Date   

Seeing your download

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

Pardon me for changing the thread here, but I’ve recently noticed something since switching to 11, and I think I saw something about it on this list earlier.  I can no longer track the progress of my download on screen.  Is there a default to restore the older behavior?  It might be right there on the opening screen, and I didn’t know to look for it.

 

Ted

 

From: Paul D. J. Jenkins [mailto:pdjj6123@...]
Sent: Sunday, December 27, 2015 7:14 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Sound Extension For Downloading In Chrome

 

Good evening Mike!

 

  I am sorry to have to pester you with this, but do you know of a similar extension for Mozilla Firefox?  Most unfortunately, there are still some pages I have an easier time working with in Firefox, than in Chrome.

 

Take care,

 

Paul Jenkins

 

From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@...]
Sent: Sunday, December 27, 2015 16:55
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Fw: Sound Extension For Downloading In Chrome

 

Howdy Y'all,

 

I finally found an extension that plays a sound when a download is complete.  Info is below:

 

Extension

 

Download Notifier
offered by ehaagwlke
(83)
Category: Productivity
4,514 users
Added to Chrome
Share

 

OVERVIEW
OVERVIEW
REVIEWS
REVIEWS
SUPPORT
SUPPORT
RELATED
RELATED

 

Compatible with your device
You get a desktop notification while your downloading finished.
0.0.5
I get the time to make the 'play a sound when download finished' feature configurable. And you also can decide whether the default download shelf should
display or not (though I prefer NOT).

 

Another change is, there will be more than one notification card displayed.

 

All things now could be configured via options page.

 

**********
V0.0.4
Here comes three new things:
1. The "Open" button now can be used
2. While one download finished, it would play a sound (not configurable for now)
3. The icon would be visible even if you are using a pure black theme

 

and one more thing (might be buggy):
- sometimes Chrome thought the file downloaded would be harmful, once this happened, this extension will prompt to ask for your confirmation, and this
will be done on the chrome://downloads page. And, this feature might be buggy, if
you encounter any problem, contact or email me. Thank you.

 

**********

 

This extension does two things:

 

1. Disabled the download shelf. Yes, I personally do not like it. So when I get the change, I just disabled it. You will get a badge while something is
downloading. Sorry no progress bar available for now.

 

2. Display a desktop notification when your downloading finished, and you could find it by one simple click.

 

TODO(May be implemented in future, may not):

 

1. An animated browser action icon which could show the downloading progress

 

2. A "OPEN" button on the notification card -- depends on whether Google would allow me to do so. [V0.0.4 added]

 

3. A popup shows all the downloads -- actually it was almost there, if there had not been some annoying bugs.
Report Abuse
Version: 0.0.5
Updated: June 21, 2015
Size: 1.73MiB
Languages: See all 2

Take care.
Mike


Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

Mario
 

I think the reason why website authors used the idea of the CAPTCHA is because it was the only solution they could think of to provide some way of thwarting spammers and web bots at the time, and therefore the wide spread use of these little devils, to add to what Gerald said.

On 1/6/2016 9:53 AM, Cindy Ray wrote:
Gerald, do you belong to a blind advocacy group? Either one of them? It is pretty amazing to make a statement like this if you don't: And the reason this situation exists in the first place is that the blindness advocacy groups which are supposed to look out for our best interests have shown absolutely no willingness to challenge online sellers who insist on confronting their customers, blind and sighted alike, with image captchas whose value at thwarting hackers is dubious at best.
We who are blind are all responsible for helping to make the changes. Much change has been made; some of this issue has been worked on as well. Probably the reason for audio captchas has something to do with blind advocacy groups. I don't for the life understand how people self-righteously make statements like this, yet they are not willing to stand with us and work on the problems.
Cindy


-----Original Message-----
From: Gerald Levy [mailto:bwaylimited@verizon.net]
Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 8:35 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?


And the reason this situation exists in the first place is that the blindness advocacy groups which are supposed to look out for our best interests have shown absolutely no willingness to challenge online sellers who insist on confronting their customers, blind and sighted alike, with image captchas whose value at thwarting hackers is dubious at best.

Gerald



-----Original Message-----
From: judith bron
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 9:18 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

And the only people excluded from making the statement they're human by identifying a captia are the blind. Sounds like a totally messed up system but we're still captive.

-----Original Message-----
From: Cindy Ray [mailto:cindyray@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 8:42 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

No, it isn't proof enough maybe, but it is one of the stones to barriers.
There is no such thing as 100% safe.
Cindy


-----Original Message-----
From: judith bron [mailto:jbron@optonline.net]
Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 7:36 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

I have been following this thread and still the question I have about captias for ages is still not answered. We have criminal minds who spend their time messing up people's lives by hacking their information via their on line accounts and stealing their identity. We have folks who steal people's address books and try to extort money from their family and friends. We are supposed to recognize an image so we can prove we're human and not robots. What can someone sitting on the other end of a computer in srilanka know about my status as a human being if I can tell him what some captia reads? If they would create the captias so we could read them back character by character problem solved, but that isn't proof enough that we're not devious. Judith

-----Original Message-----
From: Kane Brolin [mailto:kbrolin65@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2016 8:34 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

It will be a while before CAPTCHAs are stopped. This might happen, once compatibility with mobile browsing becomes a universal standard.
But the provider of online info related to my Visa card, for example, requires me to verify a CAPTCHA every time I sign in. Not just to change account settings or to do some other specialized or sensitive task--just to log in to check my points!

The muddy/hard-to-understand nature of the audio CAPTCHA is the whole point.
They want something that requires subjective, human perception to understand--not just a clear voice-print that dictation software could translate automatically into text in the way that Grasshopper does with a voicemail message.

-Kane























Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

 

Cindy Ray,

           You are entitled to your anger, which is justifiable, but not to your assertion that Captchas value at thwarting hackers is "dubious at best."  They functioned (and function) brilliantly at preventing machine-based attacks of all sorts.  They were and are a brilliant idea that had "the law of unintended consequences" attached.  They've also been modified with audio, at least genuine Captcha captchas have, due to accessibility concerns.

           Gerald's assertion is dubious, at best, as advocacy from individuals and groups is precisely what has driven the changes that have already occurred and continue to occur.  When it comes down to it the old adage, "It's not all about you," (and that's for the generic you) applies here.  Businesses and entities are only trying to protect themselves and their assets, and, by extension, their clients.  There is no malicious intent and there is far more awareness, and responsiveness, with regard to accessibility issues when those are identified.

           There is no "one size fits all" solution to any problem, and there is no utility in creating a completely permeable barrier when a partial barrier is actually needed.  Input from those negatively affected is an incredibly valuable and necessary part of working through some issues that really had not been anticipated.


Re: Is There a Way For Me to Change...

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

I guess you could cheat if you know how to manipulate the old DOS Date command.  Just set your system back, resave the file, and reset the date back to the current date.  It may not work, and I can’t see why anyone would want to do it, but that’s the best I can come up with on short notice.

 

Ted

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Sunday, December 27, 2015 12:15 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Is There a Way For Me to Change...

 

Date created cannot be changed through any easy means since it's meant to denote when file was actually created.  What gets shown by default in the generic "date" field in Windows Explorer is not date created, but date modified.  Any time a file is edited by any program that makes any changes that get saved the date modified will be updated.  Date created remains fixed at the date the file was created on the system.

You get some interesting results when you copy files with regard to these two dates.  The copied versions will have a date created of the date & time when you pasted them.  However, their date modified will be carried over from the original files, so you can have something that shows a date created of today but a date modified of three years ago.

Brian


Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

Cindy Ray <cindyray@...>
 

Gerald, do you belong to a blind advocacy group? Either one of them? It is pretty amazing to make a statement like this if you don't: And the reason this situation exists in the first place is that the blindness advocacy groups which are supposed to look out for our best interests have shown absolutely no willingness to challenge online sellers who insist on confronting their customers, blind and sighted alike, with image captchas whose value at thwarting hackers is dubious at best.
We who are blind are all responsible for helping to make the changes. Much change has been made; some of this issue has been worked on as well. Probably the reason for audio captchas has something to do with blind advocacy groups. I don't for the life understand how people self-righteously make statements like this, yet they are not willing to stand with us and work on the problems.
Cindy

-----Original Message-----
From: Gerald Levy [mailto:bwaylimited@verizon.net]
Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 8:35 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?


And the reason this situation exists in the first place is that the blindness advocacy groups which are supposed to look out for our best interests have shown absolutely no willingness to challenge online sellers who insist on confronting their customers, blind and sighted alike, with image captchas whose value at thwarting hackers is dubious at best.

Gerald



-----Original Message-----
From: judith bron
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 9:18 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

And the only people excluded from making the statement they're human by identifying a captia are the blind. Sounds like a totally messed up system but we're still captive.

-----Original Message-----
From: Cindy Ray [mailto:cindyray@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 8:42 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

No, it isn't proof enough maybe, but it is one of the stones to barriers.
There is no such thing as 100% safe.
Cindy


-----Original Message-----
From: judith bron [mailto:jbron@optonline.net]
Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 7:36 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

I have been following this thread and still the question I have about captias for ages is still not answered. We have criminal minds who spend their time messing up people's lives by hacking their information via their on line accounts and stealing their identity. We have folks who steal people's address books and try to extort money from their family and friends. We are supposed to recognize an image so we can prove we're human and not robots. What can someone sitting on the other end of a computer in srilanka know about my status as a human being if I can tell him what some captia reads? If they would create the captias so we could read them back character by character problem solved, but that isn't proof enough that we're not devious. Judith

-----Original Message-----
From: Kane Brolin [mailto:kbrolin65@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2016 8:34 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

It will be a while before CAPTCHAs are stopped. This might happen, once compatibility with mobile browsing becomes a universal standard.
But the provider of online info related to my Visa card, for example, requires me to verify a CAPTCHA every time I sign in. Not just to change account settings or to do some other specialized or sensitive task--just to log in to check my points!

The muddy/hard-to-understand nature of the audio CAPTCHA is the whole point.
They want something that requires subjective, human perception to understand--not just a clear voice-print that dictation software could translate automatically into text in the way that Grasshopper does with a voicemail message.

-Kane


Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

 

Judith,

            I will do my best to explain the function of Captchas as a security mechanism and some of the "side benefits" that have been derived from them.

            Captchas work extremely well in differentiating human beings from robots (mostly spambots).  The technology is evolving, and there is actually a move away from the conventional Captcha, but it's happening slowly.  Originally, virtually every Captcha text you would be presented with was literally scanned from old books and was usually two words.  These were words that were difficult to read and there was controversy about what they actually were, but only regarding a letter or two.  Having millions of humans see these, and give their typewritten responses as to what they were, gave researchers a way to narrow down what these words probably are as more and more people leaned toward a given answer.  They are excellent for preventing robots from using them like humans (sighted ones, anyway) do because they are not characters displayed in a way that technology can just skim off and spit back out, thus they prevent automated registrations and various sorts of automated attacks by programs.   The same idea carries over to the recordings used if you can't see these items.  They're not meant to be crystal clear because there does exist speech recognition software that can easily take "clean" recordings and translate them to the necessary text.  It's only humans that can hear recordings that have imperfections such as those that characterize old records with their pops and cracks (among other distractions) and zero in on what's signal (what they want you to type) and what's noise.

            Captchas, at least the ones that are actual Captchas, do not require that you give "the correct answer" but just one that's "correct enough."  The very nature of the beast is such that there is ambiguity about certain parts of the image, and so long as the response is unambiguous about the characters that are unambiguous, but could be anything for the characters that are ambiguous, the test is passed.  It really was a brilliant way to separate the human from the computerized intruder.  The addition of the audio portion was done after the light bulb went off that the blind and visually impaired are never going to be reading Captchas from the scanned images, but the audio is meant to be at least somewhat ambiguous as well for precisely the same reasons.

            I'm not trying to defend Captchas from an accessibility standpoint here.  But, contrary to your assertions, they are very, very, very effective at differentiating humans from robot programs and if you think about some of the places where you're encountering them you will see why that might be a security priority at that particular juncture.

            Security features are designed to be barriers.  What they ideally should not be are accessibility barriers.  If you go to the official website of the "classic Captcha" and click on anything you are immediately redirected to Google's site for the new reCaptcha (which, by the way, I'd really wonder if it is accessible by design, as it should be) where the next generation of the technology, which does not require any reading, but is "point and click" in a way that remains confusing to machines but quite clear to humans (and I think to screen readers, too).  I've seen lots of reCaptchas already.  This may let you know that what's coming next is better, or let you start complaining (and legitimately) about accessibility issues ahead of the broader use of this technology.

Brian


Re: How to Make JAWS Speak When the Value of a Field Changes?

Richard B. McDonald
 

No, the fields themselves do not move on the screen, they are fixed.

-----Original Message-----
From: Mario [mailto:mrb620@hotmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2016 10:57 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: How to Make JAWS Speak When the Value of a Field Changes?

do these fields move around while the value changes?
of course the numlock should be off when trying these:
did you try insert+numpad 7, insert+numpad 8, insert+numpad 9,
insert+tab or insert+up arrow?


On 1/5/2016 1:04 PM, Richard B. McDonald wrote:
Hi!

I use a program that has fields that contain numeric values. These
values periodically change based on information received by the
program from a ham radio which the program is monitoring. Presently,
I have to tab into the field, and then the value can be read by JAWS.
How can I make JAWS report the value of these fields each time they
change instead of having to tab into the field?

Thanks,

Richard


Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

judith bron
 

Agreed

-----Original Message-----
From: Gerald Levy [mailto:bwaylimited@verizon.net]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 9:35 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?


And the reason this situation exists in the first place is that the blindness advocacy groups which are supposed to look out for our best interests have shown absolutely no willingness to challenge online sellers who insist on confronting their customers, blind and sighted alike, with image captchas whose value at thwarting hackers is dubious at best.

Gerald



-----Original Message-----
From: judith bron
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 9:18 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

And the only people excluded from making the statement they're human by identifying a captia are the blind. Sounds like a totally messed up system but we're still captive.

-----Original Message-----
From: Cindy Ray [mailto:cindyray@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 8:42 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

No, it isn't proof enough maybe, but it is one of the stones to barriers.
There is no such thing as 100% safe.
Cindy


-----Original Message-----
From: judith bron [mailto:jbron@optonline.net]
Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 7:36 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

I have been following this thread and still the question I have about captias for ages is still not answered. We have criminal minds who spend their time messing up people's lives by hacking their information via their on line accounts and stealing their identity. We have folks who steal people's address books and try to extort money from their family and friends. We are supposed to recognize an image so we can prove we're human and not robots. What can someone sitting on the other end of a computer in srilanka know about my status as a human being if I can tell him what some captia reads? If they would create the captias so we could read them back character by character problem solved, but that isn't proof enough that we're not devious. Judith

-----Original Message-----
From: Kane Brolin [mailto:kbrolin65@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2016 8:34 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

It will be a while before CAPTCHAs are stopped. This might happen, once compatibility with mobile browsing becomes a universal standard.
But the provider of online info related to my Visa card, for example, requires me to verify a CAPTCHA every time I sign in. Not just to change account settings or to do some other specialized or sensitive task--just to log in to check my points!

The muddy/hard-to-understand nature of the audio CAPTCHA is the whole point.
They want something that requires subjective, human perception to understand--not just a clear voice-print that dictation software could translate automatically into text in the way that Grasshopper does with a voicemail message.

-Kane


Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

Gerald Levy
 

And the reason this situation exists in the first place is that the blindness advocacy groups which are supposed to look out for our best interests have shown absolutely no willingness to challenge online sellers who insist on confronting their customers, blind and sighted alike, with image captchas whose value at thwarting hackers is dubious at best.

Gerald

-----Original Message-----
From: judith bron
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 9:18 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

And the only people excluded from making the statement they're human by identifying a captia are the blind. Sounds like a totally messed up system but we're still captive.

-----Original Message-----
From: Cindy Ray [mailto:cindyray@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 8:42 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

No, it isn't proof enough maybe, but it is one of the stones to barriers. There is no such thing as 100% safe.
Cindy


-----Original Message-----
From: judith bron [mailto:jbron@optonline.net]
Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 7:36 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

I have been following this thread and still the question I have about captias for ages is still not answered. We have criminal minds who spend their time messing up people's lives by hacking their information via their on line accounts and stealing their identity. We have folks who steal people's address books and try to extort money from their family and friends. We are supposed to recognize an image so we can prove we're human and not robots. What can someone sitting on the other end of a computer in srilanka know about my status as a human being if I can tell him what some captia reads? If they would create the captias so we could read them back character by character problem solved, but that isn't proof enough that we're not devious. Judith

-----Original Message-----
From: Kane Brolin [mailto:kbrolin65@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2016 8:34 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

It will be a while before CAPTCHAs are stopped. This might happen, once compatibility with mobile browsing becomes a universal standard.
But the provider of online info related to my Visa card, for example, requires me to verify a CAPTCHA every time I sign in. Not just to change account settings or to do some other specialized or sensitive task--just to log in to check my points!

The muddy/hard-to-understand nature of the audio CAPTCHA is the whole point. They want something that requires subjective, human perception to understand--not just a clear voice-print that dictation software could translate automatically into text in the way that Grasshopper does with a voicemail message.

-Kane


Re: Need Steps For Updating Internet Explorer

 

Tom,

            Given your concern about your favorites, and even though I believe these are preserved as part of a version update, you should back them up first.  Presuing that Microsoft hasn't changed the menu structure (I only have IE11) you do this via the File menu, import and export option.

             Next you will go to the Microsoft page for Internet Explorer Download.  The page is automatically set up to check your system for the version you have and to present you with the download button for the latest version that will run on your system.  If memory serves, clicking that button will initiate the entire update process, which I'm sure includes download, dialog boxes once the upgrade starts, etc.

             IE11, like most browsers these days, does not display the menu bar by default.  Presuming you want that back on a permanent basis.  Hit Alt to bring up the menu bar for temporary display.  Under the View menu choose the Toolbars item and then check Menu Bar in the sidebar of items that comes up when you have chosen menu bar.

             I hope this is enough to at least let you take a swing at this.  I've done this upgrade many times but I haven't done it in a while and I loathe Internet Explorer, so I don't use it or do this on a routine enough basis to remember each and every tiny step in the actual upgrade process itself.

Brian


Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

Mario
 

in addition, the websites that do use CAPTCHAs sometimes do not offer an audio version.

On 1/5/2016 8:08 PM, Maria Campbell wrote:
Well of course, we can't see the letters, numbers, etc., but to add
insult to injury, the audible presentation is so garbled, it's hard to
tell, what to enter what one is supposed to hears. And that doesn't
even come close to the additional problems for people with hearing loss,
such as myself.


On 1/5/2016 6:54 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
. . . and I ask that question in all sincerity, since I haven't yet had
a client complain to me about not being able to get past them.

The version I'm seeing these days always includes a "pronounce it"
button an a "reload another" button attached to the Captcha, and I'm
wondering if those simply don't work when working with JAWS.

I may have to include "Captcha practice" at some point in the future, as
I know they're fairly ubiquitous.

Brian


Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

judith bron
 

And the only people excluded from making the statement they're human by identifying a captia are the blind. Sounds like a totally messed up system but we're still captive.

-----Original Message-----
From: Cindy Ray [mailto:cindyray@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 8:42 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

No, it isn't proof enough maybe, but it is one of the stones to barriers. There is no such thing as 100% safe.
Cindy


-----Original Message-----
From: judith bron [mailto:jbron@optonline.net]
Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 7:36 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

I have been following this thread and still the question I have about captias for ages is still not answered. We have criminal minds who spend their time messing up people's lives by hacking their information via their on line accounts and stealing their identity. We have folks who steal people's address books and try to extort money from their family and friends. We are supposed to recognize an image so we can prove we're human and not robots. What can someone sitting on the other end of a computer in srilanka know about my status as a human being if I can tell him what some captia reads? If they would create the captias so we could read them back character by character problem solved, but that isn't proof enough that we're not devious. Judith

-----Original Message-----
From: Kane Brolin [mailto:kbrolin65@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2016 8:34 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

It will be a while before CAPTCHAs are stopped. This might happen, once compatibility with mobile browsing becomes a universal standard.
But the provider of online info related to my Visa card, for example, requires me to verify a CAPTCHA every time I sign in. Not just to change account settings or to do some other specialized or sensitive task--just to log in to check my points!

The muddy/hard-to-understand nature of the audio CAPTCHA is the whole point. They want something that requires subjective, human perception to understand--not just a clear voice-print that dictation software could translate automatically into text in the way that Grasshopper does with a voicemail message.

-Kane


Re: indentations

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

Do an Alt-O for format, and P for paragraph. That’ll get you where you want to go.

 

Ted

 

From: judith bron [mailto:jbron@...]
Sent: Thursday, December 24, 2015 1:17 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: indentations

 

In the past I was able to set the formatting in the document that when I hit enter in a document to begin a new paragraph the first word was indented by 0.5 inches.  Is there a way to do this with Word 2010?

 

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Thursday, December 24, 2015 12:32 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: indentations

 

Judith,

        I'm unclear as to whether you're asking how to make it such that if you hit an enter each new paragraph automatically starts with an indent or simply how to make an indent. 

        Hitting the Tab key will give you an indent at the beginning of the paragraph and you, of course, are controlling this entirely manually.

        You can also set a hanging indent using the top slider on the horizontal ruler at the top of your document (which, unfortunately, I do not know how to control with JAWS) which sets an automatic indent when you hit Enter to start a new paragraph.  Also, open Word Help and search on the phrase "set tab stops."  There is a section in there which describes how to set a hanging indent not with the slider, but using a dialog box, but you will likely understand how to bring that dialog up in JAWS after reading what's there.

         Happy Holidays to you and yours as well.

Brian


Re: MathML and PDF files

Lisle, Ted (CHFS DMS)
 

That point about the time frame was well taken.  I took my terminal Degree in May, 1982, when the IBM pc was a new product, and before TI taught PC’s how to talk.  I remember I had 4 written exams in the fall of 1978, before I could spend full-time working on my dissertation.  Each student had 24 hours to complete his exam, my chair gave me 48, as it had to be done twice.  What I wouldn’t have given for my first XT back then.  I was lucky UK understood.

 

Ted

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: Wednesday, December 23, 2015 10:03 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: MathML and PDF files

 

Pablo,

         The sad fact is, and I don't say this to be nasty or dismissive but to introduce a reality check, that even with the advances that have been made in accessibility, and there have been many just over the last decade, the world is designed for "the typical" and those with significant disabilities are not "the typical."  This is one of the reasons I try to teach my clients (two of which are, at this time, graduate students) to learn to be their own advocates.  I do not know of a single college student who does not, with pretty much frequency, need to have a sighted reader, particularly for older print material or, as you've found, niche material like mathematical books, etc.  If colleges accept students with disabilities they are expected to provide reasonable accommodations, but very often they have absolutely no idea what that entails.  I have to say that this is not necessarily their fault, either, because students with disabilities are a micro niche and even the disabilities coordinators may be encountering someone with "disability X" or "disability Y" for the first time, ever, and have no idea of what's what.  It is absolutely impossible for any disabilities coordinator to have in-depth knowledge of every disability, or combination of disabilities, they might encounter.  A lot of thinking on one's feet is involved and, very often, taking input from the client as to what they've needed in the past in similar settings.  It's an uphill battle for all involved, including a lot of people who genuinely want to help you.

          If you actually know what you need, and in a situation like this is will probably be a reader, then push to get one.  Once you're in school you will find that "time is of the essence" will take on some real, new meaning even if you are given time accommodations for specific assignments.  You are going to have to figure out what you will require to meet those deadlines and, if it's not already in place, start rattling cages to get it into place as promptly as possible.

          If there is a state department for the blind and visually impaired in your state you would be wise to link up with them for assistance and advocacy.  Even then, you'll still have to sometimes push for what you need.

          I am not trying to be discouraging at all.  You can be a college student and be blind, but your college experience will, by definition, be very different than that of most students and you will need to be thinking about what you need all the time, and trying to anticipate what you might need as your courses change.

          One of the things that's driven me crazy as a JAWS tutor for students is the introduction of web-based course management systems.  These things are great if you can see, and can instantly tell what out of the myriad features your given professor may or may not be using for a given course, but if you can't we know how JAWS reads every blessed thing on a screen, and lots of these screens are chock full of links that aren't used, but remain there as place holders.  I have tried to encourage several local institutions to set up either "sandbox" versions of these systems with fake courses loaded so that those who have to access them with screen readers can have practice, and lots of it, prior to actually needing to use these systems for actual courses (or setting up fake courses in their real systems that they can enroll you in for practice).  The electronic course management system could be an entire semester's class alone, and no one should be trying to learn how to use it while also trying to learn the actual material for a course.

           You can do this, but you will, unquestionably, be working harder to get it done in ways that no one who is not in your situation will ever understand entirely, myself included.

Brian


Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

Cindy Ray <cindyray@...>
 

No, it isn't proof enough maybe, but it is one of the stones to barriers. There is no such thing as 100% safe.
Cindy

-----Original Message-----
From: judith bron [mailto:jbron@optonline.net]
Sent: Wednesday, January 6, 2016 7:36 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

I have been following this thread and still the question I have about captias for ages is still not answered. We have criminal minds who spend their time messing up people's lives by hacking their information via their on line accounts and stealing their identity. We have folks who steal people's address books and try to extort money from their family and friends. We are supposed to recognize an image so we can prove we're human and not robots. What can someone sitting on the other end of a computer in srilanka know about my status as a human being if I can tell him what some captia reads? If they would create the captias so we could read them back character by character problem solved, but that isn't proof enough that we're not devious. Judith

-----Original Message-----
From: Kane Brolin [mailto:kbrolin65@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2016 8:34 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

It will be a while before CAPTCHAs are stopped. This might happen, once compatibility with mobile browsing becomes a universal standard.
But the provider of online info related to my Visa card, for example, requires me to verify a CAPTCHA every time I sign in. Not just to change account settings or to do some other specialized or sensitive task--just to log in to check my points!

The muddy/hard-to-understand nature of the audio CAPTCHA is the whole point. They want something that requires subjective, human perception to understand--not just a clear voice-print that dictation software could translate automatically into text in the way that Grasshopper does with a voicemail message.

-Kane


Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

judith bron
 

I have been following this thread and still the question I have about captias for ages is still not answered. We have criminal minds who spend their time messing up people's lives by hacking their information via their on line accounts and stealing their identity. We have folks who steal people's address books and try to extort money from their family and friends. We are supposed to recognize an image so we can prove we're human and not robots. What can someone sitting on the other end of a computer in srilanka know about my status as a human being if I can tell him what some captia reads? If they would create the captias so we could read them back character by character problem solved, but that isn't proof enough that we're not devious. Judith

-----Original Message-----
From: Kane Brolin [mailto:kbrolin65@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2016 8:34 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

It will be a while before CAPTCHAs are stopped. This might happen, once compatibility with mobile browsing becomes a universal standard.
But the provider of online info related to my Visa card, for example, requires me to verify a CAPTCHA every time I sign in. Not just to change account settings or to do some other specialized or sensitive task--just to log in to check my points!

The muddy/hard-to-understand nature of the audio CAPTCHA is the whole point. They want something that requires subjective, human perception to understand--not just a clear voice-print that dictation software could translate automatically into text in the way that Grasshopper does with a voicemail message.

-Kane


Need Steps For Updating Internet Explorer

Tom Behler
 

Hello.

 

Can someone give me the steps to update Internet Explorer to IE 11?

 

Currently, on this laptop I use for work, I have IE 9.

 

As we all know, IE 9 will soon not be supported, so I’m thinking I need to bite the bullet and upgrade to IE 11.

 

For reasons I still don’t understand, I had significant problems when trying to enter information into text edit boxes in IE 11 on my home computer this past summer, so I thought I’d upgrade the work computer to IE 11 first, and deal with the home PC from there.

 

I’m currently using Jaws 16 with Windows 7.

 

Also, when you upgrade, are your favorites preserved, or will I have to re-create them for the new version?

 

Thank you!

 

Dr.  Tom Behler from Michigan

 


Re: Home based employment

Michael Mote
 

Hi! I would be interested in your work at home experiences as well.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jonelle P [mailto:jonellenicole@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2016 9:16 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Home based employment

Hi to Laura and Tina

I wanted to share that I am a Jaws 16 user who has been working from home for several companies for over 5 years now, and am also interested in the best rout to pursuing Medical transcription as a long-term career. I'll be glad to exchange links and tips about getting started with working at home. I don't mind shareing my info and you can email me at my gmail listed above, and we can even share Skype since that's where a lot of at home companies and agents connect. Thanks.

Jonelle

On 1/5/16, Adekoya Rasak <rasakadekoya@gmail.com> wrote:
big thank to Charles. but please, can a visually impaired person who
lives in a country in Africa enroll for any of tis job opportunit?

regard

On 04/01/2016, Carolyn Arnold <4carolyna@windstream.net> wrote:
If you get the scissors type, they can be taped together. When I
worked, I had three of them taped together - one for Vocal Eyes; one
for the main dictation machine and one for cassettes. It worked with
no problem.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: Kimsan [mailto:kimsansong@outlook.com]
Sent: Monday, January 4, 2016 12:37 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Home based employment

I have moderate to severe, or is it the other way around hearing
loss, so I have to do everything from the left ear.

Rather uncomfortable to put the phone and headset to one ear lol.
-----Original Message-----
From: Carolyn Arnold [mailto:4carolyna@windstream.net]
Sent: Monday, January 4, 2016 9:31 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Home based employment

I do that all the time, when I call the bank or credit card company,
earbud in right ear for computer, earbud in left for phone.

Bye for now,

Carolyn


-----Original Message-----
From: SingingHearts [mailto:singinghearts@gmail.com]
Sent: Monday, January 4, 2016 9:39 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Home based employment

I have improvised with a headset for one source and earbuds for the
other when doing medical transcription from home with one side of the
headset covering one ear and one earbud in the other. A refreshable
braille display/notetaker was very helpful, too. The companies I've
worked for provided the transcription-specific equipment (hardware and software).
Many
medical references are available online. Searching them out ahead of
time, bookmarking them, and familiarizing yourself with them can be a
great timesaver.

Hth,
Tina C.


On 1/4/16, Michael Malver <mmalver@gmail.com> wrote:
You will need a hedset that allows you to hear JAWS in one ear, and
the phone (or whatever audio source you are listening to,) in the other.
Plantronics used to make such a device years ago. You will need this
regardless of whether you work from home, or out of the home.





From: Laura Richardson [mailto:laurakr65@gmail.com]
Sent: Monday, January 04, 2016 7:04 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Home based employment



Hi list members,



I'm currently searching for a customer service, medical
transcription, or other home based position but am not sure what
extra equipment I might need to do these types of jobs from home.
Do I need special software, special headset and/or ear bud, etc.? I
use Windows 7 and Jaws 15.



Could somebody please share their current or past experience with
home based employment? Any help would be greatly appreciated.



Laura








--
"If we had no winter, the spring would not be so pleasant: if we did
not sometimes taste of adversity, prosperity would not be so welcome."
Anne Bradstreet















--
ADEKOYA, Rasak.
|Lead Consultant 360Connect.
Inclusive Leadership® Coach.
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Re: IE 11 with Jaws 17

Michael Mote
 

I wonder if you have the new smart navigation feature on.  That has been introduced in JAWS 17, and it makes navigating pages different.  You may want to check and see if it is turned on, and if so, disable it for the page you’re referring to.  You can do this by pressing JAWS Key plus V, and then searching for smart navigation.  Good luck!

 

 

From: Jean Menzies [mailto:jemenzies@...]
Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2016 6:13 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: IE 11 with Jaws 17

 

I just upgraded to Windows 10, but I don’t think that’s the issue here. Using Jaws 17 and IE in Windows 10. When I go to a site like the Manage my apple ID page, I am finding it virtually impossible to navigate outside of edit fields. I can’t explain exactly what’s happening, but it’s like I can only read parts of the page, and old arrowing options aren’t working. One thing I remember is that in a combo edit field, the arrow keys actually are inserting numbers. Just strange behaviour all around.

 

IE 11 isn’t new. Jaws 17 is quite new for me, and Windows 10 is brand new. Any ideas what might be going on here?

 

Jean


Re: What is the issue with Captchas?

Gerald Levy
 

 
Actually, the use of image captchas seems to be expanding.  A few blind Amazon customers have reported being confronted by image captchas when they attempted to sign in to their accounts, and a few major merchants like Home Depot impose image cattchas during the online check-out procedure. In the case of Amazon, there is no audio captcha alternative, so the only recourse for a blind customer is to either use Webvisum or Rumola to solve the captcha or else find a working pair of eyeballs. 
 
Gerald
 
 
 

Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2016 8:39 PM
Subject: Re: What is the issue with Captchas?
 
Some of them have gotten better than they used to be. I swear some of the old ones were so muffled you'd hear
oo
and you didn't know if
oo
was
2
q
or
u

**ee
was it
t
e
v
b
c
d
p

Some sites still don't have audio captchas, and in some cases where they do, the audio opens in a media player, so JAWS loses focus and you have to rush to get back to where you can type the captcha, by which point you've missed half the letters.

Brad

On 1/5/2016 6:54 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

. . . and I ask that question in all sincerity, since I haven't yet had a client complain to me about not being able to get past them.

The version I'm seeing these days always includes a "pronounce it" button an a "reload another" button attached to the Captcha, and I'm wondering if those simply don't work when working with JAWS.

I may have to include "Captcha practice" at some point in the future, as I know they're fairly ubiquitous.

Brian