Date   

Need help using JAWS with Airbnb.com

Tim Ford
 

Does anyone know how to navigate the airbnb.com web site?  I am having trouble navigating the all-important search results. 
 
Tim Ford
 


Re: How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

Adrian Spratt
 

Stan,

I'm beginning to feel guilty of tech malpractice, and I haven't earned even one tech-related certificate! Just keep in mind I don't carry tech malpractice insurance. But other queries off-list have caused me to clarify the steps, and I'll copy the updated set below. First, let me clarify why I opted for this procedure, because, as Brian says, there are different approaches. Personally, I hesitate to download software solutions unless I'm certain of the source. If there's a way of solving the problem without adding more software to my ever-growing software collection, I'll take it.

One point I picked up from another lister is that I hadn't emphasized enough the need to run the operation as administrator. The additional steps should clarify that part. As you'll see at the end, I also make reference to Brad's additional suggestion the other night. I haven't tested it yet, but I'm keeping it in mind in the event the Win10 notification comes back to haunt me, too. I can only say that I used to get that notification every few minutes, but ever since I followed the below steps, I havne't received it once.

So, here goes:

Windows 10 notification, how to uninstall and hide.

Two parts. First, with modifications, from
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/get-rid-windows-10-upgrade-notification-windows-7-8/
And then steps a tech friend and I devised.

The Windows Update is called KB3035583.

1. Type
command prompt
in the Win7 search window. Once it is typed, wait a moment or two for the prompt to settle down.

2. Press the applications key on the Command Prompt icon and down arrow to "Run as administrator."

3. Run the command prompt window with Win key-r. Press enter.

4. Type or copy:
WUSA /UNINSTALL /KB:3035583

5. Follow the on-screen prompts, and when complete type exit to close Command Prompt.

To hide Windows Updates from installing it again:

1. Go to Windows Update via Windows search and press enter.

2. Tab to "Change settings" and press enter.

3. Check the third item down, something to the effect of "Do it myself." Tab to OK.

4. Tab to something like "Critical update available" and press enter.

5. If the file is there, right-click and down arrow to hide. Press enter, then OK.

6. Tab back to "Change settings." Select "Automatic." Tab to OK.

7. Alt-F4 out of the dialog.

Note. Brad suggests adding the following step when blocking future updates. You run the risk of the hidden update getting unhidden if automatic updates run. I have found that turning off the option to "get recommended updates the same way as important updates" is helpful.

-----Original Message-----
From: Stan Holdeman [mailto:sholdeman@msn.com]
Sent: Sunday, January 24, 2016 9:31 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

I have followed the procedure twice now and the beloved message is right
there looking at me as I write this.

Stan


-----Original Message-----
From: Adrian Spratt
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2016 11:25 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

I recently uninstalled the Win10 notification and ensured it won't come
back. So far, so good. The steps below explain exactly what I did. the
uninstall instructions come from the indicated website. The instructions for
hiding (which essentially means removing) it from Windows automatic updates
follow. A friend and I worked them out together.

Two parts. First from
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/get-rid-windows-10-upgrade-notification-windows-7-8/

Uninstalling a Windows Update is surprisingly easy, as long as you know its
name. This update is called KB3035583 so we can use the command line to
delete it with a single command. Begin by opening the Command Prompt with
Administrator privileges (right-click the Command Prompt icon and select Run
as administrator). Run the command prompt window with Win key-r. Type or
copy:
WUSA /UNINSTALL /KB:3035583
Follow the on-screen prompts, and when complete type exit to close Command
Prompt.

To hide Windows Updates from installing it again:
Go to Windows Update via Windows search and press enter.
Tab to "Change settings" and press enter.
Check the third item down, something to the effect of "Do it myself." Tab to
OK.
Tab to something like "Critical update available" and press enter.
If the file is there, right-click and down arrow to hide. Press enter, then
OK.
Tab back to "Change settings." Select "Automatic." Tab to OK.
Alt-F4 out of the dialog.

-----Original Message-----
From: Mario [mailto:mrb620@hotmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2016 10:56 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

the problem with this is, if your windows update is set to automatic and
recommended updates are checked, the get windows 10 nag will be
reinstalled, regardless if it is hidden. Microsoft is despritly urging
users to upgrade, and they have the means to unhide what has been
hidden, even change the status of an update from optional to recommended
or important at will.

so download the gwx control panel program (I recommend the portable
version, not the installer), unzip it, run it, and enter on the option
to disable the get windows 10 app. if you should want to get windows 10,
reenabling is possible. just run the program again and enter on enable
the get windows 10 app.


gwx control panel:
http://ultimateoutsider.com/downloads/



On 1/23/2016 9:57 AM, Bill White wrote:
Hello, Tom and all. Here is what someone posted a while back as to how
to get rid of the "Get Windows 10 message".

How To Turn Off Windows10 Update Message In Windows7

Go to the run command and type in:

wusa.exe /uninstall /kb:3035583

re-boot the system.
this will uninstall the update and then when the update comes back you
will need to hide the update and not install it.

To Hide the update:

updates need to be set to download but let me install them that way
when they are downloaded you should have a new updates in the task tray
that you can click on and then you tab over to important updates Press
enter on that to bring up the list of downloaded updates. down arrow
through the list till you find the kb:3035583
update. Then uncheck the update with the Space Bar, and then right mouse
click on it.

you can then tab to the ok button and
press enter on the install button if there's other updates to install.

Bill White billwhite92701@dslextreme.com
<mailto:billwhite92701@dslextreme.com>

----- Original Message -----
*From:* Tom Behler <mailto:tombehler@gmail.com>
*To:* jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io>
*Sent:* Saturday, January 23, 2016 5:51 AM
*Subject:* How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

Hello, everyone.

Yesterday, I ran malware bytes on my home Windows 7 PC, and ever
since, I receive the "get windows 10" message every few minutes or
so. I can exit out of the message using alt F4, but the message
re-appears again soon thereafter.

How can I get rid of this message?

Personally, I find it not only annoying, but intrusive!

I do plan to upgrade to Windows 10 at some point, and don't need to
be constantly reminded of its availability!

Sorry for the little rant there, but this is really aggravating!

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus
signature database 12915 (20160123) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus
signature database 12915 (20160123) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com


Re: How To View Chkdsk Log Files

 
Edited

Mike,

           This post on sevenforums.com entitled, Windows 7: Check Disk (chkdsk) - Read Event Viewer Log, may prove helpful.  I always prefer the second option they present, where you run the following command in PowerShell to extract only Chkdsk-related events from the main event log:

get-winevent -FilterHashTable @{logname="Application"; id="1001"} | ?{$_.providername -match "wininit"} | fl timecreated, message | out-file Desktop\CHKDSKResults.txt

Then you'll have a filtered file named CHKDSKResults.txt on your desktop containing only the Chkdsk events.

Brian


Re: How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

Stan Holdeman
 

I have followed the procedure twice now and the beloved message is right there looking at me as I write this.

Stan

-----Original Message-----
From: Adrian Spratt
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2016 11:25 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

I recently uninstalled the Win10 notification and ensured it won't come back. So far, so good. The steps below explain exactly what I did. the uninstall instructions come from the indicated website. The instructions for hiding (which essentially means removing) it from Windows automatic updates follow. A friend and I worked them out together.

Two parts. First from
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/get-rid-windows-10-upgrade-notification-windows-7-8/

Uninstalling a Windows Update is surprisingly easy, as long as you know its name. This update is called KB3035583 so we can use the command line to delete it with a single command. Begin by opening the Command Prompt with Administrator privileges (right-click the Command Prompt icon and select Run as administrator). Run the command prompt window with Win key-r. Type or copy:
WUSA /UNINSTALL /KB:3035583
Follow the on-screen prompts, and when complete type exit to close Command Prompt.

To hide Windows Updates from installing it again:
Go to Windows Update via Windows search and press enter.
Tab to "Change settings" and press enter.
Check the third item down, something to the effect of "Do it myself." Tab to OK.
Tab to something like "Critical update available" and press enter.
If the file is there, right-click and down arrow to hide. Press enter, then OK.
Tab back to "Change settings." Select "Automatic." Tab to OK.
Alt-F4 out of the dialog.

-----Original Message-----
From: Mario [mailto:mrb620@hotmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2016 10:56 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

the problem with this is, if your windows update is set to automatic and
recommended updates are checked, the get windows 10 nag will be
reinstalled, regardless if it is hidden. Microsoft is despritly urging
users to upgrade, and they have the means to unhide what has been
hidden, even change the status of an update from optional to recommended
or important at will.

so download the gwx control panel program (I recommend the portable
version, not the installer), unzip it, run it, and enter on the option
to disable the get windows 10 app. if you should want to get windows 10,
reenabling is possible. just run the program again and enter on enable
the get windows 10 app.


gwx control panel:
http://ultimateoutsider.com/downloads/



On 1/23/2016 9:57 AM, Bill White wrote:
Hello, Tom and all. Here is what someone posted a while back as to how
to get rid of the "Get Windows 10 message".

How To Turn Off Windows10 Update Message In Windows7

Go to the run command and type in:

wusa.exe /uninstall /kb:3035583

re-boot the system.
this will uninstall the update and then when the update comes back you
will need to hide the update and not install it.

To Hide the update:

updates need to be set to download but let me install them that way
when they are downloaded you should have a new updates in the task tray
that you can click on and then you tab over to important updates Press
enter on that to bring up the list of downloaded updates. down arrow
through the list till you find the kb:3035583
update. Then uncheck the update with the Space Bar, and then right mouse
click on it.

you can then tab to the ok button and
press enter on the install button if there's other updates to install.

Bill White billwhite92701@dslextreme.com
<mailto:billwhite92701@dslextreme.com>

----- Original Message -----
*From:* Tom Behler <mailto:tombehler@gmail.com>
*To:* jfw@groups.io <mailto:jfw@groups.io>
*Sent:* Saturday, January 23, 2016 5:51 AM
*Subject:* How To Get Rid Of Get Windows 10 Message

Hello, everyone.

Yesterday, I ran malware bytes on my home Windows 7 PC, and ever
since, I receive the "get windows 10" message every few minutes or
so. I can exit out of the message using alt F4, but the message
re-appears again soon thereafter.

How can I get rid of this message?

Personally, I find it not only annoying, but intrusive!

I do plan to upgrade to Windows 10 at some point, and don't need to
be constantly reminded of its availability!

Sorry for the little rant there, but this is really aggravating!

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus
signature database 12915 (20160123) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com



__________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus
signature database 12915 (20160123) __________

The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

http://www.eset.com


Re: getting rid of windows ten message

 

On Sat, Jan 23, 2016 at 06:28 am, Deb and the girls <debsoundandscent@...> wrote:
Could they repost it?

 It was just discussed at great length in the thread Get Rid of Get Windows 10 Message.  Read the thread and pick your method of choice.

Brian


Re: getting rid of windows ten message

Walt Smith
 

You have to remove a Windows update, but I don't have the number of that update. This is the only way to eliminate this nuisance.



From: Deb and the girls [mailto:debsoundandscent@...]
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2016 9:28 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: getting rid of windows ten message

I  know some one gave a great explanation a while back about how to do it.  Could they repost it?

 


How To View Chkdsk Log Files

Mike B <mb69mach1@...>
 

Howdy All,
 
Running Windows 7 Pro 64 bit & Jaws 16.  Last night I ran Chkdsk & I want to view the log file, but how the heck do you do it?  Below are the steps I'm trying to follow, but after opening Filter Current Log, this is where I'm getting confused.  All help will be greatly appreciated.  Thanks much.
 
 
 This is not so much a question as it is my attempt to share info.  http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/2172-63-win7-chkdsk-file-location shows how to access
CHKDSK log files, but it's buried way down in the responses.  So here is a summary, for my own convenience  as much as for others'.
list of 8 items
• Click on Start
• Type "Event Viewer" without quotes and launch the Event Viewer.
• In the left navigation pane, under the Windows Logs folder, select Application
• In the right Actions pane, launch the "Filter Current Log..."
• Under Event Sources, choose Winit (for me the logs didn't show up as Winlogon, as suggested in some postings to the above thread)
• Click OK
• On the filtered list, go to entries at the time of CHKDSK and look through them for the CHKDSK log
• In order to look through each one, you actually have to double-click each entry to open up the details
list end
Take care.
Mike
Global warming?  Most likely caused from hot air generated by politicians!


Update On "Get Windows 10" Saga

Tom Behler
 

Hello, everyone.

 

Despite my best efforts, using the instructions that Adrian and other had provided, the “Get Windows 10” message re-appeared on my home Windows 7 computer once again late this afternoon.

 

Admittedly, I did not install the GWX control panel program software that a few had suggested, because I was a little leary of putting new software on my computer without really knowing what I was doing.

 

Anyway, having spent far too many hours on this needlessly-created  issue so far, I decided to call the Microsoft Accessibility Hotline for assistance.

 

It turns out that somehow, the “get windows 10” message, and associated files had been installed on my computer in several different locations.  It took the accessibility specialist a full hour to get everything properly uninstalled and operating as it should.

 

I couldn’t tell for sure, but I even think the accessibility specialist was getting frustrated at several points.

 

I used this situation as an opportunity to let her know in no uncertain terms that Microsoft is not making any friends among blind computer users who are being harassed repeatedly with the “get windows 10” message, and that I would hope this could somehow be taken into consideration.

 

I am sure, as someone else pointed out, this complaint and my situation will not mean diddley to Microsoft.  But, I would urge anyone with this issue to contact the Accessibility Hotline, rather than trying to go it alone with only frustration as the end result.

 

At least, this is my suggestion at this time, based on my recent experience.

 

Dr.  Tom Behler from Michigan


Is there a JAWS key stroke to toggle the script on or off?

Peter Tesar
 

Hello,

I'm testing the Thunderbird Blind script. I also have upgraded Thunderbird from version 17 to v38, a big jump.

Some strange things are happening. Tasks don't seem to work as I would expect.

The script is installed and it is on the 30 day trial. I would like to compare how JAWS handles specific tasks with Thunderbird 38, and without the script in effect.

I've looked through the web site that describes the many JAWS key strokes, and there is nothing about toggling the script on or off. Is there such a JAWS key stroke?

Thanks,

Peter T.


Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Tony
 

If that was their intent they would find another way to provide accessibility.

 

They simply do not consider the need, or worse, they don’t care.  After all, it would take a minute or two to do it properly.

 

Tony

 

 

From: Brent Harding [mailto:brent@...]
Sent: Sunday, January 24, 2016 1:00 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

 

Maybe, but what they're trying to prevent is automated means of creating lots of accounts, or posting spam. Those bots can probably easily read alt tags. I'm not sure what they are doing with the checkbox thing to prevent them from just checking it.

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Sunday, January 24, 2016 9:42 AM

Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

 

Hello,

I’m sure that there are ways to accommodate screen reader users to get around the captcha obstacle.

The presence of the statement:

   I am not a robot, check box

Is something that screen reader users could be made aware of.

Text is put in the alt tag field, which is associated with every image, and screen readers read it.

Some years ago I came across a web page with this first line statement:

  Screen Reader users, click here

This link was not visible to the sighted. Perhaps the link (and text) had the same foreground and background colors.

I’m sure that variations of this technique could be made available for which only screen reader users would know how to handle.

Peter T.



-------- Forwarded Message --------

Subject:

Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Date:

Sun, 24 Jan 2016 06:07:09 -0500

From:

Gerald Levy <bwaylimited@...>

Reply-To:

jfw@groups.io

To:

jfw@groups.io

 

 

The last time I encountered one of these check boxes labeled “I am not a robot” and checked it, I was confronted with an image captcha, anyway.  So this system is not foolproof.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

 

 


Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Brent Harding
 


Maybe, but what they're trying to prevent is automated means of creating lots of accounts, or posting spam. Those bots can probably easily read alt tags. I'm not sure what they are doing with the checkbox thing to prevent them from just checking it.
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, January 24, 2016 9:42 AM
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Hello,

I’m sure that there are ways to accommodate screen reader users to get around the captcha obstacle.

The presence of the statement:

   I am not a robot, check box

Is something that screen reader users could be made aware of.

Text is put in the alt tag field, which is associated with every image, and screen readers read it.

Some years ago I came across a web page with this first line statement:

  Screen Reader users, click here

This link was not visible to the sighted. Perhaps the link (and text) had the same foreground and background colors.

I’m sure that variations of this technique could be made available for which only screen reader users would know how to handle.

Peter T.



-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it
Date: Sun, 24 Jan 2016 06:07:09 -0500
From: Gerald Levy <bwaylimited@...>
Reply-To: jfw@groups.io
To: jfw@groups.io


 
The last time I encountered one of these check boxes labeled “I am not a robot” and checked it, I was confronted with an image captcha, anyway.  So this system is not foolproof.
 
Gerald
 
 
 



Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Tony
 

Fewer sites use Alt-Tags every day.  The more recently a site is created or updated the more likely it will be at least partially unaccessible.

 

I frequently bring this matter to the attention of site owners/programmers and they act like they don’t know what I am talking about.

 

Tony

 

From: Peter Tesar [mailto:ptesar@...]
Sent: Sunday, January 24, 2016 9:43 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

 

Hello,

 

I’m sure that there are ways to accommodate screen reader users to get around the captcha obstacle.

 

The presence of the statement:

   I am not a robot, check box

 

Is something that screen reader users could be made aware of.

 

Text is put in the alt tag field, which is associated with every image, and screen readers read it.

 

Some years ago I came across a web page with this first line statement:

  Screen Reader users, click here

 

This link was not visible to the sighted. Perhaps the link (and text) had the same foreground and background colors.

 

I’m sure that variations of this technique could be made available for which only screen reader users would know how to handle.

 

Peter T.



-------- Forwarded Message --------

Subject:

Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Date:

Sun, 24 Jan 2016 06:07:09 -0500

From:

Gerald Levy <bwaylimited@...>

Reply-To:

jfw@groups.io

To:

jfw@groups.io

 

 

The last time I encountered one of these check boxes labeled “I am not a robot” and checked it, I was confronted with an image captcha, anyway.  So this system is not foolproof.

 

Gerald

 

 

 

 

 


Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Marianne Denning
 

I was helping someone set up a Skype account recently and the audio
version was very easy to understand. That comes from a person who has
never been able to understand the audio in the past.

On 1/24/16, Peter Tesar <ptesar@ca.inter.net> wrote:
Hello,

I’m sure that there are ways to accommodate screen reader users to get
around the captcha obstacle.

The presence of the statement:

I am not a robot, check box

Is something that screen reader users could be made aware of.

Text is put in the alt tag field, which is associated with every image,
and screen readers read it.

Some years ago I came across a web page with this first line statement:

Screen Reader users, click here

This link was not visible to the sighted. Perhaps the link (and text)
had the same foreground and background colors.

I’m sure that variations of this technique could be made available for
which only screen reader users would know how to handle.

Peter T.



-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it
Date: Sun, 24 Jan 2016 06:07:09 -0500
From: Gerald Levy <bwaylimited@verizon.net>
Reply-To: jfw@groups.io
To: jfw@groups.io



The last time I encountered one of these check boxes labeled “I am not a
robot” and checked it, I was confronted with an image captcha, anyway.
So this system is not foolproof.
Gerald


--
Marianne Denning, TVI, MA
Teacher of students who are blind or visually impaired
(513) 607-6053


Re: Besides the jaws scripting manual is there a more indepth manual available to learn jaws scripting?

Soronel Haetir
 

The fsdn file has some information along that line as well as a great
deal of reference information about the functions available to call
and the events that jaws fires.

It's available at
http://www.freedomscientific.com/support/jawsdocumentation/FSDN

On 1/24/16, David Ingram <dingram269@earthlink.net> wrote:
Hi list members, besides the jaws scripting manual is there a more indepth
manual that talks about creating jaws scripts for software?

--
Soronel Haetir
soronel.haetir@gmail.com


Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Peter Tesar
 

Hello,

 

I’m sure that there are ways to accommodate screen reader users to get around the captcha obstacle.

 

The presence of the statement:

   I am not a robot, check box

 

Is something that screen reader users could be made aware of.

 

Text is put in the alt tag field, which is associated with every image, and screen readers read it.

 

Some years ago I came across a web page with this first line statement:

  Screen Reader users, click here

 

This link was not visible to the sighted. Perhaps the link (and text) had the same foreground and background colors.

 

I’m sure that variations of this technique could be made available for which only screen reader users would know how to handle.

 

Peter T.



-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it
Date: Sun, 24 Jan 2016 06:07:09 -0500
From: Gerald Levy <bwaylimited@...>
Reply-To: jfw@groups.io
To: jfw@groups.io


 
The last time I encountered one of these check boxes labeled “I am not a robot” and checked it, I was confronted with an image captcha, anyway.  So this system is not foolproof.
 
Gerald
 
 
 



Besides the jaws scripting manual is there a more indepth manual available to learn jaws scripting?

David Ingram
 

Hi list members, besides the jaws scripting manual is there a more indepth manual that talks about creating jaws scripts for software?


Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Gerald Levy
 

 
The last time I encountered one of these check boxes labeled “I am not a robot” and checked it, I was confronted with an image captcha, anyway.  So this system is not foolproof.
 
Gerald
 
 
 

Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2016 11:58 PM
Subject: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it
 
A couple of years ago we had a discussion on this list about tax preparation software that was accessible. At the time, I recommended MyFreeTaxes.com as basically accessible, with the exception of a captcha at the end and a few flakey buttons here and there. Then last year, my colleagues at United Way Worldwide heard me, and pushed the software provider to do something about it, and we got an audio captcha. That might have actually happened two years ago.

Anyway, fast forward to this year. Tonight I filed my taxes using MyFreeTaxes.com. There was a "captcha" frame, but interestingly, it didn't have a captcha. It had a checkbox I had to check (with the space bar as usual) that said something like, "I'm not a robot." It seems like I've seen this once or twice before, but it makes you wonder why more companies don't use it.

I must say I was happy with the solution, which served my purposes, cost me nothing, and was 100% accessible with JAWS 15, Firefox and Windows 7. In previous years, I think I eventually had to switch to Internet Explorer to finish the job for some reason or another, but not this year. Indeed this was the smoothest experience I have had using MyFreeTaxes, and this is my fourth year to use it.

For those who need to know, the income limit is $62,000 this year, and it really is a smooth experience from start to finish with JAWS. How often can we say that?

Hope this helps you.

Brad


Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Cristóbal
 

I’ve come across it with a few of my accounts. Ting Mobile and so on. Convenient and completely accessible.

 

From: Brad Martin [mailto:brad@...]
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2016 9:36 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

 

And now that you mention it, that's exactly what the frame said. "Recaptcha frame". At least, that's how JAWS read it. They can call it whatever they want, so long as it works.

Brad

On 1/23/2016 11:07 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Brad,

         What you describe is the reCaptcha.  It has been on tap to replace Captchas for some time now, but will take time to migrate out and become the default.

Brian

 


Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Peter Donahue
 

Good evening everyone,

 

                I encountered a captcha like this on another Website but can’t remember what it was. Glad someone came to their senses and figured out a simple solution to the issues we’ve had with captchas. This system is usable by both blind and deafblind computer users. This is not true of audio captchas. Even people with normal hearing such as my wife have trouble understanding those audio captchas.

 

Peter Donahue

 

 

 

From: Brad Martin [mailto:brad@...]
Sent: Saturday, January 23, 2016 10:58 PM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

 

A couple of years ago we had a discussion on this list about tax preparation software that was accessible. At the time, I recommended MyFreeTaxes.com as basically accessible, with the exception of a captcha at the end and a few flakey buttons here and there. Then last year, my colleagues at United Way Worldwide heard me, and pushed the software provider to do something about it, and we got an audio captcha. That might have actually happened two years ago.

Anyway, fast forward to this year. Tonight I filed my taxes using MyFreeTaxes.com. There was a "captcha" frame, but interestingly, it didn't have a captcha. It had a checkbox I had to check (with the space bar as usual) that said something like, "I'm not a robot." It seems like I've seen this once or twice before, but it makes you wonder why more companies don't use it.

I must say I was happy with the solution, which served my purposes, cost me nothing, and was 100% accessible with JAWS 15, Firefox and Windows 7. In previous years, I think I eventually had to switch to Internet Explorer to finish the job for some reason or another, but not this year. Indeed this was the smoothest experience I have had using MyFreeTaxes, and this is my fourth year to use it.

For those who need to know, the income limit is $62,000 this year, and it really is a smooth experience from start to finish with JAWS. How often can we say that?

Hope this helps you.

Brad


Re: A Win Against Captchas; I'll take it

Brad Martin
 

And now that you mention it, that's exactly what the frame said. "Recaptcha frame". At least, that's how JAWS read it. They can call it whatever they want, so long as it works.

Brad

On 1/23/2016 11:07 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Brad,

         What you describe is the reCaptcha.  It has been on tap to replace Captchas for some time now, but will take time to migrate out and become the default.

Brian