Date   

moderated Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

Randy Barnett
 

I always download and create a usb stick of the latest windows 10 then use it to boot the pc and re format the OS drive and then do a clean install of windows. this is best way to get a clean fast pc. if that is to much for you you just go to add/remove programs and delete all the stuff you dont want.

On 8/29/2020 5:01 AM, David Ingram wrote:
Are the systems to small for a 1tb os disk?  What about memory how are they in terms of memory and is the memory the fastest for the motherboard?  I recently baught a dellxsp system that is a good system that has an i7 processor in it with 2 hard drives.  1 of the drives is a 4tb drive but I'll have to check the speed.  I think that the os is a ssd drive but i'll check that just to make sure that it is fast as well.  I do have some questions as to how can I get extra software off of the drive that I didn't ask for?  Thank you for any information that you might have concerning my questions.

-----Original Message-----
From: Dave Durber
Sent: Aug 19, 2020 6:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer


Ralph:
 
I am also going to upgrade our computers very soon, although in the case of our systems, I will only need to replace the motherboards and the central processing units (CPU(s)). The type of motherboards, will depend upon whether I choose the Intel I7 or, the AMD equivalent. I will probably remove the CD/DVD drives, when I upgrade the systems, as I recently purchased a USB external CD/DVD drive. The systems in our home, have the following drive configuration:
 
2 120 GB SSD drives, and at least 1 HDD drive for storing data. 1 of the SSD drives is the system drive, which only holds the operating system and any programs which are currently installed on them, and nothing else. At present, all the system drives indicate that the total amount being used on each system drive, is about 40 GB.
 
the second SSD drive, which is drive F: in all the systems, holds the following folders, which have been moved from the system drive to drive F:, Contacts; Documents; Downloads; Favourites; Dropbox; and the folders used by the preferred email client. In addition: Music;  Pictures; Saved Games; Searches; Videos; can also be moved to drive f:. Unfortunately, in Windows 10, there does not seem to be a way of moving: Microsoft Edge Backups; One Drive; or the Public folder; from the system drive to drive F:. I do not use Microsoft Edge or One Drive, however, I would have liked to have been able to move the Public folder to drive F:, as I was able to do in Windows 7. Lastly, drive F: can be used to store the Windows pagefile.sys file
 
By moving the abovementioned folders to drive F, and not using the system drive for storing miscellaneous data, it means that when I use Image for Windows to create image backups of the system drive, I do not have to worry about losing up-to-date important data, if I need to restore an image to the system drive in the future. This would also apply, if I were to use other imaging software.
 
The HDD drive, I use to store any other form of data.
 
HTH
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, 18 August, 2020 3:15 PM
Subject: Specs for a new desktop computer

It’s looking like I will be searching for a new desktop computer.  I have not been able to figure out what makes the most difference in the speed or snappiness of the computer when using Jaws with typical applications.  So, I’d appreciate any information you techy types can pass along.

 

I know Ram makes a big difference.  What I don’t know is how much RAM is helpful and how much is overkill.

 

How much difference does multiple thread processing make?  How many threads are a good number to shoot for?

 

How much difference does an SSD drive make?  If they make a significant difference in speed, what files should be on them?

 

Being totally blind I don’t need a fancy display.  But, does a better video card affect the speed of the computer?

 

Are there other ways to increase the speed of the computer?

 

Thanks.


moderated Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

Randy Barnett
 

As for cost you need a motherboard with a M2 slot or buy a PCI-E one. just google m2 ssd and pci-e ssd you will find all kinds of info. Cache on a SSD is pointless. On a mech. hdd the cache is their to help make the drive faster but an SSD is faster than the cache on a hdd so it is not relavent.

On 8/29/2020 10:57 AM, Randy Barnett via groups.io wrote:
I have a Samsung Pro 960 M2 NVME SSD that does 2.5GBs. You need to go to the NVME spec for these speeds It runs on the PCI Express Bus. Just like the video card. the interface uses 4 PCE Express channels and can handle up to 30GBs. Of course right now there aren't any SSDs that fast but someday they will be.

On 8/29/2020 10:09 AM, David Ingram wrote:
Hi glen, what hard drive was able to give you the speed of 1gb per second?  I have to ask about drives that you say are that fast.  The next question is how much are these types of drives?  I couldn't seem to be able to find these anywhere.  What did you do different, may be I need to do that too.  Thank you for any information that you might have on these drive speeds as well as cache size.


-----Original Message-----
From: Glenn / Lenny <glennervin@...>
Sent: Aug 29, 2020 12:02 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

The cache size will always help, and I always buy things like this on
Amazon.com.
When I did a search for fastest drives, I found a lot of articles, and they
usually give a link to a product in their reviews and often those links are
for Amazon.com.
That is one way they make money with their reviews of products.
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
From: "David Ingram" <dingram269@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, August 29, 2020 7:18 AM
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer


Where can you find drives with that read write speed and how much do these
drives costs?  Also what about the cache size doesn't that have something to
do with things as well?  I could never seem to find a hard drive whether
internal or external that would meet those requirements.  What size hard
drive would that have to be in order to meet all of those requirements.?
Thank you for any information that you might have to answer these questions.


-----Original Message-----
From: Glenn / Lenny <glennervin@...>
Sent: Aug 18, 2020 11:44 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

I believe that the one thing that will increase computer speed is the hard
drive, and you want read/write speeds up around 1 gig per second
You will want a PCIE Gen 4 compatible motherboard and a PCIE SSD.
That is really the bottleneck these days, if you want speed.
Here's a video that talks about this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URt_5ryS37A
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
From: "Mario" <mrb620@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2020 10:51 AM
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer


I can only make suggestions as 8 GB of RAM is a good amount to start
with unless you intend to do intensive tasks. more RAM increases the
number of programs that can be running simultaneously. and I think there
is a small performance hit the more RAM the computer has. I'm not clear
on the role that the specifications have on the snappiness like the
type, timings and other specs. .

opting for an SSD will make access to storage of files snappy especially
at boot up time. it also has a longer life span since there aren't any
moving parts unlike a traditional spinning platter HD. and don't forget
that an SSD runs cool and produces no vibration.
I'd suggest no less than 240 GB unless you can afford to pay for 500 GB
(of course, this depends if you like to try alot of programs, tinker
around with the unknown, or play it safe and stick with a minimal set of
programs that work for you), and that the SSD be dedicated to run
Windows and programs. a seperate HD can be used for storing documents,
video and music; the stuff you can't replace if something happens to the
SSD. it would also be advisable to make a (preferrably 1to1) backup on
an external HD, and you may even consider to backup online just to be
extra safe if restoring from the external HD should fail for some reason.

having a seperate video card will only relieve the amount of RAM that is
used to display text and pictures written to the monitor. I don't know
if there is any other benefit.

I'd like to hear about the other things you inquired about from those
who know and can "do tell".

-------- Original Message --------
From: Ralph Supernaw via groups.io [mailto:rhs=startmail.com@groups.io]
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, August 18, 2020, 10:15 AM
Subject: Specs for a new desktop computer
It’s looking like I will be searching for a new desktop computer. I
have not been able to figure out what makes the most difference in the
speed or snappiness of the computer when using Jaws with typical
applications. So, I’d appreciate any information you techy types can
pass along.

I know Ram makes a big difference. What I don’t know is how much RAM is
helpful and how much is overkill.

How much difference does multiple thread processing make? How many
threads are a good number to shoot for?

How much difference does an SSD drive make? If they make a significant
difference in speed, what files should be on them?

Being totally blind I don’t need a fancy display. But, does a better
video card affect the speed of the computer?

Are there other ways to increase the speed of the computer?

Thanks.












moderated Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

Randy Barnett
 

I have a Samsung Pro 960 M2 NVME SSD that does 2.5GBs. You need to go to the NVME spec for these speeds It runs on the PCI Express Bus. Just like the video card. the interface uses 4 PCE Express channels and can handle up to 30GBs. Of course right now there aren't any SSDs that fast but someday they will be.

On 8/29/2020 10:09 AM, David Ingram wrote:
Hi glen, what hard drive was able to give you the speed of 1gb per second? I have to ask about drives that you say are that fast. The next question is how much are these types of drives? I couldn't seem to be able to find these anywhere. What did you do different, may be I need to do that too. Thank you for any information that you might have on these drive speeds as well as cache size.


-----Original Message-----
From: Glenn / Lenny <glennervin@...>
Sent: Aug 29, 2020 12:02 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

The cache size will always help, and I always buy things like this on
Amazon.com.
When I did a search for fastest drives, I found a lot of articles, and they
usually give a link to a product in their reviews and often those links are
for Amazon.com.
That is one way they make money with their reviews of products.
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
From: "David Ingram" <dingram269@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, August 29, 2020 7:18 AM
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer


Where can you find drives with that read write speed and how much do these
drives costs? Also what about the cache size doesn't that have something to
do with things as well? I could never seem to find a hard drive whether
internal or external that would meet those requirements. What size hard
drive would that have to be in order to meet all of those requirements.?
Thank you for any information that you might have to answer these questions.


-----Original Message-----
From: Glenn / Lenny <glennervin@...>
Sent: Aug 18, 2020 11:44 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

I believe that the one thing that will increase computer speed is the hard
drive, and you want read/write speeds up around 1 gig per second
You will want a PCIE Gen 4 compatible motherboard and a PCIE SSD.
That is really the bottleneck these days, if you want speed.
Here's a video that talks about this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URt_5ryS37A
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
From: "Mario" <mrb620@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2020 10:51 AM
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer


I can only make suggestions as 8 GB of RAM is a good amount to start
with unless you intend to do intensive tasks. more RAM increases the
number of programs that can be running simultaneously. and I think there
is a small performance hit the more RAM the computer has. I'm not clear
on the role that the specifications have on the snappiness like the
type, timings and other specs. .

opting for an SSD will make access to storage of files snappy especially
at boot up time. it also has a longer life span since there aren't any
moving parts unlike a traditional spinning platter HD. and don't forget
that an SSD runs cool and produces no vibration.
I'd suggest no less than 240 GB unless you can afford to pay for 500 GB
(of course, this depends if you like to try alot of programs, tinker
around with the unknown, or play it safe and stick with a minimal set of
programs that work for you), and that the SSD be dedicated to run
Windows and programs. a seperate HD can be used for storing documents,
video and music; the stuff you can't replace if something happens to the
SSD. it would also be advisable to make a (preferrably 1to1) backup on
an external HD, and you may even consider to backup online just to be
extra safe if restoring from the external HD should fail for some reason.

having a seperate video card will only relieve the amount of RAM that is
used to display text and pictures written to the monitor. I don't know
if there is any other benefit.

I'd like to hear about the other things you inquired about from those
who know and can "do tell".

-------- Original Message --------
From: Ralph Supernaw via groups.io [mailto:rhs=startmail.com@groups.io]
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, August 18, 2020, 10:15 AM
Subject: Specs for a new desktop computer
It’s looking like I will be searching for a new desktop computer. I
have not been able to figure out what makes the most difference in the
speed or snappiness of the computer when using Jaws with typical
applications. So, I’d appreciate any information you techy types can
pass along.

I know Ram makes a big difference. What I don’t know is how much RAM is
helpful and how much is overkill.

How much difference does multiple thread processing make? How many
threads are a good number to shoot for?

How much difference does an SSD drive make? If they make a significant
difference in speed, what files should be on them?

Being totally blind I don’t need a fancy display. But, does a better
video card affect the speed of the computer?

Are there other ways to increase the speed of the computer?

Thanks.












moderated Re: windows live maile question.

 

On Sat, Aug 29, 2020 at 01:33 PM, Michael Amaro wrote:
I am still using WLM 2009
But the question becomes, under what version of Windows?   WLM has been working fine all the way up through Version 1909 of Windows 10, but has begun falling apart with Version 2004.

If you're a Windows 10 user, the end of WLM is near.  And if you're not a Windows 10 user, you eventually will be if you have the slightest concern for your own cyber security and wish to stay in a Windows ecosystem.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it.
       ~ Lawrence Krauss


moderated Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

Glenn / Lenny
 

Hi,
I don't have a computer that will deliver that speed.
For eMail and Internet searching, one does not need that kind of speed.
I found the youtube link and other pages discussing HD speed, and to get to
that speed, you will need a PCI style HD and a motherboard that can do that
sort of HD.
I merely offered information I found on a quick web search.

Glenn

----- Original Message -----
From: "David Ingram" <dingram269@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, August 29, 2020 12:09 PM
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer


Hi glen, what hard drive was able to give you the speed of 1gb per second?
I have to ask about drives that you say are that fast. The next question is
how much are these types of drives? I couldn't seem to be able to find
these anywhere. What did you do different, may be I need to do that too.
Thank you for any information that you might have on these drive speeds as
well as cache size.


-----Original Message-----
From: Glenn / Lenny <glennervin@...>
Sent: Aug 29, 2020 12:02 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

The cache size will always help, and I always buy things like this on
Amazon.com.
When I did a search for fastest drives, I found a lot of articles, and they
usually give a link to a product in their reviews and often those links are
for Amazon.com.
That is one way they make money with their reviews of products.
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
From: "David Ingram" <dingram269@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, August 29, 2020 7:18 AM
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer


Where can you find drives with that read write speed and how much do these
drives costs? Also what about the cache size doesn't that have something
to
do with things as well? I could never seem to find a hard drive whether
internal or external that would meet those requirements. What size hard
drive would that have to be in order to meet all of those requirements.?
Thank you for any information that you might have to answer these
questions.


-----Original Message-----
From: Glenn / Lenny <glennervin@...>
Sent: Aug 18, 2020 11:44 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

I believe that the one thing that will increase computer speed is the hard
drive, and you want read/write speeds up around 1 gig per second
You will want a PCIE Gen 4 compatible motherboard and a PCIE SSD.
That is really the bottleneck these days, if you want speed.
Here's a video that talks about this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URt_5ryS37A
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
From: "Mario" <mrb620@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2020 10:51 AM
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer


I can only make suggestions as 8 GB of RAM is a good amount to start
with unless you intend to do intensive tasks. more RAM increases the
number of programs that can be running simultaneously. and I think there
is a small performance hit the more RAM the computer has. I'm not clear
on the role that the specifications have on the snappiness like the
type, timings and other specs. .

opting for an SSD will make access to storage of files snappy especially
at boot up time. it also has a longer life span since there aren't any
moving parts unlike a traditional spinning platter HD. and don't forget
that an SSD runs cool and produces no vibration.
I'd suggest no less than 240 GB unless you can afford to pay for 500 GB
(of course, this depends if you like to try alot of programs, tinker
around with the unknown, or play it safe and stick with a minimal set of
programs that work for you), and that the SSD be dedicated to run
Windows and programs. a seperate HD can be used for storing documents,
video and music; the stuff you can't replace if something happens to the
SSD. it would also be advisable to make a (preferrably 1to1) backup on
an external HD, and you may even consider to backup online just to be
extra safe if restoring from the external HD should fail for some reason.

having a seperate video card will only relieve the amount of RAM that is
used to display text and pictures written to the monitor. I don't know
if there is any other benefit.

I'd like to hear about the other things you inquired about from those
who know and can "do tell".

-------- Original Message --------
From: Ralph Supernaw via groups.io [mailto:rhs=startmail.com@groups.io]
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, August 18, 2020, 10:15 AM
Subject: Specs for a new desktop computer
It’s looking like I will be searching for a new desktop computer. I
have not been able to figure out what makes the most difference in the
speed or snappiness of the computer when using Jaws with typical
applications. So, I’d appreciate any information you techy types can
pass along.

I know Ram makes a big difference. What I don’t know is how much RAM is
helpful and how much is overkill.

How much difference does multiple thread processing make? How many
threads are a good number to shoot for?

How much difference does an SSD drive make? If they make a significant
difference in speed, what files should be on them?

Being totally blind I don’t need a fancy display. But, does a better
video card affect the speed of the computer?

Are there other ways to increase the speed of the computer?

Thanks.













moderated Re: windows live maile question.

Michael Amaro
 

I amstill using WLM 2009

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Marie" <magpie.mn@...>
Sent: Saturday, August 29, 2020 6:42 AM
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Subject: Re: windows live maile question.

No, I do not have this problem neither using Pop3 or iMap. But unfortunately, many folks have different problems with WLM and Win 10. I have used it since it was first created and it is still my favorite email client.
If you have the install executable, try running it and there is a chance it will do a repair and fix the problem. If that does not work, you might try uninstalling and re-installing. I also believe you may have the best results if you use version 12.
Sorry those are the only ideas I have at the moment.
Marie
-----Original Message-----
From: michaeel's mail
Sent: Saturday, August 29, 2020 4:14 AM
To: jaws help list
Subject: windows live maile question.

Hi guys just a question i just updated my desktop cmputer to the windows
10 2004.

And now windows live mail wil not send or recieve any mail i get an error.

Has anybody else found that out.

Cheers Michael.






moderated Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

David Ingram
 

Hi glen, what hard drive was able to give you the speed of 1gb per second? I have to ask about drives that you say are that fast. The next question is how much are these types of drives? I couldn't seem to be able to find these anywhere. What did you do different, may be I need to do that too. Thank you for any information that you might have on these drive speeds as well as cache size.

-----Original Message-----
From: Glenn / Lenny <glennervin@...>
Sent: Aug 29, 2020 12:02 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

The cache size will always help, and I always buy things like this on
Amazon.com.
When I did a search for fastest drives, I found a lot of articles, and they
usually give a link to a product in their reviews and often those links are
for Amazon.com.
That is one way they make money with their reviews of products.
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
From: "David Ingram" <dingram269@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, August 29, 2020 7:18 AM
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer


Where can you find drives with that read write speed and how much do these
drives costs? Also what about the cache size doesn't that have something to
do with things as well? I could never seem to find a hard drive whether
internal or external that would meet those requirements. What size hard
drive would that have to be in order to meet all of those requirements.?
Thank you for any information that you might have to answer these questions.


-----Original Message-----
From: Glenn / Lenny <glennervin@...>
Sent: Aug 18, 2020 11:44 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

I believe that the one thing that will increase computer speed is the hard
drive, and you want read/write speeds up around 1 gig per second
You will want a PCIE Gen 4 compatible motherboard and a PCIE SSD.
That is really the bottleneck these days, if you want speed.
Here's a video that talks about this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URt_5ryS37A
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
From: "Mario" <mrb620@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2020 10:51 AM
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer


I can only make suggestions as 8 GB of RAM is a good amount to start
with unless you intend to do intensive tasks. more RAM increases the
number of programs that can be running simultaneously. and I think there
is a small performance hit the more RAM the computer has. I'm not clear
on the role that the specifications have on the snappiness like the
type, timings and other specs. .

opting for an SSD will make access to storage of files snappy especially
at boot up time. it also has a longer life span since there aren't any
moving parts unlike a traditional spinning platter HD. and don't forget
that an SSD runs cool and produces no vibration.
I'd suggest no less than 240 GB unless you can afford to pay for 500 GB
(of course, this depends if you like to try alot of programs, tinker
around with the unknown, or play it safe and stick with a minimal set of
programs that work for you), and that the SSD be dedicated to run
Windows and programs. a seperate HD can be used for storing documents,
video and music; the stuff you can't replace if something happens to the
SSD. it would also be advisable to make a (preferrably 1to1) backup on
an external HD, and you may even consider to backup online just to be
extra safe if restoring from the external HD should fail for some reason.

having a seperate video card will only relieve the amount of RAM that is
used to display text and pictures written to the monitor. I don't know
if there is any other benefit.

I'd like to hear about the other things you inquired about from those
who know and can "do tell".

-------- Original Message --------
From: Ralph Supernaw via groups.io [mailto:rhs=startmail.com@groups.io]
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, August 18, 2020, 10:15 AM
Subject: Specs for a new desktop computer
It’s looking like I will be searching for a new desktop computer. I
have not been able to figure out what makes the most difference in the
speed or snappiness of the computer when using Jaws with typical
applications. So, I’d appreciate any information you techy types can
pass along.

I know Ram makes a big difference. What I don’t know is how much RAM is
helpful and how much is overkill.

How much difference does multiple thread processing make? How many
threads are a good number to shoot for?

How much difference does an SSD drive make? If they make a significant
difference in speed, what files should be on them?

Being totally blind I don’t need a fancy display. But, does a better
video card affect the speed of the computer?

Are there other ways to increase the speed of the computer?

Thanks.













moderated Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

Glenn / Lenny
 

The cache size will always help, and I always buy things like this on
Amazon.com.
When I did a search for fastest drives, I found a lot of articles, and they
usually give a link to a product in their reviews and often those links are
for Amazon.com.
That is one way they make money with their reviews of products.
Glenn

----- Original Message -----
From: "David Ingram" <dingram269@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, August 29, 2020 7:18 AM
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer


Where can you find drives with that read write speed and how much do these
drives costs? Also what about the cache size doesn't that have something to
do with things as well? I could never seem to find a hard drive whether
internal or external that would meet those requirements. What size hard
drive would that have to be in order to meet all of those requirements.?
Thank you for any information that you might have to answer these questions.


-----Original Message-----
From: Glenn / Lenny <glennervin@...>
Sent: Aug 18, 2020 11:44 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

I believe that the one thing that will increase computer speed is the hard
drive, and you want read/write speeds up around 1 gig per second
You will want a PCIE Gen 4 compatible motherboard and a PCIE SSD.
That is really the bottleneck these days, if you want speed.
Here's a video that talks about this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URt_5ryS37A
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
From: "Mario" <mrb620@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2020 10:51 AM
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer


I can only make suggestions as 8 GB of RAM is a good amount to start
with unless you intend to do intensive tasks. more RAM increases the
number of programs that can be running simultaneously. and I think there
is a small performance hit the more RAM the computer has. I'm not clear
on the role that the specifications have on the snappiness like the
type, timings and other specs. .

opting for an SSD will make access to storage of files snappy especially
at boot up time. it also has a longer life span since there aren't any
moving parts unlike a traditional spinning platter HD. and don't forget
that an SSD runs cool and produces no vibration.
I'd suggest no less than 240 GB unless you can afford to pay for 500 GB
(of course, this depends if you like to try alot of programs, tinker
around with the unknown, or play it safe and stick with a minimal set of
programs that work for you), and that the SSD be dedicated to run
Windows and programs. a seperate HD can be used for storing documents,
video and music; the stuff you can't replace if something happens to the
SSD. it would also be advisable to make a (preferrably 1to1) backup on
an external HD, and you may even consider to backup online just to be
extra safe if restoring from the external HD should fail for some reason.

having a seperate video card will only relieve the amount of RAM that is
used to display text and pictures written to the monitor. I don't know
if there is any other benefit.

I'd like to hear about the other things you inquired about from those
who know and can "do tell".

-------- Original Message --------
From: Ralph Supernaw via groups.io [mailto:rhs=startmail.com@groups.io]
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, August 18, 2020, 10:15 AM
Subject: Specs for a new desktop computer
It’s looking like I will be searching for a new desktop computer. I
have not been able to figure out what makes the most difference in the
speed or snappiness of the computer when using Jaws with typical
applications. So, I’d appreciate any information you techy types can
pass along.

I know Ram makes a big difference. What I don’t know is how much RAM is
helpful and how much is overkill.

How much difference does multiple thread processing make? How many
threads are a good number to shoot for?

How much difference does an SSD drive make? If they make a significant
difference in speed, what files should be on them?

Being totally blind I don’t need a fancy display. But, does a better
video card affect the speed of the computer?

Are there other ways to increase the speed of the computer?

Thanks.









moderated Re: How to activate a notification that is in the Action Center

Chris
 

When in action centre tab to the list of notifications, arrow down to the one you want to view and hit enter on it

 

Its as simple as that

 

 

From: Richard B. McDonald
Sent: 29 August 2020 16:57
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: How to activate a notification that is in the Action Center

 

Hi!

 

Every time I start my laptop, I get a pop-up notification that Intel wants to check for updates.  That pop-up happens too fast for me to get to it, or I otherwise just cannot get to it to say “yes.”  However, I can see the notification listed in the Action Center, but I cannot figure out how to activate it so as to say “yes”; meaning check for and install any needed updates.  How can I activate this notification?

 

I am using the latest versions of Windows 10 and JAWS.

 

Thanks,

Richard

 


moderated How to activate a notification that is in the Action Center

Richard B. McDonald
 

Hi!

 

Every time I start my laptop, I get a pop-up notification that Intel wants to check for updates.  That pop-up happens too fast for me to get to it, or I otherwise just cannot get to it to say “yes.”  However, I can see the notification listed in the Action Center, but I cannot figure out how to activate it so as to say “yes”; meaning check for and install any needed updates.  How can I activate this notification?

 

I am using the latest versions of Windows 10 and JAWS.

 

Thanks,

Richard


moderated Re: Office365: Word

HH. Smith Jr.
 

Hi CathyAnne,

 

I tried it but it did not work. A checkbox with that name did not appear in the list. Does it matter what version of Office365 you are using? I am using the enterprise version.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of CathyAnne Murtha
Sent: Friday, August 28, 2020 12:29 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io; jfw@groups.io
Subject: Re: Office365: Word

 

Try this.

 

1. Open the ribbon search edit field (ALT-Q)

2. Input - Switch Ribbons

3. Press DOWN ARROW until “Switch Ribbons” is selected

 

If it’s checked, Press ENTER to uncheck it. That should fix the issue.

 

CathyAnne

 

---

CathyAnne Murtha

Access Technology Institute

(520) 955-6611

 

CathyAnne Murtha

CEO

Access Technology Institute, LLC

Phone: (520) 955-6611



On Thu, Aug 27, 2020 at 7:30 PM -0700, "HH. Smith Jr." <josham129@...> wrote:

Hi,

 

Has anyone encountered the situation where the menu bar opens with JAWS annunciating menu has pop up; but when you hit enter or spacebar nothing happens. It is driving me nuts. I am trying to sort a list of items but it will not let me get to the sort button in the Home menu.


moderated Re: windows live maile question.

 

See my response, https://jfw.groups.io/g/main/message/81639, last night on another topic on this very forum.

It is clear that for Windows 10 users we have entered the stage where Windows Live Mail 2012 (and almost certainly all earlier versions, too) is no longer going to work reliably.

Now is the time to transition to a supported e-mail client of your choosing or webmail (and most webmail can now handle multiple accounts, and accounts that are outside of the webmail itself, e.g., Gmail webmail lets you set up yahoo.com, outlook.com, etc., accounts for reading inside their webmail interface).
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it.
       ~ Lawrence Krauss


moderated Re: flight info on research it

David Goldfield
 

What version of JAWS is being used?

David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
JAWS Certified, 2019

WWW.DavidGoldfield.org

On 8/28/2020 8:27 PM, Ann Byrne wrote:
At 4:00 I queried flight info on Research it concerning Southwest Airlines flight 470, receiving an informative reply.  three hours later when I place the same query, JAWS says the flight number is invalid.  It's the same stinkin' flight number, same airline abbreviation with same 3 digits following, no space.  This has happened before.  Any idea how to fix it?




moderated Re: windows live maile question.

Marie
 

No, I do not have this problem neither using Pop3 or iMap. But unfortunately, many folks have different problems with WLM and Win 10. I have used it since it was first created and it is still my favorite email client.
If you have the install executable, try running it and there is a chance it will do a repair and fix the problem. If that does not work, you might try uninstalling and re-installing. I also believe you may have the best results if you use version 12.
Sorry those are the only ideas I have at the moment.
Marie

-----Original Message-----
From: michaeel's mail
Sent: Saturday, August 29, 2020 4:14 AM
To: jaws help list
Subject: windows live maile question.

Hi guys just a question i just updated my desktop cmputer to the windows
10 2004.

And now windows live mail wil not send or recieve any mail i get an error.

Has anybody else found that out.

Cheers Michael.


moderated Re: windows live maile question.

michaeel's mail
 

Hi i can read mail in the inbox but if i try to recieve mail i get an error and if i try sending mail i get a message cannot send try later.

So i thinking about useing thunder bird insted.

I was hoping their might be an easy fix to windows live mail.

Cheers Michael.

On 29/08/2020 10:18 pm, Sameer wrote:

I had a similar problem in sending mails through Windows Live Mail after updating to Windows 10 version 1909.


When I tried to open a new mail, I kept getting an error message. Trying to reply to a received mail also resulted in the same error message. Completely uninstalling & reinstalling Windows Live Mail did not solve the problem.


I am using Thunderbird to receive & send mails.


Regards
Mr. Sameer Latey

On 29-08-2020 04:44 pm, michaeel's mail wrote:
Hi guys just a question i just updated my desktop cmputer to the windows 10 2004.

And now windows live mail wil not send or recieve any mail i get an error.

Has anybody else found that out.

Cheers Michael.




moderated Re: windows live maile question.

Sameer
 

I had a similar problem in sending mails through Windows Live Mail after updating to Windows 10 version 1909.


When I tried to open a new mail, I kept getting an error message. Trying to reply to a received mail also resulted in the same error message. Completely uninstalling & reinstalling Windows Live Mail did not solve the problem.


I am using Thunderbird to receive & send mails.


Regards
Mr. Sameer Latey

On 29-08-2020 04:44 pm, michaeel's mail wrote:
Hi guys just a question i just updated my desktop cmputer to the windows 10 2004.

And now windows live mail wil not send or recieve any mail i get an error.

Has anybody else found that out.

Cheers Michael.



moderated Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

David Ingram
 

Where can you find drives with that read write speed and how much do these drives costs? Also what about the cache size doesn't that have something to do with things as well? I could never seem to find a hard drive whether internal or external that would meet those requirements. What size hard drive would that have to be in order to meet all of those requirements.? Thank you for any information that you might have to answer these questions.

-----Original Message-----
From: Glenn / Lenny <glennervin@...>
Sent: Aug 18, 2020 11:44 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

I believe that the one thing that will increase computer speed is the hard
drive, and you want read/write speeds up around 1 gig per second
You will want a PCIE Gen 4 compatible motherboard and a PCIE SSD.
That is really the bottleneck these days, if you want speed.
Here's a video that talks about this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URt_5ryS37A
Glenn
----- Original Message -----
From: "Mario" <mrb620@...>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2020 10:51 AM
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer


I can only make suggestions as 8 GB of RAM is a good amount to start
with unless you intend to do intensive tasks. more RAM increases the
number of programs that can be running simultaneously. and I think there
is a small performance hit the more RAM the computer has. I'm not clear
on the role that the specifications have on the snappiness like the
type, timings and other specs. .

opting for an SSD will make access to storage of files snappy especially
at boot up time. it also has a longer life span since there aren't any
moving parts unlike a traditional spinning platter HD. and don't forget
that an SSD runs cool and produces no vibration.
I'd suggest no less than 240 GB unless you can afford to pay for 500 GB
(of course, this depends if you like to try alot of programs, tinker
around with the unknown, or play it safe and stick with a minimal set of
programs that work for you), and that the SSD be dedicated to run
Windows and programs. a seperate HD can be used for storing documents,
video and music; the stuff you can't replace if something happens to the
SSD. it would also be advisable to make a (preferrably 1to1) backup on
an external HD, and you may even consider to backup online just to be
extra safe if restoring from the external HD should fail for some reason.

having a seperate video card will only relieve the amount of RAM that is
used to display text and pictures written to the monitor. I don't know
if there is any other benefit.

I'd like to hear about the other things you inquired about from those
who know and can "do tell".

-------- Original Message --------
From: Ralph Supernaw via groups.io [mailto:rhs=startmail.com@groups.io]
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Date: Tuesday, August 18, 2020, 10:15 AM
Subject: Specs for a new desktop computer
It’s looking like I will be searching for a new desktop computer. I
have not been able to figure out what makes the most difference in the
speed or snappiness of the computer when using Jaws with typical
applications. So, I’d appreciate any information you techy types can
pass along.

I know Ram makes a big difference. What I don’t know is how much RAM is
helpful and how much is overkill.

How much difference does multiple thread processing make? How many
threads are a good number to shoot for?

How much difference does an SSD drive make? If they make a significant
difference in speed, what files should be on them?

Being totally blind I don’t need a fancy display. But, does a better
video card affect the speed of the computer?

Are there other ways to increase the speed of the computer?

Thanks.









moderated Re: Specs for a new desktop computer

David Ingram
 

Are the systems to small for a 1tb os disk?  What about memory how are they in terms of memory and is the memory the fastest for the motherboard?  I recently baught a dellxsp system that is a good system that has an i7 processor in it with 2 hard drives.  1 of the drives is a 4tb drive but I'll have to check the speed.  I think that the os is a ssd drive but i'll check that just to make sure that it is fast as well.  I do have some questions as to how can I get extra software off of the drive that I didn't ask for?  Thank you for any information that you might have concerning my questions.

-----Original Message-----
From: Dave Durber
Sent: Aug 19, 2020 6:36 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Specs for a new desktop computer


Ralph:
 
I am also going to upgrade our computers very soon, although in the case of our systems, I will only need to replace the motherboards and the central processing units (CPU(s)). The type of motherboards, will depend upon whether I choose the Intel I7 or, the AMD equivalent. I will probably remove the CD/DVD drives, when I upgrade the systems, as I recently purchased a USB external CD/DVD drive. The systems in our home, have the following drive configuration:
 
2 120 GB SSD drives, and at least 1 HDD drive for storing data. 1 of the SSD drives is the system drive, which only holds the operating system and any programs which are currently installed on them, and nothing else. At present, all the system drives indicate that the total amount being used on each system drive, is about 40 GB.
 
the second SSD drive, which is drive F: in all the systems, holds the following folders, which have been moved from the system drive to drive F:, Contacts; Documents; Downloads; Favourites; Dropbox; and the folders used by the preferred email client. In addition: Music;  Pictures; Saved Games; Searches; Videos; can also be moved to drive f:. Unfortunately, in Windows 10, there does not seem to be a way of moving: Microsoft Edge Backups; One Drive; or the Public folder; from the system drive to drive F:. I do not use Microsoft Edge or One Drive, however, I would have liked to have been able to move the Public folder to drive F:, as I was able to do in Windows 7. Lastly, drive F: can be used to store the Windows pagefile.sys file
 
By moving the abovementioned folders to drive F, and not using the system drive for storing miscellaneous data, it means that when I use Image for Windows to create image backups of the system drive, I do not have to worry about losing up-to-date important data, if I need to restore an image to the system drive in the future. This would also apply, if I were to use other imaging software.
 
The HDD drive, I use to store any other form of data.
 
HTH
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, 18 August, 2020 3:15 PM
Subject: Specs for a new desktop computer

It’s looking like I will be searching for a new desktop computer.  I have not been able to figure out what makes the most difference in the speed or snappiness of the computer when using Jaws with typical applications.  So, I’d appreciate any information you techy types can pass along.

 

I know Ram makes a big difference.  What I don’t know is how much RAM is helpful and how much is overkill.

 

How much difference does multiple thread processing make?  How many threads are a good number to shoot for?

 

How much difference does an SSD drive make?  If they make a significant difference in speed, what files should be on them?

 

Being totally blind I don’t need a fancy display.  But, does a better video card affect the speed of the computer?

 

Are there other ways to increase the speed of the computer?

 

Thanks.


moderated windows live maile question.

michaeel's mail
 

Hi guys just a question i just updated my desktop cmputer to the windows 10 2004.

And now windows live mail wil not send or recieve any mail i get an error.

Has anybody else found that out.

Cheers Michael.


moderated just a test thanks.

michaeel's mail