Date   

Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

george b <gbmagoo@...>
 

I have sonos;

Sonos sound bar, base speaker, and sonos speaker 1's for my souround in the
family room.

Also, 2 more speaker 1's in 2 other rooms in my home.

It all works great with my iPhone.

There are still some issues with the windows app. and the mac app. has
labeling issues.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Alan
Robbins
Sent: May 9, 2017 5:08
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Sonos musich system

I just fixed the subject line to avoid the dual threat and provide more
clarification Thanks, Alan

On May 8, 2017, at 20:57, Pablo Morales <pablocmd2014@gmail.com> wrote:

I am talking about the Sonos device that Sieghard was talking about.

---Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
george b
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 8:46 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Sonos music system, was: VFO has acquired the Pacielo
Group

Are you asking about sonos or f v o I am confused by the subject line

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Pablo Morales
Sent: May 8, 2017 15:50
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Sonos music system, was: VFO has acquired the Pacielo
Group

What about the sound quality?
I have been looking for a good sound system, and last year I was going to
buy the bose cube, but the accessibility in the iPhone wasn't enough and I
made a step back. What you mention about accessibility is very important for
me.
What about the number of speakers for each room, how is this
configuration?


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 12:52 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sonos music system, was: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Sorry, one more thing, in order to control a Sonos system you will need
either an iPhone, Android phone or a PC. I am not an Android user, but I
think the Sonos app is accessible, it is definitely extremely accessible on
the iPhone and for some years now Sonos seems to make sure that
accessibility is not forgotten.
The Sonos app on the PC is also accessible with Jaws, it won't read
anything with the Jaws cursor, but you can tab through all the controls and
use the right arrow, enter or spacebar to expend menus and make selections.
I think there are still accessibility issues on the Mac with Voiceover, but
I'm not sure if this has been fixed now.
I assume it would work with NVDA as well.
Brian Hartgen, maker of the Leasey scripts, also has a set of free Sonos
scripts which improve how it works with Jaws a bit.
Jonas, you asked about changing radio stations, once again, there is no
traditional FM/AM radio tuner, you would have to use Tune In Radio to listen
to your radio stations online or use the input on a player such as the Play
5, Connect or Connect Amp to connect a tuner, personally I can even get our
small local radio station in the town of 6,000 where I live via Tune In so I
don't see a point in using a tuner.

Regards,
Sieghard

-----Original Message-----
From: Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 9:39 AM
To: 'main@jfw.groups.io' <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: RE: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Hi Jonas,

I was thinking of sending this to you directly, but hopefully this rather
long write-up is not considered too much off-topic, I just thought others
may find it interesting to read. I'm a huge Sonos fan and have bought my
first Sonos equipment 8 or almost 9 years ago. I have replaced my high-end
signature series $2,000 Sony receiver in the living room with Sonos and am
not regretting it.

However, Sonos is not like a traditional amplifier or receiver with a
whole bunch of all sorts of inputs in the back where you hook up all your
components. Sonos is a multi-room system which means it is designed so you
have one of their players in every room where you want music and it then is
very much meant to play music from online sources or to play your own
digitized collection of music on your computer or network attached hard
drive although some of their players do allow you to hook up an external
source like a CD player, tape deck etc. If you did, for example, connect a
CD player to a Sonos Connect in the living room, then that source is
available on all your Sonos players throughout the house and once you
started playing something on your CD player you could listen to it in the
bedroom while somebody else could listen to Spotify or Apple Music in the
living room.
Sonos supports literally dozens of free or subscription-based music
services such as Tune In Radio, iHeart Radio, Apple Music, Spotify, Deezer,
Google Play Music, Sirius XM, Slacker and loads more. For the most part you
control all of this from the Sonos app, here you can choose on which player
you want to play music like living room, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom or
wherever you have a Sonos player. You can also group two or more or all of
your players together to play the same music throughout the house. Then you
select from which service you want to play music or you go to your own
library of digital music and further select by genre, artist, album,
playlist or individual song. Think of the Sonos app really more like a
remote control for your Sonos system, the players themselves only have two
buttons, a Play/Pause button and a volume rocker, but of course you can also
turn the volume up or down from the app, if you have a group of players
using the main volume control in the app raises or lowers the volume on all
players or you can open the volume control and adjust the volume of
individual players in your group, for example, maybe you have a party and
you just want the music in the bathroom playing very softly whereas in the
living room you want it louder.
Now, as for the players, Sonos has a number of them by now and I think
most people buy the stand-alone players/speakers nowadays rather than those
where you need to connect a set of bookshelf or tower speakers. There are 3
stand-alone speakers/players, the Play 1, Play 3 and Play 5. I think in the
States they are $199, $299 and $499, respectively. All three can stand on a
shelf or table or you can get a wall mount from various third party sources
for all of them and all three can be used as individual units or you can
configure two of them to play as stereo pairs.
The Play 1 is a relatively small speaker, about 6 inches tall by 3 inches
wide by 4 or 5 inches deep, it can be used by itself in a room where you
want music, but where it doesn't matter as much whether it's the highest
quality stereo setup. A lot of people also use a set of Play 1 as rear
speakers for surround sound (I'll come to that later).
The Play 3 is a bit larger and you can use it in portrait mode so to speak
(vertically) or in landscape mode (horizontally). It has as the name
suggests 3 drivers, I think two tweeters and a base.
The play 5 which is much larger, more like the size of a traditional
boombox, has 5 individual Class D amplifiers controlling one driver each and
it sounds fantastic, a pair of them is amazing. It is also the only one of
the 3 players I mentioned so far which has a 3.5mm headphone/line out jack
and a 3.5mm stereo input which you can use to hook up an iPhone by cable, an
MP3 player or any other analogue source such as a CD player, tap player etc.
using a 3.5mm male to RCA male cable. All Sonos players, by the way, do have
one or two ethernet ports (those who have two can work like a small ethernet
hub, you plug in one cable to the router and another one can go out to
another device). They can be plugged into a router but are really designed
to be set up wirelessly. Until a few years ago you did need either one
player connected by calbe to the router or you needed a so-called Sonos
Bridge or Boost which was plugged in, this player or bridge/boost would then
generate the Zigby network used by the players to communicate with each
other. Nowadays a Sonos system can be set up completely via your existing
WiFi network.
Apart from that all you need is a plug-in, all the players use a standard
power cable, not sure what the connector is called, but it's not the large
one that plugs into computers, but the smaller one.
Now, apart from the 3 portable speakers/players which I call portable
because you can take them wherever you have a power outlet and plug them in
and that is still in reach of your WiFi, there are two more players which
are the original ones and which are designed differently.
The Connect Amp is a larger box, about 6 inches square, 3 or so inches
thick and it weighs probably 5 pounds, it's heavy for it's compact size. It
is meant to be used more like a traditional amp and has two Class D digital
amplifiers which produce a total of 110 Watts, 55 Watt per channel. It has
the two ethernet ports in back, one set of RCA analogue inputs and a set of
traditiponal speaker terminals where you would hook up any existing
bookshelf, in-wall/in-ceiling or tower speakers. The line-in once again can
be used to hook up a music source such as CD player, tape deck (for those
who still have them) or whatever you have that has analogue RCA outputs. Of
course for a record player you would need a separate preamp.
The second one of these players is the Connect. It is a slightly smaller
box, but also square and about the same height. It is fairly light because
it has no amplifier as it is designed to be used in connection with an
existing amplifier/receiver to bring Sonos connectivity to your existing
stereo setup.
It also has one set of RCA inputs, but it has 3 different output options:
1 RCA output which can be used to connect to an older
amplifier/receiver with no digital inputs or you can connect any
powered speakers or even the base
1 Toslink optical output to connect to an optical input on a receiver or
TV, some higher-end wireless headsets often also have an optical digital
input.
1 Coax digital output, once again for connectiving to amplifiers or
receivers that have it. I have a very high-end stereo system in a separate
room downstairs, it's 20 years old by now, but it's one that will still
sound fantastic in another 20 years with a Sonic Frontiers hybrid
tube/transistor amp, Sonic Frontiers DA converter and a custom built
electronic crossover. The custom built subwovers are driven by a Bryston 250
Watt amp and the source used to be a Sonic Frontiers CD Transport, but I
have replace it with a Sonos Connect which I have connected to the DA
converter via the Coax digital connection and I can't hear a difference
between music playing from the $300 Sonos Connect or the $2,500 Sonic
Frontiers CD Transport.

Lastly, there are a few options now for sound from the TV. Initially Sonos
came out with the Playbar, a 37 inch wide soundbar with 9 separate tweeters,
mid drivers and base drivers all driven by their own Class D amplifier. The
only input other than the ethernet port all the players have is an optical
digital input for connecting it to the optical digital output on your TV.
You can set up the playbar along with two Play 1 speakers and a Sonos
Wireless Sub as a 5.1 surround system, but your TV has to support HDMI
Pass-Through I think it is called if you want a true 5.1 experience from
devices connected to your TV via HDMI such as blueray players, the Apple TV
etc.
The last and newest item is a TV stand which basically is meant to replace
the Playbar in situations where a TV is not wall-mounted but stands on a
table. The stand is only a couple of inches thick I think and you put it on
the table first, then put your TV on top of it. Again it works together with
the Sonos Sub and whatever you have for rear speakers to create a 5.1
surround system. You can use also a set of Play 3 as rear speakers, but
unless you have a really large room that isn't really necessary.
The playbar and Sonos Sub go for I think $700 US each.
The Sonos Sub is a very interesting design, it is about the size of a
mid-sized computer tower, 15.3 by 15.8 inches and just over 6 inches thick
and it has a large square hole in the middle and here are two resessed base
drivers facing each other. At 36 pounds it is very heavy for such a compact
size and you can stand it up like a computer tower or lay it flat under a
coffee table and it is of amazing quality. As I said, I am a bit of an audio
file and my downstairs system was the price of a mid-size car 20 years ago,
but if you wanted a good stereo music set up and spend $1,700 for a pair of
Play 5 and a Sonos Sub I would happily compare that sound with a $800 to
$1,00 amplifier/receiver and a set of $800 speakers and this is not
accounting for the price of a good CD player. Also, the convenience of Sonos
is just unbeatable, if you had an Apple Music subscription or one from
Spotify or Deezer you have access to all the music you want and of course
you can still listen to your own collection if you digitize it. I have
ripped all my CD's in uncompressed FLAC format and put them on a network
attached hard drive so I can listen to them any time via Sonos without
having to turn on my computer. If you have a really discerning ear you could
spend a bit more than your usual subscription and get a Deezer Elite or
Tidal subscription (about $20/month) and this will give you a streaming
service offiering lossless quality at 1,411 kbps. Deezer Elite is only
available for Sonos customers.

Regards,
Sieghard


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jonas Voll
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 6:30 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Hey Randy Barnett!
Can Sonos, change radio stations or change CD to tape player or 8 traks
with voice support?
I have one of the newer Panasonic Viera & Voice Guidance televisions see
demo link.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nG2cpSUqOSY


Jonas Voll
Support Technician I
Envision, Inc.
2301 S Water ST
Wichita, KS 67213
O: 316-425-7141
F: 316-267-4312
www.envisionus.com

Envision: To improve the quality of life and provide inspiration for the
blind and visually impaired through employment, outreach, rehabilitation,
education and research.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Randy Barnett
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 5:39 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Sonos is a great example of this their software to control their speakers
is completely accessible.

On 5/7/2017 2:26 PM, Pablo Morales wrote:
I would like to add one more thing.
Companies are understanding that they are going to sale more
products, if they can increase the number of customers, inserting
disability customers to the list. I am totally blind, and if I going
to buy a sound system, and I see that the sound system that I want has no
way to be used by a blind user.
Well, I will not buy it. But if another company is able to let me use
their sound system using my smart phone, then I will get that sound
system, no matter if it is more expensive. Here is where the
opportunity cost plays an important roll.
Companies are understanding that today more disability people is
going to school, more disability people is been productive, and it
means that they have money in their pockets. Business want that
money, so they are looking the way to sale us something. It will be
through the accessibility of their products.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 4:04 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

I think VFO as Pablo said has some good leadership and I have a
feeling they are thinking ahead. It sounds to me like this
organisation they acquired is in the business of trying to promote
accessible web development and I think it is very encouraging for a
company like VFO to jump onto this bandwagon.
They know that the more websites are made accessible by web
developers and the more there are standards being used, the better
can they make Jaws to work with said standards in accessibility.
One example of what is possible is shown by canadian government websites.
They are committed to be accessible and just about all of them follow
web accessibility standards, have accessibility statements and for
the most part are fully accessible and easy to navigate. This means
that if an organisation, in this case the canadian government, makes
a decision to make their websites accessible it is apparently
possible and can be achieved with consistancy and a high degree of
success.
Apple started the entire out of the box accessibility experience just
8 years ago and I think some pretty good advancements have been made
simply because pretty much all of the other big players (Amazon,
Facebook, Google and Microsoft) have followed Apple's example and
have started accessibility departments where a team of people
specifically works on the issue. I am not surprised that sometimes
there is a stumble or even a step back since all of these large
organisations consist of many departments, there is often great
rivalry between teams and sometimes outright pissing contests to see
who can push through their agenda and a relatively small team like
accessibility I am sure is still considered relatively unimportant by
other teams. But I believe that now that this door has been opened it
can't be closed any more and in time accessibility will continue to
improve, technology will develop to consider accessibility from the
ground up so that whatever work that is required wil simply be part
of the development. One reason why I am pretty sure this is happening
is the fact that many in leading positions with these companies are
people who themselves may benefit from this accessibility as they get
older, things like visual impairments as the population gets older
and older will be more common and there will simply be a greater need
for accessibility and those who need it will be people who grew up
with technology unlike people like my parents who are now in their
mid 70's and early 80's and who did not have this technology until
they were in their late 50's at best. I taught my Mom how to use a
computer when she was almost
60 and bought her an iPad when she was almost 70, because of this she
had no problem buying and using an iPhone last year. My Dad, however,
is almost 8 years older and he was never interested when my Mom first
got her computer and now at 82 he has no interest and little
understanding and he's barely capable of tapping the large button on
my Mom's iPhone 6S Plus when a phone call comes in.
Now take people like Tim Cook or Zuckerberg, the former is now 56,
Zuckerberg is not even 43, but you can bet that if they ever can't
see well enough any more to use technology when they are 80 will want
to have the accessibility in place to do so. In Cook's case this is
20 years away but of course several of these important people may
also simply be exposed to the issue because family or friends close
to them may have disabilities and I really think that accessibility
at this point is considered to be important by most of them.
Lastly, consider how relatively little advancemens were made in the
20 years between say the late 80's and 2008/2009 and how much of a
leap forward accessibility has taken in the last 7 or 8 years. I
guaranty anybody that in another 10 years when we get close to
reaching the next 20 year mark we all look back and shake our heads.
Maybe we won't quite jump into our own self-driving electric cars in
10 years to drive to work, but we might be darn close. We have
incredibly powerful processing capabilities, we have huge and
inexpensive storage and we have fast and reliable wireless
connections which are only getting faster. All of this is maturing
technology which will make it possible for accessibility to be more
deeply integrated.

Regards,
Sieghard

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom
Behler
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 10:42 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Exactly, because I have to say that I'm experiencing more and more
difficulty that appears to be related to Jaws not keeping up with
Office 365, which I currently use.

I'm not saying this to complain; I'm just noting it as an
increasingly-significant reality that we all face.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Maria Campbell
Sent: Sunday, May 07, 2017 1:11 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Just as two examples, They might be very smart, but what we need is
developers capable of keeping up with, or driving accessibility of
technology, out of the box, preferably.


lucky1inct@gmail.com
Faithfulness does not begin with large tasks-if it is not present in
small things, it does not exist at all.

On 5/7/2017 1:06 PM, Pablo Morales wrote:
This guys are very smart.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Randy Barnett
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 12:53 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

So what do you guys and gals think this means to us?
VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group, the software accessibility firm
providing website and application compliance solutions to enterprises
throughout the world:
.?
http://bit.ly/2qtVQ8W

























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Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Alan Robbins
 

I just fixed the subject line to avoid the dual threat and provide more clarification
Thanks,
Alan

On May 8, 2017, at 20:57, Pablo Morales <pablocmd2014@gmail.com> wrote:

I am talking about the Sonos device that Sieghard was talking about.

---Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of george b
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 8:46 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Sonos music system, was: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Are you asking about sonos or f v o I am confused by the subject line

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pablo Morales
Sent: May 8, 2017 15:50
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Sonos music system, was: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

What about the sound quality?
I have been looking for a good sound system, and last year I was going to buy the bose cube, but the accessibility in the iPhone wasn't enough and I made a step back. What you mention about accessibility is very important for me.
What about the number of speakers for each room, how is this configuration?


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 12:52 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sonos music system, was: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Sorry, one more thing, in order to control a Sonos system you will need either an iPhone, Android phone or a PC. I am not an Android user, but I think the Sonos app is accessible, it is definitely extremely accessible on the iPhone and for some years now Sonos seems to make sure that accessibility is not forgotten.
The Sonos app on the PC is also accessible with Jaws, it won't read anything with the Jaws cursor, but you can tab through all the controls and use the right arrow, enter or spacebar to expend menus and make selections. I think there are still accessibility issues on the Mac with Voiceover, but I'm not sure if this has been fixed now.
I assume it would work with NVDA as well.
Brian Hartgen, maker of the Leasey scripts, also has a set of free Sonos scripts which improve how it works with Jaws a bit.
Jonas, you asked about changing radio stations, once again, there is no traditional FM/AM radio tuner, you would have to use Tune In Radio to listen to your radio stations online or use the input on a player such as the Play 5, Connect or Connect Amp to connect a tuner, personally I can even get our small local radio station in the town of 6,000 where I live via Tune In so I don't see a point in using a tuner.

Regards,
Sieghard

-----Original Message-----
From: Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 9:39 AM
To: 'main@jfw.groups.io' <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: RE: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Hi Jonas,

I was thinking of sending this to you directly, but hopefully this rather long write-up is not considered too much off-topic, I just thought others may find it interesting to read. I'm a huge Sonos fan and have bought my first Sonos equipment 8 or almost 9 years ago. I have replaced my high-end signature series $2,000 Sony receiver in the living room with Sonos and am not regretting it.

However, Sonos is not like a traditional amplifier or receiver with a whole bunch of all sorts of inputs in the back where you hook up all your components. Sonos is a multi-room system which means it is designed so you have one of their players in every room where you want music and it then is very much meant to play music from online sources or to play your own digitized collection of music on your computer or network attached hard drive although some of their players do allow you to hook up an external source like a CD player, tape deck etc. If you did, for example, connect a CD player to a Sonos Connect in the living room, then that source is available on all your Sonos players throughout the house and once you started playing something on your CD player you could listen to it in the bedroom while somebody else could listen to Spotify or Apple Music in the living room.
Sonos supports literally dozens of free or subscription-based music services such as Tune In Radio, iHeart Radio, Apple Music, Spotify, Deezer, Google Play Music, Sirius XM, Slacker and loads more. For the most part you control all of this from the Sonos app, here you can choose on which player you want to play music like living room, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom or wherever you have a Sonos player. You can also group two or more or all of your players together to play the same music throughout the house. Then you select from which service you want to play music or you go to your own library of digital music and further select by genre, artist, album, playlist or individual song. Think of the Sonos app really more like a remote control for your Sonos system, the players themselves only have two buttons, a Play/Pause button and a volume rocker, but of course you can also turn the volume up or down from the app, if you have a group of players using the main volume control in the app raises or lowers the volume on all players or you can open the volume control and adjust the volume of individual players in your group, for example, maybe you have a party and you just want the music in the bathroom playing very softly whereas in the living room you want it louder.
Now, as for the players, Sonos has a number of them by now and I think most people buy the stand-alone players/speakers nowadays rather than those where you need to connect a set of bookshelf or tower speakers. There are 3 stand-alone speakers/players, the Play 1, Play 3 and Play 5. I think in the States they are $199, $299 and $499, respectively. All three can stand on a shelf or table or you can get a wall mount from various third party sources for all of them and all three can be used as individual units or you can configure two of them to play as stereo pairs.
The Play 1 is a relatively small speaker, about 6 inches tall by 3 inches wide by 4 or 5 inches deep, it can be used by itself in a room where you want music, but where it doesn't matter as much whether it's the highest quality stereo setup. A lot of people also use a set of Play 1 as rear speakers for surround sound (I'll come to that later).
The Play 3 is a bit larger and you can use it in portrait mode so to speak (vertically) or in landscape mode (horizontally). It has as the name suggests 3 drivers, I think two tweeters and a base.
The play 5 which is much larger, more like the size of a traditional boombox, has 5 individual Class D amplifiers controlling one driver each and it sounds fantastic, a pair of them is amazing. It is also the only one of the 3 players I mentioned so far which has a 3.5mm headphone/line out jack and a 3.5mm stereo input which you can use to hook up an iPhone by cable, an MP3 player or any other analogue source such as a CD player, tap player etc. using a 3.5mm male to RCA male cable. All Sonos players, by the way, do have one or two ethernet ports (those who have two can work like a small ethernet hub, you plug in one cable to the router and another one can go out to another device). They can be plugged into a router but are really designed to be set up wirelessly. Until a few years ago you did need either one player connected by calbe to the router or you needed a so-called Sonos Bridge or Boost which was plugged in, this player or bridge/boost would then generate the Zigby network used by the players to communicate with each other. Nowadays a Sonos system can be set up completely via your existing WiFi network.
Apart from that all you need is a plug-in, all the players use a standard power cable, not sure what the connector is called, but it's not the large one that plugs into computers, but the smaller one.
Now, apart from the 3 portable speakers/players which I call portable because you can take them wherever you have a power outlet and plug them in and that is still in reach of your WiFi, there are two more players which are the original ones and which are designed differently.
The Connect Amp is a larger box, about 6 inches square, 3 or so inches thick and it weighs probably 5 pounds, it's heavy for it's compact size. It is meant to be used more like a traditional amp and has two Class D digital amplifiers which produce a total of 110 Watts, 55 Watt per channel. It has the two ethernet ports in back, one set of RCA analogue inputs and a set of traditiponal speaker terminals where you would hook up any existing bookshelf, in-wall/in-ceiling or tower speakers. The line-in once again can be used to hook up a music source such as CD player, tape deck (for those who still have them) or whatever you have that has analogue RCA outputs. Of course for a record player you would need a separate preamp.
The second one of these players is the Connect. It is a slightly smaller box, but also square and about the same height. It is fairly light because it has no amplifier as it is designed to be used in connection with an existing amplifier/receiver to bring Sonos connectivity to your existing stereo setup.
It also has one set of RCA inputs, but it has 3 different output options:
1 RCA output which can be used to connect to an older amplifier/receiver with no digital inputs or you can connect any powered speakers or even the base
1 Toslink optical output to connect to an optical input on a receiver or TV, some higher-end wireless headsets often also have an optical digital input.
1 Coax digital output, once again for connectiving to amplifiers or receivers that have it. I have a very high-end stereo system in a separate room downstairs, it's 20 years old by now, but it's one that will still sound fantastic in another 20 years with a Sonic Frontiers hybrid tube/transistor amp, Sonic Frontiers DA converter and a custom built electronic crossover. The custom built subwovers are driven by a Bryston 250 Watt amp and the source used to be a Sonic Frontiers CD Transport, but I have replace it with a Sonos Connect which I have connected to the DA converter via the Coax digital connection and I can't hear a difference between music playing from the $300 Sonos Connect or the $2,500 Sonic Frontiers CD Transport.

Lastly, there are a few options now for sound from the TV. Initially Sonos came out with the Playbar, a 37 inch wide soundbar with 9 separate tweeters, mid drivers and base drivers all driven by their own Class D amplifier. The only input other than the ethernet port all the players have is an optical digital input for connecting it to the optical digital output on your TV. You can set up the playbar along with two Play 1 speakers and a Sonos Wireless Sub as a 5.1 surround system, but your TV has to support HDMI Pass-Through I think it is called if you want a true 5.1 experience from devices connected to your TV via HDMI such as blueray players, the Apple TV etc.
The last and newest item is a TV stand which basically is meant to replace the Playbar in situations where a TV is not wall-mounted but stands on a table. The stand is only a couple of inches thick I think and you put it on the table first, then put your TV on top of it. Again it works together with the Sonos Sub and whatever you have for rear speakers to create a 5.1 surround system. You can use also a set of Play 3 as rear speakers, but unless you have a really large room that isn't really necessary.
The playbar and Sonos Sub go for I think $700 US each.
The Sonos Sub is a very interesting design, it is about the size of a mid-sized computer tower, 15.3 by 15.8 inches and just over 6 inches thick and it has a large square hole in the middle and here are two resessed base drivers facing each other. At 36 pounds it is very heavy for such a compact size and you can stand it up like a computer tower or lay it flat under a coffee table and it is of amazing quality. As I said, I am a bit of an audio file and my downstairs system was the price of a mid-size car 20 years ago, but if you wanted a good stereo music set up and spend $1,700 for a pair of Play 5 and a Sonos Sub I would happily compare that sound with a $800 to $1,00 amplifier/receiver and a set of $800 speakers and this is not accounting for the price of a good CD player. Also, the convenience of Sonos is just unbeatable, if you had an Apple Music subscription or one from Spotify or Deezer you have access to all the music you want and of course you can still listen to your own collection if you digitize it. I have ripped all my CD's in uncompressed FLAC format and put them on a network attached hard drive so I can listen to them any time via Sonos without having to turn on my computer. If you have a really discerning ear you could spend a bit more than your usual subscription and get a Deezer Elite or Tidal subscription (about $20/month) and this will give you a streaming service offiering lossless quality at 1,411 kbps. Deezer Elite is only available for Sonos customers.

Regards,
Sieghard


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jonas Voll
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 6:30 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Hey Randy Barnett!
Can Sonos, change radio stations or change CD to tape player or 8 traks with voice support?
I have one of the newer Panasonic Viera & Voice Guidance televisions see demo link.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nG2cpSUqOSY


Jonas Voll
Support Technician I
Envision, Inc.
2301 S Water ST
Wichita, KS 67213
O: 316-425-7141
F: 316-267-4312
www.envisionus.com

Envision: To improve the quality of life and provide inspiration for the blind and visually impaired through employment, outreach, rehabilitation, education and research.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Randy Barnett
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 5:39 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Sonos is a great example of this their software to control their speakers is completely accessible.

On 5/7/2017 2:26 PM, Pablo Morales wrote:
I would like to add one more thing.
Companies are understanding that they are going to sale more products,
if they can increase the number of customers, inserting disability
customers to the list. I am totally blind, and if I going to buy a
sound system, and I see that the sound system that I want has no way to be used by a blind user.
Well, I will not buy it. But if another company is able to let me use
their sound system using my smart phone, then I will get that sound
system, no matter if it is more expensive. Here is where the
opportunity cost plays an important roll.
Companies are understanding that today more disability people is going
to school, more disability people is been productive, and it means
that they have money in their pockets. Business want that money, so
they are looking the way to sale us something. It will be through the
accessibility of their products.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 4:04 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

I think VFO as Pablo said has some good leadership and I have a
feeling they are thinking ahead. It sounds to me like this
organisation they acquired is in the business of trying to promote
accessible web development and I think it is very encouraging for a company like VFO to jump onto this bandwagon.
They know that the more websites are made accessible by web developers
and the more there are standards being used, the better can they make
Jaws to work with said standards in accessibility.
One example of what is possible is shown by canadian government websites.
They are committed to be accessible and just about all of them follow
web accessibility standards, have accessibility statements and for the
most part are fully accessible and easy to navigate. This means that
if an organisation, in this case the canadian government, makes a
decision to make their websites accessible it is apparently possible
and can be achieved with consistancy and a high degree of success.
Apple started the entire out of the box accessibility experience just
8 years ago and I think some pretty good advancements have been made
simply because pretty much all of the other big players (Amazon,
Facebook, Google and Microsoft) have followed Apple's example and have
started accessibility departments where a team of people specifically
works on the issue. I am not surprised that sometimes there is a
stumble or even a step back since all of these large organisations
consist of many departments, there is often great rivalry between
teams and sometimes outright pissing contests to see who can push
through their agenda and a relatively small team like accessibility I
am sure is still considered relatively unimportant by other teams. But
I believe that now that this door has been opened it can't be closed
any more and in time accessibility will continue to improve,
technology will develop to consider accessibility from the ground up
so that whatever work that is required wil simply be part of the
development. One reason why I am pretty sure this is happening is the
fact that many in leading positions with these companies are people
who themselves may benefit from this accessibility as they get older,
things like visual impairments as the population gets older and older
will be more common and there will simply be a greater need for
accessibility and those who need it will be people who grew up with
technology unlike people like my parents who are now in their mid 70's
and early 80's and who did not have this technology until they were in
their late 50's at best. I taught my Mom how to use a computer when
she was almost
60 and bought her an iPad when she was almost 70, because of this she
had no problem buying and using an iPhone last year. My Dad, however,
is almost 8 years older and he was never interested when my Mom first
got her computer and now at 82 he has no interest and little
understanding and he's barely capable of tapping the large button on
my Mom's iPhone 6S Plus when a phone call comes in.
Now take people like Tim Cook or Zuckerberg, the former is now 56,
Zuckerberg is not even 43, but you can bet that if they ever can't see
well enough any more to use technology when they are 80 will want to
have the accessibility in place to do so. In Cook's case this is 20
years away but of course several of these important people may also
simply be exposed to the issue because family or friends close to them
may have disabilities and I really think that accessibility at this
point is considered to be important by most of them.
Lastly, consider how relatively little advancemens were made in the 20
years between say the late 80's and 2008/2009 and how much of a leap
forward accessibility has taken in the last 7 or 8 years. I guaranty
anybody that in another 10 years when we get close to reaching the
next 20 year mark we all look back and shake our heads. Maybe we won't
quite jump into our own self-driving electric cars in 10 years to
drive to work, but we might be darn close. We have incredibly powerful
processing capabilities, we have huge and inexpensive storage and we
have fast and reliable wireless connections which are only getting
faster. All of this is maturing technology which will make it possible
for accessibility to be more deeply integrated.

Regards,
Sieghard

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom
Behler
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 10:42 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Exactly, because I have to say that I'm experiencing more and more
difficulty that appears to be related to Jaws not keeping up with
Office 365, which I currently use.

I'm not saying this to complain; I'm just noting it as an
increasingly-significant reality that we all face.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Maria Campbell
Sent: Sunday, May 07, 2017 1:11 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Just as two examples, They might be very smart, but what we need is
developers capable of keeping up with, or driving accessibility of
technology, out of the box, preferably.


lucky1inct@gmail.com
Faithfulness does not begin with large tasks-if it is not present in
small things, it does not exist at all.

On 5/7/2017 1:06 PM, Pablo Morales wrote:
This guys are very smart.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Randy Barnett
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 12:53 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

So what do you guys and gals think this means to us?
VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group, the software accessibility firm
providing website and application compliance solutions to enterprises
throughout the world:
.?
http://bit.ly/2qtVQ8W

























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Re: Reading Kindle Books with JAWS 18

Dacia Cole
 

Hi, when I do shift equals, it just says underline and doesn't speed anything up, I don't think shift minus really works either. Are there are better ways to do it?

Sent from my iPhone

On May 8, 2017, at 10:07 AM, Mario <mrb620@hotmail.com> wrote:

thanks.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Dale Heltzer [mailto:deheltzer@msn.com]
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 10:28 AM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Reading Kindle Books with JAWS 18

Hah! I've been using the Kindle app so long that I don't remember where
I got the keyboard commands from... I imagine you could Google Kindle
narration keyboard - or something similar.
The app is a first attempt at accessibility, IMHO. Quick OCR helps, Kind
of. So does Omnipage, but that's a lot of work.

Here's what I use as keyboard commands

Go to library control-l
Open title control-o

Toggle Continuous or single-page reading mode: shift-control-c
Toggle male or female voice shift-control-v
Decrease narration rate shift-minus (which is underscore)
Increase narration rate shift-equals (which is plus)

Full-screen reading mode F11


If anyone else has something to make Kindle easier to use, please chime in.
-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mario
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 9:15 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Reading Kindle Books with JAWS 18

Dale, is there a list of keystrokes that are actually readable?
the reply you sent to decrease/increase narration doesn't have any
letters, unless they are there and JAWS doesn't see them?


-------- Original Message --------
From: Dale Heltzer [mailto:deheltzer@msn.com]
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 9:35 AM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Reading Kindle Books with JAWS 18

To find the app version, use JAWS Insert-Ctrl-V

To decrease/increase narration speech rate in the Kindle PC app: dash
(-)/equals (=)

HTH


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dacia Cole
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 7:59 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Reading Kindle Books with JAWS 18

Hi,

Some of the books I have purchased read with a text to speech voice
that isn't JAWS. Is there a way to speed up that speech and such in the
kindle for pc app? How do you know which version of the app you have?

thanks,

Dacia


On 3/23/17, Alyssa <lyssassong@gmail.com> wrote:
I have used it with no problems. Just download the latest version from
Amazon's site, and be sure to use the latest version of jaws 18.



From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave
Mitchell
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2017 10:37 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Reading Kindle Books with JAWS 18



Hi All, Does anyone have experience with reading Kindle books with JAWS
18?

I found Kindle for PC accessibility Installer version 1.14.43034 but
am not sure if this is the most current version.

Off list is fine but any tips on the procedure will be much appreciated.
Thanks, Mitch

























candy crush soda saga win 10, is it accessible?

marvin kotler
 

Good morning list, Marv here.  First running windows ten and latest version of jaws.  Have a program called candy crush soda saga and wonder if it is accessible; if not, can I remove it? all the best
 


Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Nicole Massey <nyyki@...>
 

Oh, I get the sound for other things, but not for Open Document. And IIRC,
there isn't an Open Document entry in the sounds page anymore.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike B.
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 6:58 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Hi Nicole,

Try the sound named, Process Complete, from the Office group on the sounds
page. , & see if it'll work for you. Please let the list know if it does
or doesn't. Thanks much.
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool. Go Dodgers!
----- Original Message -----
From: Nicole Massey <mailto:nyyki@gypsyheir.com>
To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 4:15 PM
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

The sound pack may date back as far as Office 97. I've noticed with 32 bit
Office 2013 on a Windows 7 machine there is no associated sound for opening
a document. If anyone knows a way to activate this I'd like to have that
back. (It may take some work in the registry)

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
[mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mario
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 5:57 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Mike, are you using Office 2010 64 bit? I read a few posts on different
forums mentioning that that the 64 bit version of Office 2010 might have
either eliminated certain associations of sounds with a particular
feature/function, or the 64 bit version of Office 2010 does not correctly
implement the sounds in the sound pack. however, I do know that the sound
pack is a leftover from Office 2002/2003 and wasn't updated to work properly
in Office 2007/2010. I don't know if it works better in 2013 or the 32 bit
version of 2010. if you do find out, let the list know.


-------- Original Message --------
From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@charter.net]
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 4:22 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Hi Mario,

Yes I do have the Sounds.exe from Microsoft package installed. Where do you
find the Feedback with sound option in Office? In Word I have the following
options selected in Tools / Options / Advanced.

Provide feedback with sound

Provide feedback with animation

Confirm file format conversion on open

I have many of my own sound files in my default Media folder, so I have many
to choose from, & I can pretty much assign most options in Word to have a
sound, but I just can't figure out why the Process Complete when opening a
document doesn't work in Word 2010 anymore.


Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool. Go Dodgers!
----- Original Message -----
From: Mario
To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 12:43 PM
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document


Mike, I don't see a sound that can be set for when Word is started, but you
can assign any wav sound you want for when opening any program. (I got a pop
sound when programs close. but not when programs open)

go to the sound applet in the control panel, control+tab to the sounds
page/tab, tab to the treeview of which Windows should be the first group.
now use the down/up arrow key to find what you want. you can assign a sound
to the open program event.

before you start this, have you downloaded the sounds pack and enabled
feedback with sound in office? if not, you'll have to get it done first.

this should get you started, unless this is not what you're wanting to do.
hth


-------- Original Message --------
From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@charter.net]
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 3:20 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Hi All,

Running Windows 7 Pro 64 bit, Office 2010, & Jaws. Whenever I would open a
Word doc I used to get an assigned, Ding, sound, but that was with Office
2002. The Office task sound associated with this was, Process Complete,
from the Office sounds list in the Sounds page. Well, I don't get this ding
sound anymore although I have the ding sound assigned, so has the sound task
changed for opening documents in Word 2010? If so, what sound task should
be used? All help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks much.
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool. Go Dodgers!


Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Pablo Morales
 

I am talking about the Sonos device that Sieghard was talking about.

---Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of george b
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 8:46 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Sonos music system, was: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Are you asking about sonos or f v o I am confused by the subject line

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pablo Morales
Sent: May 8, 2017 15:50
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Sonos music system, was: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

What about the sound quality?
I have been looking for a good sound system, and last year I was going to buy the bose cube, but the accessibility in the iPhone wasn't enough and I made a step back. What you mention about accessibility is very important for me.
What about the number of speakers for each room, how is this configuration?


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 12:52 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sonos music system, was: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Sorry, one more thing, in order to control a Sonos system you will need either an iPhone, Android phone or a PC. I am not an Android user, but I think the Sonos app is accessible, it is definitely extremely accessible on the iPhone and for some years now Sonos seems to make sure that accessibility is not forgotten.
The Sonos app on the PC is also accessible with Jaws, it won't read anything with the Jaws cursor, but you can tab through all the controls and use the right arrow, enter or spacebar to expend menus and make selections. I think there are still accessibility issues on the Mac with Voiceover, but I'm not sure if this has been fixed now.
I assume it would work with NVDA as well.
Brian Hartgen, maker of the Leasey scripts, also has a set of free Sonos scripts which improve how it works with Jaws a bit.
Jonas, you asked about changing radio stations, once again, there is no traditional FM/AM radio tuner, you would have to use Tune In Radio to listen to your radio stations online or use the input on a player such as the Play 5, Connect or Connect Amp to connect a tuner, personally I can even get our small local radio station in the town of 6,000 where I live via Tune In so I don't see a point in using a tuner.

Regards,
Sieghard

-----Original Message-----
From: Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 9:39 AM
To: 'main@jfw.groups.io' <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: RE: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Hi Jonas,

I was thinking of sending this to you directly, but hopefully this rather long write-up is not considered too much off-topic, I just thought others may find it interesting to read. I'm a huge Sonos fan and have bought my first Sonos equipment 8 or almost 9 years ago. I have replaced my high-end signature series $2,000 Sony receiver in the living room with Sonos and am not regretting it.

However, Sonos is not like a traditional amplifier or receiver with a whole bunch of all sorts of inputs in the back where you hook up all your components. Sonos is a multi-room system which means it is designed so you have one of their players in every room where you want music and it then is very much meant to play music from online sources or to play your own digitized collection of music on your computer or network attached hard drive although some of their players do allow you to hook up an external source like a CD player, tape deck etc. If you did, for example, connect a CD player to a Sonos Connect in the living room, then that source is available on all your Sonos players throughout the house and once you started playing something on your CD player you could listen to it in the bedroom while somebody else could listen to Spotify or Apple Music in the living room.
Sonos supports literally dozens of free or subscription-based music services such as Tune In Radio, iHeart Radio, Apple Music, Spotify, Deezer, Google Play Music, Sirius XM, Slacker and loads more. For the most part you control all of this from the Sonos app, here you can choose on which player you want to play music like living room, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom or wherever you have a Sonos player. You can also group two or more or all of your players together to play the same music throughout the house. Then you select from which service you want to play music or you go to your own library of digital music and further select by genre, artist, album, playlist or individual song. Think of the Sonos app really more like a remote control for your Sonos system, the players themselves only have two buttons, a Play/Pause button and a volume rocker, but of course you can also turn the volume up or down from the app, if you have a group of players using the main volume control in the app raises or lowers the volume on all players or you can open the volume control and adjust the volume of individual players in your group, for example, maybe you have a party and you just want the music in the bathroom playing very softly whereas in the living room you want it louder.
Now, as for the players, Sonos has a number of them by now and I think most people buy the stand-alone players/speakers nowadays rather than those where you need to connect a set of bookshelf or tower speakers. There are 3 stand-alone speakers/players, the Play 1, Play 3 and Play 5. I think in the States they are $199, $299 and $499, respectively. All three can stand on a shelf or table or you can get a wall mount from various third party sources for all of them and all three can be used as individual units or you can configure two of them to play as stereo pairs.
The Play 1 is a relatively small speaker, about 6 inches tall by 3 inches wide by 4 or 5 inches deep, it can be used by itself in a room where you want music, but where it doesn't matter as much whether it's the highest quality stereo setup. A lot of people also use a set of Play 1 as rear speakers for surround sound (I'll come to that later).
The Play 3 is a bit larger and you can use it in portrait mode so to speak (vertically) or in landscape mode (horizontally). It has as the name suggests 3 drivers, I think two tweeters and a base.
The play 5 which is much larger, more like the size of a traditional boombox, has 5 individual Class D amplifiers controlling one driver each and it sounds fantastic, a pair of them is amazing. It is also the only one of the 3 players I mentioned so far which has a 3.5mm headphone/line out jack and a 3.5mm stereo input which you can use to hook up an iPhone by cable, an MP3 player or any other analogue source such as a CD player, tap player etc. using a 3.5mm male to RCA male cable. All Sonos players, by the way, do have one or two ethernet ports (those who have two can work like a small ethernet hub, you plug in one cable to the router and another one can go out to another device). They can be plugged into a router but are really designed to be set up wirelessly. Until a few years ago you did need either one player connected by calbe to the router or you needed a so-called Sonos Bridge or Boost which was plugged in, this player or bridge/boost would then generate the Zigby network used by the players to communicate with each other. Nowadays a Sonos system can be set up completely via your existing WiFi network.
Apart from that all you need is a plug-in, all the players use a standard power cable, not sure what the connector is called, but it's not the large one that plugs into computers, but the smaller one.
Now, apart from the 3 portable speakers/players which I call portable because you can take them wherever you have a power outlet and plug them in and that is still in reach of your WiFi, there are two more players which are the original ones and which are designed differently.
The Connect Amp is a larger box, about 6 inches square, 3 or so inches thick and it weighs probably 5 pounds, it's heavy for it's compact size. It is meant to be used more like a traditional amp and has two Class D digital amplifiers which produce a total of 110 Watts, 55 Watt per channel. It has the two ethernet ports in back, one set of RCA analogue inputs and a set of traditiponal speaker terminals where you would hook up any existing bookshelf, in-wall/in-ceiling or tower speakers. The line-in once again can be used to hook up a music source such as CD player, tape deck (for those who still have them) or whatever you have that has analogue RCA outputs. Of course for a record player you would need a separate preamp.
The second one of these players is the Connect. It is a slightly smaller box, but also square and about the same height. It is fairly light because it has no amplifier as it is designed to be used in connection with an existing amplifier/receiver to bring Sonos connectivity to your existing stereo setup.
It also has one set of RCA inputs, but it has 3 different output options:
1 RCA output which can be used to connect to an older amplifier/receiver with no digital inputs or you can connect any powered speakers or even the base
1 Toslink optical output to connect to an optical input on a receiver or TV, some higher-end wireless headsets often also have an optical digital input.
1 Coax digital output, once again for connectiving to amplifiers or receivers that have it. I have a very high-end stereo system in a separate room downstairs, it's 20 years old by now, but it's one that will still sound fantastic in another 20 years with a Sonic Frontiers hybrid tube/transistor amp, Sonic Frontiers DA converter and a custom built electronic crossover. The custom built subwovers are driven by a Bryston 250 Watt amp and the source used to be a Sonic Frontiers CD Transport, but I have replace it with a Sonos Connect which I have connected to the DA converter via the Coax digital connection and I can't hear a difference between music playing from the $300 Sonos Connect or the $2,500 Sonic Frontiers CD Transport.

Lastly, there are a few options now for sound from the TV. Initially Sonos came out with the Playbar, a 37 inch wide soundbar with 9 separate tweeters, mid drivers and base drivers all driven by their own Class D amplifier. The only input other than the ethernet port all the players have is an optical digital input for connecting it to the optical digital output on your TV. You can set up the playbar along with two Play 1 speakers and a Sonos Wireless Sub as a 5.1 surround system, but your TV has to support HDMI Pass-Through I think it is called if you want a true 5.1 experience from devices connected to your TV via HDMI such as blueray players, the Apple TV etc.
The last and newest item is a TV stand which basically is meant to replace the Playbar in situations where a TV is not wall-mounted but stands on a table. The stand is only a couple of inches thick I think and you put it on the table first, then put your TV on top of it. Again it works together with the Sonos Sub and whatever you have for rear speakers to create a 5.1 surround system. You can use also a set of Play 3 as rear speakers, but unless you have a really large room that isn't really necessary.
The playbar and Sonos Sub go for I think $700 US each.
The Sonos Sub is a very interesting design, it is about the size of a mid-sized computer tower, 15.3 by 15.8 inches and just over 6 inches thick and it has a large square hole in the middle and here are two resessed base drivers facing each other. At 36 pounds it is very heavy for such a compact size and you can stand it up like a computer tower or lay it flat under a coffee table and it is of amazing quality. As I said, I am a bit of an audio file and my downstairs system was the price of a mid-size car 20 years ago, but if you wanted a good stereo music set up and spend $1,700 for a pair of Play 5 and a Sonos Sub I would happily compare that sound with a $800 to $1,00 amplifier/receiver and a set of $800 speakers and this is not accounting for the price of a good CD player. Also, the convenience of Sonos is just unbeatable, if you had an Apple Music subscription or one from Spotify or Deezer you have access to all the music you want and of course you can still listen to your own collection if you digitize it. I have ripped all my CD's in uncompressed FLAC format and put them on a network attached hard drive so I can listen to them any time via Sonos without having to turn on my computer. If you have a really discerning ear you could spend a bit more than your usual subscription and get a Deezer Elite or Tidal subscription (about $20/month) and this will give you a streaming service offiering lossless quality at 1,411 kbps. Deezer Elite is only available for Sonos customers.

Regards,
Sieghard


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jonas Voll
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 6:30 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Hey Randy Barnett!
Can Sonos, change radio stations or change CD to tape player or 8 traks with voice support?
I have one of the newer Panasonic Viera & Voice Guidance televisions see demo link.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nG2cpSUqOSY


Jonas Voll
Support Technician I
Envision, Inc.
2301 S Water ST
Wichita, KS 67213
O: 316-425-7141
F: 316-267-4312
www.envisionus.com

Envision: To improve the quality of life and provide inspiration for the blind and visually impaired through employment, outreach, rehabilitation, education and research.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Randy Barnett
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 5:39 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Sonos is a great example of this their software to control their speakers is completely accessible.

On 5/7/2017 2:26 PM, Pablo Morales wrote:
I would like to add one more thing.
Companies are understanding that they are going to sale more products,
if they can increase the number of customers, inserting disability
customers to the list. I am totally blind, and if I going to buy a
sound system, and I see that the sound system that I want has no way to be used by a blind user.
Well, I will not buy it. But if another company is able to let me use
their sound system using my smart phone, then I will get that sound
system, no matter if it is more expensive. Here is where the
opportunity cost plays an important roll.
Companies are understanding that today more disability people is going
to school, more disability people is been productive, and it means
that they have money in their pockets. Business want that money, so
they are looking the way to sale us something. It will be through the
accessibility of their products.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 4:04 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

I think VFO as Pablo said has some good leadership and I have a
feeling they are thinking ahead. It sounds to me like this
organisation they acquired is in the business of trying to promote
accessible web development and I think it is very encouraging for a company like VFO to jump onto this bandwagon.
They know that the more websites are made accessible by web developers
and the more there are standards being used, the better can they make
Jaws to work with said standards in accessibility.
One example of what is possible is shown by canadian government websites.
They are committed to be accessible and just about all of them follow
web accessibility standards, have accessibility statements and for the
most part are fully accessible and easy to navigate. This means that
if an organisation, in this case the canadian government, makes a
decision to make their websites accessible it is apparently possible
and can be achieved with consistancy and a high degree of success.
Apple started the entire out of the box accessibility experience just
8 years ago and I think some pretty good advancements have been made
simply because pretty much all of the other big players (Amazon,
Facebook, Google and Microsoft) have followed Apple's example and have
started accessibility departments where a team of people specifically
works on the issue. I am not surprised that sometimes there is a
stumble or even a step back since all of these large organisations
consist of many departments, there is often great rivalry between
teams and sometimes outright pissing contests to see who can push
through their agenda and a relatively small team like accessibility I
am sure is still considered relatively unimportant by other teams. But
I believe that now that this door has been opened it can't be closed
any more and in time accessibility will continue to improve,
technology will develop to consider accessibility from the ground up
so that whatever work that is required wil simply be part of the
development. One reason why I am pretty sure this is happening is the
fact that many in leading positions with these companies are people
who themselves may benefit from this accessibility as they get older,
things like visual impairments as the population gets older and older
will be more common and there will simply be a greater need for
accessibility and those who need it will be people who grew up with
technology unlike people like my parents who are now in their mid 70's
and early 80's and who did not have this technology until they were in
their late 50's at best. I taught my Mom how to use a computer when
she was almost
60 and bought her an iPad when she was almost 70, because of this she
had no problem buying and using an iPhone last year. My Dad, however,
is almost 8 years older and he was never interested when my Mom first
got her computer and now at 82 he has no interest and little
understanding and he's barely capable of tapping the large button on
my Mom's iPhone 6S Plus when a phone call comes in.
Now take people like Tim Cook or Zuckerberg, the former is now 56,
Zuckerberg is not even 43, but you can bet that if they ever can't see
well enough any more to use technology when they are 80 will want to
have the accessibility in place to do so. In Cook's case this is 20
years away but of course several of these important people may also
simply be exposed to the issue because family or friends close to them
may have disabilities and I really think that accessibility at this
point is considered to be important by most of them.
Lastly, consider how relatively little advancemens were made in the 20
years between say the late 80's and 2008/2009 and how much of a leap
forward accessibility has taken in the last 7 or 8 years. I guaranty
anybody that in another 10 years when we get close to reaching the
next 20 year mark we all look back and shake our heads. Maybe we won't
quite jump into our own self-driving electric cars in 10 years to
drive to work, but we might be darn close. We have incredibly powerful
processing capabilities, we have huge and inexpensive storage and we
have fast and reliable wireless connections which are only getting
faster. All of this is maturing technology which will make it possible
for accessibility to be more deeply integrated.

Regards,
Sieghard

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom
Behler
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 10:42 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Exactly, because I have to say that I'm experiencing more and more
difficulty that appears to be related to Jaws not keeping up with
Office 365, which I currently use.

I'm not saying this to complain; I'm just noting it as an
increasingly-significant reality that we all face.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Maria Campbell
Sent: Sunday, May 07, 2017 1:11 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Just as two examples, They might be very smart, but what we need is
developers capable of keeping up with, or driving accessibility of
technology, out of the box, preferably.


lucky1inct@gmail.com
Faithfulness does not begin with large tasks-if it is not present in
small things, it does not exist at all.

On 5/7/2017 1:06 PM, Pablo Morales wrote:
This guys are very smart.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Randy Barnett
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 12:53 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

So what do you guys and gals think this means to us?
VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group, the software accessibility firm
providing website and application compliance solutions to enterprises
throughout the world:
.?
http://bit.ly/2qtVQ8W

























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Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

george b <gbmagoo@...>
 

Are you asking about sonos or f v o I am confused by the subject line

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Pablo Morales
Sent: May 8, 2017 15:50
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Sonos music system, was: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

What about the sound quality?
I have been looking for a good sound system, and last year I was going to buy the bose cube, but the accessibility in the iPhone wasn't enough and I made a step back. What you mention about accessibility is very important for me.
What about the number of speakers for each room, how is this configuration?


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 12:52 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sonos music system, was: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Sorry, one more thing, in order to control a Sonos system you will need either an iPhone, Android phone or a PC. I am not an Android user, but I think the Sonos app is accessible, it is definitely extremely accessible on the iPhone and for some years now Sonos seems to make sure that accessibility is not forgotten.
The Sonos app on the PC is also accessible with Jaws, it won't read anything with the Jaws cursor, but you can tab through all the controls and use the right arrow, enter or spacebar to expend menus and make selections. I think there are still accessibility issues on the Mac with Voiceover, but I'm not sure if this has been fixed now.
I assume it would work with NVDA as well.
Brian Hartgen, maker of the Leasey scripts, also has a set of free Sonos scripts which improve how it works with Jaws a bit.
Jonas, you asked about changing radio stations, once again, there is no traditional FM/AM radio tuner, you would have to use Tune In Radio to listen to your radio stations online or use the input on a player such as the Play 5, Connect or Connect Amp to connect a tuner, personally I can even get our small local radio station in the town of 6,000 where I live via Tune In so I don't see a point in using a tuner.

Regards,
Sieghard

-----Original Message-----
From: Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 9:39 AM
To: 'main@jfw.groups.io' <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: RE: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Hi Jonas,

I was thinking of sending this to you directly, but hopefully this rather long write-up is not considered too much off-topic, I just thought others may find it interesting to read. I'm a huge Sonos fan and have bought my first Sonos equipment 8 or almost 9 years ago. I have replaced my high-end signature series $2,000 Sony receiver in the living room with Sonos and am not regretting it.

However, Sonos is not like a traditional amplifier or receiver with a whole bunch of all sorts of inputs in the back where you hook up all your components. Sonos is a multi-room system which means it is designed so you have one of their players in every room where you want music and it then is very much meant to play music from online sources or to play your own digitized collection of music on your computer or network attached hard drive although some of their players do allow you to hook up an external source like a CD player, tape deck etc. If you did, for example, connect a CD player to a Sonos Connect in the living room, then that source is available on all your Sonos players throughout the house and once you started playing something on your CD player you could listen to it in the bedroom while somebody else could listen to Spotify or Apple Music in the living room.
Sonos supports literally dozens of free or subscription-based music services such as Tune In Radio, iHeart Radio, Apple Music, Spotify, Deezer, Google Play Music, Sirius XM, Slacker and loads more. For the most part you control all of this from the Sonos app, here you can choose on which player you want to play music like living room, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom or wherever you have a Sonos player. You can also group two or more or all of your players together to play the same music throughout the house. Then you select from which service you want to play music or you go to your own library of digital music and further select by genre, artist, album, playlist or individual song. Think of the Sonos app really more like a remote control for your Sonos system, the players themselves only have two buttons, a Play/Pause button and a volume rocker, but of course you can also turn the volume up or down from the app, if you have a group of players using the main volume control in the app raises or lowers the volume on all players or you can open the volume control and adjust the volume of individual players in your group, for example, maybe you have a party and you just want the music in the bathroom playing very softly whereas in the living room you want it louder.
Now, as for the players, Sonos has a number of them by now and I think most people buy the stand-alone players/speakers nowadays rather than those where you need to connect a set of bookshelf or tower speakers. There are 3 stand-alone speakers/players, the Play 1, Play 3 and Play 5. I think in the States they are $199, $299 and $499, respectively. All three can stand on a shelf or table or you can get a wall mount from various third party sources for all of them and all three can be used as individual units or you can configure two of them to play as stereo pairs.
The Play 1 is a relatively small speaker, about 6 inches tall by 3 inches wide by 4 or 5 inches deep, it can be used by itself in a room where you want music, but where it doesn't matter as much whether it's the highest quality stereo setup. A lot of people also use a set of Play 1 as rear speakers for surround sound (I'll come to that later).
The Play 3 is a bit larger and you can use it in portrait mode so to speak (vertically) or in landscape mode (horizontally). It has as the name suggests 3 drivers, I think two tweeters and a base.
The play 5 which is much larger, more like the size of a traditional boombox, has 5 individual Class D amplifiers controlling one driver each and it sounds fantastic, a pair of them is amazing. It is also the only one of the 3 players I mentioned so far which has a 3.5mm headphone/line out jack and a 3.5mm stereo input which you can use to hook up an iPhone by cable, an MP3 player or any other analogue source such as a CD player, tap player etc. using a 3.5mm male to RCA male cable. All Sonos players, by the way, do have one or two ethernet ports (those who have two can work like a small ethernet hub, you plug in one cable to the router and another one can go out to another device). They can be plugged into a router but are really designed to be set up wirelessly. Until a few years ago you did need either one player connected by calbe to the router or you needed a so-called Sonos Bridge or Boost which was plugged in, this player or bridge/boost would then generate the Zigby network used by the players to communicate with each other. Nowadays a Sonos system can be set up completely via your existing WiFi network.
Apart from that all you need is a plug-in, all the players use a standard power cable, not sure what the connector is called, but it's not the large one that plugs into computers, but the smaller one.
Now, apart from the 3 portable speakers/players which I call portable because you can take them wherever you have a power outlet and plug them in and that is still in reach of your WiFi, there are two more players which are the original ones and which are designed differently.
The Connect Amp is a larger box, about 6 inches square, 3 or so inches thick and it weighs probably 5 pounds, it's heavy for it's compact size. It is meant to be used more like a traditional amp and has two Class D digital amplifiers which produce a total of 110 Watts, 55 Watt per channel. It has the two ethernet ports in back, one set of RCA analogue inputs and a set of traditiponal speaker terminals where you would hook up any existing bookshelf, in-wall/in-ceiling or tower speakers. The line-in once again can be used to hook up a music source such as CD player, tape deck (for those who still have them) or whatever you have that has analogue RCA outputs. Of course for a record player you would need a separate preamp.
The second one of these players is the Connect. It is a slightly smaller box, but also square and about the same height. It is fairly light because it has no amplifier as it is designed to be used in connection with an existing amplifier/receiver to bring Sonos connectivity to your existing stereo setup.
It also has one set of RCA inputs, but it has 3 different output options:
1 RCA output which can be used to connect to an older amplifier/receiver with no digital inputs or you can connect any powered speakers or even the base
1 Toslink optical output to connect to an optical input on a receiver or TV, some higher-end wireless headsets often also have an optical digital input.
1 Coax digital output, once again for connectiving to amplifiers or receivers that have it. I have a very high-end stereo system in a separate room downstairs, it's 20 years old by now, but it's one that will still sound fantastic in another 20 years with a Sonic Frontiers hybrid tube/transistor amp, Sonic Frontiers DA converter and a custom built electronic crossover. The custom built subwovers are driven by a Bryston 250 Watt amp and the source used to be a Sonic Frontiers CD Transport, but I have replace it with a Sonos Connect which I have connected to the DA converter via the Coax digital connection and I can't hear a difference between music playing from the $300 Sonos Connect or the $2,500 Sonic Frontiers CD Transport.

Lastly, there are a few options now for sound from the TV. Initially Sonos came out with the Playbar, a 37 inch wide soundbar with 9 separate tweeters, mid drivers and base drivers all driven by their own Class D amplifier. The only input other than the ethernet port all the players have is an optical digital input for connecting it to the optical digital output on your TV. You can set up the playbar along with two Play 1 speakers and a Sonos Wireless Sub as a 5.1 surround system, but your TV has to support HDMI Pass-Through I think it is called if you want a true 5.1 experience from devices connected to your TV via HDMI such as blueray players, the Apple TV etc.
The last and newest item is a TV stand which basically is meant to replace the Playbar in situations where a TV is not wall-mounted but stands on a table. The stand is only a couple of inches thick I think and you put it on the table first, then put your TV on top of it. Again it works together with the Sonos Sub and whatever you have for rear speakers to create a 5.1 surround system. You can use also a set of Play 3 as rear speakers, but unless you have a really large room that isn't really necessary.
The playbar and Sonos Sub go for I think $700 US each.
The Sonos Sub is a very interesting design, it is about the size of a mid-sized computer tower, 15.3 by 15.8 inches and just over 6 inches thick and it has a large square hole in the middle and here are two resessed base drivers facing each other. At 36 pounds it is very heavy for such a compact size and you can stand it up like a computer tower or lay it flat under a coffee table and it is of amazing quality. As I said, I am a bit of an audio file and my downstairs system was the price of a mid-size car 20 years ago, but if you wanted a good stereo music set up and spend $1,700 for a pair of Play 5 and a Sonos Sub I would happily compare that sound with a $800 to $1,00 amplifier/receiver and a set of $800 speakers and this is not accounting for the price of a good CD player. Also, the convenience of Sonos is just unbeatable, if you had an Apple Music subscription or one from Spotify or Deezer you have access to all the music you want and of course you can still listen to your own collection if you digitize it. I have ripped all my CD's in uncompressed FLAC format and put them on a network attached hard drive so I can listen to them any time via Sonos without having to turn on my computer. If you have a really discerning ear you could spend a bit more than your usual subscription and get a Deezer Elite or Tidal subscription (about $20/month) and this will give you a streaming service offiering lossless quality at 1,411 kbps. Deezer Elite is only available for Sonos customers.

Regards,
Sieghard


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jonas Voll
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 6:30 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Hey Randy Barnett!
Can Sonos, change radio stations or change CD to tape player or 8 traks with voice support?
I have one of the newer Panasonic Viera & Voice Guidance televisions see demo link.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nG2cpSUqOSY


Jonas Voll
Support Technician I
Envision, Inc.
2301 S Water ST
Wichita, KS 67213
O: 316-425-7141
F: 316-267-4312
www.envisionus.com

Envision: To improve the quality of life and provide inspiration for the blind and visually impaired through employment, outreach, rehabilitation, education and research.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Randy Barnett
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 5:39 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Sonos is a great example of this their software to control their speakers is completely accessible.

On 5/7/2017 2:26 PM, Pablo Morales wrote:
I would like to add one more thing.
Companies are understanding that they are going to sale more products,
if they can increase the number of customers, inserting disability
customers to the list. I am totally blind, and if I going to buy a
sound system, and I see that the sound system that I want has no way to be used by a blind user.
Well, I will not buy it. But if another company is able to let me use
their sound system using my smart phone, then I will get that sound
system, no matter if it is more expensive. Here is where the
opportunity cost plays an important roll.
Companies are understanding that today more disability people is going
to school, more disability people is been productive, and it means
that they have money in their pockets. Business want that money, so
they are looking the way to sale us something. It will be through the
accessibility of their products.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 4:04 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

I think VFO as Pablo said has some good leadership and I have a
feeling they are thinking ahead. It sounds to me like this
organisation they acquired is in the business of trying to promote
accessible web development and I think it is very encouraging for a company like VFO to jump onto this bandwagon.
They know that the more websites are made accessible by web developers
and the more there are standards being used, the better can they make
Jaws to work with said standards in accessibility.
One example of what is possible is shown by canadian government websites.
They are committed to be accessible and just about all of them follow
web accessibility standards, have accessibility statements and for the
most part are fully accessible and easy to navigate. This means that
if an organisation, in this case the canadian government, makes a
decision to make their websites accessible it is apparently possible
and can be achieved with consistancy and a high degree of success.
Apple started the entire out of the box accessibility experience just
8 years ago and I think some pretty good advancements have been made
simply because pretty much all of the other big players (Amazon,
Facebook, Google and Microsoft) have followed Apple's example and have
started accessibility departments where a team of people specifically
works on the issue. I am not surprised that sometimes there is a
stumble or even a step back since all of these large organisations
consist of many departments, there is often great rivalry between
teams and sometimes outright pissing contests to see who can push
through their agenda and a relatively small team like accessibility I
am sure is still considered relatively unimportant by other teams. But
I believe that now that this door has been opened it can't be closed
any more and in time accessibility will continue to improve,
technology will develop to consider accessibility from the ground up
so that whatever work that is required wil simply be part of the
development. One reason why I am pretty sure this is happening is the
fact that many in leading positions with these companies are people
who themselves may benefit from this accessibility as they get older,
things like visual impairments as the population gets older and older
will be more common and there will simply be a greater need for
accessibility and those who need it will be people who grew up with
technology unlike people like my parents who are now in their mid 70's
and early 80's and who did not have this technology until they were in
their late 50's at best. I taught my Mom how to use a computer when
she was almost
60 and bought her an iPad when she was almost 70, because of this she
had no problem buying and using an iPhone last year. My Dad, however,
is almost 8 years older and he was never interested when my Mom first
got her computer and now at 82 he has no interest and little
understanding and he's barely capable of tapping the large button on
my Mom's iPhone 6S Plus when a phone call comes in.
Now take people like Tim Cook or Zuckerberg, the former is now 56,
Zuckerberg is not even 43, but you can bet that if they ever can't see
well enough any more to use technology when they are 80 will want to
have the accessibility in place to do so. In Cook's case this is 20
years away but of course several of these important people may also
simply be exposed to the issue because family or friends close to them
may have disabilities and I really think that accessibility at this
point is considered to be important by most of them.
Lastly, consider how relatively little advancemens were made in the 20
years between say the late 80's and 2008/2009 and how much of a leap
forward accessibility has taken in the last 7 or 8 years. I guaranty
anybody that in another 10 years when we get close to reaching the
next 20 year mark we all look back and shake our heads. Maybe we won't
quite jump into our own self-driving electric cars in 10 years to
drive to work, but we might be darn close. We have incredibly powerful
processing capabilities, we have huge and inexpensive storage and we
have fast and reliable wireless connections which are only getting
faster. All of this is maturing technology which will make it possible
for accessibility to be more deeply integrated.

Regards,
Sieghard

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom
Behler
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 10:42 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Exactly, because I have to say that I'm experiencing more and more
difficulty that appears to be related to Jaws not keeping up with
Office 365, which I currently use.

I'm not saying this to complain; I'm just noting it as an
increasingly-significant reality that we all face.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Maria Campbell
Sent: Sunday, May 07, 2017 1:11 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Just as two examples, They might be very smart, but what we need is
developers capable of keeping up with, or driving accessibility of
technology, out of the box, preferably.


lucky1inct@gmail.com
Faithfulness does not begin with large tasks-if it is not present in
small things, it does not exist at all.

On 5/7/2017 1:06 PM, Pablo Morales wrote:
This guys are very smart.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Randy Barnett
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 12:53 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

So what do you guys and gals think this means to us?
VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group, the software accessibility firm
providing website and application compliance solutions to enterprises
throughout the world:
.?
http://bit.ly/2qtVQ8W

























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Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Mike B. <mb69mach1@...>
 

Hi Nicole,
 
Try the sound named, Process Complete, from the Office group on the sounds page.  , & see if it'll work for you.  Please let the list know if it does or doesn't.  Thanks much.
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 4:15 PM
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

The sound pack may date back as far as Office 97. I've noticed with 32 bit
Office 2013 on a Windows 7 machine there is no associated sound for opening
a document. If anyone knows a way to activate this I'd like to have that
back. (It may take some work in the registry)

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mario
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 5:57 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Mike, are you using Office 2010 64 bit? I read a few posts on different
forums mentioning that that the 64 bit version of Office 2010 might have
either eliminated certain associations of sounds with a particular
feature/function, or the 64 bit version of Office 2010 does not correctly
implement the sounds in the sound pack. however, I do know that the sound
pack is a leftover from Office 2002/2003 and wasn't updated to work properly
in Office 2007/2010. I don't know if it works better in 2013 or the 32 bit
version of 2010. if you do find out, let the list know.


-------- Original Message --------
From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@...]
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 4:22 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Hi Mario,

Yes I do have the Sounds.exe from Microsoft package installed.  Where do you
find the Feedback with sound option in Office?  In Word I have the following
options selected in Tools / Options / Advanced.

Provide feedback with sound

Provide feedback with animation

Confirm file format conversion on open

I have many of my own sound files in my default Media folder, so I have many
to choose from, & I can pretty much assign most options in Word to have a
sound, but I just can't figure out why the Process Complete when opening a
document doesn't work in Word 2010 anymore.


Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!
----- Original Message -----
From: Mario
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 12:43 PM
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document


Mike, I don't see a sound that can be set for when Word is started, but you
can assign any wav sound you want for when opening any program. (I got a pop
sound when programs close. but not when programs open)

go to the sound applet in the control panel, control+tab to the sounds
page/tab, tab to the treeview of which Windows should be the first group.
now use the down/up arrow key to find what you want. you can assign a sound
to the open program event.

before you start this, have you downloaded the sounds pack and enabled
feedback with sound in office? if not, you'll have to get it done first.

this should get you started, unless this is not what you're wanting to do.
hth


-------- Original Message --------
From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@...]
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 3:20 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Hi All,

Running Windows 7 Pro 64 bit, Office 2010, & Jaws.  Whenever I would open a
Word doc I used to get an assigned, Ding, sound, but that was with Office
2002.  The Office task sound associated with this was, Process Complete,
from the Office sounds list in the Sounds page.  Well, I don't get this ding
sound anymore although I have the ding sound assigned, so has the sound task
changed for opening documents in Word 2010?  If so, what sound task should
be used?  All help will be greatly appreciated.  Thanks much.
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!













Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Mike B. <mb69mach1@...>
 

Hi Mario,
 
I'm running the 32 bit version of Office 2010.  The Process Complete sound used to work when opening a document, but I just don't know when it quit.
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!

----- Original Message -----
From: Mario
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 3:57 PM
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Mike, are you using Office 2010 64 bit? I read a few posts on different
forums mentioning that that the 64 bit version of Office 2010 might have
either eliminated certain associations of sounds with a particular
feature/function, or the 64 bit version of Office 2010 does not
correctly implement the sounds in the sound pack. however, I do know
that the sound pack is a leftover from Office 2002/2003 and wasn't
updated to work properly in Office 2007/2010. I don't know if it works
better in 2013 or the 32 bit version of 2010. if you do find out, let
the list know.


-------- Original Message --------
From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@...]
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 4:22 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Hi Mario,

Yes I do have the Sounds.exe from Microsoft package installed.  Where do you
find the Feedback with sound option in Office?  In Word I have the following
options selected in Tools / Options / Advanced.

Provide feedback with sound

Provide feedback with animation

Confirm file format conversion on open

I have many of my own sound files in my default Media folder, so I have many
to choose from, & I can pretty much assign most options in Word to have a
sound, but I just can't figure out why the Process Complete when opening a
document doesn't work in Word 2010 anymore.


Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!
----- Original Message -----
From: Mario
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 12:43 PM
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document


Mike, I don't see a sound that can be set for when Word is started, but
you can assign any wav sound you want for when opening any program. (I
got a pop sound when programs close. but not when programs open)

go to the sound applet in the control panel, control+tab to the sounds
page/tab, tab to the treeview of which Windows should be the first
group. now use the down/up arrow key to find what you want. you can
assign a sound to the open program event.

before you start this, have you downloaded the sounds pack and enabled
feedback with sound in office? if not, you'll have to get it done first.

this should get you started, unless this is not what you're wanting to
do. hth


-------- Original Message --------
From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@...]
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 3:20 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Hi All,

Running Windows 7 Pro 64 bit, Office 2010, & Jaws.  Whenever I would open a
Word doc I used to get an assigned, Ding, sound, but that was with Office
2002.  The Office task sound associated with this was, Process Complete,
from the Office sounds list in the Sounds page.  Well, I don't get this ding
sound anymore although I have the ding sound assigned, so has the sound task
changed for opening documents in Word 2010?  If so, what sound task should
be used?  All help will be greatly appreciated.  Thanks much.
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!










Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Nicole Massey <nyyki@...>
 

The sound pack may date back as far as Office 97. I've noticed with 32 bit
Office 2013 on a Windows 7 machine there is no associated sound for opening
a document. If anyone knows a way to activate this I'd like to have that
back. (It may take some work in the registry)

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mario
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 5:57 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Mike, are you using Office 2010 64 bit? I read a few posts on different
forums mentioning that that the 64 bit version of Office 2010 might have
either eliminated certain associations of sounds with a particular
feature/function, or the 64 bit version of Office 2010 does not correctly
implement the sounds in the sound pack. however, I do know that the sound
pack is a leftover from Office 2002/2003 and wasn't updated to work properly
in Office 2007/2010. I don't know if it works better in 2013 or the 32 bit
version of 2010. if you do find out, let the list know.


-------- Original Message --------
From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@charter.net]
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 4:22 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Hi Mario,

Yes I do have the Sounds.exe from Microsoft package installed. Where do you
find the Feedback with sound option in Office? In Word I have the following
options selected in Tools / Options / Advanced.

Provide feedback with sound

Provide feedback with animation

Confirm file format conversion on open

I have many of my own sound files in my default Media folder, so I have many
to choose from, & I can pretty much assign most options in Word to have a
sound, but I just can't figure out why the Process Complete when opening a
document doesn't work in Word 2010 anymore.


Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool. Go Dodgers!
----- Original Message -----
From: Mario
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 12:43 PM
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document


Mike, I don't see a sound that can be set for when Word is started, but you
can assign any wav sound you want for when opening any program. (I got a pop
sound when programs close. but not when programs open)

go to the sound applet in the control panel, control+tab to the sounds
page/tab, tab to the treeview of which Windows should be the first group.
now use the down/up arrow key to find what you want. you can assign a sound
to the open program event.

before you start this, have you downloaded the sounds pack and enabled
feedback with sound in office? if not, you'll have to get it done first.

this should get you started, unless this is not what you're wanting to do.
hth


-------- Original Message --------
From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@charter.net]
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 3:20 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Hi All,

Running Windows 7 Pro 64 bit, Office 2010, & Jaws. Whenever I would open a
Word doc I used to get an assigned, Ding, sound, but that was with Office
2002. The Office task sound associated with this was, Process Complete,
from the Office sounds list in the Sounds page. Well, I don't get this ding
sound anymore although I have the ding sound assigned, so has the sound task
changed for opening documents in Word 2010? If so, what sound task should
be used? All help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks much.
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool. Go Dodgers!


Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Mario
 

Mike, are you using Office 2010 64 bit? I read a few posts on different
forums mentioning that that the 64 bit version of Office 2010 might have
either eliminated certain associations of sounds with a particular
feature/function, or the 64 bit version of Office 2010 does not
correctly implement the sounds in the sound pack. however, I do know
that the sound pack is a leftover from Office 2002/2003 and wasn't
updated to work properly in Office 2007/2010. I don't know if it works
better in 2013 or the 32 bit version of 2010. if you do find out, let
the list know.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@charter.net]
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 4:22 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Hi Mario,

Yes I do have the Sounds.exe from Microsoft package installed. Where do you
find the Feedback with sound option in Office? In Word I have the following
options selected in Tools / Options / Advanced.

Provide feedback with sound

Provide feedback with animation

Confirm file format conversion on open

I have many of my own sound files in my default Media folder, so I have many
to choose from, & I can pretty much assign most options in Word to have a
sound, but I just can't figure out why the Process Complete when opening a
document doesn't work in Word 2010 anymore.


Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool. Go Dodgers!
----- Original Message -----
From: Mario
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 12:43 PM
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document


Mike, I don't see a sound that can be set for when Word is started, but
you can assign any wav sound you want for when opening any program. (I
got a pop sound when programs close. but not when programs open)

go to the sound applet in the control panel, control+tab to the sounds
page/tab, tab to the treeview of which Windows should be the first
group. now use the down/up arrow key to find what you want. you can
assign a sound to the open program event.

before you start this, have you downloaded the sounds pack and enabled
feedback with sound in office? if not, you'll have to get it done first.

this should get you started, unless this is not what you're wanting to
do. hth


-------- Original Message --------
From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@charter.net]
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 3:20 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Hi All,

Running Windows 7 Pro 64 bit, Office 2010, & Jaws. Whenever I would open a
Word doc I used to get an assigned, Ding, sound, but that was with Office
2002. The Office task sound associated with this was, Process Complete,
from the Office sounds list in the Sounds page. Well, I don't get this ding
sound anymore although I have the ding sound assigned, so has the sound task
changed for opening documents in Word 2010? If so, what sound task should
be used? All help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks much.
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool. Go Dodgers!


Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Pablo Morales
 

What about the sound quality?
I have been looking for a good sound system, and last year I was going to buy the bose cube, but the accessibility in the iPhone wasn't enough and I made a step back. What you mention about accessibility is very important for me.
What about the number of speakers for each room, how is this configuration?

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 12:52 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sonos music system, was: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Sorry, one more thing, in order to control a Sonos system you will need either an iPhone, Android phone or a PC. I am not an Android user, but I think the Sonos app is accessible, it is definitely extremely accessible on the iPhone and for some years now Sonos seems to make sure that accessibility is not forgotten.
The Sonos app on the PC is also accessible with Jaws, it won't read anything with the Jaws cursor, but you can tab through all the controls and use the right arrow, enter or spacebar to expend menus and make selections. I think there are still accessibility issues on the Mac with Voiceover, but I'm not sure if this has been fixed now.
I assume it would work with NVDA as well.
Brian Hartgen, maker of the Leasey scripts, also has a set of free Sonos scripts which improve how it works with Jaws a bit.
Jonas, you asked about changing radio stations, once again, there is no traditional FM/AM radio tuner, you would have to use Tune In Radio to listen to your radio stations online or use the input on a player such as the Play 5, Connect or Connect Amp to connect a tuner, personally I can even get our small local radio station in the town of 6,000 where I live via Tune In so I don't see a point in using a tuner.

Regards,
Sieghard

-----Original Message-----
From: Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 9:39 AM
To: 'main@jfw.groups.io' <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: RE: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Hi Jonas,

I was thinking of sending this to you directly, but hopefully this rather long write-up is not considered too much off-topic, I just thought others may find it interesting to read. I'm a huge Sonos fan and have bought my first Sonos equipment 8 or almost 9 years ago. I have replaced my high-end signature series $2,000 Sony receiver in the living room with Sonos and am not regretting it.

However, Sonos is not like a traditional amplifier or receiver with a whole bunch of all sorts of inputs in the back where you hook up all your components. Sonos is a multi-room system which means it is designed so you have one of their players in every room where you want music and it then is very much meant to play music from online sources or to play your own digitized collection of music on your computer or network attached hard drive although some of their players do allow you to hook up an external source like a CD player, tape deck etc. If you did, for example, connect a CD player to a Sonos Connect in the living room, then that source is available on all your Sonos players throughout the house and once you started playing something on your CD player you could listen to it in the bedroom while somebody else could listen to Spotify or Apple Music in the living room.
Sonos supports literally dozens of free or subscription-based music services such as Tune In Radio, iHeart Radio, Apple Music, Spotify, Deezer, Google Play Music, Sirius XM, Slacker and loads more. For the most part you control all of this from the Sonos app, here you can choose on which player you want to play music like living room, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom or wherever you have a Sonos player. You can also group two or more or all of your players together to play the same music throughout the house. Then you select from which service you want to play music or you go to your own library of digital music and further select by genre, artist, album, playlist or individual song. Think of the Sonos app really more like a remote control for your Sonos system, the players themselves only have two buttons, a Play/Pause button and a volume rocker, but of course you can also turn the volume up or down from the app, if you have a group of players using the main volume control in the app raises or lowers the volume on all players or you can open the volume control and adjust the volume of individual players in your group, for example, maybe you have a party and you just want the music in the bathroom playing very softly whereas in the living room you want it louder.
Now, as for the players, Sonos has a number of them by now and I think most people buy the stand-alone players/speakers nowadays rather than those where you need to connect a set of bookshelf or tower speakers. There are 3 stand-alone speakers/players, the Play 1, Play 3 and Play 5. I think in the States they are $199, $299 and $499, respectively. All three can stand on a shelf or table or you can get a wall mount from various third party sources for all of them and all three can be used as individual units or you can configure two of them to play as stereo pairs.
The Play 1 is a relatively small speaker, about 6 inches tall by 3 inches wide by 4 or 5 inches deep, it can be used by itself in a room where you want music, but where it doesn't matter as much whether it's the highest quality stereo setup. A lot of people also use a set of Play 1 as rear speakers for surround sound (I'll come to that later).
The Play 3 is a bit larger and you can use it in portrait mode so to speak (vertically) or in landscape mode (horizontally). It has as the name suggests 3 drivers, I think two tweeters and a base.
The play 5 which is much larger, more like the size of a traditional boombox, has 5 individual Class D amplifiers controlling one driver each and it sounds fantastic, a pair of them is amazing. It is also the only one of the 3 players I mentioned so far which has a 3.5mm headphone/line out jack and a 3.5mm stereo input which you can use to hook up an iPhone by cable, an MP3 player or any other analogue source such as a CD player, tap player etc. using a 3.5mm male to RCA male cable. All Sonos players, by the way, do have one or two ethernet ports (those who have two can work like a small ethernet hub, you plug in one cable to the router and another one can go out to another device). They can be plugged into a router but are really designed to be set up wirelessly. Until a few years ago you did need either one player connected by calbe to the router or you needed a so-called Sonos Bridge or Boost which was plugged in, this player or bridge/boost would then generate the Zigby network used by the players to communicate with each other. Nowadays a Sonos system can be set up completely via your existing WiFi network.
Apart from that all you need is a plug-in, all the players use a standard power cable, not sure what the connector is called, but it's not the large one that plugs into computers, but the smaller one.
Now, apart from the 3 portable speakers/players which I call portable because you can take them wherever you have a power outlet and plug them in and that is still in reach of your WiFi, there are two more players which are the original ones and which are designed differently.
The Connect Amp is a larger box, about 6 inches square, 3 or so inches thick and it weighs probably 5 pounds, it's heavy for it's compact size. It is meant to be used more like a traditional amp and has two Class D digital amplifiers which produce a total of 110 Watts, 55 Watt per channel. It has the two ethernet ports in back, one set of RCA analogue inputs and a set of traditiponal speaker terminals where you would hook up any existing bookshelf, in-wall/in-ceiling or tower speakers. The line-in once again can be used to hook up a music source such as CD player, tape deck (for those who still have them) or whatever you have that has analogue RCA outputs. Of course for a record player you would need a separate preamp.
The second one of these players is the Connect. It is a slightly smaller box, but also square and about the same height. It is fairly light because it has no amplifier as it is designed to be used in connection with an existing amplifier/receiver to bring Sonos connectivity to your existing stereo setup.
It also has one set of RCA inputs, but it has 3 different output options:
1 RCA output which can be used to connect to an older amplifier/receiver with no digital inputs or you can connect any powered speakers or even the base
1 Toslink optical output to connect to an optical input on a receiver or TV, some higher-end wireless headsets often also have an optical digital input.
1 Coax digital output, once again for connectiving to amplifiers or receivers that have it. I have a very high-end stereo system in a separate room downstairs, it's 20 years old by now, but it's one that will still sound fantastic in another 20 years with a Sonic Frontiers hybrid tube/transistor amp, Sonic Frontiers DA converter and a custom built electronic crossover. The custom built subwovers are driven by a Bryston 250 Watt amp and the source used to be a Sonic Frontiers CD Transport, but I have replace it with a Sonos Connect which I have connected to the DA converter via the Coax digital connection and I can't hear a difference between music playing from the $300 Sonos Connect or the $2,500 Sonic Frontiers CD Transport.

Lastly, there are a few options now for sound from the TV. Initially Sonos came out with the Playbar, a 37 inch wide soundbar with 9 separate tweeters, mid drivers and base drivers all driven by their own Class D amplifier. The only input other than the ethernet port all the players have is an optical digital input for connecting it to the optical digital output on your TV. You can set up the playbar along with two Play 1 speakers and a Sonos Wireless Sub as a 5.1 surround system, but your TV has to support HDMI Pass-Through I think it is called if you want a true 5.1 experience from devices connected to your TV via HDMI such as blueray players, the Apple TV etc.
The last and newest item is a TV stand which basically is meant to replace the Playbar in situations where a TV is not wall-mounted but stands on a table. The stand is only a couple of inches thick I think and you put it on the table first, then put your TV on top of it. Again it works together with the Sonos Sub and whatever you have for rear speakers to create a 5.1 surround system. You can use also a set of Play 3 as rear speakers, but unless you have a really large room that isn't really necessary.
The playbar and Sonos Sub go for I think $700 US each.
The Sonos Sub is a very interesting design, it is about the size of a mid-sized computer tower, 15.3 by 15.8 inches and just over 6 inches thick and it has a large square hole in the middle and here are two resessed base drivers facing each other. At 36 pounds it is very heavy for such a compact size and you can stand it up like a computer tower or lay it flat under a coffee table and it is of amazing quality. As I said, I am a bit of an audio file and my downstairs system was the price of a mid-size car 20 years ago, but if you wanted a good stereo music set up and spend $1,700 for a pair of Play 5 and a Sonos Sub I would happily compare that sound with a $800 to $1,00 amplifier/receiver and a set of $800 speakers and this is not accounting for the price of a good CD player. Also, the convenience of Sonos is just unbeatable, if you had an Apple Music subscription or one from Spotify or Deezer you have access to all the music you want and of course you can still listen to your own collection if you digitize it. I have ripped all my CD's in uncompressed FLAC format and put them on a network attached hard drive so I can listen to them any time via Sonos without having to turn on my computer. If you have a really discerning ear you could spend a bit more than your usual subscription and get a Deezer Elite or Tidal subscription (about $20/month) and this will give you a streaming service offiering lossless quality at 1,411 kbps. Deezer Elite is only available for Sonos customers.

Regards,
Sieghard


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jonas Voll
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 6:30 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Hey Randy Barnett!
Can Sonos, change radio stations or change CD to tape player or 8 traks with voice support?
I have one of the newer Panasonic Viera & Voice Guidance televisions see demo link.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nG2cpSUqOSY


Jonas Voll
Support Technician I
Envision, Inc.
2301 S Water ST
Wichita, KS 67213
O: 316-425-7141
F: 316-267-4312
www.envisionus.com

Envision: To improve the quality of life and provide inspiration for the blind and visually impaired through employment, outreach, rehabilitation, education and research.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Randy Barnett
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 5:39 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Sonos is a great example of this their software to control their speakers is completely accessible.

On 5/7/2017 2:26 PM, Pablo Morales wrote:
I would like to add one more thing.
Companies are understanding that they are going to sale more products,
if they can increase the number of customers, inserting disability
customers to the list. I am totally blind, and if I going to buy a
sound system, and I see that the sound system that I want has no way to be used by a blind user.
Well, I will not buy it. But if another company is able to let me use
their sound system using my smart phone, then I will get that sound
system, no matter if it is more expensive. Here is where the
opportunity cost plays an important roll.
Companies are understanding that today more disability people is going
to school, more disability people is been productive, and it means
that they have money in their pockets. Business want that money, so
they are looking the way to sale us something. It will be through the
accessibility of their products.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 4:04 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

I think VFO as Pablo said has some good leadership and I have a
feeling they are thinking ahead. It sounds to me like this
organisation they acquired is in the business of trying to promote
accessible web development and I think it is very encouraging for a company like VFO to jump onto this bandwagon.
They know that the more websites are made accessible by web developers
and the more there are standards being used, the better can they make
Jaws to work with said standards in accessibility.
One example of what is possible is shown by canadian government websites.
They are committed to be accessible and just about all of them follow
web accessibility standards, have accessibility statements and for the
most part are fully accessible and easy to navigate. This means that
if an organisation, in this case the canadian government, makes a
decision to make their websites accessible it is apparently possible
and can be achieved with consistancy and a high degree of success.
Apple started the entire out of the box accessibility experience just
8 years ago and I think some pretty good advancements have been made
simply because pretty much all of the other big players (Amazon,
Facebook, Google and Microsoft) have followed Apple's example and have
started accessibility departments where a team of people specifically
works on the issue. I am not surprised that sometimes there is a
stumble or even a step back since all of these large organisations
consist of many departments, there is often great rivalry between
teams and sometimes outright pissing contests to see who can push
through their agenda and a relatively small team like accessibility I
am sure is still considered relatively unimportant by other teams. But
I believe that now that this door has been opened it can't be closed
any more and in time accessibility will continue to improve,
technology will develop to consider accessibility from the ground up
so that whatever work that is required wil simply be part of the
development. One reason why I am pretty sure this is happening is the
fact that many in leading positions with these companies are people
who themselves may benefit from this accessibility as they get older,
things like visual impairments as the population gets older and older
will be more common and there will simply be a greater need for
accessibility and those who need it will be people who grew up with
technology unlike people like my parents who are now in their mid 70's
and early 80's and who did not have this technology until they were in
their late 50's at best. I taught my Mom how to use a computer when
she was almost
60 and bought her an iPad when she was almost 70, because of this she
had no problem buying and using an iPhone last year. My Dad, however,
is almost 8 years older and he was never interested when my Mom first
got her computer and now at 82 he has no interest and little
understanding and he's barely capable of tapping the large button on
my Mom's iPhone 6S Plus when a phone call comes in.
Now take people like Tim Cook or Zuckerberg, the former is now 56,
Zuckerberg is not even 43, but you can bet that if they ever can't see
well enough any more to use technology when they are 80 will want to
have the accessibility in place to do so. In Cook's case this is 20
years away but of course several of these important people may also
simply be exposed to the issue because family or friends close to them
may have disabilities and I really think that accessibility at this
point is considered to be important by most of them.
Lastly, consider how relatively little advancemens were made in the 20
years between say the late 80's and 2008/2009 and how much of a leap
forward accessibility has taken in the last 7 or 8 years. I guaranty
anybody that in another 10 years when we get close to reaching the
next 20 year mark we all look back and shake our heads. Maybe we won't
quite jump into our own self-driving electric cars in 10 years to
drive to work, but we might be darn close. We have incredibly powerful
processing capabilities, we have huge and inexpensive storage and we
have fast and reliable wireless connections which are only getting
faster. All of this is maturing technology which will make it possible
for accessibility to be more deeply integrated.

Regards,
Sieghard

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom
Behler
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 10:42 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Exactly, because I have to say that I'm experiencing more and more
difficulty that appears to be related to Jaws not keeping up with
Office 365, which I currently use.

I'm not saying this to complain; I'm just noting it as an
increasingly-significant reality that we all face.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Maria Campbell
Sent: Sunday, May 07, 2017 1:11 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Just as two examples, They might be very smart, but what we need is
developers capable of keeping up with, or driving accessibility of
technology, out of the box, preferably.


lucky1inct@gmail.com
Faithfulness does not begin with large tasks-if it is not present in
small things, it does not exist at all.

On 5/7/2017 1:06 PM, Pablo Morales wrote:
This guys are very smart.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Randy Barnett
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 12:53 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

So what do you guys and gals think this means to us?
VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group, the software accessibility firm
providing website and application compliance solutions to enterprises
throughout the world:
.?
http://bit.ly/2qtVQ8W

























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Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Marquette, Ed <ed.marquette@...>
 

Remember, you have to download the Microsoft sounds before the checkboxes will do anything.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike B.
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 3:24 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

 

Hi George,

 

Yes, I do have those checkboxes checked.  They're in Tools / Options / Advanced, & are the following checkboxes:

 

Provide feedback with sound

 

Provide feedback with animation

 

Confirm file format conversion on open
I have them all checked.

Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!

----- Original Message -----

From: george b

Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 12:35 PM

Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

 

You need to go find the spot like in word I think it is something like options and there is a check box somewhere in there that needs to be checked to have it use the sound

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike B.
Sent: May 8, 2017 12:21
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

 

Hi All,

 

Running Windows 7 Pro 64 bit, Office 2010, & Jaws.  Whenever I would open a Word doc I used to get an assigned, Ding, sound, but that was with Office 2002.  The Office task sound associated with this was, Process Complete, from the Office sounds list in the Sounds page.  Well, I don't get this ding sound anymore although I have the ding sound assigned, so has the sound task changed for opening documents in Word 2010?  If so, what sound task should be used?  All help will be greatly appreciated.  Thanks much.

Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!


This E-mail message is confidential, is intended only for the named recipients above and may contain information
that is privileged, attorney work product or otherwise protected by applicable law. If you have received this
message in error, please notify the sender at 402-346-6000 and delete this E-mail message.
Thank you.


Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Mike B. <mb69mach1@...>
 

Hi George,
 
Yes, I do have those checkboxes checked.  They're in Tools / Options / Advanced, & are the following checkboxes:
 
Provide feedback with sound
 
Provide feedback with animation
 
Confirm file format conversion on open
I have them all checked.
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!

----- Original Message -----
From: george b
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 12:35 PM
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

You need to go find the spot like in word I think it is something like options and there is a check box somewhere in there that needs to be checked to have it use the sound

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike B.
Sent: May 8, 2017 12:21
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

 

Hi All,

 

Running Windows 7 Pro 64 bit, Office 2010, & Jaws.  Whenever I would open a Word doc I used to get an assigned, Ding, sound, but that was with Office 2002.  The Office task sound associated with this was, Process Complete, from the Office sounds list in the Sounds page.  Well, I don't get this ding sound anymore although I have the ding sound assigned, so has the sound task changed for opening documents in Word 2010?  If so, what sound task should be used?  All help will be greatly appreciated.  Thanks much.

Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!


Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Mike B. <mb69mach1@...>
 

Hi Mario,
 
Yes I do have the Sounds.exe from Microsoft package installed.  Where do you find the Feedback with sound option in Office?  In Word I have the following options selected in Tools / Options / Advanced.
 
Provide feedback with sound
 
Provide feedback with animation
 
Confirm file format conversion on open
 
I have many of my own sound files in my default Media folder, so I have many to choose from, & I can pretty much assign most options in Word to have a sound, but I just can't figure out why the Process Complete when opening a document doesn't work in Word 2010 anymore.

Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!

----- Original Message -----
From: Mario
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 12:43 PM
Subject: Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Mike, I don't see a sound that can be set for when Word is started, but
you can assign any wav sound you want for when opening any program. (I
got a pop sound when programs close. but not when programs open)

go to the sound applet in the control panel, control+tab to the sounds
page/tab, tab to the treeview of which Windows should be the first
group. now use the down/up arrow key to find what you want. you can
assign a sound to the open program event.

before you start this, have you downloaded the sounds pack and enabled
feedback with sound in office? if not, you'll have to get it done first.

this should get you started, unless this is not what you're wanting to
do. hth


-------- Original Message --------
From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@...]
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 3:20 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Hi All,

Running Windows 7 Pro 64 bit, Office 2010, & Jaws.  Whenever I would open a
Word doc I used to get an assigned, Ding, sound, but that was with Office
2002.  The Office task sound associated with this was, Process Complete,
from the Office sounds list in the Sounds page.  Well, I don't get this ding
sound anymore although I have the ding sound assigned, so has the sound task
changed for opening documents in Word 2010?  If so, what sound task should
be used?  All help will be greatly appreciated.  Thanks much.
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!






Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Mario
 

Mike, I don't see a sound that can be set for when Word is started, but
you can assign any wav sound you want for when opening any program. (I
got a pop sound when programs close. but not when programs open)

go to the sound applet in the control panel, control+tab to the sounds
page/tab, tab to the treeview of which Windows should be the first
group. now use the down/up arrow key to find what you want. you can
assign a sound to the open program event.

before you start this, have you downloaded the sounds pack and enabled
feedback with sound in office? if not, you'll have to get it done first.

this should get you started, unless this is not what you're wanting to
do. hth

-------- Original Message --------
From: Mike B. [mailto:mb69mach1@charter.net]
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 3:20 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

Hi All,

Running Windows 7 Pro 64 bit, Office 2010, & Jaws. Whenever I would open a
Word doc I used to get an assigned, Ding, sound, but that was with Office
2002. The Office task sound associated with this was, Process Complete,
from the Office sounds list in the Sounds page. Well, I don't get this ding
sound anymore although I have the ding sound assigned, so has the sound task
changed for opening documents in Word 2010? If so, what sound task should
be used? All help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks much.
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool. Go Dodgers!


Re: Sound For Opening A Word Document

george b <gbmagoo@...>
 

You need to go find the spot like in word I think it is something like options and there is a check box somewhere in there that needs to be checked to have it use the sound

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mike B.
Sent: May 8, 2017 12:21
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Sound For Opening A Word Document

 

Hi All,

 

Running Windows 7 Pro 64 bit, Office 2010, & Jaws.  Whenever I would open a Word doc I used to get an assigned, Ding, sound, but that was with Office 2002.  The Office task sound associated with this was, Process Complete, from the Office sounds list in the Sounds page.  Well, I don't get this ding sound anymore although I have the ding sound assigned, so has the sound task changed for opening documents in Word 2010?  If so, what sound task should be used?  All help will be greatly appreciated.  Thanks much.

Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!


Sound For Opening A Word Document

Mike B. <mb69mach1@...>
 

Hi All,
 
Running Windows 7 Pro 64 bit, Office 2010, & Jaws.  Whenever I would open a Word doc I used to get an assigned, Ding, sound, but that was with Office 2002.  The Office task sound associated with this was, Process Complete, from the Office sounds list in the Sounds page.  Well, I don't get this ding sound anymore although I have the ding sound assigned, so has the sound task changed for opening documents in Word 2010?  If so, what sound task should be used?  All help will be greatly appreciated.  Thanks much.
Take care.
Mike
Sent from my iBarstool.  Go Dodgers!


Re: Disabling a jaws keystroke for a particular app.

Tony Malykh
 

Thank you all for your tips!
I figured out how to use keyboard manager in jaws, and I deleted the
conflicting jaws keystrokes.

--Tony

On 5/8/17, Mario <mrb620@hotmail.com> wrote:
I agree it would be tedious. maybe you could write a simple script for
JAWS that would pass the Alt+Shift+Up arrow to Emax using a different
keystroke such as control+shift+up arrow if that combination is not used
for anything else. just another idea.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Tony Malykh [mailto:anton.malykh@gmail.com]
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 10:21 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Disabling a jaws keystroke for a particular app.

That would work if I had to press Alt+Shift+Up only once. In my case,
Alt+Shift+Up moves a certain piece of text up by one position in emacs
org mode. I need to press it repeatedly 5-10 times. Alternating
Insert+3 and Alt+Shift+Up for 5 times is doable, but not very
practical.

Thanks for the tip though.

--Tony


On 5/6/17, Mario <mrb620@hotmail.com> wrote:
just an idea, have you tried pressing the bypass keystroke (insert+home
row 3) before issuing the alt+shift+up arrow? the bypass tells JAWS to
send the next keystroke to the application being used instead of
intercepting the keystroke.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Tony Malykh [mailto:anton.malykh@gmail.com]
Sent: Saturday, May 6, 2017 6:38 PM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Disabling a jaws keystroke for a particular app.

Hello everyone,

I am trying to press Alt+Shift+Up arrow in emacs. However, at the same
time, this keystoke happens to trigger jaws command "Mouse up". I aM
not sure what does it do, but emacs never receives this keystroke,
because jaws acts on it instead.

Is there a way to disable a particular keystroke in jaws only for
specific application? In my case, I'd like to disable Alt+Shift+Up
arrow for Cygwin only. My emacs is running inside a Cygwin terminal.

Or if there is no way to disable it for specific application, how do I
disable or change a keystroke system-wide?

Thanks
Tony



.









.






Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

george b <gbmagoo@...>
 

Hey why don't you change the subject pertain to what you're talking about your email thank you

Sent from my iPhone

On May 8, 2017, at 09:51, Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@live.ca> wrote:

Sorry, one more thing, in order to control a Sonos system you will need either an iPhone, Android phone or a PC. I am not an Android user, but I think the Sonos app is accessible, it is definitely extremely accessible on the iPhone and for some years now Sonos seems to make sure that accessibility is not forgotten.
The Sonos app on the PC is also accessible with Jaws, it won't read anything with the Jaws cursor, but you can tab through all the controls and use the right arrow, enter or spacebar to expend menus and make selections. I think there are still accessibility issues on the Mac with Voiceover, but I'm not sure if this has been fixed now.
I assume it would work with NVDA as well.
Brian Hartgen, maker of the Leasey scripts, also has a set of free Sonos scripts which improve how it works with Jaws a bit.
Jonas, you asked about changing radio stations, once again, there is no traditional FM/AM radio tuner, you would have to use Tune In Radio to listen to your radio stations online or use the input on a player such as the Play 5, Connect or Connect Amp to connect a tuner, personally I can even get our small local radio station in the town of 6,000 where I live via Tune In so I don't see a point in using a tuner.

Regards,
Sieghard

-----Original Message-----
From: Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 9:39 AM
To: 'main@jfw.groups.io' <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: RE: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Hi Jonas,

I was thinking of sending this to you directly, but hopefully this rather long write-up is not considered too much off-topic, I just thought others may find it interesting to read. I'm a huge Sonos fan and have bought my first Sonos equipment 8 or almost 9 years ago. I have replaced my high-end signature series $2,000 Sony receiver in the living room with Sonos and am not regretting it.

However, Sonos is not like a traditional amplifier or receiver with a whole bunch of all sorts of inputs in the back where you hook up all your components. Sonos is a multi-room system which means it is designed so you have one of their players in every room where you want music and it then is very much meant to play music from online sources or to play your own digitized collection of music on your computer or network attached hard drive although some of their players do allow you to hook up an external source like a CD player, tape deck etc. If you did, for example, connect a CD player to a Sonos Connect in the living room, then that source is available on all your Sonos players throughout the house and once you started playing something on your CD player you could listen to it in the bedroom while somebody else could listen to Spotify or Apple Music in the living room.
Sonos supports literally dozens of free or subscription-based music services such as Tune In Radio, iHeart Radio, Apple Music, Spotify, Deezer, Google Play Music, Sirius XM, Slacker and loads more. For the most part you control all of this from the Sonos app, here you can choose on which player you want to play music like living room, kitchen, bedroom, bathroom or wherever you have a Sonos player. You can also group two or more or all of your players together to play the same music throughout the house. Then you select from which service you want to play music or you go to your own library of digital music and further select by genre, artist, album, playlist or individual song. Think of the Sonos app really more like a remote control for your Sonos system, the players themselves only have two buttons, a Play/Pause button and a volume rocker, but of course you can also turn the volume up or down from the app, if you have a group of players using the main volume control in the app raises or lowers the volume on all players or you can open the volume control and adjust the volume of individual players in your group, for example, maybe you have a party and you just want the music in the bathroom playing very softly whereas in the living room you want it louder.
Now, as for the players, Sonos has a number of them by now and I think most people buy the stand-alone players/speakers nowadays rather than those where you need to connect a set of bookshelf or tower speakers. There are 3 stand-alone speakers/players, the Play 1, Play 3 and Play 5. I think in the States they are $199, $299 and $499, respectively. All three can stand on a shelf or table or you can get a wall mount from various third party sources for all of them and all three can be used as individual units or you can configure two of them to play as stereo pairs.
The Play 1 is a relatively small speaker, about 6 inches tall by 3 inches wide by 4 or 5 inches deep, it can be used by itself in a room where you want music, but where it doesn't matter as much whether it's the highest quality stereo setup. A lot of people also use a set of Play 1 as rear speakers for surround sound (I'll come to that later).
The Play 3 is a bit larger and you can use it in portrait mode so to speak (vertically) or in landscape mode (horizontally). It has as the name suggests 3 drivers, I think two tweeters and a base.
The play 5 which is much larger, more like the size of a traditional boombox, has 5 individual Class D amplifiers controlling one driver each and it sounds fantastic, a pair of them is amazing. It is also the only one of the 3 players I mentioned so far which has a 3.5mm headphone/line out jack and a 3.5mm stereo input which you can use to hook up an iPhone by cable, an MP3 player or any other analogue source such as a CD player, tap player etc. using a 3.5mm male to RCA male cable. All Sonos players, by the way, do have one or two ethernet ports (those who have two can work like a small ethernet hub, you plug in one cable to the router and another one can go out to another device). They can be plugged into a router but are really designed to be set up wirelessly. Until a few years ago you did need either one player connected by calbe to the router or you needed a so-called Sonos Bridge or Boost which was plugged in, this player or bridge/boost would then generate the Zigby network used by the players to communicate with each other. Nowadays a Sonos system can be set up completely via your existing WiFi network.
Apart from that all you need is a plug-in, all the players use a standard power cable, not sure what the connector is called, but it's not the large one that plugs into computers, but the smaller one.
Now, apart from the 3 portable speakers/players which I call portable because you can take them wherever you have a power outlet and plug them in and that is still in reach of your WiFi, there are two more players which are the original ones and which are designed differently.
The Connect Amp is a larger box, about 6 inches square, 3 or so inches thick and it weighs probably 5 pounds, it's heavy for it's compact size. It is meant to be used more like a traditional amp and has two Class D digital amplifiers which produce a total of 110 Watts, 55 Watt per channel. It has the two ethernet ports in back, one set of RCA analogue inputs and a set of traditiponal speaker terminals where you would hook up any existing bookshelf, in-wall/in-ceiling or tower speakers. The line-in once again can be used to hook up a music source such as CD player, tape deck (for those who still have them) or whatever you have that has analogue RCA outputs. Of course for a record player you would need a separate preamp.
The second one of these players is the Connect. It is a slightly smaller box, but also square and about the same height. It is fairly light because it has no amplifier as it is designed to be used in connection with an existing amplifier/receiver to bring Sonos connectivity to your existing stereo setup.
It also has one set of RCA inputs, but it has 3 different output options:
1 RCA output which can be used to connect to an older amplifier/receiver with no digital inputs or you can connect any powered speakers or even the base
1 Toslink optical output to connect to an optical input on a receiver or TV, some higher-end wireless headsets often also have an optical digital input.
1 Coax digital output, once again for connectiving to amplifiers or receivers that have it. I have a very high-end stereo system in a separate room downstairs, it's 20 years old by now, but it's one that will still sound fantastic in another 20 years with a Sonic Frontiers hybrid tube/transistor amp, Sonic Frontiers DA converter and a custom built electronic crossover. The custom built subwovers are driven by a Bryston 250 Watt amp and the source used to be a Sonic Frontiers CD Transport, but I have replace it with a Sonos Connect which I have connected to the DA converter via the Coax digital connection and I can't hear a difference between music playing from the $300 Sonos Connect or the $2,500 Sonic Frontiers CD Transport.

Lastly, there are a few options now for sound from the TV. Initially Sonos came out with the Playbar, a 37 inch wide soundbar with 9 separate tweeters, mid drivers and base drivers all driven by their own Class D amplifier. The only input other than the ethernet port all the players have is an optical digital input for connecting it to the optical digital output on your TV. You can set up the playbar along with two Play 1 speakers and a Sonos Wireless Sub as a 5.1 surround system, but your TV has to support HDMI Pass-Through I think it is called if you want a true 5.1 experience from devices connected to your TV via HDMI such as blueray players, the Apple TV etc.
The last and newest item is a TV stand which basically is meant to replace the Playbar in situations where a TV is not wall-mounted but stands on a table. The stand is only a couple of inches thick I think and you put it on the table first, then put your TV on top of it. Again it works together with the Sonos Sub and whatever you have for rear speakers to create a 5.1 surround system. You can use also a set of Play 3 as rear speakers, but unless you have a really large room that isn't really necessary.
The playbar and Sonos Sub go for I think $700 US each.
The Sonos Sub is a very interesting design, it is about the size of a mid-sized computer tower, 15.3 by 15.8 inches and just over 6 inches thick and it has a large square hole in the middle and here are two resessed base drivers facing each other. At 36 pounds it is very heavy for such a compact size and you can stand it up like a computer tower or lay it flat under a coffee table and it is of amazing quality. As I said, I am a bit of an audio file and my downstairs system was the price of a mid-size car 20 years ago, but if you wanted a good stereo music set up and spend $1,700 for a pair of Play 5 and a Sonos Sub I would happily compare that sound with a $800 to $1,00 amplifier/receiver and a set of $800 speakers and this is not accounting for the price of a good CD player. Also, the convenience of Sonos is just unbeatable, if you had an Apple Music subscription or one from Spotify or Deezer you have access to all the music you want and of course you can still listen to your own collection if you digitize it. I have ripped all my CD's in uncompressed FLAC format and put them on a network attached hard drive so I can listen to them any time via Sonos without having to turn on my computer. If you have a really discerning ear you could spend a bit more than your usual subscription and get a Deezer Elite or Tidal subscription (about $20/month) and this will give you a streaming service offiering lossless quality at 1,411 kbps. Deezer Elite is only available for Sonos customers.

Regards,
Sieghard


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jonas Voll
Sent: Monday, May 8, 2017 6:30 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Hey Randy Barnett!
Can Sonos, change radio stations or change CD to tape player or 8 traks with voice support?
I have one of the newer Panasonic Viera & Voice Guidance televisions see demo link.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nG2cpSUqOSY


Jonas Voll
Support Technician I
Envision, Inc.
2301 S Water ST
Wichita, KS 67213
O: 316-425-7141
F: 316-267-4312
www.envisionus.com

Envision: To improve the quality of life and provide inspiration for the blind and visually impaired through employment, outreach, rehabilitation, education and research.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Randy Barnett
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 5:39 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Sonos is a great example of this their software to control their speakers is completely accessible.

On 5/7/2017 2:26 PM, Pablo Morales wrote:
I would like to add one more thing.
Companies are understanding that they are going to sale more products,
if they can increase the number of customers, inserting disability
customers to the list. I am totally blind, and if I going to buy a
sound system, and I see that the sound system that I want has no way to be used by a blind user.
Well, I will not buy it. But if another company is able to let me use
their sound system using my smart phone, then I will get that sound
system, no matter if it is more expensive. Here is where the
opportunity cost plays an important roll.
Companies are understanding that today more disability people is going
to school, more disability people is been productive, and it means
that they have money in their pockets. Business want that money, so
they are looking the way to sale us something. It will be through the
accessibility of their products.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 4:04 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

I think VFO as Pablo said has some good leadership and I have a
feeling they are thinking ahead. It sounds to me like this
organisation they acquired is in the business of trying to promote
accessible web development and I think it is very encouraging for a company like VFO to jump onto this bandwagon.
They know that the more websites are made accessible by web developers
and the more there are standards being used, the better can they make
Jaws to work with said standards in accessibility.
One example of what is possible is shown by canadian government websites.
They are committed to be accessible and just about all of them follow
web accessibility standards, have accessibility statements and for the
most part are fully accessible and easy to navigate. This means that
if an organisation, in this case the canadian government, makes a
decision to make their websites accessible it is apparently possible
and can be achieved with consistancy and a high degree of success.
Apple started the entire out of the box accessibility experience just
8 years ago and I think some pretty good advancements have been made
simply because pretty much all of the other big players (Amazon,
Facebook, Google and Microsoft) have followed Apple's example and have
started accessibility departments where a team of people specifically
works on the issue. I am not surprised that sometimes there is a
stumble or even a step back since all of these large organisations
consist of many departments, there is often great rivalry between
teams and sometimes outright pissing contests to see who can push
through their agenda and a relatively small team like accessibility I
am sure is still considered relatively unimportant by other teams. But
I believe that now that this door has been opened it can't be closed
any more and in time accessibility will continue to improve,
technology will develop to consider accessibility from the ground up
so that whatever work that is required wil simply be part of the
development. One reason why I am pretty sure this is happening is the
fact that many in leading positions with these companies are people
who themselves may benefit from this accessibility as they get older,
things like visual impairments as the population gets older and older
will be more common and there will simply be a greater need for
accessibility and those who need it will be people who grew up with
technology unlike people like my parents who are now in their mid 70's
and early 80's and who did not have this technology until they were in
their late 50's at best. I taught my Mom how to use a computer when
she was almost
60 and bought her an iPad when she was almost 70, because of this she
had no problem buying and using an iPhone last year. My Dad, however,
is almost 8 years older and he was never interested when my Mom first
got her computer and now at 82 he has no interest and little
understanding and he's barely capable of tapping the large button on
my Mom's iPhone 6S Plus when a phone call comes in.
Now take people like Tim Cook or Zuckerberg, the former is now 56,
Zuckerberg is not even 43, but you can bet that if they ever can't see
well enough any more to use technology when they are 80 will want to
have the accessibility in place to do so. In Cook's case this is 20
years away but of course several of these important people may also
simply be exposed to the issue because family or friends close to them
may have disabilities and I really think that accessibility at this
point is considered to be important by most of them.
Lastly, consider how relatively little advancemens were made in the 20
years between say the late 80's and 2008/2009 and how much of a leap
forward accessibility has taken in the last 7 or 8 years. I guaranty
anybody that in another 10 years when we get close to reaching the
next 20 year mark we all look back and shake our heads. Maybe we won't
quite jump into our own self-driving electric cars in 10 years to
drive to work, but we might be darn close. We have incredibly powerful
processing capabilities, we have huge and inexpensive storage and we
have fast and reliable wireless connections which are only getting
faster. All of this is maturing technology which will make it possible
for accessibility to be more deeply integrated.

Regards,
Sieghard

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom
Behler
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 10:42 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Exactly, because I have to say that I'm experiencing more and more
difficulty that appears to be related to Jaws not keeping up with
Office 365, which I currently use.

I'm not saying this to complain; I'm just noting it as an
increasingly-significant reality that we all face.

Dr. Tom Behler from Michigan


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Maria Campbell
Sent: Sunday, May 07, 2017 1:11 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

Just as two examples, They might be very smart, but what we need is
developers capable of keeping up with, or driving accessibility of
technology, out of the box, preferably.


lucky1inct@gmail.com
Faithfulness does not begin with large tasks-if it is not present in
small things, it does not exist at all.

On 5/7/2017 1:06 PM, Pablo Morales wrote:
This guys are very smart.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Randy Barnett
Sent: Sunday, May 7, 2017 12:53 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group

So what do you guys and gals think this means to us?
VFO has acquired the Pacielo Group, the software accessibility firm
providing website and application compliance solutions to enterprises
throughout the world:
.?
http://bit.ly/2qtVQ8W

























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