Date   

Re: shutting down.....

HAMILTON
 

It does that with Windows 8.1 as well.


Sent from Jim's iPhone

On Aug 11, 2015, at 4:27 PM, Carolyn Arnold via Jfw <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com> wrote:

Mine does that too and no musical sound coming or going.

Best from,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark Furness
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 3:58 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list. <Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark Furness <flintman57@gmail.com>
Subject: shutting down.....

When I shut down my windows10 computer
The last thing it says is Jaws for windows: is this normal?

Mark

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Re: shutting down.....

Michal Nowicki <mnowicki4@...>
 

Perfectly normal! I think this happens because for a moment, the log on
screne may pop up, causing JAWS to restart.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Londa Peterson
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 3:07 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Londa Peterson <lpeterson@vrocp.org>
Subject: RE: shutting down.....

This is normal. It's been doing that since Windows 8.1. It surprised me at
first as well.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark Furness
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 3:58 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Mark Furness
Subject: shutting down.....

When I shut down my windows10 computer
The last thing it says is Jaws for windows: is this normal?

Mark

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Re: How To Stop Windows 10 from Sharing Your Bandwidth With Others Without Your Permission

Mark <facebookmark@...>
 

You are quite Welcome, Carolyn.

If I learn of any further "hidden" privacy settings, I'll be sure to pass
them along.

Mark

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Carolyn Arnold
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 3:45 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Carolyn Arnold
Subject: RE: How To Stop Windows 10 from Sharing Your Bandwidth With Others
Without Your Permission

Mark, this information is brailled and in my notebook, so that I can follow
your instructions to the T. Thanks.

Best from,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 5:19 PM
To: 'Jaws for Windows' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark <facebookmark@candleshoreblog.com>
Subject: How To Stop Windows 10 from Sharing Your Bandwidth With Others
Without Your Permission

Hello My Fellow Windows 10 Users,

You know, I was becoming less and less enthusiastic about Windows 10 as it
does so many things, in terms of sharing our personal information, and now,
it seems, even our band-width without our expressed permission, until I
discovered how to control it's somewhat hidden options.

Please read the following, carefully, to discover how to disable this, in my
opinion, very unwelcomed feature.

Mark

How to Disable Windows 10 Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO)

By default, Windows 10 is using your bandwidth by way of a new 'feature'
called Windows Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO). In a nutshell, Windows
10 is uploading files in the background to other Windows 10 users. This
brief guide will explain how to disable the Windows Update Delivery
Optimization service.

1.
Click the Windows 10 "Start Button" and select Settings

2.
Select Update & security from the Settings menu.

3.
Click Advanced options

4.
Click Choose how updates are delivered

5.
Finally, toggle Updates from more than one place to Off

6.
All done!


_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


_______________________________________________
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Re: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

Mark <facebookmark@...>
 

Hello Pablo,

I'm curious, what method did you use to uninstall and/or roll-back Windows
10?

Mark

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Pablo Morales
via Jfw
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2015 6:19 AM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Pablo Morales
Subject: RE: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

Well guys,
I have tried windows 10 and jaws 16 in 3 different computers. One on a old
computer from the Precambrian, the second a Dell i7, with 8GB ram, and the
third a Lenovo desktop with an i7 with 8 GB of ram also.
I have found several problems with jaws. Some times when I press insert f10,
to get the list of windows opened, jaws reads information no updated, other
times jaws reads things that were on the screen before, like dialogs or
messages, but those dialogs or messages are already close when it happen.
Some times on the log in screen, jaws reads default window, and nothing
else, if I press insert tab, jaws reads again, default window, but I have no
way to know where is the Pc cursor. I have to press tab several times until
jaws catch the Pc cursor again. Sometimes alt tab doesn't work very well,
and I have repaired jaws in all these computers.
Conclusion, I uninstalled windows 10 in my all 3 computers, and I will not
try to install windows 10 again, until news releases of windows or jaws
appear.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Jim Hamilton
via Jfw
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2015 1:17 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Jim Hamilton
Subject: RE: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

Dave:

You have more patience than I. If JAWS does not return within a minute or
so, I do a (you should excuse the expression) blind shutdown of JAWS, go to
the DESKTOP, where I have already placed the focus, and reopened JAWS. Mind
you, if a good pair of eyes is ready/willing/able, not to mention actually
present, I am not shy about asking for help in case something is going on -
un related to JAWS.

However, when no "eyes" are around, it feels like the world has been shut
off; so, I know what you mean by waiting for nothing. I usually try to find
something else to do.

Jim H

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Dave Carlson
via Jfw
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2015 2:02 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list. <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Dave Carlson <dgcarlson@sbcglobal.net>
Subject: Re: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

Jim,

Pretty much hit-or-miss. It would depend on the Operating System + Video
Device Driver + JAWS Version + Program Version + Unknown Gremlins.

Very hard to duplicate symptoms with so many variables. I do know that JAWS
16 tendency to close and reopen without any warning is a bit of a thorn in
my side. There are times when it won't come back at all, and I'm sitting
there with my hands poised, waiting for nothing.

Dave Carlson
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and pioneer

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jim Hamilton via Jfw" <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
To: "'The Jaws for Windows support list.'" <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: "Jim Hamilton" <jim.hamilton@rogers.com>
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2015 10:43 AM
Subject: RE: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?


Dave:

Very enlightening! For some reason, I never got around to, nor frankly
considered, uninstalling previous versions of JAWS, and this may have proven
to be "far-sighted" after all. I think that I may adopt your 3 most-recent
version strategy myself. However, once someone moves to Windows 10,
previous JAWS versions will not work - from what I gather.

However, it may be a while before I upgrade to Windows 10. So, for now, are
there some applications that typically misbehave with the latest JAWS
offering? Or, as with many things, it is pretty much a hit or miss
situation?

Thanks.

Jim H

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Dave Carlson
via Jfw
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2015 1:02 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list. <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Dave Carlson <dgcarlson@sbcglobal.net>
Subject: Re: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

Jim,

As to previous versions -- simply because the current install is running
fine, it does not mean that it will run so with all applications. I
occasionally run JAWS 15 when JAWS 16 is misbehaving in a particular
program. I delete versions older than 3 major revisions back, just to keep
things simpler. And I still have all the executables for last revisions of
all major versions going back to 3.5. Of course that's just my
anal-retentive nature at work, having sufficient hard disk space to justify
that level of insanity.

Dave Carlson
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and pioneer

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jim Hamilton via Jfw" <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
To: "'The Jaws for Windows support list.'" <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: "Jim Hamilton" <jim.hamilton@rogers.com>
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2015 09:30 AM
Subject: RE: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?


Don't mean to be "smart"; but, why would you want to use previous versions
of JAWS if you have the latest version running successfully. I'm sure that
there is a really good reason for it! :) :)

Jim H

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of john.falter
via Jfw
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2015 11:19 AM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list. <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: john.falter <john.falter@verizon.net>
Subject: Re: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

What I lose is the ability to use previous versions of JAWS.


On 8/9/2015 8:21 PM, Gary King via Jfw wrote:
The free feed is to lure the deer into the killing ground. I don't
think the free Windows 10 upgrade offer is quite that sinister though.
Just good old Microsoft's way of trying to keep it's dominant
position.

Gary King
w4wkz@bellsouth.net
----- Original Message ----- From: "Adrian Spratt via Jfw"
<jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: "Adrian Spratt" <Adrian@AdrianSpratt.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 09, 2015 10:06 AM
Subject: RE: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?


Are you saying Win10 smells? Hard to make out the meaning of this,
um, adage.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Daniel
McBride via Jfw
Sent: Sunday, August 09, 2015 10:05 AM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Daniel McBride
Subject: RE: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

As I pointed out earlier, a deer gets free feed at his local deer
stand feeder.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Adrian
Spratt via Jfw
Sent: Saturday, August 08, 2015 11:05 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Adrian Spratt
Subject: RE: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

Windows 10 won't be free after a year. I believe the 2020 date refers
to the end up MS support. But for now, as Brad says, who has the
time? I'm waiting for the first service pack (MS always comes out
with one) and FS's first rounds of fixes, all of which I expect will
appear within the year.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Bill
White via Jfw
Sent: Saturday, August 08, 2015 11:49 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Bill White
Subject: Re: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?

What you gain is that, in 2020, when you finally decide to upgrade,
Windows10 won't be free anymore.
Bill White billwhite92701@dslextreme.com
----- Original Message -----
From: "Brad Martin via Jfw" <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: "Brad Martin" <brad@formyfriends.org>
Sent: Saturday, August 08, 2015 7:03 PM
Subject: What do I gain with Windows 10 as a blind person?


Hi,

I've been following all this Windows 10 stuff with great interest,
and I just have a question (with a lot of background first):

So FS says you shouldn't use Edge, you should use Firefox or IE.
(I'm doing that now in Windows 7.) You can't use the built in mail
program; you should use something like Thunderbird or Outlook. (I'm
doing that now in Windows 7.) And you should use Adobe Reader for PDF
documents.
(I'm doing that now in Windows 7.) Reviews I've read all seem to
indicate that Cortana is iffy at best.

So why should I upgrade again? I'm not being smart; I'd really like
to know if I'm going to gain anything other than having a new
operating system that I have to use in the same old ways. The only
benefit I can see is that Windows 10 will be supported beyond
January of 2020, where Windows
7 will not. Am I overlooking some wonderful new feature that should
cause me to want to hurry and upgrade? Or does the old saying, "If
it ain't broke, don't fix it," apply here? I'd really honestly like
to know if JAWS users in particular are finding anything beneficial
in the upgrade, or if it's just something fun to do to your
functioning computer to see if it will still function.

P.S. Anybody on this list from Louisiana and thinking Cortana, as in
mall?
--
Brad Martin
brad@formyfriends.org <mailto:brad@formyfriends.org> My Facebook
page where I post online shopping coupons and deals:
facebook.com/ucoupons <http://www.facebook.com/ucoupons>
My SmarterBucks signup link <http://bit.ly/1w5FCPu>
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Re: How To Stop Windows 10 from Sharing Your Bandwidth With Others Without Your Permission

Brad Martin
 

Ouch. This is going to burn a lot of people who don't realize (1) they have a metered or capped connection and (2) other people are getting files from it. I have Comcast, and I have a 300 GB limit. I've never even gotten to 40 GB, so I wouldn't think anything of it until all these people start uploading files from me without my knowledge? Sure you can turn it off or mark your connection as metered, but most people aren't going to know that! Here's a more detailed explanation of what Mark's talking about. I don't like all this "opted in" stuff. You should have to opt in if you want it, not opt out if you don't. But that would require Microsoft to take your best interest into account.

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-10/windows-update-delivery-optimization-faq

Brad

On 8/11/2015 4:18 PM, Mark via Jfw wrote:
Hello My Fellow Windows 10 Users,

You know, I was becoming less and less enthusiastic about Windows 10 as it
does so many things, in terms of sharing our personal information, and now,
it seems, even our band-width without our expressed permission, until I
discovered how to control it's somewhat hidden options.

Please read the following, carefully, to discover how to disable this, in my
opinion, very unwelcomed feature.

Mark

How to Disable Windows 10 Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO)

By default, Windows 10 is using your bandwidth by way of a new 'feature'
called Windows Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO). In a nutshell, Windows
10 is uploading files in the background to other Windows 10 users. This
brief guide will explain how to disable the Windows Update Delivery
Optimization service.

1.
Click the Windows 10 "Start Button" and select Settings
2.
Select Update & security from the Settings menu.
3.
Click Advanced options
4.
Click Choose how updates are delivered
5.
Finally, toggle Updates from more than one place to Off
6.
All done!


_______________________________________________
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Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
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--
Brad Martin
brad@formyfriends.org <mailto:brad@formyfriends.org>
My Facebook page where I post online shopping coupons and deals: facebook.com/ucoupons <http://www.facebook.com/ucoupons>
My SmarterBucks signup link <http://bit.ly/1w5FCPu>
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Re: How To Stop Windows 10 from Sharing Your Bandwidth With Others Without Your Permission

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Mark, this information is brailled and in my notebook, so that I can follow
your instructions to the T. Thanks.

Best from,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 5:19 PM
To: 'Jaws for Windows' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark <facebookmark@candleshoreblog.com>
Subject: How To Stop Windows 10 from Sharing Your Bandwidth With Others
Without Your Permission

Hello My Fellow Windows 10 Users,

You know, I was becoming less and less enthusiastic about Windows 10 as it
does so many things, in terms of sharing our personal information, and now,
it seems, even our band-width without our expressed permission, until I
discovered how to control it's somewhat hidden options.

Please read the following, carefully, to discover how to disable this, in my
opinion, very unwelcomed feature.

Mark

How to Disable Windows 10 Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO)

By default, Windows 10 is using your bandwidth by way of a new 'feature'
called Windows Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO). In a nutshell, Windows
10 is uploading files in the background to other Windows 10 users. This
brief guide will explain how to disable the Windows Update Delivery
Optimization service.

1.
Click the Windows 10 "Start Button" and select Settings

2.
Select Update & security from the Settings menu.

3.
Click Advanced options

4.
Click Choose how updates are delivered

5.
Finally, toggle Updates from more than one place to Off

6.
All done!


_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


Re: How To Stop Windows 10's Prying Eyes

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Speaking of privacy issues, Good Computer Guy told us Sunday that their
company already had six calls for service, where Edge was contaminated by
viruses.


Best from,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 5:06 PM
To: 'Jaws for Windows' <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark <facebookmark@candleshoreblog.com>
Subject: How To Stop Windows 10's Prying Eyes

Hello Everyone,

I strongly suggest that anyone who has already installed or is considering
installing Windows 10, read this article, the link to which may be found at
the bottom of the text.

Mark

How To Stop Windows 10's Prying Eyes

Windows 10 is here, and Microsoft's latest operating system is designed for
a mobile-first, cloud-first future, as CEO Satya Nadella puts it. But that
future relies on big data - your data - and by default, Windows 10 can track
and share the websites you visit, the purchases you make, the places you go,
the words you type, the things you say and more.

You have the ability to control Windows 10's data collection, but it takes
some doing. The installation process lets you customize privacy settings at
the end or go with the defaults in "express settings." We'd suggest taking
the extra two minutes to forgo the latter and make your own choices here, or
adjusting the options after installation, because Microsoft's default
privacy settings might not be as private as you'd like.

The first page of settings lists four options that you can toggle on or off,
while the second page lists five items. All of them are on by default.

Under "Personalization," the first setting tailors your "speech, typing and
inking input" to the way you talk, type and write ... "by sending contacts
and calendar details, along with other associated input data to Microsoft."
The next setting sends typing and inking data to Microsoft to "improve the
recognition and suggestion platform."


Must Read
Windows 10 may do the impossible: help Microsoft win back the hearts of PC
gamers Some people may be comfortable with this usage; after all,
third-party smartphone keyboards like SwiftKey improve their autocorrect
functionality by learning how you type. But for others, sharing "contacts
and calendar details" may be a bridge too far.

Next is a rather nebulous entry: "Let apps use your advertising ID for
experiences across apps." What this sentence doesn't quite explain is that
Windows 10 generates a unique advertising ID for each user. If this option
is enabled, it allows app developers and ad networks to profile you using
that ID and serve you ads based on how you use your PC.

The final part of the first settings page concerns location. Your computer
may not have a GPS radio in it like your smartphone does, but if you're
connected to the internet, your location can be tracked through your IP
address. With this option enabled, you're allowing Windows and apps to
request your location, including your location history. That's useful for
location-based services like, say, telling a retailer's website where you
are so it can give you the address of the nearest store.

However, the location setting also lets Windows 10 "send Microsoft and
trusted partners some location data to improve location services." That part
of the equation may give you pause, especially since you have no say in what
Microsoft's "trusted partners" might be. (ExtremeTech reports that the
Windows 8 installation process included a similar setting, but without the
sharing of your data with so-called trusted partners.)

Let's move to page two. The first toggle in the browser section enables
Microsoft's SmartScreen Filter, which protects you against "malicious
content and downloads" in Windows browsers - Microsoft Edge, which debuts in
Windows 10, and Internet Explorer - and Windows Store apps. That sounds
pretty good! Next is a setting for page prediction, which sends your
browsing data to Microsoft to "improve reading, speed up browsing, and make
your overall experience better in Windows browsers." You may have a similar
feature enabled in your existing web browser, such as Google Chrome.


The next two options govern the way your PC connects to wireless networks,
as part of a new Windows 10 feature called Wi-Fi Sense. The first setting
lets you automatically connect to "suggested open hotspots," while the
second does the same for "networks shared by your contacts."

According to Microsoft's Wi-Fi Sense FAQ, the former setting relies on
Microsoft's crowdsourced database of open Wi-Fi hotspots. If enough people
get a good-quality connection from a hotspot, it'll be added to the
database.

The second setting is meant to eliminate the hassle of asking a friend for
their Wi-Fi password when you visit their place. If enabled, the setting
does two things: (1) allows you to select Wi-Fi networks to share with your
Outlook.com contacts, Skype contacts or Facebook friends, and (2) lets your
PC automatically connect to networks people have shared with you.

The way this works is that Wi-Fi passwords are shared through Wi-Fi Sense.
The passwords are encrypted, and Wi-Fi Sense only provides internet access,
not file sharing access. But those encrypted passwords are stored on a
Microsoft server somewhere. And there's no granularity: If you click the
Facebook check box, Wi-Fi Sense will allow all of your Facebook friends to
connect to networks you've selected for sharing.

The final setting during Windows 10's installation process lets your
computer "send error and diagnostic information to Microsoft." So if
something goes wrong with your PC in the future, it can send details of the
situation to Microsoft, and the company can hopefully use that data to help
find you a solution to the issue.


Adjusting privacy after installing Windows 10 If you did just click "express
settings" during the Windows 10 installation, that's OK: You can still
change any of these settings whenever you want.
Microsoft offers a guide with a laughable lack of specifics on how to do
this, so here are some details.

Instead of visiting the Control Panel, like you might be accustomed to
doing, open the Start menu (yes, it's back!) and click on Settings in the
lower left area. (You can also reach the system settings by opening up
Windows 10's new Action Center - click on the speech bubble near the right
end of the taskbar, then click "All settings.")

Most of the aforementioned toggles can be found under Privacy. That section
also contains a host of other privacy settings, like options for which apps
are allowed to access your PC's location, camera, microphone, contacts,
calendar and more. To get to the Wi-Fi Sense options, click Network &
Internet in the system settings, then hit "Manage Wi-Fi settings" below the
list of available networks.

Hey, Cortana
Cortana, Microsoft's voice-powered digital assistant - and yes, she's named
after the Halo character - is integrated directly into Windows 10. She's
undeniably useful, able to search your computer and the internet through
voice commands initiated with the phrase "hey, Cortana." She also offers
Google Now-like features such as presenting you with news, sports scores,
alerts, reminders and more.

But like Google with Google Now, Apple with Siri and Amazon with the Echo,
Microsoft needs to collect a lot of data about you and how you use the
internet in order to deliver that magical-seeming functionality. Here's a
relevant excerpt from Microsoft's privacy statement:

To enable Cortana to provide personalized experiences and relevant
suggestions, Microsoft collects and uses various types of data, such as your
device location, data from your calendar, the apps you use, data from your
emails and text messages, who you call, your contacts and how often you
interact with them on your device. Cortana also learns about you by
collecting data about how you use your device and other Microsoft services,
such as your music, alarm settings, whether the lock screen is on, what you
view and purchase, your browse and Bing search history, and more.
Cortana also analyzes your speech data, of course, and that information is
"sent to Microsoft to build personalized speech models and improve speech
recognition." Again, this kind of tracking is common to all these services,
because they couldn't function without it. But if you're not comfortable
with it, you can click the search bar that's embedded in the Windows 10
taskbar, then click the gear icon on the left side to access your Cortana
settings. There, you can turn Cortana on or off, and manage the information
about you that Cortana keeps in the cloud.

Personalized advertising
The last piece of the privacy puzzle isn't in Windows 10 at all; it's
located on a website, as Rock, Paper, Shotgun points out. On that site,
Microsoft makes the case for tailoring ads to your interests, and indeed,
that's something you may want. But the company lets you opt out of ad
personalization in two separate situations: in your browser, and "wherever I
use my Microsoft account," which includes Windows, Xbox and other Microsoft
services.

Read the fine print
As we've noted above, online services that rely on the collection of mounds
of user data are only becoming more ubiquitous. These services look to make
our lives easier by learning how we live, work and play so they can
anticipate our next move, satisfying our desires before we even express
them.

it's worth knowing what you're signing up for There's a larger conversation
to be had about whether, or to what extent, we should be entrusting our
ever-growing digital footprints to corporations like Microsoft, Apple,
Google, Facebook and Amazon. But whichever side of the debate you fall on,
it's worth knowing what you're signing up for when you scroll past the next
end-user license agreement you see.

Article at:
http://www.polygon.com/2015/7/31/9075531/windows-10-privacy-how-to





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Re: stop the "clickable"

Michael B. <mb69mach1@...>
 

Hi Mario,

You can try the following:
In "Settings Center"
under the "Web / HTML / PDFs"
category, there is a subcategory labeled
"Miscellaneous"
Under "Miscellaneous"
there is a setting labeled
"Indicate Element Attribute"
Unchecking this setting will stop Jaws from saying
"Clickable"
Although it's not recommended since there are times when you will miss
out on elements of webpages that may be useful and are clickable.

Take care.
Mike
This email was sent from my, iGoDodgersBarstool.

----- Original Message -----
From: Mario via Jfw
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Mario
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 1:37 PM
Subject: stop the "clickable"


I recall this issue being discussed but don't recall if a definite
solution was given:
for future reference, what is a "clickable" item and how is it
activated, because pressing enter or the space bar doesn't seam to do
anything? and how to stop JAWS from announcing "clickable" when
reviewing the contents of web pages in either using Firefox or Internet
Explorer(or any other browser)?


_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com
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How To Stop Windows 10 from Sharing Your Bandwidth With Others Without Your Permission

Mark <facebookmark@...>
 

Hello My Fellow Windows 10 Users,

You know, I was becoming less and less enthusiastic about Windows 10 as it
does so many things, in terms of sharing our personal information, and now,
it seems, even our band-width without our expressed permission, until I
discovered how to control it's somewhat hidden options.

Please read the following, carefully, to discover how to disable this, in my
opinion, very unwelcomed feature.

Mark

How to Disable Windows 10 Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO)

By default, Windows 10 is using your bandwidth by way of a new 'feature'
called Windows Update Delivery Optimization (WUDO). In a nutshell, Windows
10 is uploading files in the background to other Windows 10 users. This
brief guide will explain how to disable the Windows Update Delivery
Optimization service.

1.
Click the Windows 10 "Start Button" and select Settings

2.
Select Update & security from the Settings menu.

3.
Click Advanced options

4.
Click Choose how updates are delivered

5.
Finally, toggle Updates from more than one place to Off

6.
All done!


How To Stop Windows 10's Prying Eyes

Mark <facebookmark@...>
 

Hello Everyone,

I strongly suggest that anyone who has already installed or is considering
installing Windows 10, read this article, the link to which may be found at
the bottom of the text.

Mark

How To Stop Windows 10's Prying Eyes

Windows 10 is here, and Microsoft's latest operating system is designed for
a mobile-first, cloud-first future, as CEO Satya Nadella puts it. But that
future relies on big data - your data - and by default, Windows 10 can track
and share the websites you visit, the purchases you make, the places you go,
the words you type, the things you say and more.

You have the ability to control Windows 10's data collection, but it takes
some doing. The installation process lets you customize privacy settings at
the end or go with the defaults in "express settings." We'd suggest taking
the extra two minutes to forgo the latter and make your own choices here, or
adjusting the options after installation, because Microsoft's default
privacy settings might not be as private as you'd like.

The first page of settings lists four options that you can toggle on or off,
while the second page lists five items. All of them are on by default.

Under "Personalization," the first setting tailors your "speech, typing and
inking input" to the way you talk, type and write ... "by sending contacts
and calendar details, along with other associated input data to Microsoft."
The next setting sends typing and inking data to Microsoft to "improve the
recognition and suggestion platform."


Must Read
Windows 10 may do the impossible: help Microsoft win back the hearts of PC
gamers Some people may be comfortable with this usage; after all,
third-party smartphone keyboards like SwiftKey improve their autocorrect
functionality by learning how you type. But for others, sharing "contacts
and calendar details" may be a bridge too far.

Next is a rather nebulous entry: "Let apps use your advertising ID for
experiences across apps." What this sentence doesn't quite explain is that
Windows 10 generates a unique advertising ID for each user. If this option
is enabled, it allows app developers and ad networks to profile you using
that ID and serve you ads based on how you use your PC.

The final part of the first settings page concerns location. Your computer
may not have a GPS radio in it like your smartphone does, but if you're
connected to the internet, your location can be tracked through your IP
address. With this option enabled, you're allowing Windows and apps to
request your location, including your location history. That's useful for
location-based services like, say, telling a retailer's website where you
are so it can give you the address of the nearest store.

However, the location setting also lets Windows 10 "send Microsoft and
trusted partners some location data to improve location services." That part
of the equation may give you pause, especially since you have no say in what
Microsoft's "trusted partners" might be. (ExtremeTech reports that the
Windows 8 installation process included a similar setting, but without the
sharing of your data with so-called trusted partners.)

Let's move to page two. The first toggle in the browser section enables
Microsoft's SmartScreen Filter, which protects you against "malicious
content and downloads" in Windows browsers - Microsoft Edge, which debuts in
Windows 10, and Internet Explorer - and Windows Store apps. That sounds
pretty good! Next is a setting for page prediction, which sends your
browsing data to Microsoft to "improve reading, speed up browsing, and make
your overall experience better in Windows browsers." You may have a similar
feature enabled in your existing web browser, such as Google Chrome.


The next two options govern the way your PC connects to wireless networks,
as part of a new Windows 10 feature called Wi-Fi Sense. The first setting
lets you automatically connect to "suggested open hotspots," while the
second does the same for "networks shared by your contacts."

According to Microsoft's Wi-Fi Sense FAQ, the former setting relies on
Microsoft's crowdsourced database of open Wi-Fi hotspots. If enough people
get a good-quality connection from a hotspot, it'll be added to the
database.

The second setting is meant to eliminate the hassle of asking a friend for
their Wi-Fi password when you visit their place. If enabled, the setting
does two things: (1) allows you to select Wi-Fi networks to share with your
Outlook.com contacts, Skype contacts or Facebook friends, and (2) lets your
PC automatically connect to networks people have shared with you.

The way this works is that Wi-Fi passwords are shared through Wi-Fi Sense.
The passwords are encrypted, and Wi-Fi Sense only provides internet access,
not file sharing access. But those encrypted passwords are stored on a
Microsoft server somewhere. And there's no granularity: If you click the
Facebook check box, Wi-Fi Sense will allow all of your Facebook friends to
connect to networks you've selected for sharing.

The final setting during Windows 10's installation process lets your
computer "send error and diagnostic information to Microsoft." So if
something goes wrong with your PC in the future, it can send details of the
situation to Microsoft, and the company can hopefully use that data to help
find you a solution to the issue.


Adjusting privacy after installing Windows 10
If you did just click "express settings" during the Windows 10 installation,
that's OK: You can still change any of these settings whenever you want.
Microsoft offers a guide with a laughable lack of specifics on how to do
this, so here are some details.

Instead of visiting the Control Panel, like you might be accustomed to
doing, open the Start menu (yes, it's back!) and click on Settings in the
lower left area. (You can also reach the system settings by opening up
Windows 10's new Action Center - click on the speech bubble near the right
end of the taskbar, then click "All settings.")

Most of the aforementioned toggles can be found under Privacy. That section
also contains a host of other privacy settings, like options for which apps
are allowed to access your PC's location, camera, microphone, contacts,
calendar and more. To get to the Wi-Fi Sense options, click Network &
Internet in the system settings, then hit "Manage Wi-Fi settings" below the
list of available networks.

Hey, Cortana
Cortana, Microsoft's voice-powered digital assistant - and yes, she's named
after the Halo character - is integrated directly into Windows 10. She's
undeniably useful, able to search your computer and the internet through
voice commands initiated with the phrase "hey, Cortana." She also offers
Google Now-like features such as presenting you with news, sports scores,
alerts, reminders and more.

But like Google with Google Now, Apple with Siri and Amazon with the Echo,
Microsoft needs to collect a lot of data about you and how you use the
internet in order to deliver that magical-seeming functionality. Here's a
relevant excerpt from Microsoft's privacy statement:

To enable Cortana to provide personalized experiences and relevant
suggestions, Microsoft collects and uses various types of data, such as your
device location, data from your calendar, the apps you use, data from your
emails and text messages, who you call, your contacts and how often you
interact with them on your device. Cortana also learns about you by
collecting data about how you use your device and other Microsoft services,
such as your music, alarm settings, whether the lock screen is on, what you
view and purchase, your browse and Bing search history, and more.
Cortana also analyzes your speech data, of course, and that information is
"sent to Microsoft to build personalized speech models and improve speech
recognition." Again, this kind of tracking is common to all these services,
because they couldn't function without it. But if you're not comfortable
with it, you can click the search bar that's embedded in the Windows 10
taskbar, then click the gear icon on the left side to access your Cortana
settings. There, you can turn Cortana on or off, and manage the information
about you that Cortana keeps in the cloud.

Personalized advertising
The last piece of the privacy puzzle isn't in Windows 10 at all; it's
located on a website, as Rock, Paper, Shotgun points out. On that site,
Microsoft makes the case for tailoring ads to your interests, and indeed,
that's something you may want. But the company lets you opt out of ad
personalization in two separate situations: in your browser, and "wherever I
use my Microsoft account," which includes Windows, Xbox and other Microsoft
services.

Read the fine print
As we've noted above, online services that rely on the collection of mounds
of user data are only becoming more ubiquitous. These services look to make
our lives easier by learning how we live, work and play so they can
anticipate our next move, satisfying our desires before we even express
them.

it's worth knowing what you're signing up for
There's a larger conversation to be had about whether, or to what extent, we
should be entrusting our ever-growing digital footprints to corporations
like Microsoft, Apple, Google, Facebook and Amazon. But whichever side of
the debate you fall on, it's worth knowing what you're signing up for when
you scroll past the next end-user license agreement you see.

Article at:
http://www.polygon.com/2015/7/31/9075531/windows-10-privacy-how-to


Re: Upgraded to Windows 10 And Have a Question

 

Hi Jim,
They're buried in various places such as Settings/Privacy category (that's where you should start).
Cheers,
Joseph

----- Original Message -----
From: Jim Portillo via Jfw <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
Date sent: Tue, 11 Aug 2015 13:41:28 -0700
Subject: Re: Upgraded to Windows 10 And Have a Question

Oh wow. I wasn't aware of this settings thing. Now that I have it, where can I go to customize my privacy settings? I'd like to do that ASAP!
Jim


Sent from my iPhone 6!

On Aug 11, 2015, at 11:39 AM, Mark via Jfw <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com> wrote:

Hello Everyone,

I decided to take the plunge and upgrade from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10
Enterprise.

I am delighted to say that all seems well, so far. I had to use Narrator
during the installation because I began the upgrade process before reading
the Freedom Scientific Windows updating page. I'm certain the process would
have gone much more smoothly if I had but, what's done is done. During the
upgrade process, I was careful to use the custom settings path, as opposed
to the express setup, to insure that Windows 10 Privacy settings were
adjusted to my comfort level. Left unchallenged, Windows 10 will attempt to
tap into virtually everything you do and share that info with Microsoft.

My question:

Is there a specific Jaws user email list or forum for those using Windows
10? Or is this still the best place to discuss Windows 10/Jaws.

Oh, one more thing, as yet, I have not installed any third-party apps on my
notebook aside from Office 2007, which was installed prior to the update to
Windows 10.

While I own both Office 2010 professional and Office 2013 Professional, I
see no reason to update to either since 2007 Professional works just fine
for me.

I hope you are all having a great day.

Mark


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http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com

_______________________________________________
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Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


Re: Upgraded to Windows 10 And Have a Question

Jim Portillo
 

Oh wow. I wasn't aware of this settings thing. Now that I have it, where can I go to customize my privacy settings? I'd like to do that ASAP!
Jim


Sent from my iPhone 6!

On Aug 11, 2015, at 11:39 AM, Mark via Jfw <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com> wrote:

Hello Everyone,

I decided to take the plunge and upgrade from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10
Enterprise.

I am delighted to say that all seems well, so far. I had to use Narrator
during the installation because I began the upgrade process before reading
the Freedom Scientific Windows updating page. I'm certain the process would
have gone much more smoothly if I had but, what's done is done. During the
upgrade process, I was careful to use the custom settings path, as opposed
to the express setup, to insure that Windows 10 Privacy settings were
adjusted to my comfort level. Left unchallenged, Windows 10 will attempt to
tap into virtually everything you do and share that info with Microsoft.

My question:

Is there a specific Jaws user email list or forum for those using Windows
10? Or is this still the best place to discuss Windows 10/Jaws.

Oh, one more thing, as yet, I have not installed any third-party apps on my
notebook aside from Office 2007, which was installed prior to the update to
Windows 10.

While I own both Office 2010 professional and Office 2013 Professional, I
see no reason to update to either since 2007 Professional works just fine
for me.

I hope you are all having a great day.

Mark


_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


stop the "clickable"

Mario
 

I recall this issue being discussed but don't recall if a definite solution was given:
for future reference, what is a "clickable" item and how is it activated, because pressing enter or the space bar doesn't seam to do anything? and how to stop JAWS from announcing "clickable" when reviewing the contents of web pages in either using Firefox or Internet Explorer(or any other browser)?


Re: MY KEYBOARD SPEAKS FRENCH

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Can''t imagine that.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Bissett, Tom
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 3:43 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list. <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Bissett, Tom <tom.bissett@bmo.com>
Subject: MY KEYBOARD SPEAKS FRENCH

Hi, I posted this once before but didn't get any feedback. When I am on
gmail, it seems when I have cleaned up a bunch of old emails suddenly jaws
starts speaking French but only when typing. When I read back what I have
typed it is read in English. I have language detection off. It is only
when on the browser that this is happening. If I alt tab away and back the
issue remains. If I switch to another program jaws behaves normally but
begins again when I switch back to the browser.
The only way to correct this is to unload and reload jaws.
I just wondered if any one else has seen this very strange behaviour.
Tom Bisset

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Re: shutting down.....

Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@...>
 

Mine does that too and no musical sound coming or going.

Best from,

Carolyn

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark Furness
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 3:58 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list. <Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark Furness <flintman57@gmail.com>
Subject: shutting down.....

When I shut down my windows10 computer
The last thing it says is Jaws for windows: is this normal?

Mark

_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


Re: shutting down.....

Mark <facebookmark@...>
 

Hello,

The announcement does not occur when I shut down my Windows 10 computer.

Please keep in mind that since Windows 8, unless one specifically disables
the Fast User Switching option, the computer does not shut down in the sense
that we have come to understand the term in prior versions of Windows.
Instead, the default shut down option in both Windows 8.x and 10 places the
computer in a kind of hibernation mode preserving certain settings.

In order to truly shut down the computer, in the classic meaning of the
phrase, one must disable the fast-user switching located in the power
options settings of the OS. Once done, (1) Jaws will no longer announce
itself and (2) the computer will truly be shut down as it was in Windows 7
and earlier.

Mark

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Londa Peterson
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 1:07 PM
To: 'The Jaws for Windows support list.'
Cc: Londa Peterson
Subject: RE: shutting down.....

This is normal. It's been doing that since Windows 8.1. It surprised me at
first as well.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark Furness
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 3:58 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Mark Furness
Subject: shutting down.....

When I shut down my windows10 computer
The last thing it says is Jaws for windows: is this normal?

Mark

_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


_______________________________________________
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Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
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Re: MY KEYBOARD SPEAKS FRENCH

Bill White <billwhite92701@...>
 

Hi, Tom. Why not go into the Settings Center of JAWS while in your browser, find Language Detection, and turn it off. I know you said Language Detection is off, but possibly not in both applications.
Bill White billwhite92701@dslextreme.com

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bissett, Tom via Jfw" <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
To: "The Jaws for Windows support list." <jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: "Bissett, Tom" <tom.bissett@bmo.com>
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 12:43 PM
Subject: MY KEYBOARD SPEAKS FRENCH


Hi, I posted this once before but didn't get any feedback. When I am on gmail, it seems when I have cleaned up a bunch of old emails suddenly jaws starts speaking French but only when typing. When I read back what I have typed it is read in English. I have language detection off. It is only when on the browser that this is happening. If I alt tab away and back the issue remains. If I switch to another program jaws behaves normally but begins again when I switch back to the browser.
The only way to correct this is to unload and reload jaws.
I just wondered if any one else has seen this very strange behaviour.
Tom Bisset

_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 12079 (20150811) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 12079 (20150811) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com


Re: shutting down.....

Michael Mote
 

If you're running Windows 10, yes. My computer does that as well.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark Furness
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 2:58 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list. <Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com>
Cc: Mark Furness <flintman57@gmail.com>
Subject: shutting down.....

When I shut down my windows10 computer
The last thing it says is Jaws for windows: is this normal?

Mark

_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


Re: shutting down.....

Londa Peterson
 

This is normal. It's been doing that since Windows 8.1. It surprised me at
first as well.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jfw [mailto:jfw-bounces@lists.the-jdh.com] On Behalf Of Mark Furness
via Jfw
Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2015 3:58 PM
To: The Jaws for Windows support list.
Cc: Mark Furness
Subject: shutting down.....

When I shut down my windows10 computer
The last thing it says is Jaws for windows: is this normal?

Mark

_______________________________________________
Jfw mailing list
Jfw@lists.the-jdh.com
http://lists.the-jdh.com/mailman/listinfo/jfw_lists.the-jdh.com


shutting down.....

Mark Furness
 

When I shut down my windows10 computer
The last thing it says is Jaws for windows: is this normal?

Mark