Date   
Re: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

Van Lant, Robin
 

I’m interested to try this approach.  I have tended to just clear my autocomplete list in Outlook Options once in a while.

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Steve Nutt
Sent: Monday, August 6, 2018 3:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

 

Hi,

 

Not exactly, but if you start typing the Email address, followed by Control+K, you will only get Email addresses suggested to you from contacts, ignoring history.

 

So for example, if I were in your contacts and you typed “ste” then Control+K, you’d only get suggestions from your address book.

 

All the best


Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Behler
Sent: 06 August 2018 03:15
To: 'jfw list' <jfw@groups.io>
Subject: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

 

Hello, everyone.

 

I am currently experiencing a very anoying Outlook e-mail address problem.

 

Specifically, one of my e-mail contacts has changed his e-mail address, and I have deleted his old e-mail address from my contacts list.  I have also added his new e-mail address to my contacts list in the usual way.

 

However, every time I try to write an e-mail to this person using his mame, the old e-mail address still comes up, and I can’t seem to get rid of it.  Furthermore, I’m unable to access the new e-mail address  in my contacts list for this person.

 

Does anyone know how I can get rid of the old e-mail address once and for all, so that my e-mails will now only be sent to the person’s new e-mail address?

 

Thanks as always!

 

Tom Behler

 



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Re: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

Tom Behler
 

Thanks very much, Bill.

 

Will give the below steps a try, and let everyone know how things turn out.

 

Tom Behler

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2018 10:41 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

 

Hi, Tom. This happens to me often. The reason is, your friend is not only in your contacts, he’s also in suggested contacts. Try the following.

 

1. Start a new message in Outlook.

2. Press the letter which makes your friend’s old address come up.

3. When the old address comes up, press the delete key.

4. Press Escape a couple of times. When Outlook asks you if you want to save the changes, answer “no”.

5. Start another new message.

6. Press the letter that made your friend’s old address come up.

7. If it doesn’t come up with the press of that letter, arrow down, and see if it is still in the possibilities for addresses.

8. It should no longer be there, but if it is, press Delete again.

9. Press Escape a couple of times, and answer “No” if Outlook asks you if you want to save changes.

 

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom Behler
Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2018 7:15 PM
To: 'jfw list'
Subject: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

 

Hello, everyone.

 

I am currently experiencing a very anoying Outlook e-mail address problem.

 

Specifically, one of my e-mail contacts has changed his e-mail address, and I have deleted his old e-mail address from my contacts list.  I have also added his new e-mail address to my contacts list in the usual way.

 

However, every time I try to write an e-mail to this person using his mame, the old e-mail address still comes up, and I can’t seem to get rid of it.  Furthermore, I’m unable to access the new e-mail address  in my contacts list for this person.

 

Does anyone know how I can get rid of the old e-mail address once and for all, so that my e-mails will now only be sent to the person’s new e-mail address?

 

Thanks as always!

 

Tom Behler

 

Re: skype recording

Nino Dagostino
 

Thanks a lot Bill.

 

I will give you a call so we can talk.

 

Thank you and have a good day.

 

I am catching with my email, we had a death of a very close friend and were in Northern Michigan.

 

Have a good day.

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Friday, August 3, 2018 5:06 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: skype recording

 

I don’t think Skype will get the recording feature until September or thereabouts. Also, when invoked, it is going to let everyone on the call know that the call is being recorded. There will be no Skype recordings made in secret: at least not with the built-in recording feature of Skype. I’m sure there will be those who circumvent the intention to let everyone know there call is being recorded.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nino Dagostino
Sent: Friday, August 3, 2018 1:59 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: skype recording

 

Does Skype have the recording feture yet?

 

Thanks a lot.

 

 

Re: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

Not exactly, but if you start typing the Email address, followed by Control+K, you will only get Email addresses suggested to you from contacts, ignoring history.

 

So for example, if I were in your contacts and you typed “ste” then Control+K, you’d only get suggestions from your address book.

 

All the best


Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Behler
Sent: 06 August 2018 03:15
To: 'jfw list' <jfw@groups.io>
Subject: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

 

Hello, everyone.

 

I am currently experiencing a very anoying Outlook e-mail address problem.

 

Specifically, one of my e-mail contacts has changed his e-mail address, and I have deleted his old e-mail address from my contacts list.  I have also added his new e-mail address to my contacts list in the usual way.

 

However, every time I try to write an e-mail to this person using his mame, the old e-mail address still comes up, and I can’t seem to get rid of it.  Furthermore, I’m unable to access the new e-mail address  in my contacts list for this person.

 

Does anyone know how I can get rid of the old e-mail address once and for all, so that my e-mails will now only be sent to the person’s new e-mail address?

 

Thanks as always!

 

Tom Behler

 

Re: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

Bill White
 

Hi, Sieghard. I’m glad this is helpful to you. What I like about this is that you can not only delete the one annoying address that comes up when you press a letter, but, Arrowing down, you can also delete any other unwanted addresses that come up using that letter. Sometimes, I go through each letter in turn, and take out all the unwanted suggested contacts this way.

 

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2018 9:29 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

 

Thanks, Bill, learned something new here as well since I didn’t know you can get rid of suggested contacts this way, works like a charm, though.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2018 7:41 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

 

Hi, Tom. This happens to me often. The reason is, your friend is not only in your contacts, he’s also in suggested contacts. Try the following.

 

1. Start a new message in Outlook.

2. Press the letter which makes your friend’s old address come up.

3. When the old address comes up, press the delete key.

4. Press Escape a couple of times. When Outlook asks you if you want to save the changes, answer “no”.

5. Start another new message.

6. Press the letter that made your friend’s old address come up.

7. If it doesn’t come up with the press of that letter, arrow down, and see if it is still in the possibilities for addresses.

8. It should no longer be there, but if it is, press Delete again.

9. Press Escape a couple of times, and answer “No” if Outlook asks you if you want to save changes.

 

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom Behler
Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2018 7:15 PM
To: 'jfw list'
Subject: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

 

Hello, everyone.

 

I am currently experiencing a very anoying Outlook e-mail address problem.

 

Specifically, one of my e-mail contacts has changed his e-mail address, and I have deleted his old e-mail address from my contacts list.  I have also added his new e-mail address to my contacts list in the usual way.

 

However, every time I try to write an e-mail to this person using his mame, the old e-mail address still comes up, and I can’t seem to get rid of it.  Furthermore, I’m unable to access the new e-mail address  in my contacts list for this person.

 

Does anyone know how I can get rid of the old e-mail address once and for all, so that my e-mails will now only be sent to the person’s new e-mail address?

 

Thanks as always!

 

Tom Behler

 

Re: Where can i find more information about the accessibility standards that already exist?

Jodie Hoger
 

WebAIM.org is a good place to start.

On 6 Aug 2018, at 2:25 pm, David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

Hi list members, i'd like to know where can I find more information concerning the accessibility standards that are already in place. I'd like to know what accessibility standards are actually being used. I don't know about these items and i'd like to know more about it. I'm not sure whether all the companies that we talk about know this information. If they don't how can we help them to make accessibility part of what would be considered good business practices.


Re: add another email address in Thunderbird

Steve Matzura
 

File menu, New, existing mail account. Fill in the dialog.

On 8/5/2018 12:49 PM, audrey joy wrote:
Hi everyone,

Hope you are all having a wonderful summer.

Someone set up a new email account for our business. What do I have to do to add it in Thunderbird?

Thanks.

Audrey

Re: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

 

Thanks, Bill, learned something new here as well since I didn’t know you can get rid of suggested contacts this way, works like a charm, though.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill White
Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2018 7:41 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

 

Hi, Tom. This happens to me often. The reason is, your friend is not only in your contacts, he’s also in suggested contacts. Try the following.

 

1. Start a new message in Outlook.

2. Press the letter which makes your friend’s old address come up.

3. When the old address comes up, press the delete key.

4. Press Escape a couple of times. When Outlook asks you if you want to save the changes, answer “no”.

5. Start another new message.

6. Press the letter that made your friend’s old address come up.

7. If it doesn’t come up with the press of that letter, arrow down, and see if it is still in the possibilities for addresses.

8. It should no longer be there, but if it is, press Delete again.

9. Press Escape a couple of times, and answer “No” if Outlook asks you if you want to save changes.

 

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom Behler
Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2018 7:15 PM
To: 'jfw list'
Subject: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

 

Hello, everyone.

 

I am currently experiencing a very anoying Outlook e-mail address problem.

 

Specifically, one of my e-mail contacts has changed his e-mail address, and I have deleted his old e-mail address from my contacts list.  I have also added his new e-mail address to my contacts list in the usual way.

 

However, every time I try to write an e-mail to this person using his mame, the old e-mail address still comes up, and I can’t seem to get rid of it.  Furthermore, I’m unable to access the new e-mail address  in my contacts list for this person.

 

Does anyone know how I can get rid of the old e-mail address once and for all, so that my e-mails will now only be sent to the person’s new e-mail address?

 

Thanks as always!

 

Tom Behler

 

Where can i find more information about the accessibility standards that already exist?

David Ingram
 

Hi list members, i'd like to know where can I find more information concerning the accessibility standards that are already in place. I'd like to know what accessibility standards are actually being used. I don't know about these items and i'd like to know more about it. I'm not sure whether all the companies that we talk about know this information. If they don't how can we help them to make accessibility part of what would be considered good business practices.

Re: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

Bill White
 

Hi, Tom. This happens to me often. The reason is, your friend is not only in your contacts, he’s also in suggested contacts. Try the following.

 

1. Start a new message in Outlook.

2. Press the letter which makes your friend’s old address come up.

3. When the old address comes up, press the delete key.

4. Press Escape a couple of times. When Outlook asks you if you want to save the changes, answer “no”.

5. Start another new message.

6. Press the letter that made your friend’s old address come up.

7. If it doesn’t come up with the press of that letter, arrow down, and see if it is still in the possibilities for addresses.

8. It should no longer be there, but if it is, press Delete again.

9. Press Escape a couple of times, and answer “No” if Outlook asks you if you want to save changes.

 

Bill White

billwhite92701@...

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom Behler
Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2018 7:15 PM
To: 'jfw list'
Subject: Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

 

Hello, everyone.

 

I am currently experiencing a very anoying Outlook e-mail address problem.

 

Specifically, one of my e-mail contacts has changed his e-mail address, and I have deleted his old e-mail address from my contacts list.  I have also added his new e-mail address to my contacts list in the usual way.

 

However, every time I try to write an e-mail to this person using his mame, the old e-mail address still comes up, and I can’t seem to get rid of it.  Furthermore, I’m unable to access the new e-mail address  in my contacts list for this person.

 

Does anyone know how I can get rid of the old e-mail address once and for all, so that my e-mails will now only be sent to the person’s new e-mail address?

 

Thanks as always!

 

Tom Behler

 

Anoying Outlook E-mail Address Problem

Tom Behler
 

Hello, everyone.

 

I am currently experiencing a very anoying Outlook e-mail address problem.

 

Specifically, one of my e-mail contacts has changed his e-mail address, and I have deleted his old e-mail address from my contacts list.  I have also added his new e-mail address to my contacts list in the usual way.

 

However, every time I try to write an e-mail to this person using his mame, the old e-mail address still comes up, and I can’t seem to get rid of it.  Furthermore, I’m unable to access the new e-mail address  in my contacts list for this person.

 

Does anyone know how I can get rid of the old e-mail address once and for all, so that my e-mails will now only be sent to the person’s new e-mail address?

 

Thanks as always!

 

Tom Behler

 

Using corrections tracker in Word 2016

kevin meyers
 

Hello,

 

Does anyone know the best way to use correction tracker when in a Word 2016 document, Jaws2018 and Windows 10?

 

Cheers,

 

 

Kevin Meyers

 

Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

MobielSpeak and Talks were available well before 2009, in fact 2009 was the year when Apple released the iPhone 3GS and the iPod Touch third generation both with full Voiceover support.

Here is an article from September 2005 describing the release of MobileSpeak Pocket which worked on Windows Mobile 5.x pocket PC’s and later smartphones:

https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20050927005230/en/Mobile-Speak-Pocket-Code-Factory-Features-Fonix

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Angel
Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2018 3:10 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

cellular phones didn't begin to become accessible till there was a suit, I believe it was, against verizon.  Because, Samsung phones began having text to speech programs.  Then, there was the first smart accessible phone.  Which I still use as my only phone, the HTC Ozone.  With an added on screen reading program.  In 2009, there were two such screen reading programs, Talks, which was free with a cellular contract, and another which cost.  I think its name was Mobile speak.  But, it was a suit which began the ball rolling.  Now, with the drive to make cellular phone use hands free, accessibility is an result. phone

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2018 3:08 PM

Subject: Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

How about Apple making the iPhone accessible, as far as I know this came somewhat out of the blue and it was just something Apple and at that time probably to a large extend steve Jobbs decided to do.

I am not saying there shouldn’t be regulations, after all, without our CRTC telling the major carriers they couldn’t sell locked phones any more they would have probably continued to do so, but generic statements like “the free market will never do what is right” are not necessarily true and often are problematic in that they are too generic. That statement is just as problematic as if I said “the free market will regulate itself and needs no oversight”.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dan Longmore
Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2018 9:19 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

Yet without some government oversight the free market will never do what is right.  Greed will cloud their desire to do the right thing.  A watchdog is never a bad idea.

Dan

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, August 4, 2018 7:13 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

Randy,

          If you want to stop technology accessibility development in its tracks you will bring the government into it.  I say that as an ardent supporter of accessibility and government intervention where it can do good.

          If it is not extremely apparent that the non-technologically savvy being brought in to oversee technology is a recipe for disaster by now it never will be, particularly at the micromanaging level that would be making accessibility laws that would have virtually no applicability in a year or two.   Laws get very, very specific by their nature and the last thing I want or think would be for the good is a legalistic approach to accessibility on computers.  Most of those who would be in charge of crafting such legislation know absolutely nothing about the topic at all, and given what's involved would not likely dive into the research that would be needed such that the result would be in any way desirable.

          Those will be my last words about it, as having been in IT since the dawn of the PC era, and having watched how most revolutionary technologies have evolved (including ones like the worldwide web, which I incorrectly thought would be a complete flop and couldn't have been more wrong), I want the government as far away as possible from this arena, other than in regard to laws related to privacy protections not unlike those that were enacted just after the dawn of the telephone as mass communication device.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill

Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

Code Factory released MobileSpeak and there was Talks for Nokia phones around 2005/2006 I believe, maybe even a year or two earlier, I don’t think any of these solutions which made the smartphones of that time (Nokia with Symbian and others with Windows Mobile 5/6) accessible were due to a law ssuit.

I bought my first HTC smartphone in 2007 I think, at the time that used Windows Mobile 6.1 and I bought MobileSpeak to make it accessible.

As Brian said, I don’t recall anything about a suit, Apple simply released the iPhone 3GS in 2009 along with the iPod Touch third gen with Voiceover and boom, suddenly the smartphone of smartphones which started the entire smartphone revolution was accessible out of the box. In 2010 I sold my HTC phone and also my Trekker Maestro, VictorReader Stream and Booksense along with the iPod Touch I had bought in 2009 and bought an iPhone 4 and from then on it’s been just one device for me, an iPhone. I just don’t see the point any more to own any other devices other than a PC of course, but while I use my iPhone all the time to listen to audio books and so on I just use it and charge it daily if needed. I recently spent $35 canadian to get Apple to put a new battery into my 6S Plus, after a bit more than 2 years the capacity as shown by the Battery section in settings was down to 84%, now I’m back up to 100% and my phone is probably good for another 2 years. I definitely won’t buy a new phone this year and Apple will have to release something pretty compelling to make me buy a new one in 2019. Prior to my 6S Plus in 2015 I bought a new phone more often since development still progressed more rapidly, but now these are mature devices and while Face Id might be nice and wireless charging is convenient, these are noot compelling features for me. After I bought my iPhone 4 in 2010 I bought a 4S a year later simply because it was the first phone which had SIRI. Then in 2013 I bought the 5S because it was a bit larger, had a much faster CPU and the first 64 Bit CPU as well as Touch Id. I upgraded to the 6S Plus because of the larger battery, better camera and because it had an improved Touch Id home button as well as 3D Touch. The 7/7 Plus wasn’t compelling for me since apart from a bit of a camera update and faster CPU it only dropped the 3.5mm audio jack which I think was a bit of a step back without wireless charging. The 8/8 Plus inbtroduced wireless charging which is great since I just didn’t like the idea of having to buy a rather expensive splitter from Belkin to charge and use a wired headset at the same time, but I think wireless charging is still going to come into its own in the next year or two with respect to charging spped and the iPhone X of course is simply way too expensive. I love technology, but strangely I really like my 6S Plus and I’m happy with its performance especially now that in iOS 12 it’s actually faster and works more efficiently hence my lack of interest in plunking down well over $1,000 in canadian currency to get the latest and greatest. My wife has a 6S and of course if I upgrade I would not expect her to stick with her old phone so in fact it would probably be close to $3,000 Canadian by the time everything is said and done with taxes, maybe a few wireless charging mats and all that. I’m not interested in dropping my $49 Koodo plan which gives me 6Gb of data and unlimited calling and texting for a much more expensive plan from Telus just to save a few hundred Dollars and again getting locked into a 2-year contract. We’ll run these phones into the ground and then we go spend the money for whatever is the newest at the time either in the fall of 2019 but more likely in the fall of 2020.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2018 3:24 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

On Sun, Aug 5, 2018 at 06:10 PM, Angel wrote:

cellular phones didn't begin to become accessible till there was a suit, I believe it was, against verizon.

I can find no reference to anything even vaguely like this in relation to smartphone technology.

Based on AFB AccessWorld Magazine article published in 2011, http://www.afb.org/afbpress/pubnew.asp?DocID=aw120602, that would not seem to be correct, either.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill

Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

On Sun, Aug 5, 2018 at 06:10 PM, Angel wrote:
cellular phones didn't begin to become accessible till there was a suit, I believe it was, against verizon.
I can find no reference to anything even vaguely like this in relation to smartphone technology.

Based on AFB AccessWorld Magazine article published in 2011, http://www.afb.org/afbpress/pubnew.asp?DocID=aw120602, that would not seem to be correct, either.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill

Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

Angel
 


cellular phones didn't begin to become accessible till there was a suit, I believe it was, against verizon.  Because, Samsung phones began having text to speech programs.  Then, there was the first smart accessible phone.  Which I still use as my only phone, the HTC Ozone.  With an added on screen reading program.  In 2009, there were two such screen reading programs, Talks, which was free with a cellular contract, and another which cost.  I think its name was Mobile speak.  But, it was a suit which began the ball rolling.  Now, with the drive to make cellular phone use hands free, accessibility is an result. phone

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2018 3:08 PM
Subject: Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

How about Apple making the iPhone accessible, as far as I know this came somewhat out of the blue and it was just something Apple and at that time probably to a large extend steve Jobbs decided to do.

I am not saying there shouldn’t be regulations, after all, without our CRTC telling the major carriers they couldn’t sell locked phones any more they would have probably continued to do so, but generic statements like “the free market will never do what is right” are not necessarily true and often are problematic in that they are too generic. That statement is just as problematic as if I said “the free market will regulate itself and needs no oversight”.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dan Longmore
Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2018 9:19 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

Yet without some government oversight the free market will never do what is right.  Greed will cloud their desire to do the right thing.  A watchdog is never a bad idea.

Dan

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, August 4, 2018 7:13 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

Randy,

          If you want to stop technology accessibility development in its tracks you will bring the government into it.  I say that as an ardent supporter of accessibility and government intervention where it can do good.

          If it is not extremely apparent that the non-technologically savvy being brought in to oversee technology is a recipe for disaster by now it never will be, particularly at the micromanaging level that would be making accessibility laws that would have virtually no applicability in a year or two.   Laws get very, very specific by their nature and the last thing I want or think would be for the good is a legalistic approach to accessibility on computers.  Most of those who would be in charge of crafting such legislation know absolutely nothing about the topic at all, and given what's involved would not likely dive into the research that would be needed such that the result would be in any way desirable.

          Those will be my last words about it, as having been in IT since the dawn of the PC era, and having watched how most revolutionary technologies have evolved (including ones like the worldwide web, which I incorrectly thought would be a complete flop and couldn't have been more wrong), I want the government as far away as possible from this arena, other than in regard to laws related to privacy protections not unlike those that were enacted just after the dawn of the telephone as mass communication device.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill

Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

How about Apple making the iPhone accessible, as far as I know this came somewhat out of the blue and it was just something Apple and at that time probably to a large extend steve Jobbs decided to do.

I am not saying there shouldn’t be regulations, after all, without our CRTC telling the major carriers they couldn’t sell locked phones any more they would have probably continued to do so, but generic statements like “the free market will never do what is right” are not necessarily true and often are problematic in that they are too generic. That statement is just as problematic as if I said “the free market will regulate itself and needs no oversight”.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dan Longmore
Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2018 9:19 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

Yet without some government oversight the free market will never do what is right.  Greed will cloud their desire to do the right thing.  A watchdog is never a bad idea.

Dan

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, August 4, 2018 7:13 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

Randy,

          If you want to stop technology accessibility development in its tracks you will bring the government into it.  I say that as an ardent supporter of accessibility and government intervention where it can do good.

          If it is not extremely apparent that the non-technologically savvy being brought in to oversee technology is a recipe for disaster by now it never will be, particularly at the micromanaging level that would be making accessibility laws that would have virtually no applicability in a year or two.   Laws get very, very specific by their nature and the last thing I want or think would be for the good is a legalistic approach to accessibility on computers.  Most of those who would be in charge of crafting such legislation know absolutely nothing about the topic at all, and given what's involved would not likely dive into the research that would be needed such that the result would be in any way desirable.

          Those will be my last words about it, as having been in IT since the dawn of the PC era, and having watched how most revolutionary technologies have evolved (including ones like the worldwide web, which I incorrectly thought would be a complete flop and couldn't have been more wrong), I want the government as far away as possible from this arena, other than in regard to laws related to privacy protections not unlike those that were enacted just after the dawn of the telephone as mass communication device.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill

Re: add another email address in Thunderbird

 

Audrey,

           See any one of the tutorials returned by:  https://duckduckgo.com/?q=thunderbird+add+account

           If the account is from virtually any major and quite a few upper tier minor email service providers you'll just start the add account process, enter the e-mail address and password for the account, and Thunderbird will do the rest.  If necessary, you'll have to do a manual configuration, and that's covered in a number of those tutorials as well, but that's unlikely to be necessary.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill

Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

On Sun, Aug 5, 2018 at 01:12 PM, Jason White wrote:
These standards are already in place as public policy.
Correct.  And they're good ones.

Creating more regulation in addition to that already extant is not going to advance the cause of accessibility.  Even the regulations have their limits and it will only be a philosophical sea change (which appears to be in progress) that will make taking accessibility into account as part of good design routine.   It was never even considered or taught when I was a computer science major, but that makes sense because I was in that program at the dawn of the PC age (1980-1984).  Very little had been "invented" in the realm of software (relatively speaking) and almost all of it was text based (though still inaccessible).   We're now very long past that period and mature design philosophies, including what's currently being taught in academic settings, includes discussions of taking accessibility into account from the earliest stages of design and there exists a huge information base on just how to do that.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill

Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

Jason White
 

These standards are already in place as public policy. The most widely cited are the regulations under section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act in the United States (36 CFR Part 1194) and the EN 301 549 standard for public procurement of information and communication technology in the European Union.

 

If you want your software to be used in the public sector (a large market for commercial software developers), you’ll increasingly be required  to follow these accessibility standards.

 

From: <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Dan Longmore <danlongmore44@...>
Reply-To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Date: Sunday, August 5, 2018 at 12:19
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

Yet without some government oversight the free market will never do what is right.  Greed will cloud their desire to do the right thing.  A watchdog is never a bad idea.

Dan

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, August 4, 2018 7:13 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Should there be an accessibility standard for programs that are used by the visually impared?

 

Randy,

          If you want to stop technology accessibility development in its tracks you will bring the government into it.  I say that as an ardent supporter of accessibility and government intervention where it can do good.

          If it is not extremely apparent that the non-technologically savvy being brought in to oversee technology is a recipe for disaster by now it never will be, particularly at the micromanaging level that would be making accessibility laws that would have virtually no applicability in a year or two.   Laws get very, very specific by their nature and the last thing I want or think would be for the good is a legalistic approach to accessibility on computers.  Most of those who would be in charge of crafting such legislation know absolutely nothing about the topic at all, and given what's involved would not likely dive into the research that would be needed such that the result would be in any way desirable.

          Those will be my last words about it, as having been in IT since the dawn of the PC era, and having watched how most revolutionary technologies have evolved (including ones like the worldwide web, which I incorrectly thought would be a complete flop and couldn't have been more wrong), I want the government as far away as possible from this arena, other than in regard to laws related to privacy protections not unlike those that were enacted just after the dawn of the telephone as mass communication device.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill