Correcting the way my synthesizer says something


Van Lant, Robin
 

Hello,

I understand how to change a basic pronunciation of a word.  What I cannot figure out is where it is making an assumption of an abbreviation.  Here is the example today.  At work, I have a set of Excel files where, each time the file is updated, we add a “v” then a number (without spaces) before the Excel file extension to represent version 1, version 2, and so on.  When arrowing through the Explorer window to find the file I want, JAWS is reading the “v5” as “volt 5”.  I can understand this if I were writing “9v” as in a battery type, but am surprised that it is getting converted when in the other order.  It’s not work my time to add a dictionary entry for each possible combination of “v” and a number, so I’m just curious how others deal with these little oddities, or do you just get used to the quirks.   I am using Vocalizer Nathan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robin Van Lant, Sr. Program Manager

Key Equipment Finance |  720-304-1060

www.keyequipmentfinance.com 

 



This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy. This communication may contain nonpublic personal information about consumers subject to the restrictions of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. You may not directly or indirectly reuse or redisclose such information for any purpose other than to provide the services for which you are receiving the information.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114


If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key
send an e-mail to mailto:DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.


 

Robin,

         This is an instance where the use of regular expression for pattern matching in the voice dictionary comes in very handy, and I think JAWS supports this, but I don't have it handy at the moment.  I know NVDA does, and I could swear that I needed to do a regular expression match in the past for one of my graduate student clients who was reading technical documents where "unusual sequences" were butchered by JAWS, but I could be confusing this with NVDA, too.  What follows applies as far as a regular expression match regardless of where you might be trying to use one.

         If you wanted to capture the lowercase  or uppercase letter 'v' followed immediately by some digit followed by any other digits or dots, until you hit a space, the regular expression would be:

                     (v|V)([0-9]+[\.0-9]*)

and to get that to read as "version" followed by the sequence of digits you'd use the following in the replacement field:

                      version \2

This would cause v5, or V3.7.21.7 to be matched, and in the case of the first be read as version five and the second version 3.7.21.7

A discussion of regular expression syntax is way beyond what can be done in a forums post, and if you're of a "programmer's mind" there are myriad online references to both learn about the syntax, what it means, how to use it, and to test it out.   I just used the sites regex101.com to test out the regular expression as I put it together and regexr.com for a syntax reference.  I'm rusty, so it took me a while to figure out how to capture any sequence of digits or digits interspersed with periods/dots and have that sequence viewed as a single unit.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill


 

Just in case the original strings could contain a space or spaces between the 'v' or 'V' and the digit sequence, e.g.:

                          v 5      or  V 2.10.7

use the following for the regular expression:   (v|V)\s*([0-9]+[\.0-9]*)
and the same replacement as I gave before.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill


Van Lant, Robin
 

Brian,

Wow, never would have come up with this.  I’ll play with it.  Thanks. 

 

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, August 13, 2018 5:52 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Correcting the way my synthesizer says something

 

Robin,

         This is an instance where the use of regular expression for pattern matching in the voice dictionary comes in very handy, and I think JAWS supports this, but I don't have it handy at the moment.  I know NVDA does, and I could swear that I needed to do a regular expression match in the past for one of my graduate student clients who was reading technical documents where "unusual sequences" were butchered by JAWS, but I could be confusing this with NVDA, too.  What follows applies as far as a regular expression match regardless of where you might be trying to use one.

         If you wanted to capture the lowercase  or uppercase letter 'v' followed immediately by some digit followed by any other digits or dots, until you hit a space, the regular expression would be:

                     (v|V)([0-9]+[\.0-9]*)

and to get that to read as "version" followed by the sequence of digits you'd use the following in the replacement field:

                      version \2

This would cause v5, or V3.7.21.7 to be matched, and in the case of the first be read as version five and the second version 3.7.21.7

A discussion of regular expression syntax is way beyond what can be done in a forums post, and if you're of a "programmer's mind" there are myriad online references to both learn about the syntax, what it means, how to use it, and to test it out.   I just used the sites regex101.com to test out the regular expression as I put it together and regexr.com for a syntax reference.  I'm rusty, so it took me a while to figure out how to capture any sequence of digits or digits interspersed with periods/dots and have that sequence viewed as a single unit.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill



This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information. It is intended solely for the use of the addressee. If you are not the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, copying, distributing or using any of this information. If you received this communication in error, please contact the sender immediately and destroy the material in its entirety, whether electronic or hard copy. This communication may contain nonpublic personal information about consumers subject to the restrictions of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act. You may not directly or indirectly reuse or redisclose such information for any purpose other than to provide the services for which you are receiving the information.

127 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44114


If you prefer not to receive future e-mail offers for products or services from Key
send an e-mail to mailto:DNERequests@... with 'No Promotional E-mails' in the SUBJECT line.


 

Robin,

           I have also written to VFO technical support about what the regular expression matching and substitution capabilities of JAWS 2018 are.   I am as close to certain as I can be that I have used this technique in a JAWS speech dictionary in earlier versions of JAWS but I'll be darned if I could find where it's stashed today.

           I absolutely know that NVDA can do it, and I fail to believe that my memory of having done so at one time with JAWS is incorrect (but I will probably be proven to be wrong).
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill


 

Robin,

             This just in directly from VFO.  Give it a try:
--------------------------------

Thank you for contacting VFO ® Technical Support. First of all, if you create a dictionary entry of the letter “v” or “V” followed by white space, the JAWS® program will assume that every entry and the space after the letter. So occurrences like “v3” will be ignored. However, if you put a space before the letter in the “Actual Word” field, then JAWS will interpret the letter “v” or “V” as the beginning of the term.

 

Next, you should use the “*” (asterisk) symbol immediately after the letter to stand for any numeric combinations that would follow. Once this is done JAWS will read the items correctly. The following example illustrates this feature.

 

Your actual word would be “ v*”, with the replacement word as “version” (without the quotes). JAWS would then read:

 

“ V3” will be read as “Version “3

“ V4” will be read as “Version 4”

 

If you have any additional questions regarding this or any other issue, please don't hesitate to contact us.

 

--------------------------------
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill