Date   

moderated Re: Antivirus software.

David Griffith
 

Ironically Malwarebytes notified me last night that it had again updated to the latest version of its database so 1.7 is definitely still being updated but of course I have set it to never update the actual program, only the database.

It definitely helped me last week. I suspected a false positive given the complete lack of awareness by Windows Defender but the following convinced me otherwise.

  1. It specifically named the Trojan.
  2. 2. It struggle mightily to quarantine it from the VLC Directories but was constantly failing at first given an warning message about this failure about every 30 seconds or so.
  3. When I uninstalled VLC the uninstall failed to removed the directories Malwarebytes was pointing to as infected.
  4. When I tried to  delete these folders manually  Windows told me I could not as they were being used by another process -  - classic virus indication. No program but VLC had any business  accessing these folders and it had already been uninstalled.
  5. Luckily a full scan by Malwarebytes resulted in it successfully removing the trojan from memory/registry although I would have to go back to the log files to find out which bits were infected.
  6. After the full scan and cleaning of the memory/registry I was then, as a fail safe, able to delete the offending remaining Videoland directory without any problem which also reassured me that whatever the process was that was preventing deletion had been cleaned out by Malwarebytes.

I was very glad I had kept 1.7  as an accessible version.

 

David Griffith

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: David Goldfield
Sent: 10 June 2020 00:01
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Antivirus software.

 

Hi. I'm actually surprised that MalwareBytes is still maintaining the

1.7 branch. While it's true that some future versions may have had some

accessibility challenges the 4.x version which I last tried three months

was reasonably accessible. It might be worth installing it to see how

well it performs, considering that its capabilities have certainly

improved since V1.7.

 

David Goldfield,

Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist

JAWS Certified, 2019

 

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org

 

On 6/6/2020 7:00 PM, David Griffith wrote:

> I have heard a lot about how Windows Defender has improved.  So much so I

> abandoned the ESET Smart security subscription I had because of

> deteriorating accessibility.

> I have however kept my old 1.7 version of Malwarebytes going and resisted

> program upgrade to maintain accessibility although I let the virus database

> keep up to date.

> Thank goodness I did. During the last week Malwarebytes identified a Trojan

> on my laptop that Windows Defender  was completely oblivious of despite my

> performing a complete Windows Defender scan after the Malwarebytes alert.

> I turned to Windows Defender as Initially Malwarebytes was struggling and

> failing to quarantine this Trojan threat.

> On investigation it had infected   one of the plug-in directories of

> Videoland VLC. Uninstalling VLC did not succeed in removing the offending

> files and predictably trying to delete  these files manually also failed as

> Windows identified them as being used by another process.

> Eventually a full scan by Malwarebyte was able to remove this trojan from my

> registry in memory and I was finally able to also delete the offending VLC

> directories as a failsafe.

> What was more concerning was the fact that Windows Defender was completely

> unaware of this problem and failed to react.

> David Griffith

> -----Original Message-----

> From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of david Jennette

> Sent: 06 June 2020 23:37

> To: jfw@groups.io

> Subject: Antivirus software.

> Hi. I've asked this a few years ago but I figured it's time to ask again do

> to things changing. I'm wondering if Windows defender is still the most

> accessible antivirus software or if there are others now that work well with

> Jaws. Thanks.

>

 

 

 


moderated Re: speed of speech

Verlyn Baldwin
 

Hey everyone, These commands are great! So simple and easy to remember.
Thanks a bunch,

Verlyn Baldwin


moderated Re: How do I clear a filter in Outlook 2016?

James Bentley
 

Hi Ann,

What's working for me is to type:

alt+v and v again
then, tab to discription filter and hit enter
Now, Tab to clear and hit enter.

Then tab to OK and hit enter. You may need to tab again to OK and hit enter
one more time.

HTH

James B

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ann Byrne
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 10:09 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: How do I clear a filter in Outlook 2016?

My student's computer has filtered turned on. I went to filters and
chose the clear button, but the program still shows only ten messages
in her inbox. can someone please give me the steps?

Thx,


moderated Zoom ... locating a meeting

Ann Byrne
 

On the meeting/sign-in screen I didn't know the info about my meeting, but it was a recurring meeting. There is a marvelous field called "history", listing prior meetings. Down arrow to the one you need and whack enter, and you're in business.


moderated How do I clear a filter in Outlook 2016?

Ann Byrne
 

My student's computer has filtered turned on. I went to filters and chose the clear button, but the program still shows only ten messages in her inbox. can someone please give me the steps?

Thx,


moderated Re: Antivirus software.

Glenn / Lenny
 

It would be nice if all scanner programs would allow exclusions, such as any file over a certain size, or MP3 files.
That would speed up scans quite a bit.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2020 3:32 AM
Subject: Re: Antivirus software.

Hi,

 

I personally use Vipre, I can’t pass on exact statistics on how well it performs in benchmark tests, but I’ve personally used it for many years and kept a clean system. I find a lot of anti-virus software is fairly  inaccessible  sadly these days. I find Vipre very accessible, there are a couple of really small areas it could have some improvement , such as it won’t read what percentage of the scan is complete when running a scan, but both the task bar icon and its options in here are all accessible (you can start, stop and pause scans from here), but the program itself is pretty accessible too, like I said there are a couple of small areas which could do with a small improvement, but compared with most other anti-virus software on the market its pretty accessible and I think they are quite open to accessibility suggestions from a post I saw on another forum. One of the only complaints I had with viper is its scans seem to take a really long time to complete

 

Paul

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Goldfield
Sent: 10 June 2020 00:22
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Antivirus software.

 

Hi, David.

As others have already said Microsoft Defender/Windows Security is certainly accessible. In my opinion its interface isn't necessarily the most intuitive but all controls are well labeled and the program is easy to learn, particularly if you explore it thoroughly.

Kaspersky Antivirus has some accessibility with NVDA on its task manager and settings screens, with poor accessibility on the program's main screen. When using JAWS accessibility on the main screen is just about nonexistent when attempting to navigate with tab and shift+tab. For best results I'd recommend using the touch cursor if you use JAWS. When using NVDA object navigation will be almost essential, particularly on the program's main screen. Its installer went from being 100% accessible in 2015 to 100% inaccessible in later versions. However, installing it is definitely possible if you know how to make use of your screen reader's OCR functions since all you really need to do is to keep pressing enter to activate the Next button. At one point the installer downloads most of its components and you'll need to use OCR to know when this process has completed. Again, your screen reader's OCR features will be your friend during this process. Alternatively, you can use an app or service on a smart phone to assist you with this such as Seeing AI, Envision AI, Be My Eyes or AIRA. AIRA has the additional benefit of allowing an agent to remotely access and control your computer using Teamviewer, if needed.

I wrote a review of using Kaspersky with NVDA on my blog. While the post was written several years ago it's still fairly accurate as Kaspersky, for better or worse, has not changed very much in the past five years.

Symantec Endpoint Protection is extremely accessible. However, I think this program may be more for corporate users and I don't know how the Norton products for home users are doing these days when it comes to accessibility. I first used Norton Antivirus in 1999 and, like many programs from that time, it used standard controls and was 100% accessible. Around 2000 or so the interface changed to more of an HTML environment and so it was very different but still accessible. It has been years since I've used a Norton product.

MalwareBytes, as of a few months ago when I last tried it, was reasonably accessible as long as you use tab and shift-tab to navigate with it.

 

David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019
 
WWW.DavidGoldfield.org

On 6/6/2020 6:37 PM, david Jennette wrote:

Hi. I’ve asked this a few years ago but I figured it’s time to ask again do to things changing. I’m wondering if Windows defender is still the most accessible antivirus software or if there are others now that work well with Jaws. Thanks.


moderated Re: Acronis image with Jaws

Klaus Vielhauer
 

Hello Chris,


the Image program that is included  in Windows does not work in case of a harddisk failure.

I am looking for a solution that also covers such a problem.

Klaus

On 6/10/2020 12:50 AM, Chris Hill wrote:
I gave Up on them five years ago for an accessibility try image for windows instead
On Jun 9, 2020, at 17:38, Klaus Vielhauer <vielhau@...> wrote:

Hello,

at the install screen there is no speech and I had to stop.

Does anyone use this program successfully?

Thanks

Klaus





moderated Re: Antivirus software.

paul lemm
 

Hi,

 

I personally use Vipre, I can’t pass on exact statistics on how well it performs in benchmark tests, but I’ve personally used it for many years and kept a clean system. I find a lot of anti-virus software is fairly  inaccessible  sadly these days. I find Vipre very accessible, there are a couple of really small areas it could have some improvement , such as it won’t read what percentage of the scan is complete when running a scan, but both the task bar icon and its options in here are all accessible (you can start, stop and pause scans from here), but the program itself is pretty accessible too, like I said there are a couple of small areas which could do with a small improvement, but compared with most other anti-virus software on the market its pretty accessible and I think they are quite open to accessibility suggestions from a post I saw on another forum. One of the only complaints I had with viper is its scans seem to take a really long time to complete

 

Paul

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of David Goldfield
Sent: 10 June 2020 00:22
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Antivirus software.

 

Hi, David.

As others have already said Microsoft Defender/Windows Security is certainly accessible. In my opinion its interface isn't necessarily the most intuitive but all controls are well labeled and the program is easy to learn, particularly if you explore it thoroughly.

Kaspersky Antivirus has some accessibility with NVDA on its task manager and settings screens, with poor accessibility on the program's main screen. When using JAWS accessibility on the main screen is just about nonexistent when attempting to navigate with tab and shift+tab. For best results I'd recommend using the touch cursor if you use JAWS. When using NVDA object navigation will be almost essential, particularly on the program's main screen. Its installer went from being 100% accessible in 2015 to 100% inaccessible in later versions. However, installing it is definitely possible if you know how to make use of your screen reader's OCR functions since all you really need to do is to keep pressing enter to activate the Next button. At one point the installer downloads most of its components and you'll need to use OCR to know when this process has completed. Again, your screen reader's OCR features will be your friend during this process. Alternatively, you can use an app or service on a smart phone to assist you with this such as Seeing AI, Envision AI, Be My Eyes or AIRA. AIRA has the additional benefit of allowing an agent to remotely access and control your computer using Teamviewer, if needed.

I wrote a review of using Kaspersky with NVDA on my blog. While the post was written several years ago it's still fairly accurate as Kaspersky, for better or worse, has not changed very much in the past five years.

Symantec Endpoint Protection is extremely accessible. However, I think this program may be more for corporate users and I don't know how the Norton products for home users are doing these days when it comes to accessibility. I first used Norton Antivirus in 1999 and, like many programs from that time, it used standard controls and was 100% accessible. Around 2000 or so the interface changed to more of an HTML environment and so it was very different but still accessible. It has been years since I've used a Norton product.

MalwareBytes, as of a few months ago when I last tried it, was reasonably accessible as long as you use tab and shift-tab to navigate with it.

 

David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019
 
WWW.DavidGoldfield.org

On 6/6/2020 6:37 PM, david Jennette wrote:

Hi. I’ve asked this a few years ago but I figured it’s time to ask again do to things changing. I’m wondering if Windows defender is still the most accessible antivirus software or if there are others now that work well with Jaws. Thanks.


moderated my apologises!!!

Shan Noyes
 

Hi all!!

 

My apologies.  Just went back and re read the help area slowly and this time it worked.  But one thing is when switching from one application to another that has a different voice it takes a little longer for the voice to change over. 

 

No biggy.  But thought I should write and save folks a lot of time writing and telling me how to do it.

 

Thanks and have a good day everyone.

 

 

Shan Noyes

Technical Analyst – Systems Security

GIAC

W: 306 777-4830

C: 306 533-1440

 

NOTICE: This confidential e-mail message is only for the intended recipients. If you are not the intended recipient, be advised that disclosing, copying, distributing, or any other use of this message, is strictly prohibited. In such case, please destroy this message and notify the sender.


moderated jaws 2020 & setting speech profiles per application

Shan Noyes
 

Hi all!

 

I’ve never done this before in Jaws and I’ve tried a couple of things but maybe I’m not doing it in the correct order.

 

What I want to do is create a voice profile its actually using a different voice then I usually use and then assigning that voice profile to a specific application,

 

I created the voice profile under jaws options then voices and voice adjustments.

 

When I saved it I gave it a different name and told it not to be the default.

 

Now how do I tell jaws that I want the new speech profile to be used by a specific application.  E.g. script manager.

 

Thanks all!

 

Have a good day.

 

 

Shan Noyes

Technical Analyst – Systems Security

GIAC

W: 306 777-4830

C: 306 533-1440

 

NOTICE: This confidential e-mail message is only for the intended recipients. If you are not the intended recipient, be advised that disclosing, copying, distributing, or any other use of this message, is strictly prohibited. In such case, please destroy this message and notify the sender.


moderated Re: speed of speech

netbat66
 

i think the other keys are control alt and page up and down.
one combo changes it on the fly without saveing the change and the other saves the changes.

-----Original Message-----
From: Orlando Enrique Fiol via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, June 09, 2020 5:31 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: speed of speech

At 12:18 PM 6/9/2020, Ashleigh Piccinino wrote:
You can do it on the fly with CTRL windows key and either page up or
page down. Another way to do it is through the startup wizard.
There are also undefined key commands to increase and decrease voice
rate, pitch and volume on the fly. You can use these as alternatives
to the temporary and permanent voice decrease/increase commands.


Orlando Enrique Fiol


moderated Re: speed of speech

Orlando Enrique Fiol
 

At 12:18 PM 6/9/2020, Ashleigh Piccinino wrote:
You can do it on the fly with CTRL windows key and either page up or
page down. Another way to do it is through the startup wizard.
There are also undefined key commands to increase and decrease voice rate, pitch and volume on the fly. You can use these as alternatives to the temporary and permanent voice decrease/increase commands.


Orlando Enrique Fiol


moderated Re: Acronis image with Jaws

John Covici
 

No, and with the paid version you can do incremental backups which can
take 5-10 minutes and you can schedule, so it becomes automatic. You
can also clone the drive, but I think a backup is better.

On Tue, 09 Jun 2020 16:13:02 -0400,
Dennis Brown wrote:

Do you need eyes to create the image with macrium reflect?
Thanks,
Dennis

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Covici
Sent: Tuesday, June 9, 2020 3:12 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Acronis image with Jaws

I like macrium reflect, but you need eyeballs to restore from the recovery
media, but this is true of all of them pretty much.

On Tue, 09 Jun 2020 10:25:02 -0400,
Klaus Vielhauer wrote:

Hello John,

thanks for the quick answer.

Question: Wich Windows image backup software works with Jaws?

I assume that recreation may not work at all - I hope it never is
necessary - but creating a image on a harddisk with speech is desired.

Klaus


On 6/9/2020 2:13 PM, John Covici wrote:
Don't bother, they use some different method to draw the screen, so
its not accessible.

On Tue, 09 Jun 2020 04:11:52 -0400,
Klaus Vielhauer wrote:
Hello,

at the install screen there is no speech and I had to stop.

Does anyone use this program successfully?

Thanks

Klaus





--
Your life is like a penny. You're going to lose it. The question is:
How do
you spend it?

John Covici wb2una
covici@...





--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com



--
Your life is like a penny. You're going to lose it. The question is:
How do
you spend it?

John Covici wb2una
covici@...


moderated Re: Antivirus software.

David Goldfield
 

Hi, David.

As others have already said Microsoft Defender/Windows Security is certainly accessible. In my opinion its interface isn't necessarily the most intuitive but all controls are well labeled and the program is easy to learn, particularly if you explore it thoroughly.

Kaspersky Antivirus has some accessibility with NVDA on its task manager and settings screens, with poor accessibility on the program's main screen. When using JAWS accessibility on the main screen is just about nonexistent when attempting to navigate with tab and shift+tab. For best results I'd recommend using the touch cursor if you use JAWS. When using NVDA object navigation will be almost essential, particularly on the program's main screen. Its installer went from being 100% accessible in 2015 to 100% inaccessible in later versions. However, installing it is definitely possible if you know how to make use of your screen reader's OCR functions since all you really need to do is to keep pressing enter to activate the Next button. At one point the installer downloads most of its components and you'll need to use OCR to know when this process has completed. Again, your screen reader's OCR features will be your friend during this process. Alternatively, you can use an app or service on a smart phone to assist you with this such as Seeing AI, Envision AI, Be My Eyes or AIRA. AIRA has the additional benefit of allowing an agent to remotely access and control your computer using Teamviewer, if needed.

I wrote a review of using Kaspersky with NVDA on my blog. While the post was written several years ago it's still fairly accurate as Kaspersky, for better or worse, has not changed very much in the past five years.

Symantec Endpoint Protection is extremely accessible. However, I think this program may be more for corporate users and I don't know how the Norton products for home users are doing these days when it comes to accessibility. I first used Norton Antivirus in 1999 and, like many programs from that time, it used standard controls and was 100% accessible. Around 2000 or so the interface changed to more of an HTML environment and so it was very different but still accessible. It has been years since I've used a Norton product.

MalwareBytes, as of a few months ago when I last tried it, was reasonably accessible as long as you use tab and shift-tab to navigate with it.


David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org
On 6/6/2020 6:37 PM, david Jennette wrote:

Hi. I’ve asked this a few years ago but I figured it’s time to ask again do to things changing. I’m wondering if Windows defender is still the most accessible antivirus software or if there are others now that work well with Jaws. Thanks.


moderated Re: Antivirus software.

David Goldfield
 

Hi. I'm actually surprised that MalwareBytes is still maintaining the 1.7 branch. While it's true that some future versions may have had some accessibility challenges the 4.x version which I last tried three months was reasonably accessible. It might be worth installing it to see how well it performs, considering that its capabilities have certainly improved since V1.7.

David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org

On 6/6/2020 7:00 PM, David Griffith wrote:
I have heard a lot about how Windows Defender has improved. So much so I
abandoned the ESET Smart security subscription I had because of
deteriorating accessibility.
I have however kept my old 1.7 version of Malwarebytes going and resisted
program upgrade to maintain accessibility although I let the virus database
keep up to date.
Thank goodness I did. During the last week Malwarebytes identified a Trojan
on my laptop that Windows Defender was completely oblivious of despite my
performing a complete Windows Defender scan after the Malwarebytes alert.
I turned to Windows Defender as Initially Malwarebytes was struggling and
failing to quarantine this Trojan threat.
On investigation it had infected one of the plug-in directories of
Videoland VLC. Uninstalling VLC did not succeed in removing the offending
files and predictably trying to delete these files manually also failed as
Windows identified them as being used by another process.
Eventually a full scan by Malwarebyte was able to remove this trojan from my
registry in memory and I was finally able to also delete the offending VLC
directories as a failsafe.
What was more concerning was the fact that Windows Defender was completely
unaware of this problem and failed to react.
David Griffith





-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of david Jennette
Sent: 06 June 2020 23:37
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Antivirus software.

Hi. I've asked this a few years ago but I figured it's time to ask again do
to things changing. I'm wondering if Windows defender is still the most
accessible antivirus software or if there are others now that work well with
Jaws. Thanks.





moderated Re: Antivirus software.

David Goldfield
 

MalwareBytes claims that the latest 4.X releases can be used as an antivirus program (not the free, on-demand only version.) However, because they don't use standard definition or signature files I feel a bit jittery depending on it as my main security tool. Their reasons for why this is a nonissue are somewhat compelling and I realize that standard definition files are not the only way to protect a computer. Still I am not comfortable using it as my sole or even my primary security tool.


David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org
On 6/9/2020 12:55 PM, Blind Tech tutorials And Tips wrote:

Hi,
You can use malware bites, it is about 90% accessible, and mostly useable, and it is a very strong anti-virus software, most prefer it ove others. Yes windows defender is the most accessible, but if you want a better antivirus, that is accessible 90% of the time and is much more secure than windows defender, I would go for malware bites.

On Sat, Jun 6, 2020 at 8:20 PM david Jennette <dcjenn@...> wrote:

I sent this an hour or so ago but didn’t see it post to the list so I’m going to try again. Sorry if you all get the message a second time.

I’m wondering if windows defender is still the best antivirus software to use with jaws or if there are now other packages that are accessible now. I figured I’d ask because some time has passed and things might have changed. Thanks.


moderated Re: Acronis image with Jaws

Chris Hill
 

I gave Up on them five years ago for an accessibility try image for windows instead

On Jun 9, 2020, at 17:38, Klaus Vielhauer <vielhau@...> wrote:

Hello,

at the install screen there is no speech and I had to stop.

Does anyone use this program successfully?

Thanks

Klaus





moderated Re: Acronis image with Jaws

Dennis Brown
 

Do you need eyes to create the image with macrium reflect?
Thanks,
Dennis

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Covici
Sent: Tuesday, June 9, 2020 3:12 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Acronis image with Jaws

I like macrium reflect, but you need eyeballs to restore from the recovery
media, but this is true of all of them pretty much.

On Tue, 09 Jun 2020 10:25:02 -0400,
Klaus Vielhauer wrote:

Hello John,

thanks for the quick answer.

Question: Wich Windows image backup software works with Jaws?

I assume that recreation may not work at all - I hope it never is
necessary - but creating a image on a harddisk with speech is desired.

Klaus


On 6/9/2020 2:13 PM, John Covici wrote:
Don't bother, they use some different method to draw the screen, so
its not accessible.

On Tue, 09 Jun 2020 04:11:52 -0400,
Klaus Vielhauer wrote:
Hello,

at the install screen there is no speech and I had to stop.

Does anyone use this program successfully?

Thanks

Klaus





--
Your life is like a penny. You're going to lose it. The question is:
How do
you spend it?

John Covici wb2una
covici@...





--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com


moderated Re: Antivirus software.

Don Mauck
 

For me, I’m very happy with the ESET suite of products. I’ve never been a victim of Malware or any other virus. While free is nice and Windows Defender works well enough, I’m very glad o take the extra protection I  very happy with ESET.

 

From: Brian Vogel <britechguy@...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 9, 2020 1:27 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Antivirus software.

 

On Tue, Jun 9, 2020 at 02:26 PM, Dan Longmore wrote:

Windows Defender is a strong anti virus program and while paid ones may have stronger points

Dan, what follows is not a criticism of what you've said, which is 100% accurate, but an addition.  Any other product, paid or free (at least potentially), may do better than Windows Security does with a given thing.  That's shown time and again in formal tests where each and every major security suite product changes position, often from the last test to the current one, because one of the things tested that's given more weight than others improves in one product while staying the same in others.

This is one reason why any statement that product X is better than product Y, without any qualifications, and regardless of the product, is nothing more than an opinion.  You need to be able to identify what it is that's better, and why, between X and Y across all significant dimensions, how you weight those, and that product X is better across a majority of them before you can declare it better with any objectivity.

I can, and have, given my subjective opinions about what I like best, but that does not make it "best for all users and situations."  I generally try to describe what my criteria were.

So, I'll repeat myself, as I've posted this before.  But the closest thing you (any you) are going to find that are at least somewhat objective measures of the effectiveness of a given security suite across multiple dimensions/functions is to look at the reports from testing labs, and not just the latest one, but going back at least a year, preferably two, to see how the various products have changed places over time, and how the different testers weight things differently such that one declares suite X superior to suite Y while another says just the opposite, but both place them in the top tier of products.  There are no simple declarations with regard to security software.

See the most recent plus the last several years of historical test results from:

AV Test

AV Comparatives

SE Labs  (Reports Page)

MRG Effitas  (360 Protection Testing Category)

This article from Quietman7, a security expert at BleepingComputer.com, makes for interesting reading, too, and directly pertains to the sorts of testing referenced above:  
Reflections on Antivirus/Antimalware Testing & Comparisons

 

 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it.
       ~ Lawrence Krauss


moderated Re: Antivirus software.

 

On Tue, Jun 9, 2020 at 02:26 PM, Dan Longmore wrote:
Windows Defender is a strong anti virus program and while paid ones may have stronger points
Dan, what follows is not a criticism of what you've said, which is 100% accurate, but an addition.  Any other product, paid or free (at least potentially), may do better than Windows Security does with a given thing.  That's shown time and again in formal tests where each and every major security suite product changes position, often from the last test to the current one, because one of the things tested that's given more weight than others improves in one product while staying the same in others.

This is one reason why any statement that product X is better than product Y, without any qualifications, and regardless of the product, is nothing more than an opinion.  You need to be able to identify what it is that's better, and why, between X and Y across all significant dimensions, how you weight those, and that product X is better across a majority of them before you can declare it better with any objectivity.

I can, and have, given my subjective opinions about what I like best, but that does not make it "best for all users and situations."  I generally try to describe what my criteria were.

So, I'll repeat myself, as I've posted this before.  But the closest thing you (any you) are going to find that are at least somewhat objective measures of the effectiveness of a given security suite across multiple dimensions/functions is to look at the reports from testing labs, and not just the latest one, but going back at least a year, preferably two, to see how the various products have changed places over time, and how the different testers weight things differently such that one declares suite X superior to suite Y while another says just the opposite, but both place them in the top tier of products.  There are no simple declarations with regard to security software.

See the most recent plus the last several years of historical test results from:

AV Test

AV Comparatives

SE Labs  (Reports Page)

MRG Effitas  (360 Protection Testing Category)

This article from Quietman7, a security expert at BleepingComputer.com, makes for interesting reading, too, and directly pertains to the sorts of testing referenced above:  
Reflections on Antivirus/Antimalware Testing & Comparisons

 

 
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Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it.
       ~ Lawrence Krauss