Date   
Re: $100 for a new computer?

David & his pack of dogs
 

That’s about $50 more then what it would cost to get a Win 10 operating system CD. Of course the price for that CD might have gone up since I bought it a  while back.   

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: April 24, 2019 9:03 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: $100 for a new computer?

 

And just to ad to this, some of the top of the line mechanical gaming keyboards can easily cost $200 or more (that is Canadian Dollars).

If somebody wants to read more why such mechanical keyboards are superior, this Tech Radar article might be of interest:

 

Best gaming keyboard 2019: the best gaming keyboards we've tested

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David & his pack of dogs
Sent: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 8:15 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: $100 for a new computer?

 

Thank you as well.  I should have titled the subject line $100 for a keyboard? 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Shan Noyes
Sent: April 24, 2019 7:51 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: $100 for a new computer?

 

Thanks excellent and very interesting article shan 


On Apr 24, 2019, at 2:22 AM, Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

It’s not the media keys and such which cost money but the fact whether you buy a mechanical keyboard or not. Mechanical keyboards are what many of us would call the old style IBM type keyboards. They are relatively heavy and only few of them exist in wireless form (Logitech does make a wireless mechanical gaming keyboard). Many of these also are sold as “gaming keyboards” and each key has a small mechanical switch and one of the most well-known among those is the Cherry MX switch, below is an article for those who are interested which explains its history and different types:

 

An introduction to Cherry MX mechanical switches

 

Mechanical keyboards are defined by their switches. In the Filco Majestouch-2 and many others, it is Cherry MX switches that are used. In this article, we’ll look at the many different kinds of Cherry switches on the market and see how they compare to one another.

 

A potted history of Cherry

Cherry Corporation was founded in the United States in 1953 and started producing keyboards in 1967, making them the oldest keyboard manufacturer in the world that’s still in business. The company was moved to Germany in 1967 and bought by ZF Friedrichshafen AG in 2008, but keyboards and mechanical switches are still produced under the Cherry brand.

Their most popular line of switches, the Cherry MX series, was introduced around 1985. These switches are usually referenced by their physical colour, with each colour denoting the switch’s handling characteristics – whether it is clicky, whether it is tactile, and how much force is required to actuate the switch, in centi-Newtons (cN) or grams (g).

Now that we’ve explained a bit of the background information, we can have a look at the switches themselves – starting with the four most common varieties.

 

Linear switches

Linear switches have the simplest operation, moving straight up and down without any additional tactile feedback or loud clicking noise – we’ll come to these more complicated switches later on. There are two common types of linear switches – Black and Red.

 

Cherry MX Black switches were introduced in 1984, making them one of the older Cherry switches. They have a medium to high actuation force, at 60 cN, which means they are the stiffest of the four most common Cherry switches. These switches are used in point-of-sale stations, but typically aren’t considered ideal for typing due to their high weighting. They have found use in RTS video games, where the high weighting can prevent accidental key presses that might occur on less stiff switches. The stronger spring also means that they rebound faster, meaning they can be actuated quite quickly given enough force – although you may also find fatigue becomes more of a factor than with other switches.

 

Red Conversely, Cherry MX Red switches were only introduced in 2008 and are the most recent switch to be developed by the company. They have a low actuation force, at 45 cN – tied with Brown for the lowest of the four most common switches. Red switches have been marketed as a gaming switch, with the light weighting allowing for more rapid actuation, and have become increasingly common in gaming keyboards.

 

Tactile, non-clicky switches

Tactile switches provide, as the name suggests, additional tactile feedback as the key actuates. As you press the key down, there is a noticeable bump which lets you know that your key press has been registered.

 

Brown The most popular type of tactile, non-clicky switch is the Cherry MX Brown. This switch was introduced in 1994 as a special ‘ergo soft’ switch, but quickly became one of the most popular switches. Today, the majority of Filco keyboards are sold with Brown switches, as the switch is a good middle-of-the-road option appropriate for both typing and gaming. They are also ideal for typing in office environments, where a clicky switch might annoy some.

 

Tactile, clicky switches

Clicky switches add a deliberately louder ‘click’ sound to the existing tactile bump, allowing for greater typing feedback. This makes it easier to know that you’ve hit the activation point. This is achieved by a more complicated mechanism, with a blue plunger and a white slider. When the actuation point is reached, the slider is propelled to the bottom of the switch and the click noise is produced.

 

Blue

The Cherry MX Blue is the most common clicky switch, and was first made available in Filco keyboards in 2007. Blue switches are favoured by typists due to their tactile bump and audible click, but can be less suitable for gaming as the weighting is relatively high – 50 cN – and it is a bit harder to double tap, as the release point is above the actuation point. Blue switches are noticeably louder than other mechanical switches, which are already louder than rubber domes, so these switches can be a bit disruptive in close working conditions.

 

Less common Cherry MX switches

While the four switches listed above are found on the vast majority of mechanical keyboards with Cherry switches, quite a few other variants exist as well. We’ll cover these briefly.

 

• ClearSilent Red (Pink) switches are quieter variants of the linear MX Red switch, with rubber pieces inside that dampen the sound of the switch returning to its default position. The actuation force remains 45 cN.

• Speed Silver is a shortened version of the MX Red switch, actuating at 1.2mm instead of 2mm and with a total travel of 3.4mm compared to 4mm.

• Clear switches are a stiffer version of Brown switches, with a tactile bump and weighting of 65 cN.

• Grey  switches are used for space bars on Clear keyboards, with a weighting of 80 cN.

• Green switches are a stiffer version of Blue switches, with a tactile bump and audible click, weighted at 80 cN. It is primarily used for space bars.

• White switches are very similar to green switches, with modern versions being weighted the same (80 cN) but being slightly quieter.

• Super Black  switches are extra stiff (150 cN) linear switches designed for space bars on keyboards with Black switches.

• Dark Grey  switches are moderately more stiff linear (80 cN) switches designed for use as space bars on keyboards with Cherry MX Black switches.

• Cherry MX Lock  switches are locking linear switches that stay down until pressed again, typically used for Caps Lock and TTY lock in keyboards before the 1980s.

 

Conclusion

So there we have it – information on the various MX switches produced by Cherry and now ZF Electronics. I hope this has been useful – if you have any questions, feel free to share them in the comments below! You can also ask on Twitter or Facebook. Finally, if you’d like to pick up a few switches to play around

with, then you can do so on our switches page. Thanks for reading and have a good one

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David & his pack of dogs
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 10:38 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: $100 for a new computer?

 

Marty, years ago when I took my keyboard in to be fixed the tech said to get a new one would be far cheaper.  Because they would have to take all the keys out, dust them off then put them back together.  That was when keyboards were around $100 to buy.  Now, they are much cheaper.   One can get good ones on Amazon or Best Buy for around $30-50. If one shops around and look for sales on them, which happen all the time. Of course if one wants or needs an ergonomic or a fancy keyboard with media controls and other such bells and whistles, one could spend a lot of money, if that was what one really wanted to do.    

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Annabelle Susan Morison
Sent: April 23, 2019 10:02 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

 

This is a new keyboard. It's one of those ones with buckling springs rather than rubber domes. I got it in August of 2018, and I think it's really amazing.

 


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Marty Hutchings
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 8:01 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

Sounds like a lot of trouble to go through just to change one key.  How about a new keyboard.

 

Marty

 

Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 7:35 PM

Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

 

On Tue, Apr 23, 2019 at 08:11 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

and I get attacked by Marty's signature with its religious talk (I'm not religious, thank you),

Uh, no.  No one's signature "attacks you" or anyone else.  You are perfectly free to ignore them.

Back to the beginning, at least two of us have recommended you try a key remapper like SharpKeys or similar.  All appearances are that, for whatever reason, the output from your right ALT key is being interpreted as ALT-GR on your machine.  A key remapper, changing that key to straight ALT, is the fastest way to achieve your stated goal.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  
The psychology of adultery has been falsified by conventional morals, which assume, in monogamous countries, that attraction to one person cannot co-exist with a serious affection for another.  Everybody knows that this is untrue. . .

           ~ Bertrand Russell

Re: How to edit Outlook 2016 address autocompletion list

 

Hi Christoph,

 

I just tested these steps I got from google and should have done so before because so far at least this does not seem to work when Jaws is running.

I’ll check into it a bit more later when I can ask one of my sighted employees to do this first without Jaws and make it works as advertised and then I’ll see if I can figure out a way to do it with Jaws.

Of course clearing all entries in File > Options is no problem, but it may not be what you want.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Delaunay Christophe
Sent: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 4:56 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: How to edit Outlook 2016 address autocompletion list

 

Hi all,

 

I’m using Jaws 2019 on a windows7-64 based computer.

 

Does anyone know whether there is an accessible way to remove old, (obsolete), addresses from the Outlook 2016 autocompletion list please?

 

Many thanks in advance. Have a nice day. Chris D

Re: Jaws 2018 Mozilla firefox portable firefox 62.0 problem

Chris
 

I’m pretty sure that webvisum has been deprecated since around Firefox 55+

So since then its been incompatible with the new Firefox

 

Check in the addon manager to confirm this

 

 

From: O.Addison Gethers
Sent: 24 April 2019 15:05
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Jaws 2018 Mozilla firefox portable firefox 62.0 problem

 

Hello All,

 

I am trying to use Webvisum with Mozilla firefox portable 62.0 with jaws 2018 an windows 10.

When I press ctrl+alt+6while in the edit box, webvisum does not preform the ccaptcha?

Can someone please assist me?I using desktop and laptop computer window10

 

Thank you

Addison

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com

 

Re: How to edit Outlook 2016 address autocompletion list

 

A Google search for “How to remove addresses from Outlook auto complete” gave me this:

 

To remove a single name or email address from Outlook's autocomplete list

1. Create a new email message in Outlook .

2. Start typing the name or address  you want to remove .

3. Use the down arrow key to highlight the undesired entry.

4 Press Del. on your keyboard.

 

You can also completely clear auto-complete:

 

Select File > Options, keyboard shortcut is Alt + F followed by T

Go to the Mail tab

Tab a lot until  you get to “Empty Auto-Complete List Button” or press Alt + E 3 times

Activate the button and confirm.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Delaunay Christophe
Sent: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 4:56 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: How to edit Outlook 2016 address autocompletion list

 

Hi all,

 

I’m using Jaws 2019 on a windows7-64 based computer.

 

Does anyone know whether there is an accessible way to remove old, (obsolete), addresses from the Outlook 2016 autocompletion list please?

 

Many thanks in advance. Have a nice day. Chris D

Re: Jaws 2018 Mozilla firefox portable firefox 62.0 problem

JM Casey
 

I personally never got this add-on to do what it claiemd to do, not even with older versions of Firefox, but others reported success. However it definitely won’t work with Firefox 62, or, as has already been said, any current version of firefox. If you absolutely, and I mean absolutely, must use it, I suppose you could find an older version with which it’s still compatible (pre 57, basically) and just run it when you need one of those things solved. I wouldn’t run it for more than that because by this point it’s a big security risk.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of O.Addison Gethers
Sent: April 24, 2019 10:05 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Jaws 2018 Mozilla firefox portable firefox 62.0 problem

 

Hello All,

 

I am trying to use Webvisum with Mozilla firefox portable 62.0 with jaws 2018 an windows 10.

When I press ctrl+alt+6while in the edit box, webvisum does not preform the ccaptcha?

Can someone please assist me?I using desktop and laptop computer window10

 

Thank you

Addison

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com

Re: $100 for a new computer?

 

And just to ad to this, some of the top of the line mechanical gaming keyboards can easily cost $200 or more (that is Canadian Dollars).

If somebody wants to read more why such mechanical keyboards are superior, this Tech Radar article might be of interest:

 

Best gaming keyboard 2019: the best gaming keyboards we've tested

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David & his pack of dogs
Sent: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 8:15 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: $100 for a new computer?

 

Thank you as well.  I should have titled the subject line $100 for a keyboard? 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Shan Noyes
Sent: April 24, 2019 7:51 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: $100 for a new computer?

 

Thanks excellent and very interesting article shan 


On Apr 24, 2019, at 2:22 AM, Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

It’s not the media keys and such which cost money but the fact whether you buy a mechanical keyboard or not. Mechanical keyboards are what many of us would call the old style IBM type keyboards. They are relatively heavy and only few of them exist in wireless form (Logitech does make a wireless mechanical gaming keyboard). Many of these also are sold as “gaming keyboards” and each key has a small mechanical switch and one of the most well-known among those is the Cherry MX switch, below is an article for those who are interested which explains its history and different types:

 

An introduction to Cherry MX mechanical switches

 

Mechanical keyboards are defined by their switches. In the Filco Majestouch-2 and many others, it is Cherry MX switches that are used. In this article, we’ll look at the many different kinds of Cherry switches on the market and see how they compare to one another.

 

A potted history of Cherry

Cherry Corporation was founded in the United States in 1953 and started producing keyboards in 1967, making them the oldest keyboard manufacturer in the world that’s still in business. The company was moved to Germany in 1967 and bought by ZF Friedrichshafen AG in 2008, but keyboards and mechanical switches are still produced under the Cherry brand.

Their most popular line of switches, the Cherry MX series, was introduced around 1985. These switches are usually referenced by their physical colour, with each colour denoting the switch’s handling characteristics – whether it is clicky, whether it is tactile, and how much force is required to actuate the switch, in centi-Newtons (cN) or grams (g).

Now that we’ve explained a bit of the background information, we can have a look at the switches themselves – starting with the four most common varieties.

 

Linear switches

Linear switches have the simplest operation, moving straight up and down without any additional tactile feedback or loud clicking noise – we’ll come to these more complicated switches later on. There are two common types of linear switches – Black and Red.

 

Cherry MX Black switches were introduced in 1984, making them one of the older Cherry switches. They have a medium to high actuation force, at 60 cN, which means they are the stiffest of the four most common Cherry switches. These switches are used in point-of-sale stations, but typically aren’t considered ideal for typing due to their high weighting. They have found use in RTS video games, where the high weighting can prevent accidental key presses that might occur on less stiff switches. The stronger spring also means that they rebound faster, meaning they can be actuated quite quickly given enough force – although you may also find fatigue becomes more of a factor than with other switches.

 

Red Conversely, Cherry MX Red switches were only introduced in 2008 and are the most recent switch to be developed by the company. They have a low actuation force, at 45 cN – tied with Brown for the lowest of the four most common switches. Red switches have been marketed as a gaming switch, with the light weighting allowing for more rapid actuation, and have become increasingly common in gaming keyboards.

 

Tactile, non-clicky switches

Tactile switches provide, as the name suggests, additional tactile feedback as the key actuates. As you press the key down, there is a noticeable bump which lets you know that your key press has been registered.

 

Brown The most popular type of tactile, non-clicky switch is the Cherry MX Brown. This switch was introduced in 1994 as a special ‘ergo soft’ switch, but quickly became one of the most popular switches. Today, the majority of Filco keyboards are sold with Brown switches, as the switch is a good middle-of-the-road option appropriate for both typing and gaming. They are also ideal for typing in office environments, where a clicky switch might annoy some.

 

Tactile, clicky switches

Clicky switches add a deliberately louder ‘click’ sound to the existing tactile bump, allowing for greater typing feedback. This makes it easier to know that you’ve hit the activation point. This is achieved by a more complicated mechanism, with a blue plunger and a white slider. When the actuation point is reached, the slider is propelled to the bottom of the switch and the click noise is produced.

 

Blue

The Cherry MX Blue is the most common clicky switch, and was first made available in Filco keyboards in 2007. Blue switches are favoured by typists due to their tactile bump and audible click, but can be less suitable for gaming as the weighting is relatively high – 50 cN – and it is a bit harder to double tap, as the release point is above the actuation point. Blue switches are noticeably louder than other mechanical switches, which are already louder than rubber domes, so these switches can be a bit disruptive in close working conditions.

 

Less common Cherry MX switches

While the four switches listed above are found on the vast majority of mechanical keyboards with Cherry switches, quite a few other variants exist as well. We’ll cover these briefly.

 

• ClearSilent Red (Pink) switches are quieter variants of the linear MX Red switch, with rubber pieces inside that dampen the sound of the switch returning to its default position. The actuation force remains 45 cN.

• Speed Silver is a shortened version of the MX Red switch, actuating at 1.2mm instead of 2mm and with a total travel of 3.4mm compared to 4mm.

• Clear switches are a stiffer version of Brown switches, with a tactile bump and weighting of 65 cN.

• Grey  switches are used for space bars on Clear keyboards, with a weighting of 80 cN.

• Green switches are a stiffer version of Blue switches, with a tactile bump and audible click, weighted at 80 cN. It is primarily used for space bars.

• White switches are very similar to green switches, with modern versions being weighted the same (80 cN) but being slightly quieter.

• Super Black  switches are extra stiff (150 cN) linear switches designed for space bars on keyboards with Black switches.

• Dark Grey  switches are moderately more stiff linear (80 cN) switches designed for use as space bars on keyboards with Cherry MX Black switches.

• Cherry MX Lock  switches are locking linear switches that stay down until pressed again, typically used for Caps Lock and TTY lock in keyboards before the 1980s.

 

Conclusion

So there we have it – information on the various MX switches produced by Cherry and now ZF Electronics. I hope this has been useful – if you have any questions, feel free to share them in the comments below! You can also ask on Twitter or Facebook. Finally, if you’d like to pick up a few switches to play around

with, then you can do so on our switches page. Thanks for reading and have a good one

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David & his pack of dogs
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 10:38 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: $100 for a new computer?

 

Marty, years ago when I took my keyboard in to be fixed the tech said to get a new one would be far cheaper.  Because they would have to take all the keys out, dust them off then put them back together.  That was when keyboards were around $100 to buy.  Now, they are much cheaper.   One can get good ones on Amazon or Best Buy for around $30-50. If one shops around and look for sales on them, which happen all the time. Of course if one wants or needs an ergonomic or a fancy keyboard with media controls and other such bells and whistles, one could spend a lot of money, if that was what one really wanted to do.    

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Annabelle Susan Morison
Sent: April 23, 2019 10:02 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

 

This is a new keyboard. It's one of those ones with buckling springs rather than rubber domes. I got it in August of 2018, and I think it's really amazing.

 


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Marty Hutchings
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 8:01 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

Sounds like a lot of trouble to go through just to change one key.  How about a new keyboard.

 

Marty

 

From: Brian Vogel

Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 7:35 PM

Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

 

On Tue, Apr 23, 2019 at 08:11 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

and I get attacked by Marty's signature with its religious talk (I'm not religious, thank you),

Uh, no.  No one's signature "attacks you" or anyone else.  You are perfectly free to ignore them.

Back to the beginning, at least two of us have recommended you try a key remapper like SharpKeys or similar.  All appearances are that, for whatever reason, the output from your right ALT key is being interpreted as ALT-GR on your machine.  A key remapper, changing that key to straight ALT, is the fastest way to achieve your stated goal.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  
The psychology of adultery has been falsified by conventional morals, which assume, in monogamous countries, that attraction to one person cannot co-exist with a serious affection for another.  Everybody knows that this is untrue. . .

           ~ Bertrand Russell

Re: Jaws 2018 Mozilla firefox portable firefox 62.0 problem

 

Webvisum does no longer work with any current Firefox versions, I think at best it was maybe version 52 or something or maybe even below that.

To my knowledge the Webvisum extension has not been developed any further in years.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of O.Addison Gethers
Sent: Wednesday, April 24, 2019 7:05 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Jaws 2018 Mozilla firefox portable firefox 62.0 problem

 

Hello All,

 

I am trying to use Webvisum with Mozilla firefox portable 62.0 with jaws 2018 an windows 10.

When I press ctrl+alt+6while in the edit box, webvisum does not preform the ccaptcha?

Can someone please assist me?I using desktop and laptop computer window10

 

Thank you

Addison

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com

Re: $100 for a new computer?

David & his pack of dogs
 

Thank you as well.  I should have titled the subject line $100 for a keyboard? 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Shan Noyes
Sent: April 24, 2019 7:51 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: $100 for a new computer?

 

Thanks excellent and very interesting article shan 


On Apr 24, 2019, at 2:22 AM, Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

It’s not the media keys and such which cost money but the fact whether you buy a mechanical keyboard or not. Mechanical keyboards are what many of us would call the old style IBM type keyboards. They are relatively heavy and only few of them exist in wireless form (Logitech does make a wireless mechanical gaming keyboard). Many of these also are sold as “gaming keyboards” and each key has a small mechanical switch and one of the most well-known among those is the Cherry MX switch, below is an article for those who are interested which explains its history and different types:

 

An introduction to Cherry MX mechanical switches

 

Mechanical keyboards are defined by their switches. In the Filco Majestouch-2 and many others, it is Cherry MX switches that are used. In this article, we’ll look at the many different kinds of Cherry switches on the market and see how they compare to one another.

 

A potted history of Cherry

Cherry Corporation was founded in the United States in 1953 and started producing keyboards in 1967, making them the oldest keyboard manufacturer in the world that’s still in business. The company was moved to Germany in 1967 and bought by ZF Friedrichshafen AG in 2008, but keyboards and mechanical switches are still produced under the Cherry brand.

Their most popular line of switches, the Cherry MX series, was introduced around 1985. These switches are usually referenced by their physical colour, with each colour denoting the switch’s handling characteristics – whether it is clicky, whether it is tactile, and how much force is required to actuate the switch, in centi-Newtons (cN) or grams (g).

Now that we’ve explained a bit of the background information, we can have a look at the switches themselves – starting with the four most common varieties.

 

Linear switches

Linear switches have the simplest operation, moving straight up and down without any additional tactile feedback or loud clicking noise – we’ll come to these more complicated switches later on. There are two common types of linear switches – Black and Red.

 

Cherry MX Black switches were introduced in 1984, making them one of the older Cherry switches. They have a medium to high actuation force, at 60 cN, which means they are the stiffest of the four most common Cherry switches. These switches are used in point-of-sale stations, but typically aren’t considered ideal for typing due to their high weighting. They have found use in RTS video games, where the high weighting can prevent accidental key presses that might occur on less stiff switches. The stronger spring also means that they rebound faster, meaning they can be actuated quite quickly given enough force – although you may also find fatigue becomes more of a factor than with other switches.

 

Red Conversely, Cherry MX Red switches were only introduced in 2008 and are the most recent switch to be developed by the company. They have a low actuation force, at 45 cN – tied with Brown for the lowest of the four most common switches. Red switches have been marketed as a gaming switch, with the light weighting allowing for more rapid actuation, and have become increasingly common in gaming keyboards.

 

Tactile, non-clicky switches

Tactile switches provide, as the name suggests, additional tactile feedback as the key actuates. As you press the key down, there is a noticeable bump which lets you know that your key press has been registered.

 

Brown The most popular type of tactile, non-clicky switch is the Cherry MX Brown. This switch was introduced in 1994 as a special ‘ergo soft’ switch, but quickly became one of the most popular switches. Today, the majority of Filco keyboards are sold with Brown switches, as the switch is a good middle-of-the-road option appropriate for both typing and gaming. They are also ideal for typing in office environments, where a clicky switch might annoy some.

 

Tactile, clicky switches

Clicky switches add a deliberately louder ‘click’ sound to the existing tactile bump, allowing for greater typing feedback. This makes it easier to know that you’ve hit the activation point. This is achieved by a more complicated mechanism, with a blue plunger and a white slider. When the actuation point is reached, the slider is propelled to the bottom of the switch and the click noise is produced.

 

Blue

The Cherry MX Blue is the most common clicky switch, and was first made available in Filco keyboards in 2007. Blue switches are favoured by typists due to their tactile bump and audible click, but can be less suitable for gaming as the weighting is relatively high – 50 cN – and it is a bit harder to double tap, as the release point is above the actuation point. Blue switches are noticeably louder than other mechanical switches, which are already louder than rubber domes, so these switches can be a bit disruptive in close working conditions.

 

Less common Cherry MX switches

While the four switches listed above are found on the vast majority of mechanical keyboards with Cherry switches, quite a few other variants exist as well. We’ll cover these briefly.

 

• ClearSilent Red (Pink) switches are quieter variants of the linear MX Red switch, with rubber pieces inside that dampen the sound of the switch returning to its default position. The actuation force remains 45 cN.

• Speed Silver is a shortened version of the MX Red switch, actuating at 1.2mm instead of 2mm and with a total travel of 3.4mm compared to 4mm.

• Clear switches are a stiffer version of Brown switches, with a tactile bump and weighting of 65 cN.

• Grey  switches are used for space bars on Clear keyboards, with a weighting of 80 cN.

• Green switches are a stiffer version of Blue switches, with a tactile bump and audible click, weighted at 80 cN. It is primarily used for space bars.

• White switches are very similar to green switches, with modern versions being weighted the same (80 cN) but being slightly quieter.

• Super Black  switches are extra stiff (150 cN) linear switches designed for space bars on keyboards with Black switches.

• Dark Grey  switches are moderately more stiff linear (80 cN) switches designed for use as space bars on keyboards with Cherry MX Black switches.

• Cherry MX Lock  switches are locking linear switches that stay down until pressed again, typically used for Caps Lock and TTY lock in keyboards before the 1980s.

 

Conclusion

So there we have it – information on the various MX switches produced by Cherry and now ZF Electronics. I hope this has been useful – if you have any questions, feel free to share them in the comments below! You can also ask on Twitter or Facebook. Finally, if you’d like to pick up a few switches to play around

with, then you can do so on our switches page. Thanks for reading and have a good one

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David & his pack of dogs
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 10:38 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: $100 for a new computer?

 

Marty, years ago when I took my keyboard in to be fixed the tech said to get a new one would be far cheaper.  Because they would have to take all the keys out, dust them off then put them back together.  That was when keyboards were around $100 to buy.  Now, they are much cheaper.   One can get good ones on Amazon or Best Buy for around $30-50. If one shops around and look for sales on them, which happen all the time. Of course if one wants or needs an ergonomic or a fancy keyboard with media controls and other such bells and whistles, one could spend a lot of money, if that was what one really wanted to do.    

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Annabelle Susan Morison
Sent: April 23, 2019 10:02 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

 

This is a new keyboard. It's one of those ones with buckling springs rather than rubber domes. I got it in August of 2018, and I think it's really amazing.

 


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Marty Hutchings
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 8:01 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

Sounds like a lot of trouble to go through just to change one key.  How about a new keyboard.

 

Marty

 

Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 7:35 PM

Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

 

On Tue, Apr 23, 2019 at 08:11 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

and I get attacked by Marty's signature with its religious talk (I'm not religious, thank you),

Uh, no.  No one's signature "attacks you" or anyone else.  You are perfectly free to ignore them.

Back to the beginning, at least two of us have recommended you try a key remapper like SharpKeys or similar.  All appearances are that, for whatever reason, the output from your right ALT key is being interpreted as ALT-GR on your machine.  A key remapper, changing that key to straight ALT, is the fastest way to achieve your stated goal.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  
The psychology of adultery has been falsified by conventional morals, which assume, in monogamous countries, that attraction to one person cannot co-exist with a serious affection for another.  Everybody knows that this is untrue. . .

           ~ Bertrand Russell

Re: $100 for a new computer?

Shan Noyes
 

Thanks excellent and very interesting article shan 


On Apr 24, 2019, at 2:22 AM, Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

It’s not the media keys and such which cost money but the fact whether you buy a mechanical keyboard or not. Mechanical keyboards are what many of us would call the old style IBM type keyboards. They are relatively heavy and only few of them exist in wireless form (Logitech does make a wireless mechanical gaming keyboard). Many of these also are sold as “gaming keyboards” and each key has a small mechanical switch and one of the most well-known among those is the Cherry MX switch, below is an article for those who are interested which explains its history and different types:

 

An introduction to Cherry MX mechanical switches

 

Mechanical keyboards are defined by their switches. In the Filco Majestouch-2 and many others, it is Cherry MX switches that are used. In this article, we’ll look at the many different kinds of Cherry switches on the market and see how they compare to one another.

 

A potted history of Cherry

Cherry Corporation was founded in the United States in 1953 and started producing keyboards in 1967, making them the oldest keyboard manufacturer in the world that’s still in business. The company was moved to Germany in 1967 and bought by ZF Friedrichshafen AG in 2008, but keyboards and mechanical switches are still produced under the Cherry brand.

Their most popular line of switches, the Cherry MX series, was introduced around 1985. These switches are usually referenced by their physical colour, with each colour denoting the switch’s handling characteristics – whether it is clicky, whether it is tactile, and how much force is required to actuate the switch, in centi-Newtons (cN) or grams (g).

Now that we’ve explained a bit of the background information, we can have a look at the switches themselves – starting with the four most common varieties.

 

Linear switches

Linear switches have the simplest operation, moving straight up and down without any additional tactile feedback or loud clicking noise – we’ll come to these more complicated switches later on. There are two common types of linear switches – Black and Red.

 

Cherry MX Black switches were introduced in 1984, making them one of the older Cherry switches. They have a medium to high actuation force, at 60 cN, which means they are the stiffest of the four most common Cherry switches. These switches are used in point-of-sale stations, but typically aren’t considered ideal for typing due to their high weighting. They have found use in RTS video games, where the high weighting can prevent accidental key presses that might occur on less stiff switches. The stronger spring also means that they rebound faster, meaning they can be actuated quite quickly given enough force – although you may also find fatigue becomes more of a factor than with other switches.

 

Red Conversely, Cherry MX Red switches were only introduced in 2008 and are the most recent switch to be developed by the company. They have a low actuation force, at 45 cN – tied with Brown for the lowest of the four most common switches. Red switches have been marketed as a gaming switch, with the light weighting allowing for more rapid actuation, and have become increasingly common in gaming keyboards.

 

Tactile, non-clicky switches

Tactile switches provide, as the name suggests, additional tactile feedback as the key actuates. As you press the key down, there is a noticeable bump which lets you know that your key press has been registered.

 

Brown The most popular type of tactile, non-clicky switch is the Cherry MX Brown. This switch was introduced in 1994 as a special ‘ergo soft’ switch, but quickly became one of the most popular switches. Today, the majority of Filco keyboards are sold with Brown switches, as the switch is a good middle-of-the-road option appropriate for both typing and gaming. They are also ideal for typing in office environments, where a clicky switch might annoy some.

 

Tactile, clicky switches

Clicky switches add a deliberately louder ‘click’ sound to the existing tactile bump, allowing for greater typing feedback. This makes it easier to know that you’ve hit the activation point. This is achieved by a more complicated mechanism, with a blue plunger and a white slider. When the actuation point is reached, the slider is propelled to the bottom of the switch and the click noise is produced.

 

Blue

The Cherry MX Blue is the most common clicky switch, and was first made available in Filco keyboards in 2007. Blue switches are favoured by typists due to their tactile bump and audible click, but can be less suitable for gaming as the weighting is relatively high – 50 cN – and it is a bit harder to double tap, as the release point is above the actuation point. Blue switches are noticeably louder than other mechanical switches, which are already louder than rubber domes, so these switches can be a bit disruptive in close working conditions.

 

Less common Cherry MX switches

While the four switches listed above are found on the vast majority of mechanical keyboards with Cherry switches, quite a few other variants exist as well. We’ll cover these briefly.

 

• ClearSilent Red (Pink) switches are quieter variants of the linear MX Red switch, with rubber pieces inside that dampen the sound of the switch returning to its default position. The actuation force remains 45 cN.

• Speed Silver is a shortened version of the MX Red switch, actuating at 1.2mm instead of 2mm and with a total travel of 3.4mm compared to 4mm.

• Clear switches are a stiffer version of Brown switches, with a tactile bump and weighting of 65 cN.

• Grey  switches are used for space bars on Clear keyboards, with a weighting of 80 cN.

• Green switches are a stiffer version of Blue switches, with a tactile bump and audible click, weighted at 80 cN. It is primarily used for space bars.

• White switches are very similar to green switches, with modern versions being weighted the same (80 cN) but being slightly quieter.

• Super Black  switches are extra stiff (150 cN) linear switches designed for space bars on keyboards with Black switches.

• Dark Grey  switches are moderately more stiff linear (80 cN) switches designed for use as space bars on keyboards with Cherry MX Black switches.

• Cherry MX Lock  switches are locking linear switches that stay down until pressed again, typically used for Caps Lock and TTY lock in keyboards before the 1980s.

 

Conclusion

So there we have it – information on the various MX switches produced by Cherry and now ZF Electronics. I hope this has been useful – if you have any questions, feel free to share them in the comments below! You can also ask on Twitter or Facebook. Finally, if you’d like to pick up a few switches to play around

with, then you can do so on our switches page. Thanks for reading and have a good one

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David & his pack of dogs
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 10:38 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: $100 for a new computer?

 

Marty, years ago when I took my keyboard in to be fixed the tech said to get a new one would be far cheaper.  Because they would have to take all the keys out, dust them off then put them back together.  That was when keyboards were around $100 to buy.  Now, they are much cheaper.   One can get good ones on Amazon or Best Buy for around $30-50. If one shops around and look for sales on them, which happen all the time. Of course if one wants or needs an ergonomic or a fancy keyboard with media controls and other such bells and whistles, one could spend a lot of money, if that was what one really wanted to do.    

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Annabelle Susan Morison
Sent: April 23, 2019 10:02 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

 

This is a new keyboard. It's one of those ones with buckling springs rather than rubber domes. I got it in August of 2018, and I think it's really amazing.

 


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Marty Hutchings
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 8:01 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

Sounds like a lot of trouble to go through just to change one key.  How about a new keyboard.

 

Marty

 

From: Brian Vogel

Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 7:35 PM

Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

 

On Tue, Apr 23, 2019 at 08:11 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

and I get attacked by Marty's signature with its religious talk (I'm not religious, thank you),

Uh, no.  No one's signature "attacks you" or anyone else.  You are perfectly free to ignore them.

Back to the beginning, at least two of us have recommended you try a key remapper like SharpKeys or similar.  All appearances are that, for whatever reason, the output from your right ALT key is being interpreted as ALT-GR on your machine.  A key remapper, changing that key to straight ALT, is the fastest way to achieve your stated goal.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  
The psychology of adultery has been falsified by conventional morals, which assume, in monogamous countries, that attraction to one person cannot co-exist with a serious affection for another.  Everybody knows that this is untrue. . .

           ~ Bertrand Russell

Jaws 2018 Mozilla firefox portable firefox 62.0 problem

O.Addison Gethers
 

Hello All,

 

I am trying to use Webvisum with Mozilla firefox portable 62.0 with jaws 2018 an windows 10.

When I press ctrl+alt+6while in the edit box, webvisum does not preform the ccaptcha?

Can someone please assist me?I using desktop and laptop computer window10

Thank you

Addison


Virus-free. www.avast.com

How to edit Outlook 2016 address autocompletion list

Delaunay Christophe
 

Hi all,

 

I’m using Jaws 2019 on a windows7-64 based computer.

 

Does anyone know whether there is an accessible way to remove old, (obsolete), addresses from the Outlook 2016 autocompletion list please?

 

Many thanks in advance. Have a nice day. Chris D

Re: $100 for a new computer?

 

It’s not the media keys and such which cost money but the fact whether you buy a mechanical keyboard or not. Mechanical keyboards are what many of us would call the old style IBM type keyboards. They are relatively heavy and only few of them exist in wireless form (Logitech does make a wireless mechanical gaming keyboard). Many of these also are sold as “gaming keyboards” and each key has a small mechanical switch and one of the most well-known among those is the Cherry MX switch, below is an article for those who are interested which explains its history and different types:

 

An introduction to Cherry MX mechanical switches

 

Mechanical keyboards are defined by their switches. In the Filco Majestouch-2 and many others, it is Cherry MX switches that are used. In this article, we’ll look at the many different kinds of Cherry switches on the market and see how they compare to one another.

 

A potted history of Cherry

Cherry Corporation was founded in the United States in 1953 and started producing keyboards in 1967, making them the oldest keyboard manufacturer in the world that’s still in business. The company was moved to Germany in 1967 and bought by ZF Friedrichshafen AG in 2008, but keyboards and mechanical switches are still produced under the Cherry brand.

Their most popular line of switches, the Cherry MX series, was introduced around 1985. These switches are usually referenced by their physical colour, with each colour denoting the switch’s handling characteristics – whether it is clicky, whether it is tactile, and how much force is required to actuate the switch, in centi-Newtons (cN) or grams (g).

Now that we’ve explained a bit of the background information, we can have a look at the switches themselves – starting with the four most common varieties.

 

Linear switches

Linear switches have the simplest operation, moving straight up and down without any additional tactile feedback or loud clicking noise – we’ll come to these more complicated switches later on. There are two common types of linear switches – Black and Red.

 

Cherry MX Black switches were introduced in 1984, making them one of the older Cherry switches. They have a medium to high actuation force, at 60 cN, which means they are the stiffest of the four most common Cherry switches. These switches are used in point-of-sale stations, but typically aren’t considered ideal for typing due to their high weighting. They have found use in RTS video games, where the high weighting can prevent accidental key presses that might occur on less stiff switches. The stronger spring also means that they rebound faster, meaning they can be actuated quite quickly given enough force – although you may also find fatigue becomes more of a factor than with other switches.

 

Red Conversely, Cherry MX Red switches were only introduced in 2008 and are the most recent switch to be developed by the company. They have a low actuation force, at 45 cN – tied with Brown for the lowest of the four most common switches. Red switches have been marketed as a gaming switch, with the light weighting allowing for more rapid actuation, and have become increasingly common in gaming keyboards.

 

Tactile, non-clicky switches

Tactile switches provide, as the name suggests, additional tactile feedback as the key actuates. As you press the key down, there is a noticeable bump which lets you know that your key press has been registered.

 

Brown The most popular type of tactile, non-clicky switch is the Cherry MX Brown. This switch was introduced in 1994 as a special ‘ergo soft’ switch, but quickly became one of the most popular switches. Today, the majority of Filco keyboards are sold with Brown switches, as the switch is a good middle-of-the-road option appropriate for both typing and gaming. They are also ideal for typing in office environments, where a clicky switch might annoy some.

 

Tactile, clicky switches

Clicky switches add a deliberately louder ‘click’ sound to the existing tactile bump, allowing for greater typing feedback. This makes it easier to know that you’ve hit the activation point. This is achieved by a more complicated mechanism, with a blue plunger and a white slider. When the actuation point is reached, the slider is propelled to the bottom of the switch and the click noise is produced.

 

Blue

The Cherry MX Blue is the most common clicky switch, and was first made available in Filco keyboards in 2007. Blue switches are favoured by typists due to their tactile bump and audible click, but can be less suitable for gaming as the weighting is relatively high – 50 cN – and it is a bit harder to double tap, as the release point is above the actuation point. Blue switches are noticeably louder than other mechanical switches, which are already louder than rubber domes, so these switches can be a bit disruptive in close working conditions.

 

Less common Cherry MX switches

While the four switches listed above are found on the vast majority of mechanical keyboards with Cherry switches, quite a few other variants exist as well. We’ll cover these briefly.

 

• ClearSilent Red (Pink) switches are quieter variants of the linear MX Red switch, with rubber pieces inside that dampen the sound of the switch returning to its default position. The actuation force remains 45 cN.

• Speed Silver is a shortened version of the MX Red switch, actuating at 1.2mm instead of 2mm and with a total travel of 3.4mm compared to 4mm.

• Clear switches are a stiffer version of Brown switches, with a tactile bump and weighting of 65 cN.

• Grey  switches are used for space bars on Clear keyboards, with a weighting of 80 cN.

• Green switches are a stiffer version of Blue switches, with a tactile bump and audible click, weighted at 80 cN. It is primarily used for space bars.

• White switches are very similar to green switches, with modern versions being weighted the same (80 cN) but being slightly quieter.

• Super Black  switches are extra stiff (150 cN) linear switches designed for space bars on keyboards with Black switches.

• Dark Grey  switches are moderately more stiff linear (80 cN) switches designed for use as space bars on keyboards with Cherry MX Black switches.

• Cherry MX Lock  switches are locking linear switches that stay down until pressed again, typically used for Caps Lock and TTY lock in keyboards before the 1980s.

 

Conclusion

So there we have it – information on the various MX switches produced by Cherry and now ZF Electronics. I hope this has been useful – if you have any questions, feel free to share them in the comments below! You can also ask on Twitter or Facebook. Finally, if you’d like to pick up a few switches to play around

with, then you can do so on our switches page. Thanks for reading and have a good one

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David & his pack of dogs
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 10:38 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: $100 for a new computer?

 

Marty, years ago when I took my keyboard in to be fixed the tech said to get a new one would be far cheaper.  Because they would have to take all the keys out, dust them off then put them back together.  That was when keyboards were around $100 to buy.  Now, they are much cheaper.   One can get good ones on Amazon or Best Buy for around $30-50. If one shops around and look for sales on them, which happen all the time. Of course if one wants or needs an ergonomic or a fancy keyboard with media controls and other such bells and whistles, one could spend a lot of money, if that was what one really wanted to do.    

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Annabelle Susan Morison
Sent: April 23, 2019 10:02 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

 

This is a new keyboard. It's one of those ones with buckling springs rather than rubber domes. I got it in August of 2018, and I think it's really amazing.

 


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Marty Hutchings
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 8:01 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

Sounds like a lot of trouble to go through just to change one key.  How about a new keyboard.

 

Marty

 

From: Brian Vogel

Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 7:35 PM

Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

 

On Tue, Apr 23, 2019 at 08:11 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

and I get attacked by Marty's signature with its religious talk (I'm not religious, thank you),

Uh, no.  No one's signature "attacks you" or anyone else.  You are perfectly free to ignore them.

Back to the beginning, at least two of us have recommended you try a key remapper like SharpKeys or similar.  All appearances are that, for whatever reason, the output from your right ALT key is being interpreted as ALT-GR on your machine.  A key remapper, changing that key to straight ALT, is the fastest way to achieve your stated goal.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  
The psychology of adultery has been falsified by conventional morals, which assume, in monogamous countries, that attraction to one person cannot co-exist with a serious affection for another.  Everybody knows that this is untrue. . .

           ~ Bertrand Russell

Re: $100 for a new computer?

David & his pack of dogs
 

Marty, years ago when I took my keyboard in to be fixed the tech said to get a new one would be far cheaper.  Because they would have to take all the keys out, dust them off then put them back together.  That was when keyboards were around $100 to buy.  Now, they are much cheaper.   One can get good ones on Amazon or Best Buy for around $30-50. If one shops around and look for sales on them, which happen all the time. Of course if one wants or needs an ergonomic or a fancy keyboard with media controls and other such bells and whistles, one could spend a lot of money, if that was what one really wanted to do.    

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Annabelle Susan Morison
Sent: April 23, 2019 10:02 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

 

This is a new keyboard. It's one of those ones with buckling springs rather than rubber domes. I got it in August of 2018, and I think it's really amazing.

 


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Marty Hutchings
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 8:01 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

Sounds like a lot of trouble to go through just to change one key.  How about a new keyboard.

 

Marty

 

Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 7:35 PM

Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

 

On Tue, Apr 23, 2019 at 08:11 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

and I get attacked by Marty's signature with its religious talk (I'm not religious, thank you),

Uh, no.  No one's signature "attacks you" or anyone else.  You are perfectly free to ignore them.

Back to the beginning, at least two of us have recommended you try a key remapper like SharpKeys or similar.  All appearances are that, for whatever reason, the output from your right ALT key is being interpreted as ALT-GR on your machine.  A key remapper, changing that key to straight ALT, is the fastest way to achieve your stated goal.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  
The psychology of adultery has been falsified by conventional morals, which assume, in monogamous countries, that attraction to one person cannot co-exist with a serious affection for another.  Everybody knows that this is untrue. . .

           ~ Bertrand Russell

Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

Annabelle Susan Morison
 


This is a new keyboard. It's one of those ones with buckling springs rather than rubber domes. I got it in August of 2018, and I think it's really amazing.



From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Marty Hutchings
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 8:01 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

Sounds like a lot of trouble to go through just to change one key.  How about a new keyboard.
 
Marty
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 7:35 PM
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys
 
On Tue, Apr 23, 2019 at 08:11 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:
and I get attacked by Marty's signature with its religious talk (I'm not religious, thank you),
Uh, no.  No one's signature "attacks you" or anyone else.  You are perfectly free to ignore them.

Back to the beginning, at least two of us have recommended you try a key remapper like SharpKeys or similar.  All appearances are that, for whatever reason, the output from your right ALT key is being interpreted as ALT-GR on your machine.  A key remapper, changing that key to straight ALT, is the fastest way to achieve your stated goal.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  
The psychology of adultery has been falsified by conventional morals, which assume, in monogamous countries, that attraction to one person cannot co-exist with a serious affection for another.  Everybody knows that this is untrue. . .

           ~ Bertrand Russell

Re: One note and JAWS

 

Which Office 2016? The retail or subscription version? Jaws will work better with the subscription version and while I can’t really say too much being on the Jaws private Beta, well, I just can’t say too much.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Maurine Park
Sent: Monday, April 22, 2019 11:22 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: One note and JAWS

 

Hello,

I’m using JAWS 19 with one note 2016.

I’m wondering if there’s any work arounds for the 2 applications not working well together? I’m using one note with my ipad and iphone both running voice over and having no issues.

I’d appreciate any feedback.

Thanks,

 

 

Maurine Park

Assistive Technology Instructor in Training

E-mail park@...

Google privacy.

Randy Barnett
 

Google privacy settings.
Google privacy.
If you haven't looked at your Google settings lately you may want to. I noticed today that there is all kinds of personal settings that can be changed
now. It was a little surprising to see how much google was saving to use for advertising and 3rd parties.

Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

Randy Barnett
 

That is not an uncommon price for a good keyboard and Annabell has a nice american made one so it wasnt cheap.

On 4/23/2019 8:13 PM, Marty Hutchings wrote:
Wow, $80 for a keyboard.  I’ve got at least 3 of them just sitting around here collecting dust.
 
Love in Christ
Marty
For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the powers, against the world forces of this darkness, against the spiritual forces of wickedness in the heavenly places.
Therefore, take up the full armor of God, so that you will be able to resist in the evil day, and having done everything, to stand firm.
Ephesians 6:12, 13
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 10:03 PM
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys
 
On Tue, Apr 23, 2019 at 11:01 PM, Marty Hutchings wrote:
Sounds like a lot of trouble to go through just to change one key.
Takes all of 5 minutes, and costs nothing.  After I've plonked down over $80 for a keyboard, I would gladly use a key remapper.  They get used with some frequency, particularly when assistive technology is involved.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  
The psychology of adultery has been falsified by conventional morals, which assume, in monogamous countries, that attraction to one person cannot co-exist with a serious affection for another.  Everybody knows that this is untrue. . .

           ~ Bertrand Russell


Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

Marty Hutchings
 

Wow, $80 for a keyboard.  I’ve got at least 3 of them just sitting around here collecting dust.
 
Love in Christ
Marty
For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the powers, against the world forces of this darkness, against the spiritual forces of wickedness in the heavenly places.
Therefore, take up the full armor of God, so that you will be able to resist in the evil day, and having done everything, to stand firm.
Ephesians 6:12, 13
 

Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 10:03 PM
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys
 
On Tue, Apr 23, 2019 at 11:01 PM, Marty Hutchings wrote:
Sounds like a lot of trouble to go through just to change one key.
Takes all of 5 minutes, and costs nothing.  After I've plonked down over $80 for a keyboard, I would gladly use a key remapper.  They get used with some frequency, particularly when assistive technology is involved.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  
The psychology of adultery has been falsified by conventional morals, which assume, in monogamous countries, that attraction to one person cannot co-exist with a serious affection for another.  Everybody knows that this is untrue. . .

           ~ Bertrand Russell

Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

 

On Tue, Apr 23, 2019 at 11:01 PM, Marty Hutchings wrote:
Sounds like a lot of trouble to go through just to change one key. 
Takes all of 5 minutes, and costs nothing.  After I've plonked down over $80 for a keyboard, I would gladly use a key remapper.  They get used with some frequency, particularly when assistive technology is involved.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  
The psychology of adultery has been falsified by conventional morals, which assume, in monogamous countries, that attraction to one person cannot co-exist with a serious affection for another.  Everybody knows that this is untrue. . .

           ~ Bertrand Russell

Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys

Marty Hutchings
 

Sounds like a lot of trouble to go through just to change one key.  How about a new keyboard.
 
Love in Christ
Marty
For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the powers, against the world forces of this darkness, against the spiritual forces of wickedness in the heavenly places.
Therefore, take up the full armor of God, so that you will be able to resist in the evil day, and having done everything, to stand firm.
Ephesians 6:12, 13
 

Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 7:35 PM
Subject: Re: Trouble With Right Alt+Arrow Keys
 
On Tue, Apr 23, 2019 at 08:11 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:
and I get attacked by Marty's signature with its religious talk (I'm not religious, thank you),
Uh, no.  No one's signature "attacks you" or anyone else.  You are perfectly free to ignore them.

Back to the beginning, at least two of us have recommended you try a key remapper like SharpKeys or similar.  All appearances are that, for whatever reason, the output from your right ALT key is being interpreted as ALT-GR on your machine.  A key remapper, changing that key to straight ALT, is the fastest way to achieve your stated goal.
 
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Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  
The psychology of adultery has been falsified by conventional morals, which assume, in monogamous countries, that attraction to one person cannot co-exist with a serious affection for another.  Everybody knows that this is untrue. . .

           ~ Bertrand Russell