Date   

Re: Correction: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown Menu To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Daniel McBride
 

Mark:

How does one do this in Windows 7?

Daniel

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2015 10:57 AM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Mark
Subject: Correction: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8
Shutdown Menu To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Hello Everyone,

Joe is quite correct. I did use the incorrect term to describe how to truly
shut down a computer.

I should never compose emails after 11:00pm (smile).

Below you will find the steps as previously posted but with the correct
terminology. I apologize for any confusion I may have caused.

By the way, as to the question of should one disable the Fast-Startup
feature; the only reason this topic got on-list was because someone asked
why Jaws kept announcing itself when she/he shut down the PC.

The following steps will work in both Windows 10 and Windows 8.x in order to
disable the Fast-startup option. Doing this will allow your computer to
truly be shut-down as it was in Windows 7 and earlier.

To disable Fast-startup, do the following:

1.
Access Windows 10 Power Options. This can easily be achieved using several
methods:
a.
Right click in the lower left corner of the screen (or simultaneously press
the Windows + X keys). This will bring up an 'Admin' menu. Simply select
Power Options from that menu.
b.
From within the Desktop; navigate to Control Panel>Power Options.
Or c.
From within the Start Screen; type "power", click on Settings, and select
Power Options from the list of results:

2.
In the 'Power Options' window; click on Choose what the power buttons do
(from the left hand panel):

3.
In the new window; click on Change settings that are currently unavailable:

4.
Uncheck Fast-startup.

That's all there is to it.

Enjoy,

Mark


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Re: JAWS REPEATING

Adrian Spratt
 

I'm finding webpages load much faster now that I've given up on the automatic setting in forms mode and reverted to "Manual." It seems JAWS added several seconds to the loading process, and a lot more verbiage, as it figured out where to land on a forms field. Curiously, even with the "manual" setting, in many cases JAWS still takes me right to the field I want, and all I need do is press enter.

For anyone interested, these forms mode settings are in the JAWS key+v quick settings dialog.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Bissett, Tom via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2015 10:41 AM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Bissett, Tom
Subject: RE: JAWS REPEATING

I don't know if this is in all cases but I have observed that web pages often load from different sources. Each time a load from one of the sources completes the title is announced causing jaws to repeat the title several times depending on how many sources the page is being loaded from. As an example you go to a page with some standard text but has an advertisement loading from a different source, this will cause jaws to announce the title when the page is loaded and again when the ad is loaded.
Regards
Tom Bisset
-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of DALE HELTZER via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2015 10:35 AM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: DALE HELTZER
Subject: RE: JAWS REPEATING

I have had the same irritating experience.
Anyone else?



Dale E. Heltzer
deheltzer@msn.com

"A foolish consestency is tha hobgabljyn Qf littwe mjndz." - Ralph Waldo Emerson via Howard Ashby Kranz

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark Furness via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 12:59 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Mark Furness
Subject: JAWS REPEATING

Running latest jaws.
When I go to a web page, jaws speaks 3 times the beginning.

Why and is there a fix?

Thank you for saving my hearing!
Mark

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Correction: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown Menu To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Mark <facebookmark@...>
 

Hello Everyone,

Joe is quite correct. I did use the incorrect term to describe how to truly
shut down a computer.

I should never compose emails after 11:00pm (smile).

Below you will find the steps as previously posted but with the correct
terminology. I apologize for any confusion I may have caused.

By the way, as to the question of should one disable the Fast-Startup
feature; the only reason this topic got on-list was because someone asked
why Jaws kept announcing itself when she/he shut down the PC.

The following steps will work in both Windows 10 and Windows 8.x in order to
disable the Fast-startup option. Doing this will allow your computer to
truly be shut-down as it was in Windows 7 and earlier.

To disable Fast-startup, do the following:

1.
Access Windows 10 Power Options. This can easily be achieved using several
methods:
a.
Right click in the lower left corner of the screen (or simultaneously press
the Windows + X keys). This will bring up an 'Admin' menu. Simply select
Power Options from that menu.
b.
From within the Desktop; navigate to Control Panel>Power Options.
Or c.
From within the Start Screen; type "power", click on Settings, and select
Power Options from the list of results:

2.
In the 'Power Options' window; click on Choose what the power buttons do
(from the left hand panel):

3.
In the new window; click on Change settings that are currently unavailable:

4.
Uncheck Fast-startup.

That's all there is to it.

Enjoy,

Mark


Re: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown Menu To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

I was wondering the exact same thing.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Soronel Haetir via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2015 9:02 AM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list. <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Soronel Haetir <soronel.haetir@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown Menu To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

More to the point, given that fast shutdown still results in a system that is drawing no power (unlike a sleeping system which is still maintaining ram coherence) what exactly do you see as the downside to using it?

On 8/12/15, Mark Furness via Jfw <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com> wrote:
I followed your steps and I could not find “fast user switching.

Mark
On Aug 12, 2015, at 3:23 AM, Mark via Jfw <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com> wrote:

Hello Everyone,

The following steps will work in both Windows 10 and Windows 8.x in
order to disable the Fast-User switching option. Doing this will
allow your computer to truly be shut-down as it was in Windows 7 and
earlier.

To disable Fast-User Switching, do the following:

1.
Access Windows 10 Power Options. This can easily be achieved using
several
methods:
a.
Right click in the lower left corner of the screen (or simultaneously
press the Windows + X keys). This will bring up an 'Admin' menu.
Simply select Power Options from that menu.
b.
From within the Desktop; navigate to Control Panel>Power Options.
Or c.
From within the Start Screen; type "power", click on Settings, and
select Power Options from the list of results:

2.
In the 'Power Options' window; click on Choose what the power buttons
do (from the left hand panel):

3.
In the new window; click on Change settings that are currently
unavailable:

4.
Uncheck Fast user switching.

That's all there is to it.

Enjoy,

Mark


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--
Soronel Haetir
soronel.haetir@gmail.com

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Re: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown Menu To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Daniel McBride
 

Joe:

Do you recommend having fast start up on or off?

Dan

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Joseph Lee via
Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2015 4:07 AM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Joseph Lee
Subject: RE: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown
Menu To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Hi Debbie and list:
That's because Mark might have been confused in terminology: it's actually
called Fast Startup. Let me explain what it truly does (a bit technical
here, but will try to boil this down a bit):
When Windows boots, it needs to read in needed data one at a time in
multiple phases. First, whether you are booting into Safe Mode is
determined, then Windows kernel (the heart of the operating system), called
NTOSKrnl.exe (Windows NT Operating System Kernel) determines type of CPU,
amount of RAM, devices present and so on. Once the kernel is ready, it'll
ask the video card to display the Windows logo on screen, then other parts
of Windows responsible for loading user profiles will display a login prompt
(if configured to do so), and if the user successfully logs in, Windows will
start programs that will start automatically (including JAWS) and apply user
settings (this is collectively called a "session", and there is a subsystem
in Windows (called Session Manager Subsystem or SMSS.exe) that manages this;
when you use Windows, at least two sessions become active: session 0
(services) and session N (where N is the currently logged in user).
During shutdown, Windows will first close programs you were using, and if an
app does not respond, it'll pop up a dialog saying one or more apps are not
responding and ask if you wish to shutdown anyway (you may get this prompt
from time to time). Once the user logs off, Windows will terminate services
(including JAWS if told to run as a service), save user settings (including
registry changes) and turn your computer off completely. This is a full
startup/shutdown cycle.
As opposed to the above cycle, Microsoft has found a way to just turn off
user session (Windows 8.0 and later). When the computer shuts down, if Fast
Startup (technically called Hybrid Boot) is in use, Windows will log off the
user (save profiles, close programs, etc.), then the system services will
enter hibernation (where current physical memory content is stored on a
disk). Next time the computer boots, Windows system services will resume
from where they have left off, then users will be prompted to log in. This
is useful on newer computers which uses a newer firmware type called Unified
Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI), as the boot process is simpler than
older BIOS (Basic Input/Output System) firmware (I'll not go into details on
how these firmware boots, as this is too off topic here; ask me offlist) or
those using SSD's (Solid State Drives).
The reason why you hear "JAWS for Windows" when you turn off your computer
is because you have Fast Startup (or Hybrid Boot) turned on. To change this
behavior, follow Mark's instructions, but look for Fast Startup instead.
Hybrid Boot should not be confused with Fast User Switching (Windows XP and
later): Fast User Switching lets someone else log into your computer via a
different user account (provided there are multiple user accounts) without
stopping programs you were using (you'll be logged off first). On PC's
(client Windows versions), only one user can use the computer at a time, but
on server systems, multiple users can log in simultaneously (this includes
Remote Desktop accounts).
References:
Full startup/shutdown sequence:
* Ionescu, Alex, Solomon, David A., Russinovich, Mark E. Windows Internals,
Sixth Edition Part 2 (Windows 7), Microsoft Press, 2012.
Hybrid Boot:
* Sinofsky, Steven. Delivering fast boot times in Windows 8, MSDN Building
Windows 8 blog, September 8, 2011. URL:
http://blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/archive/2011/09/08/delivering-fast-boot-times-in-
windows-8.aspx
* Woods, Ben. Windows 8 'hybrid' mode brings faster boot, ZDNet, September
9, 2011. URL:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/windows-8-hybrid-mode-brings-faster-boot/
* Shultz, Greg. How Windows 8 Hybrid Shutdown / Fast Boot feature works,
TechRepublic, October 24, 2013. URL:
http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/windows-and-office/how-windows-8-hybrid-shu
tdown-fast-boot-feature-works/
UEFI boot process:
* UEFI boot: how does that actually work, then (Adam W), January 25, 2014.
URL:
https://www.happyassassin.net/2014/01/25/uefi-boot-how-does-that-actually-wo
rk-then/
Windows sessions:
* Hameed, C. Sessions, Desktops and Windows Stations, Ask the Performance
Team, TechNet, July 24, 2007. URL:
http://blogs.technet.com/b/askperf/archive/2007/07/24/sessions-desktops-and-
windows-stations.aspx
Although these references refer to old Windows releases (Windows Vista, 7
and 8.x), it applies to Windows 10, and some of these are quite technical.
Hope this helps.
Cheers,
Joseph



-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Debbie April
Yuille via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2015 1:13 AM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Debbie April Yuille
Subject: RE: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown
Menu To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Hi Mark

I've followed your steps, but I don't see an option to disable fast user
switching. I do however see an option to turn off fast start up though.

Thanks
Debbie

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, 12 August 2015 5:23 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark <facebookmark@candleshoreblog.com>
Subject: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown Menu
To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Hello Everyone,

The following steps will work in both Windows 10 and Windows 8.x in order to
disable the Fast-User switching option. Doing this will allow your computer
to truly be shut-down as it was in Windows 7 and earlier.

To disable Fast-User Switching, do the following:

1.
Access Windows 10 Power Options. This can easily be achieved using several
methods:
a.
Right click in the lower left corner of the screen (or simultaneously press
the Windows + X keys). This will bring up an 'Admin' menu. Simply select
Power Options from that menu.
b.
From within the Desktop; navigate to Control Panel>Power Options.
Or c.
From within the Start Screen; type "power", click on Settings, and select
Power Options from the list of results:

2.
In the 'Power Options' window; click on Choose what the power buttons do
(from the left hand panel):

3.
In the new window; click on Change settings that are currently unavailable:

4.
Uncheck Fast user switching.

That's all there is to it.

Enjoy,

Mark


_______________________________________________
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Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


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Re: shutting down.....

Daniel McBride
 

Mark:

I believe it is normal. That has been occurring since I started using JAWS
when I shut down. I started in 2002 with JAWS 4 and am currently on JAWS 14.

Dan

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Jim Hamilton
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 9:27 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Jim Hamilton
Subject: Re: shutting down.....

It does that with Windows 8.1 as well.


Sent from Jim's iPhone


On Aug 11, 2015, at 4:27 PM, Carolyn Arnold via Jfw
<jfw@lists.the-jdh.com> wrote:

Mine does that too and no musical sound coming or going.

Best from,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark
Furness via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 3:58 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list. <Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark Furness <flintman57@gmail.com>
Subject: shutting down.....

When I shut down my windows10 computer The last thing it says is Jaws
for windows: is this normal?

Mark

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Re: JAWS REPEATING

Bissett, Tom <tom.bissett@...>
 

I don't know if this is in all cases but I have observed that web pages often load from different sources. Each time a load from one of the sources completes the title is announced causing jaws to repeat the title several times depending on how many sources the page is being loaded from. As an example you go to a page with some standard text but has an advertisement loading from a different source, this will cause jaws to announce the title when the page is loaded and again when the ad is loaded.
Regards
Tom Bisset

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of DALE HELTZER via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2015 10:35 AM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: DALE HELTZER
Subject: RE: JAWS REPEATING

I have had the same irritating experience.
Anyone else?



Dale E. Heltzer
deheltzer@msn.com

"A foolish consestency is tha hobgabljyn Qf littwe mjndz." - Ralph Waldo Emerson via Howard Ashby Kranz

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark Furness via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 12:59 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Mark Furness
Subject: JAWS REPEATING

Running latest jaws.
When I go to a web page, jaws speaks 3 times the beginning.

Why and is there a fix?

Thank you for saving my hearing!
Mark

_______________________________________________
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Re: JAWS REPEATING

Dale Heltzer
 

I have had the same irritating experience.
Anyone else?



Dale E. Heltzer
deheltzer@msn.com

"A foolish consestency is tha hobgabljyn Qf littwe mjndz." - Ralph Waldo
Emerson via Howard Ashby Kranz

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark Furness
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 12:59 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Mark Furness
Subject: JAWS REPEATING

Running latest jaws.
When I go to a web page, jaws speaks 3 times the beginning.

Why and is there a fix?

Thank you for saving my hearing!
Mark

_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
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Re: How To Stop Windows 10 from Sharing Your Bandwidth With Others Without Your Permission

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Well, I've been at it for a little over 70 years, so Braille I can do. It is
easier for me to have computer instructions in Braille, so that I can go
through a process step by step LOL.

Best from,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Kimsan via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2015 3:14 AM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Kimsan <kimsansong@gmail.com>
Subject: RE: How To Stop Windows 10 from Sharing Your Bandwidth With Others
Without Your Permission

Wow!
You wrote all of that in braille?
I'm not one to brag, but I'm slow at braille writing.
,

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Carolyn Arnold
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 3:45 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@windstream.net>
Subject: RE: How To Stop Windows 10 from Sharing Your Bandwidth With Others
Without Your Permission

Mark, this information is brailled and in my notebook, so that I can follow
your instructions to the T. Thanks.

Best from,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 5:19 PM
To: 'Jaws for Windows' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark <facebookmark@candleshoreblog.com>
Subject: How To Stop Windows 10 from Sharing Your Bandwidth With Others
Without Your Permission

Hello My Fellow Windows 10 Users,

You know, I was becoming less and less enthusiastic about Windows 10 as it
does so many things, in terms of sharing our personal information, and now,
it seems, even our band-width without our expressed permission, until I
discovered how to control it's somewhat hidden options.

Please read the following, carefully, to discover how to disable this, in my
opinion, very unwelcomed feature.

Mark

How to Disable Windows 10 Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO)

By default, Windows 10 is using your bandwidth by way of a new 'feature'
called Windows Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO). In a nutshell, Windows
10 is uploading files in the background to other Windows 10 users. This
brief guide will explain how to disable the Windows Update Delivery
Optimization service.

1.
Click the Windows 10 "Start Button" and select Settings

2.
Select Update & security from the Settings menu.

3.
Click Advanced options

4.
Click Choose how updates are delivered

5.
Finally, toggle Updates from more than one place to Off

6.
All done!


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Re: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

Pablo Morales
 

Well guys,
I have tried windows 10 and jaws 16 in 3 different computers. One on a old
computer from the Precambrian, the second a Dell i7, with 8GB ram, and the
third a Lenovo desktop with an i7 with 8 GB of ram also.
I have found several problems with jaws. Some times when I press insert f10,
to get the list of windows opened, jaws reads information no updated, other
times jaws reads things that were on the screen before, like dialogs or
messages, but those dialogs or messages are already close when it happen.
Some times on the log in screen, jaws reads default window, and nothing
else, if I press insert tab, jaws reads again, default window, but I have no
way to know where is the Pc cursor. I have to press tab several times until
jaws catch the Pc cursor again. Sometimes alt tab doesn't work very well,
and I have repaired jaws in all these computers.
Conclusion, I uninstalled windows 10 in my all 3 computers, and I will not
try to install windows 10 again, until news releases of windows or jaws
appear.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Jim Hamilton
via Jfw
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2015 1:17 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Jim Hamilton
Subject: RE: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

Dave:

You have more patience than I. If JAWS does not return within a minute or
so, I do a (you should excuse the expression) blind shutdown of JAWS, go to
the DESKTOP, where I have already placed the focus, and reopened JAWS. Mind
you, if a good pair of eyes is ready/willing/able, not to mention actually
present, I am not shy about asking for help in case something is going on -
un related to JAWS.

However, when no "eyes" are around, it feels like the world has been shut
off; so, I know what you mean by waiting for nothing. I usually try to find
something else to do.

Jim H

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Dave Carlson
via Jfw
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2015 2:02 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list. <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Dave Carlson <dgcarlson@sbcglobal.net>
Subject: Re: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

Jim,

Pretty much hit-or-miss. It would depend on the Operating System + Video
Device Driver + JAWS Version + Program Version + Unknown Gremlins.

Very hard to duplicate symptoms with so many variables. I do know that JAWS
16 tendency to close and reopen without any warning is a bit of a thorn in
my side. There are times when it won't come back at all, and I'm sitting
there with my hands poised, waiting for nothing.

Dave Carlson
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and pioneer

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jim Hamilton via Jfw" <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
To: "'The Jaws for Windows support list.'" <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: "Jim Hamilton" <jim.hamilton@rogers.com>
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2015 10:43 AM
Subject: RE: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?


Dave:

Very enlightening! For some reason, I never got around to, nor frankly
considered, uninstalling previous versions of JAWS, and this may have proven
to be "far-sighted" after all. I think that I may adopt your 3 most-recent
version strategy myself. However, once someone moves to Windows 10,
previous JAWS versions will not work - from what I gather.

However, it may be a while before I upgrade to Windows 10. So, for now, are
there some applications that typically misbehave with the latest JAWS
offering? Or, as with many things, it is pretty much a hit or miss
situation?

Thanks.

Jim H

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Dave Carlson
via Jfw
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2015 1:02 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list. <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Dave Carlson <dgcarlson@sbcglobal.net>
Subject: Re: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

Jim,

As to previous versions -- simply because the current install is running
fine, it does not mean that it will run so with all applications. I
occasionally run JAWS 15 when JAWS 16 is misbehaving in a particular
program. I delete versions older than 3 major revisions back, just to keep
things simpler. And I still have all the executables for last revisions of
all major versions going back to 3.5. Of course that's just my
anal-retentive nature at work, having sufficient hard disk space to justify
that level of insanity.

Dave Carlson
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and pioneer

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jim Hamilton via Jfw" <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
To: "'The Jaws for Windows support list.'" <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: "Jim Hamilton" <jim.hamilton@rogers.com>
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2015 09:30 AM
Subject: RE: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?


Don't mean to be "smart"; but, why would you want to use previous versions
of JAWS if you have the latest version running successfully. I'm sure that
there is a really good reason for it! :) :)

Jim H

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of john.falter
via Jfw
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2015 11:19 AM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list. <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: john.falter <john.falter@verizon.net>
Subject: Re: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

What I lose is the ability to use previous versions of JAWS.


On 8/9/2015 8:21 PM, Gary King via Jfw wrote:
The free feed is to lure the deer into the killing ground. I don't
think the free Windows 10 upgrade offer is quite that sinister
though. Just good old Microsoft's way of trying to keep it's dominant
position.

Gary King
w4wkz@bellsouth.net
----- Original Message ----- From: "Adrian Spratt via Jfw"
<jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: "Adrian Spratt" <Adrian@AdrianSpratt.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 09, 2015 10:06 AM
Subject: RE: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?


Are you saying Win10 smells? Hard to make out the meaning of this,
um, adage.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Daniel
McBride via Jfw
Sent: Sunday, August 09, 2015 10:05 AM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Daniel McBride
Subject: RE: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

As I pointed out earlier, a deer gets free feed at his local deer stand
feeder.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Adrian
Spratt
via Jfw
Sent: Saturday, August 08, 2015 11:05 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Adrian Spratt
Subject: RE: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

Windows 10 won't be free after a year. I believe the 2020 date refers
to the
end up MS support. But for now, as Brad says, who has the time? I'm
waiting
for the first service pack (MS always comes out with one) and FS's first
rounds of fixes, all of which I expect will appear within the year.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Bill
White via
Jfw
Sent: Saturday, August 08, 2015 11:49 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Bill White
Subject: Re: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

What you gain is that, in 2020, when you finally decide to upgrade,
Windows10 won't be free anymore.
Bill White billwhite92701@dslextreme.com
----- Original Message -----
From: "Brad Martin via Jfw" <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: "Brad Martin" <brad@formyfriends.org>
Sent: Saturday, August 08, 2015 7:03 PM
Subject: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?


Hi,

I've been following all this Windows 10 stuff with great interest, and
I just have a question (with a lot of background first):

So FS says you shouldn't use Edge, you should use Firefox or IE. (I'm
doing that now in Windows 7.) You can't use the built in mail program;
you should use something like Thunderbird or Outlook. (I'm doing that
now in Windows 7.) And you should use Adobe Reader for PDF documents.
(I'm doing that now in Windows 7.) Reviews I've read all seem to
indicate that Cortana is iffy at best.

So why should I upgrade again? I'm not being smart; I'd really like to
know if I'm going to gain anything other than having a new operating
system that I have to use in the same old ways. The only benefit I can
see is that Windows 10 will be supported beyond January of 2020, where
Windows
7 will not. Am I overlooking some wonderful new feature that should
cause me to want to hurry and upgrade? Or does the old saying, "If it
ain't broke, don't fix it," apply here? I'd really honestly like to
know if JAWS users in particular are finding anything beneficial in
the upgrade, or if it's just something fun to do to your functioning
computer to see if it will still function.

P.S. Anybody on this list from Louisiana and thinking Cortana, as in
mall?
--
Brad Martin
brad@formyfriends.org <mailto:brad@formyfriends.org> My Facebook page
where I post online shopping coupons and deals:
facebook.com/ucoupons <http://www.facebook.com/ucoupons>
My SmarterBucks signup link <http://bit.ly/1w5FCPu>
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Re: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown Menu To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Soronel Haetir
 

More to the point, given that fast shutdown still results in a system
that is drawing no power (unlike a sleeping system which is still
maintaining ram coherence) what exactly do you see as the downside to
using it?

On 8/12/15, Mark Furness via Jfw <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com> wrote:
I followed your steps and I could not find “fast user switching.

Mark
On Aug 12, 2015, at 3:23 AM, Mark via Jfw <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com> wrote:

Hello Everyone,

The following steps will work in both Windows 10 and Windows 8.x in order
to
disable the Fast-User switching option. Doing this will allow your
computer
to truly be shut-down as it was in Windows 7 and earlier.

To disable Fast-User Switching, do the following:

1.
Access Windows 10 Power Options. This can easily be achieved using several
methods:
a.
Right click in the lower left corner of the screen (or simultaneously
press
the Windows + X keys). This will bring up an 'Admin' menu. Simply select
Power Options from that menu.
b.
From within the Desktop; navigate to Control Panel>Power Options.
Or c.
From within the Start Screen; type "power", click on Settings, and select
Power Options from the list of results:

2.
In the 'Power Options' window; click on Choose what the power buttons do
(from the left hand panel):

3.
In the new window; click on Change settings that are currently
unavailable:

4.
Uncheck Fast user switching.

That's all there is to it.

Enjoy,

Mark


_______________________________________________
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Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
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--
Soronel Haetir
soronel.haetir@gmail.com


Re: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown Menu To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Mark Furness
 

I followed your steps and I could not find “fast user switching.

Mark

On Aug 12, 2015, at 3:23 AM, Mark via Jfw <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com> wrote:

Hello Everyone,

The following steps will work in both Windows 10 and Windows 8.x in order to
disable the Fast-User switching option. Doing this will allow your computer
to truly be shut-down as it was in Windows 7 and earlier.

To disable Fast-User Switching, do the following:

1.
Access Windows 10 Power Options. This can easily be achieved using several
methods:
a.
Right click in the lower left corner of the screen (or simultaneously press
the Windows + X keys). This will bring up an 'Admin' menu. Simply select
Power Options from that menu.
b.
From within the Desktop; navigate to Control Panel>Power Options.
Or c.
From within the Start Screen; type "power", click on Settings, and select
Power Options from the list of results:

2.
In the 'Power Options' window; click on Choose what the power buttons do
(from the left hand panel):

3.
In the new window; click on Change settings that are currently unavailable:

4.
Uncheck Fast user switching.

That's all there is to it.

Enjoy,

Mark


_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
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Re: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown Menu To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

 

Hi Debbie and list:
That's because Mark might have been confused in terminology: it's actually
called Fast Startup. Let me explain what it truly does (a bit technical
here, but will try to boil this down a bit):
When Windows boots, it needs to read in needed data one at a time in
multiple phases. First, whether you are booting into Safe Mode is
determined, then Windows kernel (the heart of the operating system), called
NTOSKrnl.exe (Windows NT Operating System Kernel) determines type of CPU,
amount of RAM, devices present and so on. Once the kernel is ready, it'll
ask the video card to display the Windows logo on screen, then other parts
of Windows responsible for loading user profiles will display a login prompt
(if configured to do so), and if the user successfully logs in, Windows will
start programs that will start automatically (including JAWS) and apply user
settings (this is collectively called a "session", and there is a subsystem
in Windows (called Session Manager Subsystem or SMSS.exe) that manages this;
when you use Windows, at least two sessions become active: session 0
(services) and session N (where N is the currently logged in user).
During shutdown, Windows will first close programs you were using, and if an
app does not respond, it'll pop up a dialog saying one or more apps are not
responding and ask if you wish to shutdown anyway (you may get this prompt
from time to time). Once the user logs off, Windows will terminate services
(including JAWS if told to run as a service), save user settings (including
registry changes) and turn your computer off completely. This is a full
startup/shutdown cycle.
As opposed to the above cycle, Microsoft has found a way to just turn off
user session (Windows 8.0 and later). When the computer shuts down, if Fast
Startup (technically called Hybrid Boot) is in use, Windows will log off the
user (save profiles, close programs, etc.), then the system services will
enter hibernation (where current physical memory content is stored on a
disk). Next time the computer boots, Windows system services will resume
from where they have left off, then users will be prompted to log in. This
is useful on newer computers which uses a newer firmware type called Unified
Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI), as the boot process is simpler than
older BIOS (Basic Input/Output System) firmware (I'll not go into details on
how these firmware boots, as this is too off topic here; ask me offlist) or
those using SSD's (Solid State Drives).
The reason why you hear "JAWS for Windows" when you turn off your computer
is because you have Fast Startup (or Hybrid Boot) turned on. To change this
behavior, follow Mark's instructions, but look for Fast Startup instead.
Hybrid Boot should not be confused with Fast User Switching (Windows XP and
later): Fast User Switching lets someone else log into your computer via a
different user account (provided there are multiple user accounts) without
stopping programs you were using (you'll be logged off first). On PC's
(client Windows versions), only one user can use the computer at a time, but
on server systems, multiple users can log in simultaneously (this includes
Remote Desktop accounts).
References:
Full startup/shutdown sequence:
* Ionescu, Alex, Solomon, David A., Russinovich, Mark E. Windows Internals,
Sixth Edition Part 2 (Windows 7), Microsoft Press, 2012.
Hybrid Boot:
* Sinofsky, Steven. Delivering fast boot times in Windows 8, MSDN Building
Windows 8 blog, September 8, 2011. URL:
http://blogs.msdn.com/b/b8/archive/2011/09/08/delivering-fast-boot-times-in-
windows-8.aspx
* Woods, Ben. Windows 8 'hybrid' mode brings faster boot, ZDNet, September
9, 2011. URL:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/windows-8-hybrid-mode-brings-faster-boot/
* Shultz, Greg. How Windows 8 Hybrid Shutdown / Fast Boot feature works,
TechRepublic, October 24, 2013. URL:
http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/windows-and-office/how-windows-8-hybrid-shu
tdown-fast-boot-feature-works/
UEFI boot process:
* UEFI boot: how does that actually work, then (Adam W), January 25, 2014.
URL:
https://www.happyassassin.net/2014/01/25/uefi-boot-how-does-that-actually-wo
rk-then/
Windows sessions:
* Hameed, C. Sessions, Desktops and Windows Stations, Ask the Performance
Team, TechNet, July 24, 2007. URL:
http://blogs.technet.com/b/askperf/archive/2007/07/24/sessions-desktops-and-
windows-stations.aspx
Although these references refer to old Windows releases (Windows Vista, 7
and 8.x), it applies to Windows 10, and some of these are quite technical.
Hope this helps.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Debbie April
Yuille via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2015 1:13 AM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Debbie April Yuille
Subject: RE: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown
Menu To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Hi Mark

I've followed your steps, but I don't see an option to disable fast user
switching. I do however see an option to turn off fast start up though.

Thanks
Debbie

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, 12 August 2015 5:23 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark <facebookmark@candleshoreblog.com>
Subject: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown Menu
To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Hello Everyone,

The following steps will work in both Windows 10 and Windows 8.x in order to
disable the Fast-User switching option. Doing this will allow your computer
to truly be shut-down as it was in Windows 7 and earlier.

To disable Fast-User Switching, do the following:

1.
Access Windows 10 Power Options. This can easily be achieved using several
methods:
a.
Right click in the lower left corner of the screen (or simultaneously press
the Windows + X keys). This will bring up an 'Admin' menu. Simply select
Power Options from that menu.
b.
From within the Desktop; navigate to Control Panel>Power Options.
Or c.
From within the Start Screen; type "power", click on Settings, and select
Power Options from the list of results:

2.
In the 'Power Options' window; click on Choose what the power buttons do
(from the left hand panel):

3.
In the new window; click on Change settings that are currently unavailable:

4.
Uncheck Fast user switching.

That's all there is to it.

Enjoy,

Mark


_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


_______________________________________________
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Re: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown Menu To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Debbie April Yuille
 

Hi Mark

I've followed your steps, but I don't see an option to disable fast user
switching. I do however see an option to turn off fast start up though.

Thanks
Debbie

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, 12 August 2015 5:23 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark <facebookmark@candleshoreblog.com>
Subject: How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown Menu
To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Hello Everyone,

The following steps will work in both Windows 10 and Windows 8.x in order to
disable the Fast-User switching option. Doing this will allow your computer
to truly be shut-down as it was in Windows 7 and earlier.

To disable Fast-User Switching, do the following:

1.
Access Windows 10 Power Options. This can easily be achieved using several
methods:
a.
Right click in the lower left corner of the screen (or simultaneously press
the Windows + X keys). This will bring up an 'Admin' menu. Simply select
Power Options from that menu.
b.
From within the Desktop; navigate to Control Panel>Power Options.
Or c.
From within the Start Screen; type "power", click on Settings, and select
Power Options from the list of results:

2.
In the 'Power Options' window; click on Choose what the power buttons do
(from the left hand panel):

3.
In the new window; click on Change settings that are currently unavailable:

4.
Uncheck Fast user switching.

That's all there is to it.

Enjoy,

Mark


_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


Re: shutting down.....

Debbie April Yuille
 

Thanks.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, 12 August 2015 5:17 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark <facebookmark@candleshoreblog.com>
Subject: RE: shutting down.....

Hello Debbie,

I will list the steps to disable Fast User Switching in a different thread
so that it will be easier to find in the future.

Standby.

Mark

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Debbie April
Yuille via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 9:36 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Debbie April Yuille
Subject: RE: shutting down.....

Hi Mark

Where abouts would I go to turn off this fast user switching to make my
computer truly shut down?

Thanks
Debbie

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, 12 August 2015 6:26 AM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark <facebookmark@candleshoreblog.com>
Subject: RE: shutting down.....

Hello,

The announcement does not occur when I shut down my Windows 10 computer.

Please keep in mind that since Windows 8, unless one specifically disables
the Fast User Switching option, the computer does not shut down in the sense
that we have come to understand the term in prior versions of Windows.
Instead, the default shut down option in both Windows 8.x and 10 places the
computer in a kind of hibernation mode preserving certain settings.

In order to truly shut down the computer, in the classic meaning of the
phrase, one must disable the fast-user switching located in the power
options settings of the OS. Once done, (1) Jaws will no longer announce
itself and (2) the computer will truly be shut down as it was in Windows 7
and earlier.

Mark

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Londa Peterson
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 1:07 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Londa Peterson
Subject: RE: shutting down.....

This is normal. It's been doing that since Windows 8.1. It surprised me at
first as well.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark Furness
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 3:58 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Mark Furness
Subject: shutting down.....

When I shut down my windows10 computer
The last thing it says is Jaws for windows: is this normal?

Mark

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_______________________________________________
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Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


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How To Configure Either The Windows 10 or Windows 8 Shutdown Menu To Truly Turn Off Your Computer

Mark <facebookmark@...>
 

Hello Everyone,

The following steps will work in both Windows 10 and Windows 8.x in order to
disable the Fast-User switching option. Doing this will allow your computer
to truly be shut-down as it was in Windows 7 and earlier.

To disable Fast-User Switching, do the following:

1.
Access Windows 10 Power Options. This can easily be achieved using several
methods:
a.
Right click in the lower left corner of the screen (or simultaneously press
the Windows + X keys). This will bring up an 'Admin' menu. Simply select
Power Options from that menu.
b.
From within the Desktop; navigate to Control Panel>Power Options.
Or c.
From within the Start Screen; type "power", click on Settings, and select
Power Options from the list of results:

2.
In the 'Power Options' window; click on Choose what the power buttons do
(from the left hand panel):

3.
In the new window; click on Change settings that are currently unavailable:

4.
Uncheck Fast user switching.

That's all there is to it.

Enjoy,

Mark


Re: shutting down.....

Mark <facebookmark@...>
 

Hello Debbie,

I will list the steps to disable Fast User Switching in a different thread
so that it will be easier to find in the future.

Standby.

Mark

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Debbie April
Yuille via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 9:36 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Debbie April Yuille
Subject: RE: shutting down.....

Hi Mark

Where abouts would I go to turn off this fast user switching to make my
computer truly shut down?

Thanks
Debbie

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, 12 August 2015 6:26 AM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark <facebookmark@candleshoreblog.com>
Subject: RE: shutting down.....

Hello,

The announcement does not occur when I shut down my Windows 10 computer.

Please keep in mind that since Windows 8, unless one specifically disables
the Fast User Switching option, the computer does not shut down in the sense
that we have come to understand the term in prior versions of Windows.
Instead, the default shut down option in both Windows 8.x and 10 places the
computer in a kind of hibernation mode preserving certain settings.

In order to truly shut down the computer, in the classic meaning of the
phrase, one must disable the fast-user switching located in the power
options settings of the OS. Once done, (1) Jaws will no longer announce
itself and (2) the computer will truly be shut down as it was in Windows 7
and earlier.

Mark

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Londa Peterson
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 1:07 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Londa Peterson
Subject: RE: shutting down.....

This is normal. It's been doing that since Windows 8.1. It surprised me at
first as well.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark Furness
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 3:58 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Mark Furness
Subject: shutting down.....

When I shut down my windows10 computer
The last thing it says is Jaws for windows: is this normal?

Mark

_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


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Re: How To Stop Windows 10 from Sharing Your Bandwidth With Others Without Your Permission

Kimsan <kimsansong@...>
 

Wow!
You wrote all of that in braille?
I'm not one to brag, but I'm slow at braille writing.
,

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Carolyn Arnold
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 3:45 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@windstream.net>
Subject: RE: How To Stop Windows 10 from Sharing Your Bandwidth With Others
Without Your Permission

Mark, this information is brailled and in my notebook, so that I can follow
your instructions to the T. Thanks.

Best from,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 5:19 PM
To: 'Jaws for Windows' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark <facebookmark@candleshoreblog.com>
Subject: How To Stop Windows 10 from Sharing Your Bandwidth With Others
Without Your Permission

Hello My Fellow Windows 10 Users,

You know, I was becoming less and less enthusiastic about Windows 10 as it
does so many things, in terms of sharing our personal information, and now,
it seems, even our band-width without our expressed permission, until I
discovered how to control it's somewhat hidden options.

Please read the following, carefully, to discover how to disable this, in my
opinion, very unwelcomed feature.

Mark

How to Disable Windows 10 Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO)

By default, Windows 10 is using your bandwidth by way of a new 'feature'
called Windows Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO). In a nutshell, Windows
10 is uploading files in the background to other Windows 10 users. This
brief guide will explain how to disable the Windows Update Delivery
Optimization service.

1.
Click the Windows 10 "Start Button" and select Settings

2.
Select Update & security from the Settings menu.

3.
Click Advanced options

4.
Click Choose how updates are delivered

5.
Finally, toggle Updates from more than one place to Off

6.
All done!


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Why and How to Enable System Restore in Windows 10

Mark <facebookmark@...>
 

Hello My Fellow Windows 10 Users,

If you didn't know, system restore is disabled in Windows 10. I strongly
suggest that you enable this time-tested feature as you never know when you
may need it.

On a personal note, although I've been using Windows since version 2.0, it
wasn't until last month when, attempting to do something rather
unconventional on my primary Windows 7 PC, that I found myself in an
application driver quagmire. I can honestly say, were it not for Windows 7
system restore, I would have had to completely reinstall Windows. In all
these years, I only needed this tool, once but, when I needed it, it was
there.

The following article, at the end of which you will find its direct URL,
describes how and why to enable System Restore, in Windows 10.

Enjoy and Good Luck,

Mark

Why and How to Enable System Restore in Windows 10
By Jim Tanous posted on July 27, 2015

Although considered an improvement in most respects over Windows 8,
Microsoft's upcoming Windows 10 - set to launch Wednesday, July 29th -
curiously changes course on a relatively useful and important feature:
System Restore. Read on to find out why System Restore may be one of the
first things you'll want to enable after upgrading to Windows 10.

Getting to Know System Restore
First introduced more than 15 years ago as part of Windows ME, System
Restore tracks software installations, driver changes, and software updates,
and allows a user to revert their PC to a prior state if one of the
aforementioned events causes a problem. For example, System Restore can make
a backup of a PC's graphics card driver just before a new driver is
installed. If that new driver causes an issue - e.g., distorted colors,
reduced resolution, or a blank screen - the user can initiate a System
Restore procedure that will revert Windows back to the original working
graphics driver.

An early version of System Restore in Windows ME.
By default, Windows will create a record of the changes introduced by a
system or software event - something called a restore point - automatically
as changes occur on a user's PC. Users also have the option of manually
creating restore points at any time, and are advised to do so before
performing major upgrades or changes to the system.

Although sometimes likened to features like Time Machine in OS X, it's
important to note that System Restore isn't a "backup" utility, at least not
in the usual sense. It's true that System Restore backs up important files
related to Windows, such as registry files, drive and boot configurations,
and hardware drivers, but the feature won't back up your user data such as
documents, music, or movies. Think of System Restore as backup for your
computer - the files that keep the system functioning, regardless of user
data - rather than backup for you.

The feature wasn't perfect, of course, didn't always work as intended, and
required users to reserve a portion of each drive on which System Restore
was enabled, but it was a handy and relatively easy to use safety measure
that saved countless Windows users from bad drivers and botched upgrades.

But the true beauty of System Restore, as many computer repair technicians
will attest, was that it was enabled by default on all recent versions of
Windows. This often made software repairs for novice users much easier, as
these users didn't even know that System Restore was enabled on their PC,
silently protecting them when they made the mistake of thinking that
deleting their chipset drivers was a good idea.

As we've recently learned, however, that changes in Windows 10.

System Restore in Windows 10
The good news first: System Restore is available and fully functional in
Windows 10. As we mentioned above, however, the bad news is that this
feature is turned off by default. Even worse, the interface to enable and
manage System Restore is relatively hidden in the legacy Control Panel, and
isn't something that a typical user will stumble upon while browsing the new
Windows 10 Settings app. That leaves users on their own to eventually
discover the feature, hear about it from colleagues, or find an article like
this one on the Web.

While there are new update and restore features built in to Windows 10,
including the option to roll the system back entirely to the previous
version of Windows, System Restore may still be a good choice for many
users. Here's how you can enable System Restore in Windows 10.

The easiest way to find the System Restore configuration window in Windows
10 is to simply search for it via the Start Menu. Just click on the Search
or Cortana icon in your desktop taskbar, or tap the Windows Key on your
keyboard, and type System Restore.

You'll see a search result appear labeled Create a restore point. Click it
and you'll be taken directly to the System Protection tab of the System
Properties window, which is where System Restore options are located.
Alternatively, you can navigate to this same location via Control Panel >
System > System Protection.

If you've used System Restore in a previous version of Windows, you'll
recognize the interface. All eligible drives will be listed in the
"Protection Settings" portion of the window, and you'll need to manually
enable System Restore on each drive you want protected. Due to the nature of
System Restore, however, most users will only need to enable it on their
primary C drive to gain adequate protection.

To enable System Restore in Windows 10, select your desired drive from the
list and click Configure. In the new window that appears, click the option
labeled Turn on system protection.

System Restore is useless without drive space in which to store its restore
points, of course, so you'll also need to reserve a portion of your drive
for this purpose in the Disk Space Usage section of the window. As you drag
the slider to the right, you'll see the designated usage space represented
both in actual size as well as a percentage of your drive. The more space
you assign to System Restore, the more restore points you'll have at your
disposal in the event of a critical system issue. Assigning too much space,
however, limits what's available to you for applications and user data, so
be sure to strike a good balance. On all but the smallest of drives, we
recommend reserving at least 10GB for System Restore.

With your changes made, click Apply and then OK to save your new
configuration and close the window. System Restore will now be enabled for
your selected drive, and you can let it operate automatically in the
background or manually create restore points as desired. If you ever
encounter an issue and need to perform a System Restore, just head back to
this same window and click System Restore to launch the restore interface.
Of note, in the event of catastrophic issues where Windows is no longer
bootable, you can access your system restore points from the Windows 10
recovery environment.

Why System Restore is Important in Windows 10
As we mentioned earlier, System Restore has served an important role for
many users over the past 15 years of Windows, but it may be especially
important for Windows 10 users in mission critical environments. In the lead
up to the launch of Windows 10, Microsoft has revealed that most Windows 10
users will be required to apply system updates via the Windows Update
service.

Microsoft has long used Windows Update to deliver security patches, bug
fixes, and new features to users, and most users were strongly urged to
accept the updates as they became available. But a measurable number of
Windows users failed to update in a timely manner, and there was nothing
Microsoft could do to force these users to upgrade.

Some users had good reasons to delay or avoid applying Windows updates:
updates could potentially conflict with certain software or hardware,
particularly in large businesses where custom software and configurations
are common, and some updates were known to have bugs that caused crashes or
system instability. Other users simply neglected proper maintenance
procedures and chose to leave their PCs unpatched.

Whatever the reason for avoiding Windows Updates, large numbers of Windows
installations are currently running without the latest updates, a problem
that creates a significant security vulnerability and one that Microsoft
seeks to fix with Windows 10. Here's how the Windows 10 update situation
breaks down:

For all intents and purposes, there are three versions of Windows 10 that
will be running on PCs this year: Windows 10 Home, Windows 10 Pro, and
Windows 10 Enterprise. Most consumers will get their free upgrade to Windows
10 Home or Pro based on the version of Windows 7 or 8 they are currently
running.

When it comes to Windows updates, Windows 10 Home users will be required by
the Windows EULA to accept and install all security and feature updates that
Microsoft releases. Some options exist to delay the installation of these
updates for a short period of time, but Windows 10 Home users will get all
Windows updates soon after they are released.

Windows 10 Pro users, on the other hand, have a little bit more flexibility,
but it comes with a pretty big catch. These users can defer Windows updates
for up to 8 months by electing to join the Current Branch for Business
(CBB), an update roadmap intended for businesses that need to manage and
schedule updates for large groups of mission critical systems. Beyond that
maximum 8-month staging period, however, Windows 10 Pro users won't be able
to receive any future security fixes or feature improvements until they've
accepted all previous updates.

Out of these three primary versions of Windows 10, only Windows 10
Enterprise users have the ability to truly defer updates, and they can do so
for years while still receiving support from Microsoft. This was a necessary
concession by Microsoft, of course, to ensure that enterprise customers have
the flexibility to accommodate their unique needs, and Windows 10 Enterprise
customers are paying for the privilege, as this version of Windows is
ineligible for the free upgrade offer.

This move by Microsoft to force most Windows 10 users to accept updates will
likely be a positive change overall - preventing and combating security
threats will be easier once the majority of Windows users are running the
latest version of the operating system - but it's sure to cause issues for
some users, especially in the early days. That's where System Restore comes
in.

Chances are that you'll be running a version of Windows 10 covered by
Microsoft's mandatory update policy. In addition to proper user backups
(you're keeping good backups of your data, right?) and the recovery tools
included in Windows 10, System Restore can provide another layer of security
if one of these upcoming mandatory Windows updates has an inherent problem,
or at the very least causes a compatibility issue unique to your PC and
configuration. You'll need to give up a small portion of your drive for
system restore points, but it's likely that you won't give that small
sacrifice a second thought if a future botched update forces you to turn to
System Restore.

We hope that Microsoft eventually sorts out this new process for updating
Windows, and that future updates are extremely reliable. Until then,
however, it's almost a certainty that some Windows 10 updates will slip
through with potentially catastrophic bugs and compatibility issues. Absent
abandoning Windows entirely, users will be forced to accept this new
reality, and while the vast majority of users will be completely fine, it
won't hurt to have a handy System Restore point standing by in case of
trouble.

Original Article At:
http://www.tekrevue.com/how-to-enable-system-restore-windows-10/


Re: shutting down.....

Debbie April Yuille
 

Hi Mark

Where abouts would I go to turn off this fast user switching to make my
computer truly shut down?

Thanks
Debbie

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, 12 August 2015 6:26 AM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark <facebookmark@candleshoreblog.com>
Subject: RE: shutting down.....

Hello,

The announcement does not occur when I shut down my Windows 10 computer.

Please keep in mind that since Windows 8, unless one specifically disables
the Fast User Switching option, the computer does not shut down in the sense
that we have come to understand the term in prior versions of Windows.
Instead, the default shut down option in both Windows 8.x and 10 places the
computer in a kind of hibernation mode preserving certain settings.

In order to truly shut down the computer, in the classic meaning of the
phrase, one must disable the fast-user switching located in the power
options settings of the OS. Once done, (1) Jaws will no longer announce
itself and (2) the computer will truly be shut down as it was in Windows 7
and earlier.

Mark

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Londa Peterson
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 1:07 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Londa Peterson
Subject: RE: shutting down.....

This is normal. It's been doing that since Windows 8.1. It surprised me at
first as well.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark Furness
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 3:58 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Mark Furness
Subject: shutting down.....

When I shut down my windows10 computer
The last thing it says is Jaws for windows: is this normal?

Mark

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