Office program itself.  Those that are screen reader specific, like dealing with making the screen reader announce row or column titles in Excel, are documented in the screen reader documentation.

The following can prove to be handy when you want to play around with any of the Office programs, particularly for the more obscure features:

Keyboard Shortcuts for Microsoft Office Programs

Keystrokes for Office programs from Microsoft Support Pages:

Word

Excel

Outlook

PowerPoint

Access

 

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill



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