Office 365 Accessibility


Tom Behler
 

Hello, everyone.

 

I am about to purchase a new laptop.  It is a Windows 7 laptop, with a key to upgrade to Windows 10 when I am ready to do so.  I am currently using Jaws 16.

 

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016 package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.

 

Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

 

Are there accessibility issues with the one drive cloud storage component of Office 365?

 

Thanks for any input.

 

Dr.  Tom Behler from Michigan

 

 


Jason White
 

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as compared
to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft Office
on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially different from the
stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web interface
rather than a desktop application, then it's completely different and may not
be as convenient or accessible. At least some of the Office365 subscription
plans let you install Office desktop and mobile applications on your devices,
so you don't have to use the online Web application.


Tom Behler
 

Thanks, Jason.

This is good to know, and I'll ask about it the next time I go to where I'm
planning to purchase my new laptop.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft
Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially different
from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web
interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely different
and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of the Office365
subscription plans let you install Office desktop and mobile applications on
your devices, so you don't have to use the online Web application.


Jonelle P
 

Hi,

Can you tell me where you're planning on purchasing your new Windows 7
laptop? I need a Windows 7 laptop as well and don't hthink I'm ready
for Windows 10, but I'm wondering if I could just order it from the
place where you're going. So if you don't mind giving out the name...
Thanks. Jonelle

On 4/23/16, Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:
Thanks, Jason.

This is good to know, and I'll ask about it the next time I go to where I'm
planning to purchase my new laptop.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft
Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially
different
from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web
interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely different
and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of the Office365
subscription plans let you install Office desktop and mobile applications
on
your devices, so you don't have to use the online Web application.








--

Beauty is quality, & quality is a way of life.


Tom Behler
 

Jonelle:

I'm ordering it from Staples.

I don't have the model number right here, but it's on their web site.

It's an HP laptop that has windows 7 installed, and has an upgrade key for Windows 10.

I can get you the model number a bit later if you'd like me to.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan

-----Original Message-----
From: Jonelle P [mailto:jonellenicole@gmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 4:17 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Hi,

Can you tell me where you're planning on purchasing your new Windows 7 laptop? I need a Windows 7 laptop as well and don't hthink I'm ready for Windows 10, but I'm wondering if I could just order it from the place where you're going. So if you don't mind giving out the name...
Thanks. Jonelle

On 4/23/16, Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:
Thanks, Jason.

This is good to know, and I'll ask about it the next time I go to
where I'm planning to purchase my new laptop.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft
Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially
different from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web
interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely
different and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of
the Office365 subscription plans let you install Office desktop and
mobile applications on your devices, so you don't have to use the
online Web application.









--

Beauty is quality, & quality is a way of life.


Les Kriegler <kriegler@...>
 

Hi Jason and Tom,

Jason,you are exactly correct. I had the Office 365 subscription whereby I
could download Office to my tablet and my wife's computer. Yes, there were
two installs available and it worked as the stand-alone copy did. Another
thing to check is many companies offer a substantial discount on Office
stand-alone for home use. This could include educational institutions,
private employers, state organizations, etc. I wound up picking up the
stand-alone copy of 2016 for a little over $25 which is much preferred to
paying an annual subscription for Office 365. While I couldn't receive a
refund on the remainder of my year's subscription, it was still worth it to
go the stand-alone route.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft
Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially different
from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web
interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely different
and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of the Office365
subscription plans let you install Office desktop and mobile applications on
your devices, so you don't have to use the online Web application.


Pablo Morales
 

Why is better the stand-alone copy of 2016than the 365 version?

-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 3:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Hi Jason and Tom,

Jason,you are exactly correct. I had the Office 365 subscription whereby I
could download Office to my tablet and my wife's computer. Yes, there were
two installs available and it worked as the stand-alone copy did. Another
thing to check is many companies offer a substantial discount on Office
stand-alone for home use. This could include educational institutions,
private employers, state organizations, etc. I wound up picking up the
stand-alone copy of 2016 for a little over $25 which is much preferred to
paying an annual subscription for Office 365. While I couldn't receive a
refund on the remainder of my year's subscription, it was still worth it to
go the stand-alone route.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft
Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially different
from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web
interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely different
and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of the Office365
subscription plans let you install Office desktop and mobile applications on
your devices, so you don't have to use the online Web application.


Les Kriegler <kriegler@...>
 

As I stated before, if you can get the stand-alone for a discount, then you
don't have to pay each year for a subscription. It's called the Home
Program and if you either work for a company that has it, or you have a
family member that works for said company, it may work out. Functionally,
as long as you aren't using the on-line version of Office 365, the programs
themselves are the same.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Pablo Morales [mailto:pablocmd2014@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 6:27 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Why is better the stand-alone copy of 2016than the 365 version?


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 3:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Hi Jason and Tom,

Jason,you are exactly correct. I had the Office 365 subscription whereby I
could download Office to my tablet and my wife's computer. Yes, there were
two installs available and it worked as the stand-alone copy did. Another
thing to check is many companies offer a substantial discount on Office
stand-alone for home use. This could include educational institutions,
private employers, state organizations, etc. I wound up picking up the
stand-alone copy of 2016 for a little over $25 which is much preferred to
paying an annual subscription for Office 365. While I couldn't receive a
refund on the remainder of my year's subscription, it was still worth it to
go the stand-alone route.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft
Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially different
from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web
interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely different
and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of the Office365
subscription plans let you install Office desktop and mobile applications on
your devices, so you don't have to use the online Web application.


Tom Behler
 

Less:

The unfortunate thing for me right now is that I will be retiring from my
full-time University teaching position in several weeks, and my University
doesn't offer Microsoft office software discounts for retired faculty.

I inquired as to whether I could buy the software now, since I'm still
currently employed, but was told that my access to the software would be
terminated once I was officially retired.

Kind of a bummer for sure, which is why I'm trying to decide the best way to
go both economically and practically.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan

-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 3:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Hi Jason and Tom,

Jason,you are exactly correct. I had the Office 365 subscription whereby I
could download Office to my tablet and my wife's computer. Yes, there were
two installs available and it worked as the stand-alone copy did. Another
thing to check is many companies offer a substantial discount on Office
stand-alone for home use. This could include educational institutions,
private employers, state organizations, etc. I wound up picking up the
stand-alone copy of 2016 for a little over $25 which is much preferred to
paying an annual subscription for Office 365. While I couldn't receive a
refund on the remainder of my year's subscription, it was still worth it to
go the stand-alone route.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft
Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially different
from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web
interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely different
and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of the Office365
subscription plans let you install Office desktop and mobile applications on
your devices, so you don't have to use the online Web application.


Les Kriegler <kriegler@...>
 

Tom, I wonder once you purchased the software how it could be restricted as
to your using it? Once it's installed, it runs, you receive a key and
you're all set. You might have to set up a Microsoft Account, and then
you'd be tied in that way. I'm curious as to how your employer could
restrict your use of Office once you've purchased it? If I were in your
shoes, I'd contact Microsoft to discuss how this would actually work if you
purchase this now. If your employer doesn't offer the Home Program, then
that's a different issue, don't recall if you stated that to be the case.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 9:55 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Less:

The unfortunate thing for me right now is that I will be retiring from my
full-time University teaching position in several weeks, and my University
doesn't offer Microsoft office software discounts for retired faculty.

I inquired as to whether I could buy the software now, since I'm still
currently employed, but was told that my access to the software would be
terminated once I was officially retired.

Kind of a bummer for sure, which is why I'm trying to decide the best way to
go both economically and practically.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 3:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Hi Jason and Tom,

Jason,you are exactly correct. I had the Office 365 subscription whereby I
could download Office to my tablet and my wife's computer. Yes, there were
two installs available and it worked as the stand-alone copy did. Another
thing to check is many companies offer a substantial discount on Office
stand-alone for home use. This could include educational institutions,
private employers, state organizations, etc. I wound up picking up the
stand-alone copy of 2016 for a little over $25 which is much preferred to
paying an annual subscription for Office 365. While I couldn't receive a
refund on the remainder of my year's subscription, it was still worth it to
go the stand-alone route.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft
Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially different
from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web
interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely different
and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of the Office365
subscription plans let you install Office desktop and mobile applications on
your devices, so you don't have to use the online Web application.


Tom Behler
 

Les:

I don't believe my employer offers the home edition, but will doublecheck
tomorrow.

You certainly have given me some good stuff to think about here.

As I understand it, the University's process for employee purchases is all
done on line, not via a CD or key card, but I'm going to doublecheck on this
as well just to be sure.

Tom Behler

-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 10:57 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom, I wonder once you purchased the software how it could be restricted as
to your using it? Once it's installed, it runs, you receive a key and
you're all set. You might have to set up a Microsoft Account, and then
you'd be tied in that way. I'm curious as to how your employer could
restrict your use of Office once you've purchased it? If I were in your
shoes, I'd contact Microsoft to discuss how this would actually work if you
purchase this now. If your employer doesn't offer the Home Program, then
that's a different issue, don't recall if you stated that to be the case.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 9:55 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Less:

The unfortunate thing for me right now is that I will be retiring from my
full-time University teaching position in several weeks, and my University
doesn't offer Microsoft office software discounts for retired faculty.

I inquired as to whether I could buy the software now, since I'm still
currently employed, but was told that my access to the software would be
terminated once I was officially retired.

Kind of a bummer for sure, which is why I'm trying to decide the best way to
go both economically and practically.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 3:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Hi Jason and Tom,

Jason,you are exactly correct. I had the Office 365 subscription whereby I
could download Office to my tablet and my wife's computer. Yes, there were
two installs available and it worked as the stand-alone copy did. Another
thing to check is many companies offer a substantial discount on Office
stand-alone for home use. This could include educational institutions,
private employers, state organizations, etc. I wound up picking up the
stand-alone copy of 2016 for a little over $25 which is much preferred to
paying an annual subscription for Office 365. While I couldn't receive a
refund on the remainder of my year's subscription, it was still worth it to
go the stand-alone route.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft
Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially different
from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web
interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely different
and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of the Office365
subscription plans let you install Office desktop and mobile applications on
your devices, so you don't have to use the online Web application.


 

Tom,

           My quick advice to you would be to go with Office 2016 in the version you want rather than Office 365 via subscription if that option exists.  Office 2016 is a freestanding desktop app (what we used to call an installed program) and once it's in it's in.  There are no web connections that are required and no time periods related to subscriptions.  If Office 2013 is still available through your employer that would also be an option.

Brian
-- 
I have yet to see any problem, however complicated, which, when looked at in the right way, did not become still more complicated.
     ~  Poul Anderson


Tom Behler
 

Thanks, Brian.

 

I’m definitely considering your advice here.

 

I’m going to check once again with my university tomorrow to make sure I completely understand the available  options for both current and retired faculty.

 

I’m beginning to wonder if the info I got about the unavailability of Microsoft Office to retired faculty referred to Office 365, not stand-alone editions of office.

 

Tom Behler

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 12:55 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

 

Tom,

           My quick advice to you would be to go with Office 2016 in the version you want rather than Office 365 via subscription if that option exists.  Office 2016 is a freestanding desktop app (what we used to call an installed program) and once it's in it's in.  There are no web connections that are required and no time periods related to subscriptions.  If Office 2013 is still available through your employer that would also be an option.

Brian
-- 
I have yet to see any problem, however complicated, which, when looked at in the right way, did not become still more complicated.
     ~  Poul Anderson


Les Kriegler <kriegler@...>
 

Tom, I purchased the stand-alone version on-line. I think Microsoft
requires that it be done this way. There is some information you'll need
which your employer would provide. When I purchased on-line, I received a
download executeable file, and for a little extra, I also got a DVD.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 11:12 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Les:

I don't believe my employer offers the home edition, but will doublecheck
tomorrow.

You certainly have given me some good stuff to think about here.

As I understand it, the University's process for employee purchases is all
done on line, not via a CD or key card, but I'm going to doublecheck on this
as well just to be sure.

Tom Behler


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 10:57 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom, I wonder once you purchased the software how it could be restricted as
to your using it? Once it's installed, it runs, you receive a key and
you're all set. You might have to set up a Microsoft Account, and then
you'd be tied in that way. I'm curious as to how your employer could
restrict your use of Office once you've purchased it? If I were in your
shoes, I'd contact Microsoft to discuss how this would actually work if you
purchase this now. If your employer doesn't offer the Home Program, then
that's a different issue, don't recall if you stated that to be the case.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 9:55 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Less:

The unfortunate thing for me right now is that I will be retiring from my
full-time University teaching position in several weeks, and my University
doesn't offer Microsoft office software discounts for retired faculty.

I inquired as to whether I could buy the software now, since I'm still
currently employed, but was told that my access to the software would be
terminated once I was officially retired.

Kind of a bummer for sure, which is why I'm trying to decide the best way to
go both economically and practically.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 3:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Hi Jason and Tom,

Jason,you are exactly correct. I had the Office 365 subscription whereby I
could download Office to my tablet and my wife's computer. Yes, there were
two installs available and it worked as the stand-alone copy did. Another
thing to check is many companies offer a substantial discount on Office
stand-alone for home use. This could include educational institutions,
private employers, state organizations, etc. I wound up picking up the
stand-alone copy of 2016 for a little over $25 which is much preferred to
paying an annual subscription for Office 365. While I couldn't receive a
refund on the remainder of my year's subscription, it was still worth it to
go the stand-alone route.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft
Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially different
from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web
interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely different
and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of the Office365
subscription plans let you install Office desktop and mobile applications on
your devices, so you don't have to use the online Web application.


Tom Behler
 

Les:

I am here at work now, so will keep this short.

Basically, it does look like I might have an option to purchase a
stand-alone version of Office through my University for approximately $80.
I'll have to be sure it has Outlook, since this is how I manage my e-mail,
but it does look like this might be a good way for me to go.

It's certainly better than the $299 I'd have to pay normally.

Thanks for stearing me in this direction.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan

-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 4:09 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom, I purchased the stand-alone version on-line. I think Microsoft
requires that it be done this way. There is some information you'll need
which your employer would provide. When I purchased on-line, I received a
download executeable file, and for a little extra, I also got a DVD.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 11:12 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Les:

I don't believe my employer offers the home edition, but will doublecheck
tomorrow.

You certainly have given me some good stuff to think about here.

As I understand it, the University's process for employee purchases is all
done on line, not via a CD or key card, but I'm going to doublecheck on this
as well just to be sure.

Tom Behler


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 10:57 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom, I wonder once you purchased the software how it could be restricted as
to your using it? Once it's installed, it runs, you receive a key and
you're all set. You might have to set up a Microsoft Account, and then
you'd be tied in that way. I'm curious as to how your employer could
restrict your use of Office once you've purchased it? If I were in your
shoes, I'd contact Microsoft to discuss how this would actually work if you
purchase this now. If your employer doesn't offer the Home Program, then
that's a different issue, don't recall if you stated that to be the case.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 9:55 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Less:

The unfortunate thing for me right now is that I will be retiring from my
full-time University teaching position in several weeks, and my University
doesn't offer Microsoft office software discounts for retired faculty.

I inquired as to whether I could buy the software now, since I'm still
currently employed, but was told that my access to the software would be
terminated once I was officially retired.

Kind of a bummer for sure, which is why I'm trying to decide the best way to
go both economically and practically.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 3:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Hi Jason and Tom,

Jason,you are exactly correct. I had the Office 365 subscription whereby I
could download Office to my tablet and my wife's computer. Yes, there were
two installs available and it worked as the stand-alone copy did. Another
thing to check is many companies offer a substantial discount on Office
stand-alone for home use. This could include educational institutions,
private employers, state organizations, etc. I wound up picking up the
stand-alone copy of 2016 for a little over $25 which is much preferred to
paying an annual subscription for Office 365. While I couldn't receive a
refund on the remainder of my year's subscription, it was still worth it to
go the stand-alone route.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft
Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially different
from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web
interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely different
and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of the Office365
subscription plans let you install Office desktop and mobile applications on
your devices, so you don't have to use the online Web application.


Page, Aaron
 

Hi Tom,

We have the Microsoft Home Use Program at my university for employees to purchase a copy of Office for use on their home computer. The price is discounted and you get a product key and downloadable setup file to install Office. However, the user agreement for this program specifically states that once you are no longer an active employee you must uninstall the software from your computer.

I do not believe the software will actually stop functioning (as it would with a subscription-based version), but it is a violation of the user agreement to continue using the software after employment has ended. I would expect that any discounted version of Office you can get from your university would be similar.

I would agree with Brian and the others that if you can get a discounted copy of Office 2016 (that you can still use after you retire) then go for that. If you cannot get a discounted version I would go with the subscription-based Office 365, as you end up paying the same but you also get the additional OneDrive storage and Office Web Apps, as well as the regular Office 2016 desktop applications. I have used OneDrive and the office Web Apps quite a bit as a student the past few years and have had reasonably good luck with them using JAWS. OneDrive has a separate accessible view that makes it easier to navigate, and the Office Web Apps are similar to Google Docs in that you enable the screen reader mode and use shortcuts specific to the app. I also really like how you can open a collaborative document in the web app (such as Word Online), and then edit it in the desktop version via SharePoint by simply pressing a button.

Regards,
Aaron M. Page

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 9:12 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Les:

I don't believe my employer offers the home edition, but will doublecheck tomorrow.

You certainly have given me some good stuff to think about here.

As I understand it, the University's process for employee purchases is all done on line, not via a CD or key card, but I'm going to doublecheck on this as well just to be sure.

Tom Behler


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 10:57 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom, I wonder once you purchased the software how it could be restricted as to your using it? Once it's installed, it runs, you receive a key and you're all set. You might have to set up a Microsoft Account, and then you'd be tied in that way. I'm curious as to how your employer could restrict your use of Office once you've purchased it? If I were in your shoes, I'd contact Microsoft to discuss how this would actually work if you purchase this now. If your employer doesn't offer the Home Program, then that's a different issue, don't recall if you stated that to be the case.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 9:55 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Less:

The unfortunate thing for me right now is that I will be retiring from my full-time University teaching position in several weeks, and my University doesn't offer Microsoft office software discounts for retired faculty.

I inquired as to whether I could buy the software now, since I'm still currently employed, but was told that my access to the software would be terminated once I was officially retired.

Kind of a bummer for sure, which is why I'm trying to decide the best way to go both economically and practically.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 3:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Hi Jason and Tom,

Jason,you are exactly correct. I had the Office 365 subscription whereby I could download Office to my tablet and my wife's computer. Yes, there were two installs available and it worked as the stand-alone copy did. Another thing to check is many companies offer a substantial discount on Office stand-alone for home use. This could include educational institutions, private employers, state organizations, etc. I wound up picking up the stand-alone copy of 2016 for a little over $25 which is much preferred to paying an annual subscription for Office 365. While I couldn't receive a refund on the remainder of my year's subscription, it was still worth it to go the stand-alone route.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially different from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely different and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of the Office365 subscription plans let you install Office desktop and mobile applications on your devices, so you don't have to use the online Web application.


Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Doc Tom, if it does not have Outlook, I think it can be downloaded. If
you enjoy retirement half as much as I have after working for 40 years,
you're in for a good time!

Bye for now,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 9:11 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Les:

I am here at work now, so will keep this short.

Basically, it does look like I might have an option to purchase a
stand-alone version of Office through my University for approximately
$80.
I'll have to be sure it has Outlook, since this is how I manage my
e-mail, but it does look like this might be a good way for me to go.

It's certainly better than the $299 I'd have to pay normally.

Thanks for stearing me in this direction.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan




-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 4:09 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom, I purchased the stand-alone version on-line. I think Microsoft
requires that it be done this way. There is some information you'll need
which your employer would provide. When I purchased on-line, I received
a download executeable file, and for a little extra, I also got a DVD.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 11:12 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Les:

I don't believe my employer offers the home edition, but will doublecheck
tomorrow.

You certainly have given me some good stuff to think about here.

As I understand it, the University's process for employee purchases is
all done on line, not via a CD or key card, but I'm going to doublecheck
on this as well just to be sure.

Tom Behler


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 10:57 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom, I wonder once you purchased the software how it could be restricted
as to your using it? Once it's installed, it runs, you receive a key and
you're all set. You might have to set up a Microsoft Account, and then
you'd be tied in that way. I'm curious as to how your employer could
restrict your use of Office once you've purchased it? If I were in your
shoes, I'd contact Microsoft to discuss how this would actually work if
you purchase this now. If your employer doesn't offer the Home Program,
then that's a different issue, don't recall if you stated that to be the
case.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 9:55 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Less:

The unfortunate thing for me right now is that I will be retiring from my
full-time University teaching position in several weeks, and my
University doesn't offer Microsoft office software discounts for retired
faculty.

I inquired as to whether I could buy the software now, since I'm still
currently employed, but was told that my access to the software would be
terminated once I was officially retired.

Kind of a bummer for sure, which is why I'm trying to decide the best way
to go both economically and practically.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 3:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Hi Jason and Tom,

Jason,you are exactly correct. I had the Office 365 subscription whereby
I could download Office to my tablet and my wife's computer. Yes, there
were two installs available and it worked as the stand-alone copy did.
Another thing to check is many companies offer a substantial discount on
Office stand-alone for home use. This could include educational
institutions, private employers, state organizations, etc. I wound up
picking up the stand-alone copy of 2016 for a little over $25 which is
much preferred to paying an annual subscription for Office 365. While I
couldn't receive a refund on the remainder of my year's subscription, it
was still worth it to go the stand-alone route.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft
Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially
different from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web
interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely
different and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of
the Office365 subscription plans let you install Office desktop and
mobile applications on your devices, so you don't have to use the online
Web application.


Michael Mote
 

Hi Tom!  If you have the choice, I would utilize the Office 2016 applications, and not Office 365.  For the most part, the web based version is tough for someone who is blind.  I have managed to find a way to make the mail part work much better, by using the light version.  Depending on your subscription, you may have access to the latest version of the Office applications through Office 365.  I mention this in case the company you are working for is planning on moving to Office 365.  That would probably allow you to download the latest version of Office for your PC.  Hope this helps!  Good luck!

 

 

 

From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@...]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 7:43 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Office 365 Accessibility

 

Hello, everyone.

 

I am about to purchase a new laptop.  It is a Windows 7 laptop, with a key to upgrade to Windows 10 when I am ready to do so.  I am currently using Jaws 16.

 

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016 package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.

 

Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

 

Are there accessibility issues with the one drive cloud storage component of Office 365?

 

Thanks for any input.

 

Dr.  Tom Behler from Michigan

 

 


Tom Behler
 

Thanks for this additional information, Aaron.

I will certainly check into the user license agreement, since I take those
things seriously.

One thing I can argue is that, even though I'll be retired, I will still be
associated with the University, since I'll have official emeriti status, and
plan to be involved in its Faculty Emeriti Association, and other entities.

This is worth checking into, though, and I appreciate your bringing it to my
attention.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan

-----Original Message-----
From: Page, Aaron [mailto:Aaron.Page@mso.umt.edu]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 9:30 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Hi Tom,

We have the Microsoft Home Use Program at my university for employees to
purchase a copy of Office for use on their home computer. The price is
discounted and you get a product key and downloadable setup file to install
Office. However, the user agreement for this program specifically states
that once you are no longer an active employee you must uninstall the
software from your computer.

I do not believe the software will actually stop functioning (as it would
with a subscription-based version), but it is a violation of the user
agreement to continue using the software after employment has ended. I would
expect that any discounted version of Office you can get from your
university would be similar.

I would agree with Brian and the others that if you can get a discounted
copy of Office 2016 (that you can still use after you retire) then go for
that. If you cannot get a discounted version I would go with the
subscription-based Office 365, as you end up paying the same but you also
get the additional OneDrive storage and Office Web Apps, as well as the
regular Office 2016 desktop applications. I have used OneDrive and the
office Web Apps quite a bit as a student the past few years and have had
reasonably good luck with them using JAWS. OneDrive has a separate
accessible view that makes it easier to navigate, and the Office Web Apps
are similar to Google Docs in that you enable the screen reader mode and use
shortcuts specific to the app. I also really like how you can open a
collaborative document in the web app (such as Word Online), and then edit
it in the desktop version via SharePoint by simply pressing a button.

Regards,
Aaron M. Page



-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 9:12 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Les:

I don't believe my employer offers the home edition, but will doublecheck
tomorrow.

You certainly have given me some good stuff to think about here.

As I understand it, the University's process for employee purchases is all
done on line, not via a CD or key card, but I'm going to doublecheck on this
as well just to be sure.

Tom Behler


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 10:57 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom, I wonder once you purchased the software how it could be restricted as
to your using it? Once it's installed, it runs, you receive a key and
you're all set. You might have to set up a Microsoft Account, and then
you'd be tied in that way. I'm curious as to how your employer could
restrict your use of Office once you've purchased it? If I were in your
shoes, I'd contact Microsoft to discuss how this would actually work if you
purchase this now. If your employer doesn't offer the Home Program, then
that's a different issue, don't recall if you stated that to be the case.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 9:55 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Less:

The unfortunate thing for me right now is that I will be retiring from my
full-time University teaching position in several weeks, and my University
doesn't offer Microsoft office software discounts for retired faculty.

I inquired as to whether I could buy the software now, since I'm still
currently employed, but was told that my access to the software would be
terminated once I was officially retired.

Kind of a bummer for sure, which is why I'm trying to decide the best way to
go both economically and practically.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 3:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Hi Jason and Tom,

Jason,you are exactly correct. I had the Office 365 subscription whereby I
could download Office to my tablet and my wife's computer. Yes, there were
two installs available and it worked as the stand-alone copy did. Another
thing to check is many companies offer a substantial discount on Office
stand-alone for home use. This could include educational institutions,
private employers, state organizations, etc. I wound up picking up the
stand-alone copy of 2016 for a little over $25 which is much preferred to
paying an annual subscription for Office 365. While I couldn't receive a
refund on the remainder of my year's subscription, it was still worth it to
go the stand-alone route.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft
Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially different
from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web
interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely different
and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of the Office365
subscription plans let you install Office desktop and mobile applications on
your devices, so you don't have to use the online Web application.


Tom Behler
 

Carolyn:

I think the edition of Office 365 that I can get discounted from the
University already has Outlook, so I should be all set there.

On the retirement front, I've been in academia as a college professor for 34
years, and, if you add the years it took me to get my Masters and PH.D
degrees, I'm very close to 40 years myself.

Looking forward to retirement for sure!

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan

-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 10:30 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Doc Tom, if it does not have Outlook, I think it can be downloaded. If you
enjoy retirement half as much as I have after working for 40 years, you're
in for a good time!

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 9:11 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Les:

I am here at work now, so will keep this short.

Basically, it does look like I might have an option to purchase a
stand-alone version of Office through my University for approximately $80.
I'll have to be sure it has Outlook, since this is how I manage my e-mail,
but it does look like this might be a good way for me to go.

It's certainly better than the $299 I'd have to pay normally.

Thanks for stearing me in this direction.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan




-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Monday, April 25, 2016 4:09 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom, I purchased the stand-alone version on-line. I think Microsoft
requires that it be done this way. There is some information you'll need
which your employer would provide. When I purchased on-line, I received a
download executeable file, and for a little extra, I also got a DVD.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 11:12 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Les:

I don't believe my employer offers the home edition, but will doublecheck
tomorrow.

You certainly have given me some good stuff to think about here.

As I understand it, the University's process for employee purchases is all
done on line, not via a CD or key card, but I'm going to doublecheck on this
as well just to be sure.

Tom Behler


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 10:57 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom, I wonder once you purchased the software how it could be restricted as
to your using it? Once it's installed, it runs, you receive a key and
you're all set. You might have to set up a Microsoft Account, and then
you'd be tied in that way. I'm curious as to how your employer could
restrict your use of Office once you've purchased it? If I were in your
shoes, I'd contact Microsoft to discuss how this would actually work if you
purchase this now. If your employer doesn't offer the Home Program, then
that's a different issue, don't recall if you stated that to be the case.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Behler [mailto:tombehler@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 9:55 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Less:

The unfortunate thing for me right now is that I will be retiring from my
full-time University teaching position in several weeks, and my University
doesn't offer Microsoft office software discounts for retired faculty.

I inquired as to whether I could buy the software now, since I'm still
currently employed, but was told that my access to the software would be
terminated once I was officially retired.

Kind of a bummer for sure, which is why I'm trying to decide the best way to
go both economically and practically.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: Les Kriegler [mailto:kriegler@nycap.rr.com]
Sent: Sunday, April 24, 2016 3:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Hi Jason and Tom,

Jason,you are exactly correct. I had the Office 365 subscription whereby I
could download Office to my tablet and my wife's computer. Yes, there were
two installs available and it worked as the stand-alone copy did.
Another thing to check is many companies offer a substantial discount on
Office stand-alone for home use. This could include educational
institutions, private employers, state organizations, etc. I wound up
picking up the stand-alone copy of 2016 for a little over $25 which is much
preferred to paying an annual subscription for Office 365. While I couldn't
receive a refund on the remainder of my year's subscription, it was still
worth it to go the stand-alone route.

Les

-----Original Message-----
From: Jason White via Groups.io [mailto:jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io]
Sent: Saturday, April 23, 2016 8:53 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Office 365 Accessibility

Tom Behler <tombehler@gmail.com> wrote:

I am trying to decide whether to go with the stand-alone Office 2016
package, or whether to take out a home subscription to Office 365.



Are there any known Jaws accessibility issues with Office 365, as
compared to the standard Office 2016 package?

If your Office365 subscription lets you download and install Microsoft
Office on your desktop machine, then it shouldn't be substantially different
from the stand-alone package.

However, if you're planning to use Office365 Online, which is a Web
interface rather than a desktop application, then it's completely different
and may not be as convenient or accessible. At least some of the Office365
subscription plans let you install Office desktop and mobile applications on
your devices, so you don't have to use the online Web application.