Date   

Re: speaking passwords

 

If sighted users can't see the password why should we?

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don H
Sent: Friday, August 17, 2018 2:58 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: speaking passwords

Dam shame that FS doesn't think its users have the capacity to make a
decision to speak passwords or not.

On 8/17/2018 4:47 PM, netbat66 wrote:
rots of ruck.
i asked for this last year and vfo told me this was a security risk and
they would not allow this with any versions of jaws.
and why not?
i am not a business this is home with only me. no one else is going to
see the passwords. unless my dog can talk. grin

-----Original Message----- From: Don H
Sent: Friday, August 17, 2018 9:59 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: speaking passwords

With both Window Eyes and NVDA you have a option to speak passwords as
you type them in.  I sure would like to see this feature in JAWS.









Re: Really really simple backup question

Stan Bobbitt
 

Thank you very much Brian for this comprehensive information!

Stan B

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, August 17, 2018 11:01 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Really really simple backup question

 

Sharon,

I'm going to give it a shot at answering your questions, one by one, and including a bit of information about "the question I think you were trying to ask" in addition to what was literally there.  The questions will all be repeated, with a > at the beginning of the question quotation.

> What is the difference between a backup, a differential backup, an integral backup, a system backup?

           A generic "backup" could be nothing other than copying files off to another drive by hand, but that's really not what the focus of the latest go-rounds was, nor will be here.

           A system image backup is, essentially, a snapshot of your computer's state:  all installed software, including the operating system, user accounts, all data associated with all user accounts, etc., taken at a given point in time and saved in a format that would allow you to restore that state, exactly, if you had a catastrophic failure of your hard drive and needed to replace it.

           Both differential and incremental backups are backups taken after a full system image backup, that collect the changes that have occurred since that last system image backup, but in slightly different ways.  Please see the article, Incremental vs differential backup – what is the difference?, which explains the differences better than I can and in non-technical terms.

> What if I wanted to get a complete backup of my system, and had no idea at all which program to get?

            This is sort of the crux of the earlier discussions.   Clearly Image for Windows is great and accessible if you are willing and able to pay just under $40 for it.  But if you can't, my parallel thread about other options, whether fully accessible or just accessible for maintaining your backups, is in its infancy.  Watch that space.

> Where would be even a good starting point for a person who has never once done an image or complete backup?

             I guess my only answer is deciding whether you wish to purchase backup software or to use a free version.  Then to decide whether whatever you use has to be 100% accessible or whether you can live with having an assistant to help you set up the system image backup and/or user data backup and, heaven forbid but it could happen, do the recovery.

>  Would I need an external drive with nothing else on it?

              You definitely need an external drive.   If you are using backup software, which I highly recommend, it can have lots of other stuff on it.  The backups will be placed in a folder of their own.

               I do not recommend disc cloning, which requires an external drive that's dedicated to nothing but the backup, and, ideally, would not be a regular external backup drive but a regular disc drive you could "pop in" to your machine for which you would purchase a USB enclosure where it would live while being used as an external backup drive.

> Is the Microsoft product a good starting place for a person who has never done anything like this before?

                This question is a bit to vague to answer as posed.   Microsoft includes a built-in backup and recovery that's been around since Windows 7, at least.  They have, however, stated that it is officially deprecated and state that users should seek out third party options, which is why I don't discuss it.  This utility was for system image backup and recovery.

                 File History, which exists under Windows 10 (and Windows 8.1, I think), is an excellent starting place for taking user data backups.  I just suggest that those starting out with File History pay very careful attention to both the frequency of backup and the backup retention period.  The default frequency is hourly, which is way too often for your average home user, and retention is forever, which is a space hog particularly if you know you really generally only care about the most recent version of a file once it's more than so old.  This is why I suggest retention of three months, as this will keep all versions of the same file in File History that are younger than three months old then, as the oldest version becomes three months and one day (or more) old it gets booted out.  Versions older than your retention period get booted out successively until what's left is only the most recent version of the file from the date you last touched it.   The retention period is NOT about the age of the current and last copy of the file, but of its previous versions that were collected along the way.  The current and last version will be retained until or unless it is deleted or, if you start working on it again, as versions with the changes you've done.

By the way, I saw your comment about knowing that you don't necessarily expect total accessibility, but I thought a comprehensive answer for other readers would be useful.  Your options are a lot wider in this situation, and I can still recommend EaseUS To Do Backup Free without hesitation if you don't object to needing assistance with the setup of your backup regimen nor if recovery were ever necessary.  The part you have to deal with to take successive full system images, or incremental backups, is entirely accessible.  I don't think the free version supports differential backup, but I could be mistaken.   My own protocol is generally to take full system image backups about once per month, then deleting any of these older than the previous month's backups since I wouldn't want anything from "the wayback machine" if I have a more recent backup.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill


Re: speaking of passwords

netbat66
 

maybe if we flood there suggestion box they might listen. grin
they sure didn't care about it when i asked last year.

-----Original Message-----
From: Don H
Sent: Friday, August 17, 2018 3:48 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: speaking of passwords


this is the reply from FS on speaking paswords.

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: RE: speaking of passwords
Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2018 22:23:11 +0000
From: VFO Technical Support <support@VFO-Group.com>
To: 'Don H' <lmddh50@adams.net>

Thank you for contacting VFO ® Technical Support. The JAWS® program is
designed to read what displays on the screen, and, or what is typed on
the keyboard. However, since "Passwords" are a secure part of the
Windows operating system, JAWS is design to be sensitive to that aspect
of the system security. Also, because JAWS is often run by users in
public places, business offices, and schools, the screen reader has been
designed so that the characters in a user's password are not spoken.
This allows the user to have personal security for their accounts when
they use their PC.
Notwithstanding, if you wish to make a recommendation to have this
feature added to a future release of JAWS, you should send a message to
suggestions@vfo-group.com.
If you have any additional questions regarding this or any other issue,
please don't hesitate to contact us.
If replying to this message, be sure to include all previous
correspondence pertaining to this matter so that we might better assist you.

Sincerely,
Dennis Godin
VFO™ | Technical Support Specialist
11800 31st Court North, St. Petersburg, FL 33716
T 727-803-8000 F 727-803-8001
dgodin@vfogroup.com
www.vfogroup.com

The information contained in this communication is confidential, may
constitute inside information, and is intended only for the use of the
addressee. It is the property of VFO™. Unauthorized use, disclosure or
copying of this communication or any part thereof is strictly prohibited
and may be unlawful. If you have received this communication in error,
please notify us immediately by return email, and destroy this
communication and all copies thereof, including all attachments.

-----Original Message-----
From: Don H <lmddh50@adams.net> Sent: Friday, August 17, 2018 6:02 PM
To: VFO Technical Support <support@VFO-Group.com>
Subject: speaking of passwords

It would sure be great for Jaws to have the option to have passwords
spoken or not. Tired of being locked out of a account because I
mistypes a password.


Defining a Hotkey for Use with the BrailleEdge

Dani Pagador
 

Hi, Everyone.
I am using JFW17, Win10, and a BrailleEdge. I would like to use the
shift+F3 combination to change the letter case. Using this combination
on the PC keyboard achieves the desired result, as it's a standard
Windows command, I think. But I can't do this same thing using the
BrailleEdge. Is there any way to define a hotkey?

Thanks,
Dani


Re: Skype number of rings

inamuddin khan
 

Dear, if you enable voice mail, your call will go to voice mail in whatever seconds you set!

HTH

With regards from Inamuddin with the Skype ID:

Charlsdarwin1

 

 

You can contact me via gmail:
inamuddin09@...

Inamuddin.ronaque@...

outlook:
inam092@...

yahoo:
inamuddin2010@...

Add my Skype ID:
charlsdarwin1
Meet me on facebook:
www.facebook.com/inamuddin786

Follow me on my twitter ID:
www.twitter.com/charlsdarwin1

Call me on my cell numbers:
+92-300-2227598 

+92-334-3348409

 

 

From: Morey Worthington
Sent: Saturday, August 18, 2018 3:50 AM
To: jfw@groups.io
Subject: Skype number of rings

 

Hi All.

 

In either Skype 7 or 8, is there a way to limit the number of incoming

call sounds? I had a call and it rang, rang, rang, and then rang some

more. I could not get to it answer the call so I physically shut down

the program to shut it off.

 

Some where in the settings can a person limit the number of incoming

call sounds??

 

Hope this makes sense.

 

Thanks,

 

Morey Worthington

 

 

 

 


Skype number of rings

Morey Worthington
 

Hi All.

In either Skype 7 or 8, is there a way to limit the number of incoming call sounds? I had a call and it rang, rang, rang, and then rang some more. I could not get to it answer the call so I physically shut down the program to shut it off.

Some where in the settings can a person limit the number of incoming call sounds??

Hope this makes sense.

Thanks,

Morey Worthington


Re: speaking of passwords

Don H
 

this is the reply from FS on speaking paswords.

-------- Forwarded Message --------
Subject: RE: speaking of passwords
Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2018 22:23:11 +0000
From: VFO Technical Support <support@VFO-Group.com>
To: 'Don H' <lmddh50@adams.net>

Thank you for contacting VFO ® Technical Support. The JAWS® program is designed to read what displays on the screen, and, or what is typed on the keyboard. However, since "Passwords" are a secure part of the Windows operating system, JAWS is design to be sensitive to that aspect of the system security. Also, because JAWS is often run by users in public places, business offices, and schools, the screen reader has been designed so that the characters in a user's password are not spoken. This allows the user to have personal security for their accounts when they use their PC.
Notwithstanding, if you wish to make a recommendation to have this feature added to a future release of JAWS, you should send a message to suggestions@vfo-group.com.
If you have any additional questions regarding this or any other issue, please don't hesitate to contact us.
If replying to this message, be sure to include all previous correspondence pertaining to this matter so that we might better assist you.

Sincerely,
Dennis Godin
VFO™ | Technical Support Specialist
11800 31st Court North, St. Petersburg, FL 33716
T 727-803-8000 F 727-803-8001
dgodin@vfogroup.com
www.vfogroup.com

The information contained in this communication is confidential, may constitute inside information, and is intended only for the use of the addressee. It is the property of VFO™. Unauthorized use, disclosure or copying of this communication or any part thereof is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by return email, and destroy this communication and all copies thereof, including all attachments.

-----Original Message-----
From: Don H <lmddh50@adams.net> Sent: Friday, August 17, 2018 6:02 PM
To: VFO Technical Support <support@VFO-Group.com>
Subject: speaking of passwords

It would sure be great for Jaws to have the option to have passwords spoken or not. Tired of being locked out of a account because I mistypes a password.


Re: is there to control the volume of a song playing on YouTube without changing the volume on your computer?

netbat66
 

turn off the virtual pc cursor then you will be able to use the youtube controls.
j,k and l to rewind pause and fast forward.
also the left and right arrows.
arrow up and down keys to change the volume.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Rawls
Sent: Friday, August 17, 2018 3:04 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: is there to control the volume of a song playing on YouTube without changing the volume on your computer?



I don’t want to lower the whole volume on all things on my computer, just the songs playing from YouTube. I am using windows ten and jaws 2018. jim


is there to control the volume of a song playing on YouTube without changing the volume on your computer?

Jim Rawls
 

I don’t want to lower the whole volume on all things on my computer, just the songs playing from YouTube. I am using windows ten and jaws 2018. jim


Re: speaking passwords

Don H
 

Dam shame that FS doesn't think its users have the capacity to make a decision to speak passwords or not.

On 8/17/2018 4:47 PM, netbat66 wrote:
rots of ruck.
i asked for this last year and vfo told me this was a security risk and they would not allow this with any versions of jaws.
and why not?
i am not a business this is home with only me. no one else is going to see the passwords. unless my dog can talk. grin
-----Original Message----- From: Don H
Sent: Friday, August 17, 2018 9:59 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: speaking passwords
With both Window Eyes and NVDA you have a option to speak passwords as
you type them in.  I sure would like to see this feature in JAWS.


Re: speaking passwords

netbat66
 

rots of ruck.
i asked for this last year and vfo told me this was a security risk and they would not allow this with any versions of jaws.
and why not?
i am not a business this is home with only me. no one else is going to see the passwords. unless my dog can talk. grin

-----Original Message-----
From: Don H
Sent: Friday, August 17, 2018 9:59 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: speaking passwords

With both Window Eyes and NVDA you have a option to speak passwords as
you type them in. I sure would like to see this feature in JAWS.


Re: Really really simple backup question

ely.r@...
 

 

Great job Professor Brian. Sharron, Good job of structuring your “simple” questions.

Going to keep this but promise to site both of you if I quote it anywhere.

Rik

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, August 17, 2018 11:01 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Really really simple backup question

 

Sharon,

I'm going to give it a shot at answering your questions, one by one, and including a bit of information about "the question I think you were trying to ask" in addition to what was literally there.  The questions will all be repeated, with a > at the beginning of the question quotation.

> What is the difference between a backup, a differential backup, an integral backup, a system backup?

           A generic "backup" could be nothing other than copying files off to another drive by hand, but that's really not what the focus of the latest go-rounds was, nor will be here.

           A system image backup is, essentially, a snapshot of your computer's state:  all installed software, including the operating system, user accounts, all data associated with all user accounts, etc., taken at a given point in time and saved in a format that would allow you to restore that state, exactly, if you had a catastrophic failure of your hard drive and needed to replace it.

           Both differential and incremental backups are backups taken after a full system image backup, that collect the changes that have occurred since that last system image backup, but in slightly different ways.  Please see the article, Incremental vs differential backup – what is the difference?, which explains the differences better than I can and in non-technical terms.

> What if I wanted to get a complete backup of my system, and had no idea at all which program to get?

            This is sort of the crux of the earlier discussions.   Clearly Image for Windows is great and accessible if you are willing and able to pay just under $40 for it.  But if you can't, my parallel thread about other options, whether fully accessible or just accessible for maintaining your backups, is in its infancy.  Watch that space.

> Where would be even a good starting point for a person who has never once done an image or complete backup?

             I guess my only answer is deciding whether you wish to purchase backup software or to use a free version.  Then to decide whether whatever you use has to be 100% accessible or whether you can live with having an assistant to help you set up the system image backup and/or user data backup and, heaven forbid but it could happen, do the recovery.

>  Would I need an external drive with nothing else on it?

              You definitely need an external drive.   If you are using backup software, which I highly recommend, it can have lots of other stuff on it.  The backups will be placed in a folder of their own.

               I do not recommend disc cloning, which requires an external drive that's dedicated to nothing but the backup, and, ideally, would not be a regular external backup drive but a regular disc drive you could "pop in" to your machine for which you would purchase a USB enclosure where it would live while being used as an external backup drive.

> Is the Microsoft product a good starting place for a person who has never done anything like this before?

                This question is a bit to vague to answer as posed.   Microsoft includes a built-in backup and recovery that's been around since Windows 7, at least.  They have, however, stated that it is officially deprecated and state that users should seek out third party options, which is why I don't discuss it.  This utility was for system image backup and recovery.

                 File History, which exists under Windows 10 (and Windows 8.1, I think), is an excellent starting place for taking user data backups.  I just suggest that those starting out with File History pay very careful attention to both the frequency of backup and the backup retention period.  The default frequency is hourly, which is way too often for your average home user, and retention is forever, which is a space hog particularly if you know you really generally only care about the most recent version of a file once it's more than so old.  This is why I suggest retention of three months, as this will keep all versions of the same file in File History that are younger than three months old then, as the oldest version becomes three months and one day (or more) old it gets booted out.  Versions older than your retention period get booted out successively until what's left is only the most recent version of the file from the date you last touched it.   The retention period is NOT about the age of the current and last copy of the file, but of its previous versions that were collected along the way.  The current and last version will be retained until or unless it is deleted or, if you start working on it again, as versions with the changes you've done.

By the way, I saw your comment about knowing that you don't necessarily expect total accessibility, but I thought a comprehensive answer for other readers would be useful.  Your options are a lot wider in this situation, and I can still recommend EaseUS To Do Backup Free without hesitation if you don't object to needing assistance with the setup of your backup regimen nor if recovery were ever necessary.  The part you have to deal with to take successive full system images, or incremental backups, is entirely accessible.  I don't think the free version supports differential backup, but I could be mistaken.   My own protocol is generally to take full system image backups about once per month, then deleting any of these older than the previous month's backups since I wouldn't want anything from "the wayback machine" if I have a more recent backup.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill


groups.io will be down for maintenance this evening, starting at 9PM Pacific Time (4AM Saturday 8/18 UTC), for about two hours.

 

The subject says it all, but I'll repeat it here in case it gets cut off by certain e-mail clients:

groups.io will be down for maintenance this evening, starting at 9PM Pacific Time (4AM Saturday 8/18 UTC), for about two hours.

There has been a banner message to this effect up all day on the web interface, but nothing has come across on traffic on the groups themselves, which leaves e-mail users in the dark.

You can still reply to messages, but all of it will be held in a queue during the maintenance period.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill


Re: moving Outlook folders

Van Lant, Robin
 

Hello,

To move yoru folder, do the following steps.  I want through them, but am not in a place with two accounts that I can move a folder, to, but think this will work.

  1. Press Shift F6 to getting to the tree view with all your folders. 
  2. Arrow down to the folder you want to move
  3. Press the application key or Shift F10 to open the context menu and arrow down to Move.
  4. A dialog box with a tree view will open.  Arrow down to your new mail account.  If you want to put the folder at the main level, just hit enter., or press right arrow to expand that mail account and continuing arrowing down to the folder under which you want to move your folder.
  5.  

 

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin Meyers
Sent: Thursday, August 16, 2018 9:46 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: moving Outlook folders

 

Hello, I’m using windows10 and Office 2016. I created a new email address and would like to move the folders under the old email address to the new one. Is there a way to do the move?



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Re: Really really simple backup question

Steve Matzura
 

 Brian,

The ability to pull  files  out of an image backup does exist in the TDIBRS. An image can be opened like an archive (ZIP, LZH, GZip, etc.), or mounted and given a letter like a disk. This was never brought up in the original discussion, but before you or anyone else asked, I thought I'd pre-answer.

On 8/17/2018 12:11 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
Mario,

           I presume you're talking about this Drive Snapshot (v1.46).

           Yes, it does backups, and it's own webpage states, "Disk Image Backup for Windows."

           Disk image, system image, potato, po-tah-to.

           One could, of course, take a disk image backup of a disk other than your system disc, too, but that's not what's been being talked about.  It appears that Drive Snapshot allows you to selectively recover files/folders as well, which is a very nice feature not always available.
 


Re: Really really simple backup question

 

Sharon,

           Correct, correct, and correct.

           The retention period in File History, and any backup software that is an incremental data backup, is how long do I retain the versions other than the current static version.  The frequency of backup is how often do I want to make a new copy if anything is changed.

             I'm going to give an analogy that I think is reasonably easy to grasp.   Think of the various versions as photocopies of the original document, taken at a specific time, that are held in a filing cabinet.  Once every backup period (let's say one hour) someone's checking the filing cabinet to see if the oldest photocopy is older than the retention period (let's say 4 hours).  If it is older it gets tossed.  This continues hourly until the only copy left in the cabinet is the most recent photocopy.

             If you make a change 5 weeks later, then a new photocopy is placed in the folder.  If you keep making changes over the course of 4 hours, multiple copies will be kept while this changing is going on, and the oldest copies tossed away when they are older than 4 hours.

             You eventually have only one backed up copy of anything that is older than the retention period and that has not been changed.  It will only be deleted from the backup if you delete the original, and even that, I believe, won't happen until the retention period has passed for the one copy has been sitting there.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill


Re: Really really simple backup question

Sharon
 

Okay, I think I understand. So with file history you are saying that files are not deleted after three months if it’s the only file you have?

Like if a file is six months old but I haven’t changed it at all in that time, it wouldn’t be deleted?

And I’m assuming this is data backup not image backup right?

Sharon

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, August 17, 2018 11:01 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Really really simple backup question

 

Sharon,

I'm going to give it a shot at answering your questions, one by one, and including a bit of information about "the question I think you were trying to ask" in addition to what was literally there.  The questions will all be repeated, with a > at the beginning of the question quotation.

> What is the difference between a backup, a differential backup, an integral backup, a system backup?

           A generic "backup" could be nothing other than copying files off to another drive by hand, but that's really not what the focus of the latest go-rounds was, nor will be here.

           A system image backup is, essentially, a snapshot of your computer's state:  all installed software, including the operating system, user accounts, all data associated with all user accounts, etc., taken at a given point in time and saved in a format that would allow you to restore that state, exactly, if you had a catastrophic failure of your hard drive and needed to replace it.

           Both differential and incremental backups are backups taken after a full system image backup, that collect the changes that have occurred since that last system image backup, but in slightly different ways.  Please see the article, Incremental vs differential backup – what is the difference?, which explains the differences better than I can and in non-technical terms.

> What if I wanted to get a complete backup of my system, and had no idea at all which program to get?

            This is sort of the crux of the earlier discussions.   Clearly Image for Windows is great and accessible if you are willing and able to pay just under $40 for it.  But if you can't, my parallel thread about other options, whether fully accessible or just accessible for maintaining your backups, is in its infancy.  Watch that space.

> Where would be even a good starting point for a person who has never once done an image or complete backup?

             I guess my only answer is deciding whether you wish to purchase backup software or to use a free version.  Then to decide whether whatever you use has to be 100% accessible or whether you can live with having an assistant to help you set up the system image backup and/or user data backup and, heaven forbid but it could happen, do the recovery.

>  Would I need an external drive with nothing else on it?

              You definitely need an external drive.   If you are using backup software, which I highly recommend, it can have lots of other stuff on it.  The backups will be placed in a folder of their own.

               I do not recommend disc cloning, which requires an external drive that's dedicated to nothing but the backup, and, ideally, would not be a regular external backup drive but a regular disc drive you could "pop in" to your machine for which you would purchase a USB enclosure where it would live while being used as an external backup drive.

> Is the Microsoft product a good starting place for a person who has never done anything like this before?

                This question is a bit to vague to answer as posed.   Microsoft includes a built-in backup and recovery that's been around since Windows 7, at least.  They have, however, stated that it is officially deprecated and state that users should seek out third party options, which is why I don't discuss it.  This utility was for system image backup and recovery.

                 File History, which exists under Windows 10 (and Windows 8.1, I think), is an excellent starting place for taking user data backups.  I just suggest that those starting out with File History pay very careful attention to both the frequency of backup and the backup retention period.  The default frequency is hourly, which is way too often for your average home user, and retention is forever, which is a space hog particularly if you know you really generally only care about the most recent version of a file once it's more than so old.  This is why I suggest retention of three months, as this will keep all versions of the same file in File History that are younger than three months old then, as the oldest version becomes three months and one day (or more) old it gets booted out.  Versions older than your retention period get booted out successively until what's left is only the most recent version of the file from the date you last touched it.   The retention period is NOT about the age of the current and last copy of the file, but of its previous versions that were collected along the way.  The current and last version will be retained until or unless it is deleted or, if you start working on it again, as versions with the changes you've done.

By the way, I saw your comment about knowing that you don't necessarily expect total accessibility, but I thought a comprehensive answer for other readers would be useful.  Your options are a lot wider in this situation, and I can still recommend EaseUS To Do Backup Free without hesitation if you don't object to needing assistance with the setup of your backup regimen nor if recovery were ever necessary.  The part you have to deal with to take successive full system images, or incremental backups, is entirely accessible.  I don't think the free version supports differential backup, but I could be mistaken.   My own protocol is generally to take full system image backups about once per month, then deleting any of these older than the previous month's backups since I wouldn't want anything from "the wayback machine" if I have a more recent backup.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134  

    The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

          ~ Dorothy Nevill


Re: Braille edge 40 and jaws

Richard Turner
 


I believe you also have to install the driver from the HIMS web site, but that may have changed.
Once it is functioning as a braille display, you just press spacebar-dot7--t, which toggles typing mode on and off.
Dot 7 is also known as the backspace key.
I have a braille edge running with Jaws 2018.
HTH,
Richard



"I'll be more enthusiastic about encouraging thinking outside the box when there's evidence of any thinking going on inside it." -- Terry Pratchett



[Sent from my little hand-held computer]



On Aug 17, 2018, at 8:10 AM, david <davidmac1957@...> wrote:

Good morning all;

A friend wants me to assist her in setting up her braille display with the current version of jaws.

I understand to setup the braille display I need to go to synthesizer and braille manager,

once I do this, is there a setting to change so she can use the display to type instead of using the laptop keyboard?

In advance thanks for the help.

 

       The impossible is the untried,  Never under estimate the power of a dream.

 


speaking passwords

Don H
 

With both Window Eyes and NVDA you have a option to speak passwords as you type them in. I sure would like to see this feature in JAWS.


JAWS Scripts for Audible & Youtube

Mike B. <mike9902@...>
 

Hi All,
 
Thought some might be interested in this from this weeks edition of Top Tech Tidbits:
 
16. A. Doug Lee has JAWS scripts for YouTube:
 
 
16. B. And is developing scripts for the Win10 Audible app:
 

Take care.  Mike.  Go Dodgers!
Sennt from my iBarstool.
Arguing with a woman is like reading a software license agreement.  In the end you have to ignore everything, & click I agree.