Date   
moderated Re: Audio files question

Marty Hutchings
 

David, Can you download the files by Right click or Application key for context menu and down arrow to Save file as? If so, then you can play the files in your favorite media player.



Love in Christ
Marty
For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the powers, against the world forces of this darkness, against the spiritual forces of wickedness in the heavenly places.
Therefore, take up the full armor of God, so that you will be able to resist in the evil day, and having done everything, to stand firm.
Ephesians 6:12, 13

-----Original Message-----
From: David Pearson
Sent: Sunday, September 01, 2019 2:56 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Audio files question

Hello list:

I have an e-mail containing a link to a website containing a collection of 5
audio files. I can go to the website, and play the files, but was wondering
if there's a way to pause playing, and then continue from that point using
only keyboard commands as it sometimes gets noisy when the AC unit comes on,
which makes me feel like I'm in the "Wizard of Oz".

Lastly, is there also a method to fast forward or rewind these files once
they've started playing? Been told that there's a pause button on monitor
screen. Don't know exactly what type files these are, they're described
simply as "Audio files".

Sincerely,



David S. Pearson

moderated Re: Audio files question

 

Are you able to share the web page address?   It's impossible to know what controls a given site may, or may not, give you.   There are scads of web audio player options out there, and it entirely depends on which one is in use.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer

moderated Audio files question

David Pearson
 

Hello list:

I have an e-mail containing a link to a website containing a collection of 5 audio files. I can go to the website, and play the files, but was wondering if there's a way to pause playing, and then continue from that point using only keyboard commands as it sometimes gets noisy when the AC unit comes on, which makes me feel like I'm in the "Wizard of Oz".

Lastly, is there also a method to fast forward or rewind these files once they've started playing? Been told that there's a pause button on monitor screen. Don't know exactly what type files these are, they're described simply as "Audio files".

Sincerely,



David S. Pearson

moderated Accessible Server Software

Robbie Curtis
 

Hey Yall,


Can anyone direct me to an accessible local server software? Thanks.

--
Robbie J. Curtis
essence64@...
"Stay in peace, not pieces!"


---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com

moderated Re: Windows updates

 

Jim,

           Thank you for mentioning the row/column header feature of Excel.   I have been trying to get folks to use this for a long time now both because it's permanent and it is screen reader agnostic as well.

Excel - Assigning a Title Row or Column.docx
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer

moderated jaws access to lastpass

John Covici
 

Hi. Anyone on here use lastpass? I am finding it a real pita and
some things seem not to work at all, like autofilling. I am using it
with crome now. My main problem is that it seems inaccessible with
the keyboard and difficult even with the mouse when I go into my
vault.


Any assistance would be appreciated.

--
Your life is like a penny. You're going to lose it. The question is:
How do
you spend it?

John Covici wb2una
covici@...

moderated Re: Windows updates

Jim Pursley
 

I didn't see an answer to your Excel question.  I  think that since beginning with JAWS 2018 column and row headers in Excel are managed through the ribbon menus or, more handily, on the applications key adjacent to the right control key.  The new method is taken from Excel itself and offers a permanent fix.   When in Excel position the cursor on the intersection of row and column (upper left corner).  Hit the applications key and arrow upward maybe four positions to Define Name.  Hit enter and type titleregion1..()and your right hand corner ending cell address).  This command sets the range of the rows and columns you are trying to hear.  tab through the other positions and hit OK.  Your headers should read normally.  When you save the spreadsheet you will save your column and row header verbosity.  Occasionally as in an older Excel spreadsheet the applications key won't have the Define Name option.  You'll need to go into the formulas menu and arrow down to Define Name and put the info mentioned above in the Name Manager.


Note that you can label the headings in a spreadsheet with multiple regions by specifying the far upper left and far lower right cell coordinates of each region.  Just position your cursor on the upper left intersection of row and column.


Earlier versions of JAWS used alt + control and R or C to specify row and column headers in addition to Quick Settings.   The R and C keystroke combo no longer works well in JAWS 2019 and above, maybe not in 2018 either; I don't recall when the changeover occurred.


The new method is vastly superior to any of the older methods as it's a permanent (until deleted) setting for your spreadsheet.  A spreadsheet originator can define names, too, so the readers need not go through the exercise.

On 8/31/2019 8:58 PM, Denise J Moses wrote:

How do I find out what version of Windows I have?  Is there a way to turn off automatic updates?  Every time it updates it screws up something with JAWS.  Now in Excel I can’t get it to read the title name of each column.  I go under quick settings & turn it on but it won’t stay checked on.  I am using the latest version of JAWS 2018 with Windows 10.

Thank you for the help.

Denise

moderated Re: Windows updates

 

Hi,

This is more so now for two reasons:

  • Windows 7 and 8.1: numerous security flaws, along with Microsoft requiring everyone to install signed updates from now on to harden security.
  • Windows 10: security issues with unsupported feature updates (and even on supported ones) and due to the nature of Windows as a Service. This November, Version 1803 (April 2018 Update), considered one of the stable feature updates in recent memory, will go out of support for millions of consumers.

 

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jason White via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, September 1, 2019 9:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

It’s also important to recognize that those who delay the installation of updates are more vulnerable to the exploitation of security issues that are fixed by the updates.

 

From: <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Reply-To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Date: Sunday, September 1, 2019 at 11:17
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

On Sat, Aug 31, 2019 at 10:26 PM, Denise J Moses wrote:

Does it not update until you restart your computer or does it do it if you aren’t around to tell it what to do?

Denise, what I suggest is the next time this message comes up that you take the time to read the entire message text, as there have been (and probably will continue to be) some changes recently.

In virtually all cases, it will tell you that a restart is required and that you can elect to restart now or, if you don't, the computer will restart itself outside active hours.   You set active hours in Settings, Update & Security, Windows Update pane.   If you're on Version 1903 there is a button for Change active hours, if memory serves prior to 1903 it is a link that has the same click-through text as the button does.   If either is activated, you are taken to a dialog where you tell Windows the hours during which you do not ever want the computer to restart itself for an update if a restart is required.   It will only restart itself outside those hours.   Personally, I very seldom wait for the automatic restart outside of active hours.  I prefer to gracefully close what I'm doing if that's reasonable and do the restart myself.

Also, with the advent of Version 1903 you get a lot more control over updates in general.   Right now there is an optional cumulative update (KB4152941) that has a Download and Install link on the Windows Update pane not unlike what's being presented for Feature Updates now, which allows the user to decide if they want to do exactly what the link says.

Mind you, if you put off updates again and again and again there will come a time when they will be applied automatically by Windows.   This is part and parcel of Windows as a Service and, as a service technician, I strongly support that measure by Microsoft.   A huge number of the smoldering heaps of what remained of systems I have been called to fix in the era prior to Windows 10 could be traced to having blocked updates, many of which are essential.   It's never been put better than this:

There really isn't a point to checking for updates and not installing them. . .  It's important to install all available updates. I've been doing this since the days of DOS, and I still don't have the confidence to pick and choose among updates.  There are just too many variables involved - and most people can't evaluate the full consequences of installing/not installing updates.

        ~ John Carrona, AKA usasma on BleepingComputer.com, http://www.carrona.org/

Also, if you are having repeated issues after updates are applied, that strongly suggests issues in your current Windows 10 installation that need to be addressed.   The easiest way to do this, though it is work, is to do a completely clean reinstall of Windows 10 so that you know you have a solid foundation upon which ongoing updates can be placed:

           a) Completely Clean Win10 (Re)install Using MCT to Download Win10 ISO File

           b) Completely Clean Win10 (Re)install Using MCT to Create a Bootable USB Drive

It's a major effort at the outset, but it makes life so much easier going forward that it's very much worth doing.

 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer

moderated Re: Windows updates

Jason White
 

It’s also important to recognize that those who delay the installation of updates are more vulnerable to the exploitation of security issues that are fixed by the updates.

 

From: <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Reply-To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Date: Sunday, September 1, 2019 at 11:17
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

On Sat, Aug 31, 2019 at 10:26 PM, Denise J Moses wrote:

Does it not update until you restart your computer or does it do it if you aren’t around to tell it what to do?

Denise, what I suggest is the next time this message comes up that you take the time to read the entire message text, as there have been (and probably will continue to be) some changes recently.

In virtually all cases, it will tell you that a restart is required and that you can elect to restart now or, if you don't, the computer will restart itself outside active hours.   You set active hours in Settings, Update & Security, Windows Update pane.   If you're on Version 1903 there is a button for Change active hours, if memory serves prior to 1903 it is a link that has the same click-through text as the button does.   If either is activated, you are taken to a dialog where you tell Windows the hours during which you do not ever want the computer to restart itself for an update if a restart is required.   It will only restart itself outside those hours.   Personally, I very seldom wait for the automatic restart outside of active hours.  I prefer to gracefully close what I'm doing if that's reasonable and do the restart myself.

Also, with the advent of Version 1903 you get a lot more control over updates in general.   Right now there is an optional cumulative update (KB4152941) that has a Download and Install link on the Windows Update pane not unlike what's being presented for Feature Updates now, which allows the user to decide if they want to do exactly what the link says.

Mind you, if you put off updates again and again and again there will come a time when they will be applied automatically by Windows.   This is part and parcel of Windows as a Service and, as a service technician, I strongly support that measure by Microsoft.   A huge number of the smoldering heaps of what remained of systems I have been called to fix in the era prior to Windows 10 could be traced to having blocked updates, many of which are essential.   It's never been put better than this:

There really isn't a point to checking for updates and not installing them. . .  It's important to install all available updates. I've been doing this since the days of DOS, and I still don't have the confidence to pick and choose among updates.  There are just too many variables involved - and most people can't evaluate the full consequences of installing/not installing updates.

        ~ John Carrona, AKA usasma on BleepingComputer.com, http://www.carrona.org/

Also, if you are having repeated issues after updates are applied, that strongly suggests issues in your current Windows 10 installation that need to be addressed.   The easiest way to do this, though it is work, is to do a completely clean reinstall of Windows 10 so that you know you have a solid foundation upon which ongoing updates can be placed:

           a) Completely Clean Win10 (Re)install Using MCT to Download Win10 ISO File

           b) Completely Clean Win10 (Re)install Using MCT to Create a Bootable USB Drive

It's a major effort at the outset, but it makes life so much easier going forward that it's very much worth doing.

 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer

moderated Re: Windows updates

 

On Sat, Aug 31, 2019 at 10:26 PM, Denise J Moses wrote:
Does it not update until you restart your computer or does it do it if you aren’t around to tell it what to do?
Denise, what I suggest is the next time this message comes up that you take the time to read the entire message text, as there have been (and probably will continue to be) some changes recently.

In virtually all cases, it will tell you that a restart is required and that you can elect to restart now or, if you don't, the computer will restart itself outside active hours.   You set active hours in Settings, Update & Security, Windows Update pane.   If you're on Version 1903 there is a button for Change active hours, if memory serves prior to 1903 it is a link that has the same click-through text as the button does.   If either is activated, you are taken to a dialog where you tell Windows the hours during which you do not ever want the computer to restart itself for an update if a restart is required.   It will only restart itself outside those hours.   Personally, I very seldom wait for the automatic restart outside of active hours.  I prefer to gracefully close what I'm doing if that's reasonable and do the restart myself.

Also, with the advent of Version 1903 you get a lot more control over updates in general.   Right now there is an optional cumulative update (KB4152941) that has a Download and Install link on the Windows Update pane not unlike what's being presented for Feature Updates now, which allows the user to decide if they want to do exactly what the link says.

Mind you, if you put off updates again and again and again there will come a time when they will be applied automatically by Windows.   This is part and parcel of Windows as a Service and, as a service technician, I strongly support that measure by Microsoft.   A huge number of the smoldering heaps of what remained of systems I have been called to fix in the era prior to Windows 10 could be traced to having blocked updates, many of which are essential.   It's never been put better than this:

There really isn't a point to checking for updates and not installing them. . .  It's important to install all available updates. I've been doing this since the days of DOS, and I still don't have the confidence to pick and choose among updates.  There are just too many variables involved - and most people can't evaluate the full consequences of installing/not installing updates.

        ~ John Carrona, AKA usasma on BleepingComputer.com, http://www.carrona.org/

Also, if you are having repeated issues after updates are applied, that strongly suggests issues in your current Windows 10 installation that need to be addressed.   The easiest way to do this, though it is work, is to do a completely clean reinstall of Windows 10 so that you know you have a solid foundation upon which ongoing updates can be placed:

           a) Completely Clean Win10 (Re)install Using MCT to Download Win10 ISO File

           b) Completely Clean Win10 (Re)install Using MCT to Create a Bootable USB Drive

It's a major effort at the outset, but it makes life so much easier going forward that it's very much worth doing.

 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer

moderated Re: Windows updates

Jason White
 

I have a laptop from Lenovo that is running Windows 10 Pro for Workstations. So far, I’ve had no problems with Windows updates.

 

I keep Windows up to date. I also keep the firmware and drivers up to date via the Lenovo Vantage tool. I make sure that JAWS and NVDA are both running the latest versions; the same for Office 365 and Web browsers such as Chrome.

 

I don’t know how long my good luck will last, but it’s holding so far. I am not running Insider versions, as I don’t want to be a beta tester on this machine.

 

From: <main@jfw.groups.io> on behalf of Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...>
Reply-To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Date: Saturday, August 31, 2019 at 23:35
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

Hi,

And it could get a bit easy… or rather, a bit hard to explain the ins and outs of recent changes, because we (Windows Insiders) are dealing with not one, not two, but three preview build series at once. Basically, not everyone on a given cohort (ring) are testing Version 1909 features, and if they do, they can’t switch to other preview cohort. This is because of the nature of Version 1909: it’ll be a different build number than Version 1903, but as far as servicing goes, it’ll be identical to 1903; a given cumulative update package for both releases will be able to resolve bugs in both releases at the same time. The difference comes down to internal flags used to enable or disable 1909 specific features, the most obvious feature for screen reader users being the ability to mute notification sound without resorting to enabling focus assist.

As for an update and restart notification: yes, Windows will notify you.

As for turning off updates through various means: no, not even a stock installation of Pro will do it; you need Enterprise or Education, or get a Pro machine hooked up to a Windows Server domain where updates are distributed by computers running Windows Server operating systems (via Windows Server Update Services or System Center Configuration Manager). As far as editions go, Pro is considered a “consumer-level product” – additional features on top of Home, such as ability to join a Windows Server domain, Hyper-V, and as of version 1903, Windows Sandbox. Just like Home, a given feature update for Pro will get 18 months of support, by end of which you will find your computer is running whichever feature update is out by then; as someone stated best, “you’ll get the inevitable”. On the other hand, Enterprise and Education will get at least 18 months (note the difference in my phrasing); that is, some feature updates will get 18 months of support, while others will get a longer support duration; there is a specialized version of Enterprise that will see a feature update supported for up to ten years, but that is because Enterprise LTSC (long-term servicing channel) is meant for mission-critical devices.

As for updates messing up JAWS settings: multiple factors might be involved, including hardware drivers, JAWS not reacting to change quickly enough, or Vispero knowing about bugs but needing time to resolve and test fixes. Part of the reason why you get frequent JAWS updates is to keep up with changes, which is happening in a flash; the flash will go off faster on Insider Preview builds because things come and go without notice (if you want proof, just follow me on Twitter; I guarantee that almost every week, you’ll see me post announcements about Preview builds and some assistive technologies).

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, August 31, 2019 6:16 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

You can't permanently turn off updates regardless of the version you're running (if you're a consumer, not a government or similar).

As of version 1903, all editions of Windows 10 give quite a bit more control about how and when updates are downloaded and applied.  What I find perversely funny is now that the control (or at least a large part of it) that many were crying for has been given, there is now an equally vocal group decrying the fact that updates are not as automatic as they were in earlier versions of Windows 10.

When it comes to update methodology, Microsoft is damned if they do and damned if they don't.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer

moderated List Rules - Sun, 09/01/2019 #cal-notice

main@jfw.groups.io Calendar <noreply@...>
 

List Rules

When:
Sunday, 1 September 2019
12:00am to 1:00am
(GMT-04:00) America/New York

Description:
The following is the current version of the JFW Mailing List policies. These are sent out monthly, and also available from:

http://groups.io/g/jfw/wiki/List-Policies 

 

**List Policies**

1: Keep it clean. We're a family list, and there are people here who probably don't want to hear everything *exactly* that's running through your head. If you wouldn't see it on TV, it doesn't belong in a post to the list. If you're not sure, email the administration before you post it to the list. Otherwise, you stand to see your posts moderated.

2: Stay on topic. We're a JFW-oriented list. That said, anything related to JFW, its functionality with programs etc is acceptable. If it doesn't have to do with JFW, it doesn't belong on the list. This includes, but isn't limited to, talk of other screen readers such as Window Eyes.

3: Listen to, and respect, the wishes of the admins/moderators. If you're asked by an admin or moderator to drop a subject, or take something to private emails (in the instance of two people carrying on a thread list-wide), please do so. If the subject is changed on a thread by an admin or moderator, it will be explained why in the email sent out with it. Please don't continue replying to the old subject.

4: Don't ask over the list for a position on the list administration. If you'd like to help out, it's of course welcome, but address the request to do so to the admin team, otherwise it'll be ignored. Requests are always welcome, whether help is being looked for or not. When help is needed, a post will be made to the list. The requests already received will be kept in mind.

5: Keep flaming to a minimum. This is not limited to flaming of each other, but goes beyond that, to flaming of products, opinions, ideas, suggestions, etc. Constructive criticism never hurts. Flame wars, especially public ones, both drive people from this list and are unwelcome here. either take the problem to private emails, or report the problem to list administration.

6. Respect the opinions and views of others. This is *very* important in any environment, most especially an online environment where the only gage one has on a person is what that person puts to writing. If you come off as hostile in your posting, whether you intended to or not, people will take it as such. Online, "face value" means just that. People make mistakes, people don't always have access to the same information you do. For that matter, people don't always have the same experience you do. If you know how someone can solve their problem, great. Suggest it to them and/or the list. Do *not* proceed to tell someone, on or off list, that they have no business posting. Repeat offenders of this particular rule will be banned for a week to 30 days, depending on the severity. Serious problems will be banned permanently.

As always, if there are problems or questions with regards these policies, don't hesitate to send them off-list to jfw+owner@groups.io

James,
List Admin
 

moderated Re: Windows updates

 

Hi,

And it could get a bit easy… or rather, a bit hard to explain the ins and outs of recent changes, because we (Windows Insiders) are dealing with not one, not two, but three preview build series at once. Basically, not everyone on a given cohort (ring) are testing Version 1909 features, and if they do, they can’t switch to other preview cohort. This is because of the nature of Version 1909: it’ll be a different build number than Version 1903, but as far as servicing goes, it’ll be identical to 1903; a given cumulative update package for both releases will be able to resolve bugs in both releases at the same time. The difference comes down to internal flags used to enable or disable 1909 specific features, the most obvious feature for screen reader users being the ability to mute notification sound without resorting to enabling focus assist.

As for an update and restart notification: yes, Windows will notify you.

As for turning off updates through various means: no, not even a stock installation of Pro will do it; you need Enterprise or Education, or get a Pro machine hooked up to a Windows Server domain where updates are distributed by computers running Windows Server operating systems (via Windows Server Update Services or System Center Configuration Manager). As far as editions go, Pro is considered a “consumer-level product” – additional features on top of Home, such as ability to join a Windows Server domain, Hyper-V, and as of version 1903, Windows Sandbox. Just like Home, a given feature update for Pro will get 18 months of support, by end of which you will find your computer is running whichever feature update is out by then; as someone stated best, “you’ll get the inevitable”. On the other hand, Enterprise and Education will get at least 18 months (note the difference in my phrasing); that is, some feature updates will get 18 months of support, while others will get a longer support duration; there is a specialized version of Enterprise that will see a feature update supported for up to ten years, but that is because Enterprise LTSC (long-term servicing channel) is meant for mission-critical devices.

As for updates messing up JAWS settings: multiple factors might be involved, including hardware drivers, JAWS not reacting to change quickly enough, or Vispero knowing about bugs but needing time to resolve and test fixes. Part of the reason why you get frequent JAWS updates is to keep up with changes, which is happening in a flash; the flash will go off faster on Insider Preview builds because things come and go without notice (if you want proof, just follow me on Twitter; I guarantee that almost every week, you’ll see me post announcements about Preview builds and some assistive technologies).

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, August 31, 2019 6:16 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

You can't permanently turn off updates regardless of the version you're running (if you're a consumer, not a government or similar).

As of version 1903, all editions of Windows 10 give quite a bit more control about how and when updates are downloaded and applied.  What I find perversely funny is now that the control (or at least a large part of it) that many were crying for has been given, there is now an equally vocal group decrying the fact that updates are not as automatic as they were in earlier versions of Windows 10.

When it comes to update methodology, Microsoft is damned if they do and damned if they don't.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer

moderated Re: Windows updates

Denise J Moses
 

Brian,

 

Thank you for the directions to find out the Windows version.  I tried it & got it.  I am using Office 16.  Do you get Windows notifications when they are going to updates?  Sometimes I am on the computer & something pops up to tell me there is an update & I can restart to update.  Does it not update until you restart your computer or does it do it if you aren’t around to tell it what to do?

Denise

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, August 31, 2019 6:17 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

To find out what Version and Build of Windows 10 you're running hit the Windows Key and immediately type winver then hit Enter.  If you prefer, you can hit WinKey+R and enter winver in run box then hit enter.

Turning off automatic updates is a very, very bad idea.

What version of Office are you using?  
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer

moderated Re: Windows updates

 

You can't permanently turn off updates regardless of the version you're running (if you're a consumer, not a government or similar).

As of version 1903, all editions of Windows 10 give quite a bit more control about how and when updates are downloaded and applied.  What I find perversely funny is now that the control (or at least a large part of it) that many were crying for has been given, there is now an equally vocal group decrying the fact that updates are not as automatic as they were in earlier versions of Windows 10.

When it comes to update methodology, Microsoft is damned if they do and damned if they don't.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer

moderated Re: cannot reinstall JAWS 2019 on Windows 10

Maria Reyes
 

I agree. there should be only 1 list for Jaws.

On Aug 27, 2019, at 7:17 PM, Randy Barnett <blindmansbluff09@...> wrote:

Well at least you didnt have to re-install windows...
On 8/27/2019 3:56 PM, Orlando Enrique Fiol via Groups.Io wrote:
At 04:51 PM 8/27/2019, Randy Barnett wrote:
did you delete all folders for jaws, including the ones in program folders, program folder x86 and app data?
I sure did. But that didn't help. What helped was reversing all of Winaero Tweaker''s changes.


Orlando Enrique Fiol




moderated Re: Windows updates

James Homuth
 

You also don’t get to actually turn off automatic updates unless you’re running I believe it’s pro. The Win10 home laptop I have access to (not mine, but I helped set it up) only gives you the option of delaying the inevitable.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: August-31-19 8:17 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Windows updates

 

To find out what Version and Build of Windows 10 you're running hit the Windows Key and immediately type winver then hit Enter.  If you prefer, you can hit WinKey+R and enter winver in run box then hit enter.

Turning off automatic updates is a very, very bad idea.

What version of Office are you using?  
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer

moderated Re: Windows updates

 

To find out what Version and Build of Windows 10 you're running hit the Windows Key and immediately type winver then hit Enter.  If you prefer, you can hit WinKey+R and enter winver in run box then hit enter.

Turning off automatic updates is a very, very bad idea.

What version of Office are you using?  
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1903, Build 18362  

Many of the insights of the saint stem from his experience as a sinner.

         ~ Eric Hoffer

moderated Windows updates

Denise J Moses
 

How do I find out what version of Windows I have?  Is there a way to turn off automatic updates?  Every time it updates it screws up something with JAWS.  Now in Excel I can’t get it to read the title name of each column.  I go under quick settings & turn it on but it won’t stay checked on.  I am using the latest version of JAWS 2018 with Windows 10.

Thank you for the help.

Denise

moderated solving captchas

netbat66
 

usually this only works if the web server is useing the google captcha engine. but not all sites use google. many have developed there own captcha engine and it wouldn't by pass it
the servers that do will have a varify button when you are logged into your google account before you go to them.

-----Original Message-----
From: Andy
Sent: Saturday, August 31, 2019 12:15 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Which Browser Works Best With JAWS?


This seems to be the case for me. I just check the "I am not a robot" box and am passed through to the web site.

Andy


----- Original Message -----
From: Sharon
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Sent: Saturday, August 31, 2019 10:56 AM
Subject: Re: Which Browser Works Best With JAWS?


re-captcha thing?

You mean there is a way to do that if you are always signed into Google?

Sharon





From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of JM Casey
Sent: Saturday, August 31, 2019 12:55 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Which Browser Works Best With JAWS?





I agree with most everything you’ve said, but I would just add that there isn’t really a universal answer to the OP. You should really have Chrome and Firefox on your system and use them both as needed. Really not enough difference in how you actually *operate* each browser to claim that there isa disadvantage in having and using both of them.



I mostly use Firefox as well, but some sites do work better in Chrome. Youtube is *much* more responsive in Chrome on my Windows 10 machine, for instance, and yes, it’sa google service, so I suppose that makes sense. Being signed in all the time is alright if you need to use the re-captcha thing. But therea re indeed privacy concerns that make me lean a little heavier on firefox, even though it is not quite as snappy and really takes forever to load very large pages into JAWS virtual buffer (not 100% sure that is the issue, but it’s definitely a pain).

Anyway, tldr: use both of them.









From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Csercsics
Sent: August 31, 2019 10:03 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Which Browser Works Best With JAWS?





I like the new edge, but firefox murders it for customization. So if you’re the type that likes to tweak your browsing experience, firefox, otherwise the new edge dev is really stable, and I could recommend it. There’s also the edge beta channel. I tried Chrome for a bit when I had Android, but I find I don’t need the sync features anymore since I don’t really browse the web on mobile anyway, because I just don’t like touch screens that much, and I don’t need to be constantly signed into google services. But if you need google services extensively, then chrome is great. I haven’t found much that doesn’t work with Firefox, at least nothing that doesn’t work off the top of my head, so I wouldn’t worry too much about compatibility, but if you care about monopolies, or privacy or customization or keyboard shortcuts, then firefox is probably still winning for you. Hopefully this helps out a bit.