Date   

moderated Re: problum with jaws and windows live mail and deleating messages in the inbox.

Robin Frost
 

Hi,
I can verify this behavior. It doesn't happen with every message but I have witnessed it. I agree with Ann refreshing the screen and making sure program window is maximized helps too. considering that this program is no longer supported by Microsoft I'm not sure how eater VFO will be to address it but couldn’t hurt to report it for good measure. I too am still using it but am aware that a day might come when it'll just stop working or other wise be purged from running on Windows. So just delete with care or just rescue from trash when necessary (smile).
Robin

-----Original Message-----
From: Ann Byrne
Sent: Tuesday, April 3, 2018 12:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: problum with jaws and windows live mail and deleating messages in the inbox.

Be sure to refresh the screen after deleting a message. JAWS seems
to remember what was there instead of showing what is there
now. Press insert+escape to have JAWS update the screen correctly.
At 10:37 AM 4/3/2018, you wrote:
hi dave thanks for that. what should i be checking for? also how do you get to these diologs? many thanks. from Mich.

From: Dave...
Sent: Tuesday, April 3, 2018 10:38 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: problum with jaws and windows live mail and deleating messages in the inbox.

Sounds like a WLM setting. Check in your Tools/Options/General or Tools/Options/Read dialogs.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: Mich Verrier
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Sent: Monday, April 02, 2018 20:12
Subject: problum with jaws and windows live mail and deleating messages in the inbox.

Hi all for the past few days i have been having problums with jaws and windows live mail and deleating messages in the inbox. this is happening with jaws 2018 and also keeps on happening on older versions of jaws as well. what is happening is that when i go and deleate a message from the inbox jaws will read the message below that message as the same message that i just deleated when when i arrow up it is a diffrint message that i might want to keep. so lets say that i get a message from friend 1 and then another message from friend 2 well jaws will deleate the message from friend 1 but then it continues reading the message below that it will still be the same subject and message from friend 1 but would be from in fact friend 2 and the only way i would know this is to use my up arrow to check. it is anoying and i have found this happening on jaws 2018, as well as jaws 18 and 17. i am running windows 10 64 bit. i hope some one can help solve this problum. from Mich.


moderated Re: Spyware

Gerald Levy
 

But suppose the ransomware gets installed as soon as you click on the link to the rogue web site, and you start hearing the message to call the 800 number or else. If your computer has been frozen and you shut it down by pressing the power button and then reboot it, there is a good chance that you will not have speech because the ransomware will prevent JAWS or other default screen reader from loading. Then what do you do?

Gerald

-----Original Message-----
From: Mario
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 3:05 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

when I got hit, thinking it was a prank because of some missing info, I
immediately shutdown, disconnected from the router, ran a MRT quick scan
then a full VIPRE scan, cleaned up any cached leftovers, rebooted,
reconnected to the router, and everything is fine. but I didn't call the
answer desk. should I have?



-------- Original Message --------
From: Sieghard Weitzel [mailto:sieghard@live.ca]
Sent: Tuesday, Apr 3, 2018 11:05 AM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Spyware

It won’t hurt your computer if you pull out the cord.

*From:* main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Gerald Levy
*Sent:* Tuesday, April 3, 2018 6:24 AM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: Spyware

In retrospect, I probably should have called the MS accessibility
helpline instead of calling the 800 number as instructed by the
ransomware message. But I was so freaked out that in a panic, I called
the 800 number. If I ever experience another such ransomware attack, I
will definitely call the MS accessibility helpline first.

Gerald

*From:*Richard Turner <mailto:richardturner42@outlook.com>

*Sent:*Tuesday, April 03, 2018 9:08 AM

*To:*main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

*Subject:*Re: Spyware

No charge, completely free, and in my expierience, they will work with
you until the issue is resolved no matter howlong it takes. I was on
one call for almost 2 hours when my system had gotten really messed up.

I believe they are open in the United States from 6AM to 10PM week days
and 6 to 3 on weekends. Something like that.

I would suggest calling them anyway, and have them log into your
computer to see if there are any traces left, even though you’ve done a
check.

I’d also, obviously, not go near that web site again, grin.

Richard

“The secret is not to make your music louder, but to make the world
quieter.”

- Mitch _Albom_from The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto, page 1

*From:*main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
<main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>> *On Behalf Of *John Doering
*Sent:* Tuesday, April 3, 2018 5:43 AM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: Spyware

Richard, Jessica, and Paul:

Thank you all for the advice. If it comes up again, I will definitely
call Microsoft accessibility. Is there any charge for calling them?

Regards,

*John Doering*

Administrative Pricing Specialist****

**

*p. **414-778-3040 Ext 4063****t. **800-642-8778 **f.**414-778-3392*****

NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any document
attached hereto is intended only for the named recipient(s). If you are
not the intended recipient, nor the employee or agent responsible for
delivering this message in confidence to the intended recipient(s), you
are hereby notified that you have received this transmittal in error,
and any review, dissemination, distribution or copying of this
transmittal or its attachments is strictly prohibited. If you have
received this transmittal and/or attachments in error, please notify me
immediately by reply e-mail and then delete this message, including any
attachments.

*From:*Richard Turner [mailto:richardturner42@outlook.com]
*Sent:* Tuesday, April 03, 2018 7:25 AM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: Spyware

John,

If you know the 800 number, you could Google it from your work computer
to find out if it is for real, which I highly doubt.

But, I'd call Microsoft accessibility: 800-936-5900 from before turning
on the computer. Ideally, from a speaker phone so when you turn it on,
if the pop-up comes up they can hear it.

HTH,

Richard

“The secret is not to make your music louder, but to make the world
quieter.”

- Mitch _Albom_ from The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto, page 1


On Apr 3, 2018, at 5:07 AM, John Doering <john.doering@ibsupply.com
<mailto:john.doering@ibsupply.com>> wrote:

Hello:

When surfing the web last night, I entered on a link and got a pop
up window that stated Windows detected my system was attacked by
spyware. It stated the spyware was now stealing my credit card
numbers, passwords, and the rest. It also stated this verbally in a
female voice with what sounded like a British accent. It demanded
that I call Microsoft at an 800 number it provided. It also stated
that if I closed the window without calling that Microsoft 800
number, Microsoft would to protect their system disable my IP address.

I never trust pop ups from the web so tried to close the window
without success. I then shut down my system, but when I powered
back up the pop up came up again. This time though, I was able to
close the window. I ran a virus scan with Windows Defender and
there were threats found. I entered on the take action link and let
it run its course. I then ran MRT.exe which found nothing. Then I
shut down the system and have not started it since. Keep your
fingers crossed that it is gone when I power up.

For your information, I am sending this message from my work
computer, so should not be infected.

Has anyone heard of this and is the 800 number legit?

Any help would be appreciated.

Thankyou,

*John Doering*

Administrative Pricing Specialist**

**

*p. **414-778-3040 Ext 4063****t. **800-642-8778
**f.**414-778-3392*****

NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any document
attached hereto is intended only for the named recipient(s). If you
are not the intended recipient, nor the employee or agent
responsible for delivering this message in confidence to the
intended recipient(s), you are hereby notified that you have
received this transmittal in error, and any review, dissemination,
distribution or copying of this transmittal or its attachments is
strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmittal and/or
attachments in error, please notify me immediately by reply e-mail
and then delete this message, including any attachments.


moderated Re: Spyware

Gerald Levy
 

Just out of curiosity, I did some research to determine whether the NYPD has a dedicated computer crime unit that can be contacted in the event that you become the victim of computer crime, and to my surprise, there is apparently no such unit. Victims of crime are simply instructed to call 911 to report a serious crime in progress, or else their local police precinct to report minor crimes. There is a joint cybercrime task force between the FBI, NYPD and state police, but their function is primarily to educcate the public about computer crime and investigate major security breaches and the like, not petty incidents like the one I eexperienced. The local district attorney's office will investigate reports of identity theft but not petty computer crime. But even if you could report a ransomware attack, you would probably have to make a trip to police or FBI headquarters and fill out mountains of paperwork to document it. So there is basically very little the average blind computer user can do to prevent these scammers from plying their trade.

Gerald

-----Original Message-----
From: Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 2:29 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

Gerald,

You can be sure that a police department like the NYPD has a large department entirely dedicated to this sort of stuff so I wouldn't dismiss this. If you were living in a one-horse town somewhere in the midwest with a relatively low crime rate (except for the occasional mass school or church shooting) then maybe the police there would be much less able to help. Having said this, apart from reporting it I agree that the police probably won't be able to do much especially if you already fell for the scam and paid. Glad you were able to get your money back from Paypal.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 11:11 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware


But if you live in a large city like New York, the local police are unlikely to get involved in petty computer crime unless you are threatened with physical violence if you refuse to pay the scammers' ransom demands. And the FBI probably gets deluged with ransomware and spyware attack reports every day, but is apparently powerless to prevent them. After all, if a hostile foreign government can hack into Facebook and affect the outcome of a presidential election,evading FBI scrutiny, how can we individual computer users feel safe?

Gerald



-----Original Message-----
From: David & his pack of dogs
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 1:27 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

Gerald, There was a news item where computer scamming was close to the top
of crimes. So, sorry to ruin your fun however, computer scams would not be
ignored. Smile. I should also jump in here. Just because you call the MS
help desk, does not insure you get qualified help. It is rare however, I
have experienced first hand a person there who kept giving me sighted
directions even though I told her I was using JAWS as a screen reader and
had a vision problem. Comments such as, "You see that red X in the top of
the screen? ?Click on it. Or, click on the yellow ? on the bottom of your
screen." When she asked for me to maximize the screen. I told her I was
not sure how to do that. Her response, "You see the yellow ? at the bottom
of the screen, click on that." Now she keeps calling me for a follow up
even though the problem has long been solved by level 2 techs. She even
called during the window of time they gave me to call me on this problem.
Yes, I have given her a scathing review on the feedback email I was sent by
Microsoft. At least I think it was Microsoft. Grin.



-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: April 3, 2018 10:12 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware


When I experienced the ransomware attack I described previously, I Googled
the 800 number I called and discovered that it was supposedly the number for
a legitimate computer repair company in Los Angeles. I suspect that the
scammers had hacked or hijacked this number so that calls were routed to
their offshore base of operations instead of the real company. So checking
the 800 number on Google may not be very helpful. Some tech experts actually
suggest calling the police if you experience such a ransomware attack. Can
you imagine anything so stupid? You call your local police precinct,
explain your situation to the desk sargeant, and he tells you, sorry
pal,can't help you. We have more important things to worry about like
solving murders and getting dangerous criminals off the streets. And if you
call 911, the dispatcher will probably send a pair of cops to your home to
arrestyou for reporting an emergency that is not life-threatening and
wasting their time. Call the FBI? What can they do if the scammers are
located overseas, well out of reach of the long arm of the law. There's
always Interpol, but my image of them comes from James Bond movies where
they are portrayed as a bunch of inept stuffed shirts who run around Europe
in Giorgio Armani suits and spend most of their time in Monte Carlo casinos
looking for blackjack cheaters. So there is really no place to turn.

Gerald




-----Original Message-----
From: Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 12:08 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

Hi John: Did you try copying that number to the clipboard and searching the
web to see if it's legit/

Hope your system is okay.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of John
Doering
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 5:07 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Spyware

Hello:

When surfing the web last night, I entered on a link and got a pop up window
that stated Windows detected my system was attacked by spyware. It stated
the spyware was now stealing my credit card numbers, passwords, and the
rest. It also stated this verbally in a female voice with what sounded like
a British accent. It demanded that I call Microsoft at an 800 number it
provided. It also stated that if I closed the window without calling that
Microsoft 800 number, Microsoft would to protect their system disable my IP
address.

I never trust pop ups from the web so tried to close the window without
success. I then shut down my system, but when I powered back up the pop up
came up again. This time though, I was able to close the window. I ran a
virus scan with Windows Defender and there were threats found. I entered on
the take action link and let it run its course. I then ran MRT.exe which
found nothing. Then I shut down the system and have not started it since.
Keep your fingers crossed that it is gone when I power up.

For your information, I am sending this message from my work computer, so
should not be infected.

Has anyone heard of this and is the 800 number legit?

Any help would be appreciated.



Thankyou,





John Doering

Administrative Pricing Specialist


p. 414-778-3040 Ext 4063 t. 800-642-8778 f. 414-778-3392



NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any document attached
hereto is intended only for the named recipient(s). If you are not the
intended recipient, nor the employee or agent responsible for delivering
this message in confidence to the intended recipient(s), you are hereby
notified that you have received this transmittal in error, and any review,
dissemination, distribution or copying of this transmittal or its
attachments is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmittal
and/or attachments in error, please notify me immediately by reply e-mail
and then delete this message, including any attachments.


moderated Re: Spyware

Mario
 

when I got hit, thinking it was a prank because of some missing info, I
immediately shutdown, disconnected from the router, ran a MRT quick scan
then a full VIPRE scan, cleaned up any cached leftovers, rebooted,
reconnected to the router, and everything is fine. but I didn't call the
answer desk. should I have?

-------- Original Message --------
From: Sieghard Weitzel [mailto:sieghard@live.ca]
Sent: Tuesday, Apr 3, 2018 11:05 AM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Spyware

It won’t hurt your computer if you pull out the cord.

*From:* main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Gerald Levy
*Sent:* Tuesday, April 3, 2018 6:24 AM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: Spyware

In retrospect, I probably should have called the MS accessibility
helpline instead of calling the 800 number as instructed by the
ransomware message.  But I was so freaked out that in a panic, I called
the 800 number.  If I ever experience another such ransomware attack, I
will definitely call the MS accessibility helpline first.

Gerald

*From:*Richard Turner <mailto:richardturner42@outlook.com>

*Sent:*Tuesday, April 03, 2018 9:08 AM

*To:*main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>

*Subject:*Re: Spyware

No charge, completely free, and in my expierience, they will work with
you until the issue is resolved no matter howlong it takes.  I was on
one call for almost 2 hours when my system had gotten really messed up.

I believe they are open in the United States from 6AM to 10PM week days
and 6 to 3 on weekends.  Something like that.

I would suggest calling them anyway, and have them log into your
computer to see if there are any traces left, even though you’ve done a
check.

I’d also, obviously, not go near that web site again, grin.

Richard

“The secret is not to make your music louder, but to make the world
quieter.”

- Mitch _Albom_from The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto, page 1

*From:*main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
<main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>> *On Behalf Of *John Doering
*Sent:* Tuesday, April 3, 2018 5:43 AM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: Spyware

Richard, Jessica, and Paul:

Thank you all for the advice.  If it comes up again, I will definitely
call Microsoft accessibility.   Is there any charge for calling them?

Regards,

*John Doering*

Administrative Pricing Specialist****

**

*p. **414-778-3040 Ext 4063****t. **800-642-8778 **f.**414-778-3392*****

NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any document
attached hereto is intended only for the named recipient(s). If you are
not the intended recipient, nor the employee or agent responsible for
delivering this message in confidence to the intended recipient(s), you
are hereby notified that you have received this transmittal in error,
and any review, dissemination, distribution or copying of this
transmittal or its attachments is strictly prohibited. If you have
received this transmittal and/or attachments in error, please notify me
immediately by reply e-mail and then delete this message, including any
attachments.

*From:*Richard Turner [mailto:richardturner42@outlook.com]
*Sent:* Tuesday, April 03, 2018 7:25 AM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: Spyware

John,

If you know the 800 number, you could Google it from your work computer
to find out if it is for real, which I highly doubt.

But, I'd call Microsoft accessibility: 800-936-5900 from before turning
on the computer. Ideally, from a speaker phone so when you turn it on,
if the pop-up comes up they can hear it.

HTH,

Richard

“The secret is not to make your music louder, but to make the world
quieter.”

- Mitch _Albom_ from The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto, page 1


On Apr 3, 2018, at 5:07 AM, John Doering <john.doering@ibsupply.com
<mailto:john.doering@ibsupply.com>> wrote:

Hello:

When surfing the web last night, I entered on a link and got a pop
up window that stated Windows detected my system was attacked by
spyware.  It stated the spyware was now stealing my credit card
numbers, passwords, and the rest.  It also stated this verbally in a
female voice with what sounded like a British accent.  It demanded
that I call Microsoft at an 800 number it provided.  It also stated
that if I closed the window without calling that Microsoft 800
number, Microsoft would to protect their system disable my IP address.

I never trust pop ups from the web so tried to close the window
without success.  I then shut down my system, but when I powered
back up the pop up came up again.  This time though, I was able to
close the window. I ran a  virus scan with Windows Defender and
there were threats found.  I entered on the take action link and let
it run its course.  I then ran MRT.exe which found nothing.  Then I
shut down the system and have not started it since.  Keep your
fingers crossed that it is gone when I power up.

For your information, I am sending this message from my work
computer, so should not be infected.

Has anyone heard of this and is the 800 number legit?

Any help would be appreciated.

Thankyou,

*John Doering*

Administrative Pricing Specialist**

**

*p. **414-778-3040 Ext 4063****t. **800-642-8778
**f.**414-778-3392*****

NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any document
attached hereto is intended only for the named recipient(s). If you
are not the intended recipient, nor the employee or agent
responsible for delivering this message in confidence to the
intended recipient(s), you are hereby notified that you have
received this transmittal in error, and any review, dissemination,
distribution or copying of this transmittal or its attachments is
strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmittal and/or
attachments in error, please notify me immediately by reply e-mail
and then delete this message, including any attachments.


moderated Re: Spyware

Angel
 

I don't know whether you all heard two weeks ago come Thursday, the city of Atlanta Georgia was hacked in this way. The cities computer system was entirely disabled. The cities computer system was ransomed for the sum of 50 thousand dollars. I wondered, when this was broadcast throuout Atlanta, and the citizens were told they could still pay bills by ordinary mail, how many millennials knew even that paying bills by mail was even an option. There was some discussion about whether it would be less expensive to pay the hackers, or to find an expert to fix the problem in country. The upshot was, the cities computer system was fixed, without paying the hackers. So, if any of you have fallen victim to such as these people are, you should not feel to foolish. Because this sort of thing can happen to anyone at all.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gerald Levy" <bwaylimited@verizon.net>
To: <main@jfw.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 2:10 PM
Subject: Re: Spyware



But if you live in a large city like New York, the local police are unlikely to get involved in petty computer crime unless you are threatened with physical violence if you refuse to pay the scammers' ransom demands. And the FBI probably gets deluged with ransomware and spyware attack reports every day, but is apparently powerless to prevent them. After all, if a hostile foreign government can hack into Facebook and affect the outcome of a presidential election,evading FBI scrutiny, how can we individual computer users feel safe?

Gerald



-----Original Message-----
From: David & his pack of dogs
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 1:27 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

Gerald, There was a news item where computer scamming was close to the top
of crimes. So, sorry to ruin your fun however, computer scams would not be
ignored. Smile. I should also jump in here. Just because you call the MS
help desk, does not insure you get qualified help. It is rare however, I
have experienced first hand a person there who kept giving me sighted
directions even though I told her I was using JAWS as a screen reader and
had a vision problem. Comments such as, "You see that red X in the top of
the screen? ?Click on it. Or, click on the yellow ? on the bottom of your
screen." When she asked for me to maximize the screen. I told her I was
not sure how to do that. Her response, "You see the yellow ? at the bottom
of the screen, click on that." Now she keeps calling me for a follow up
even though the problem has long been solved by level 2 techs. She even
called during the window of time they gave me to call me on this problem.
Yes, I have given her a scathing review on the feedback email I was sent by
Microsoft. At least I think it was Microsoft. Grin.



-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: April 3, 2018 10:12 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware


When I experienced the ransomware attack I described previously, I Googled
the 800 number I called and discovered that it was supposedly the number for
a legitimate computer repair company in Los Angeles. I suspect that the
scammers had hacked or hijacked this number so that calls were routed to
their offshore base of operations instead of the real company. So checking
the 800 number on Google may not be very helpful. Some tech experts actually
suggest calling the police if you experience such a ransomware attack. Can
you imagine anything so stupid? You call your local police precinct,
explain your situation to the desk sargeant, and he tells you, sorry
pal,can't help you. We have more important things to worry about like
solving murders and getting dangerous criminals off the streets. And if you
call 911, the dispatcher will probably send a pair of cops to your home to
arrestyou for reporting an emergency that is not life-threatening and
wasting their time. Call the FBI? What can they do if the scammers are
located overseas, well out of reach of the long arm of the law. There's
always Interpol, but my image of them comes from James Bond movies where
they are portrayed as a bunch of inept stuffed shirts who run around Europe
in Giorgio Armani suits and spend most of their time in Monte Carlo casinos
looking for blackjack cheaters. So there is really no place to turn.

Gerald




-----Original Message-----
From: Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 12:08 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

Hi John: Did you try copying that number to the clipboard and searching the
web to see if it's legit/

Hope your system is okay.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of John
Doering
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 5:07 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Spyware

Hello:

When surfing the web last night, I entered on a link and got a pop up window
that stated Windows detected my system was attacked by spyware. It stated
the spyware was now stealing my credit card numbers, passwords, and the
rest. It also stated this verbally in a female voice with what sounded like
a British accent. It demanded that I call Microsoft at an 800 number it
provided. It also stated that if I closed the window without calling that
Microsoft 800 number, Microsoft would to protect their system disable my IP
address.

I never trust pop ups from the web so tried to close the window without
success. I then shut down my system, but when I powered back up the pop up
came up again. This time though, I was able to close the window. I ran a
virus scan with Windows Defender and there were threats found. I entered on
the take action link and let it run its course. I then ran MRT.exe which
found nothing. Then I shut down the system and have not started it since.
Keep your fingers crossed that it is gone when I power up.

For your information, I am sending this message from my work computer, so
should not be infected.

Has anyone heard of this and is the 800 number legit?

Any help would be appreciated.



Thankyou,





John Doering

Administrative Pricing Specialist


p. 414-778-3040 Ext 4063 t. 800-642-8778 f. 414-778-3392



NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any document attached
hereto is intended only for the named recipient(s). If you are not the
intended recipient, nor the employee or agent responsible for delivering
this message in confidence to the intended recipient(s), you are hereby
notified that you have received this transmittal in error, and any review,
dissemination, distribution or copying of this transmittal or its
attachments is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmittal
and/or attachments in error, please notify me immediately by reply e-mail
and then delete this message, including any attachments.















moderated Re: Spyware

Gudrun Brunot
 

Which she richly deserves. I've had great experience with the Microsoft
Disability Answer desk, but it is a gamble, I know. Sometiems, I get someone
who is very well-meaning, but getting the right info across can require a
bit of patience. Other times, I get someone that makes me feel like "Ah,
wow, I'm in safe hands that will guide me and my computer out of this
hell..." Still, haven't run across a bad one yet.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of David &
his pack of dogs
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 10:28 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

Gerald, There was a news item where computer scamming was close to the top
of crimes. So, sorry to ruin your fun however, computer scams would not be
ignored. Smile. I should also jump in here. Just because you call the MS
help desk, does not insure you get qualified help. It is rare however, I
have experienced first hand a person there who kept giving me sighted
directions even though I told her I was using JAWS as a screen reader and
had a vision problem. Comments such as, "You see that red X in the top of
the screen? ?Click on it. Or, click on the yellow ? on the bottom of your
screen." When she asked for me to maximize the screen. I told her I was
not sure how to do that. Her response, "You see the yellow ? at the bottom
of the screen, click on that." Now she keeps calling me for a follow up
even though the problem has long been solved by level 2 techs. She even
called during the window of time they gave me to call me on this problem.
Yes, I have given her a scathing review on the feedback email I was sent by
Microsoft. At least I think it was Microsoft. Grin.



-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: April 3, 2018 10:12 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware


When I experienced the ransomware attack I described previously, I Googled
the 800 number I called and discovered that it was supposedly the number for
a legitimate computer repair company in Los Angeles. I suspect that the
scammers had hacked or hijacked this number so that calls were routed to
their offshore base of operations instead of the real company. So checking
the 800 number on Google may not be very helpful. Some tech experts actually
suggest calling the police if you experience such a ransomware attack. Can
you imagine anything so stupid? You call your local police precinct,
explain your situation to the desk sargeant, and he tells you, sorry
pal,can't help you. We have more important things to worry about like
solving murders and getting dangerous criminals off the streets. And if you
call 911, the dispatcher will probably send a pair of cops to your home to
arrestyou for reporting an emergency that is not life-threatening and
wasting their time. Call the FBI? What can they do if the scammers are
located overseas, well out of reach of the long arm of the law. There's
always Interpol, but my image of them comes from James Bond movies where
they are portrayed as a bunch of inept stuffed shirts who run around Europe
in Giorgio Armani suits and spend most of their time in Monte Carlo casinos
looking for blackjack cheaters. So there is really no place to turn.

Gerald




-----Original Message-----
From: Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 12:08 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

Hi John: Did you try copying that number to the clipboard and searching the
web to see if it's legit/

Hope your system is okay.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of John
Doering
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 5:07 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Spyware

Hello:

When surfing the web last night, I entered on a link and got a pop up window
that stated Windows detected my system was attacked by spyware. It stated
the spyware was now stealing my credit card numbers, passwords, and the
rest. It also stated this verbally in a female voice with what sounded like
a British accent. It demanded that I call Microsoft at an 800 number it
provided. It also stated that if I closed the window without calling that
Microsoft 800 number, Microsoft would to protect their system disable my IP
address.

I never trust pop ups from the web so tried to close the window without
success. I then shut down my system, but when I powered back up the pop up
came up again. This time though, I was able to close the window. I ran a
virus scan with Windows Defender and there were threats found. I entered on
the take action link and let it run its course. I then ran MRT.exe which
found nothing. Then I shut down the system and have not started it since.
Keep your fingers crossed that it is gone when I power up.

For your information, I am sending this message from my work computer, so
should not be infected.

Has anyone heard of this and is the 800 number legit?

Any help would be appreciated.



Thankyou,





John Doering

Administrative Pricing Specialist


p. 414-778-3040 Ext 4063 t. 800-642-8778 f. 414-778-3392



NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any document attached
hereto is intended only for the named recipient(s). If you are not the
intended recipient, nor the employee or agent responsible for delivering
this message in confidence to the intended recipient(s), you are hereby
notified that you have received this transmittal in error, and any review,
dissemination, distribution or copying of this transmittal or its
attachments is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmittal
and/or attachments in error, please notify me immediately by reply e-mail
and then delete this message, including any attachments.


moderated Re: Spyware

 

Gerald,

You can be sure that a police department like the NYPD has a large department entirely dedicated to this sort of stuff so I wouldn't dismiss this. If you were living in a one-horse town somewhere in the midwest with a relatively low crime rate (except for the occasional mass school or church shooting) then maybe the police there would be much less able to help. Having said this, apart from reporting it I agree that the police probably won't be able to do much especially if you already fell for the scam and paid. Glad you were able to get your money back from Paypal.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 11:11 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware


But if you live in a large city like New York, the local police are unlikely to get involved in petty computer crime unless you are threatened with physical violence if you refuse to pay the scammers' ransom demands. And the FBI probably gets deluged with ransomware and spyware attack reports every day, but is apparently powerless to prevent them. After all, if a hostile foreign government can hack into Facebook and affect the outcome of a presidential election,evading FBI scrutiny, how can we individual computer users feel safe?

Gerald



-----Original Message-----
From: David & his pack of dogs
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 1:27 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

Gerald, There was a news item where computer scamming was close to the top
of crimes. So, sorry to ruin your fun however, computer scams would not be
ignored. Smile. I should also jump in here. Just because you call the MS
help desk, does not insure you get qualified help. It is rare however, I
have experienced first hand a person there who kept giving me sighted
directions even though I told her I was using JAWS as a screen reader and
had a vision problem. Comments such as, "You see that red X in the top of
the screen? ?Click on it. Or, click on the yellow ? on the bottom of your
screen." When she asked for me to maximize the screen. I told her I was
not sure how to do that. Her response, "You see the yellow ? at the bottom
of the screen, click on that." Now she keeps calling me for a follow up
even though the problem has long been solved by level 2 techs. She even
called during the window of time they gave me to call me on this problem.
Yes, I have given her a scathing review on the feedback email I was sent by
Microsoft. At least I think it was Microsoft. Grin.



-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: April 3, 2018 10:12 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware


When I experienced the ransomware attack I described previously, I Googled
the 800 number I called and discovered that it was supposedly the number for
a legitimate computer repair company in Los Angeles. I suspect that the
scammers had hacked or hijacked this number so that calls were routed to
their offshore base of operations instead of the real company. So checking
the 800 number on Google may not be very helpful. Some tech experts actually
suggest calling the police if you experience such a ransomware attack. Can
you imagine anything so stupid? You call your local police precinct,
explain your situation to the desk sargeant, and he tells you, sorry
pal,can't help you. We have more important things to worry about like
solving murders and getting dangerous criminals off the streets. And if you
call 911, the dispatcher will probably send a pair of cops to your home to
arrestyou for reporting an emergency that is not life-threatening and
wasting their time. Call the FBI? What can they do if the scammers are
located overseas, well out of reach of the long arm of the law. There's
always Interpol, but my image of them comes from James Bond movies where
they are portrayed as a bunch of inept stuffed shirts who run around Europe
in Giorgio Armani suits and spend most of their time in Monte Carlo casinos
looking for blackjack cheaters. So there is really no place to turn.

Gerald




-----Original Message-----
From: Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 12:08 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

Hi John: Did you try copying that number to the clipboard and searching the
web to see if it's legit/

Hope your system is okay.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of John
Doering
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 5:07 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Spyware

Hello:

When surfing the web last night, I entered on a link and got a pop up window
that stated Windows detected my system was attacked by spyware. It stated
the spyware was now stealing my credit card numbers, passwords, and the
rest. It also stated this verbally in a female voice with what sounded like
a British accent. It demanded that I call Microsoft at an 800 number it
provided. It also stated that if I closed the window without calling that
Microsoft 800 number, Microsoft would to protect their system disable my IP
address.

I never trust pop ups from the web so tried to close the window without
success. I then shut down my system, but when I powered back up the pop up
came up again. This time though, I was able to close the window. I ran a
virus scan with Windows Defender and there were threats found. I entered on
the take action link and let it run its course. I then ran MRT.exe which
found nothing. Then I shut down the system and have not started it since.
Keep your fingers crossed that it is gone when I power up.

For your information, I am sending this message from my work computer, so
should not be infected.

Has anyone heard of this and is the 800 number legit?

Any help would be appreciated.



Thankyou,





John Doering

Administrative Pricing Specialist


p. 414-778-3040 Ext 4063 t. 800-642-8778 f. 414-778-3392



NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any document attached
hereto is intended only for the named recipient(s). If you are not the
intended recipient, nor the employee or agent responsible for delivering
this message in confidence to the intended recipient(s), you are hereby
notified that you have received this transmittal in error, and any review,
dissemination, distribution or copying of this transmittal or its
attachments is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmittal
and/or attachments in error, please notify me immediately by reply e-mail
and then delete this message, including any attachments.


moderated Re: Becky email problem

 

OK, thanks for the info, no need for me to pay for another email application. I use Office 365 for my business and that includes Outlook as well as all the other Office applications.
Occasionally Microsoft is known to push an update which breaks something, but for the most part Outlook works extremely well for me.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mike Rogers
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 11:18 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Becky email problem

Becky is an email program like Outlook. You can check it out, by googling Becky email program. It costs $40 and I've been using it for years. Works well, but there are a couple things to uncheck after installation, that allows it to work with screenreaders.

********************************

www.harmonicaworkshops.com



On Tue, 3 Apr 2018 16:35:53 +0000
"Sieghard Weitzel" <sieghard@live.ca> wrote:

What on earth is "becky" email?

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mike Rogers
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 8:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Becky email problem

When I try to read a reply that I'm writing, only part of the message shows up being read by the screenreader. It appears to be a problem in Becky, as this happens with Jaws and Window Eyes. Any suggestions?

********************************

www.harmonicaworkshops.com








moderated Re: FW: configuring Outlook 2016 with an Outlook.com account

Mario
 

that's good news. thanks Richard and Tim.

-------- Original Message --------
From: Richard Turner [mailto:richardturner42@outlook.com]
Sent: Tuesday, Apr 3, 2018 9:49 AM EST
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: FW: configuring Outlook 2016 with an Outlook.com account

Greetings,
I had forwarded a message from this list to a contact I have with the
Microsoft Accessibility team. The director of that team's Enterprise
department that works with businesses/agencies like the one I work for.

I had received a prompt response from him and he copied his team.
One of them just reached out to me to let me know that the issue has
been resolved. This was concerning the mysterious pop-up window that
seems to be invisable to screen readers.
I've copied the text of this latest response, followed by the original
message to the list that I had forwarded to Microsoft.
Hi Richard,

I am from the enterprise Disability Answer Desk.

From searching my email, it appears that I haven't touched base with
you before today--and I apologize for that oversight.

I wanted to let you know that this issue has been fixed and it will
slowly make its way to all Office 365 subscribers. It also should be
available in the Office 2013 and Office 2016 version that is not the
monthly subscription builds.

Should you have any questions, don't hesitate to let me know.

Tim

From the director:

Thank you so much for sending the note and letting me know. We were
recently alerted to the issue and please be assured we are working as
fast as we can to fix it. The ability to add an account just needs to
work, there's no question.
-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mario
Sent: Saturday, February 24, 2018 1:18 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: configuring Outlook 2016 with an Outlook.com account

for anyone interested, the solution to the subject is there is a window
that pops up (that appears in Windows, not Outlook) that asks for your
account address and password that is not detected or accessible with
either JAWS, NVDA or Narrator.

after starting Outlook, the configuration wizard comes up to setup the
default profile to establish a connection and retrieve your email.
activate the yes buttons for the first two dialog and type in your name,
account address, password, and again to confirm the password is correct,
and finally activate the next button. once the mysterious window asking
for your address, password and activating the next/OK button is accessed
and completed, Outlook 2016 will connect with the account.

as far as I can tell this frustrating experience occurs if Outlook 2016
is operated in Windows 10. I'm not sure if this also occurs in Windows 7
(probably not).

so, if you have an Outlook.com account that you'd like to use with
Outlook 2016 (and possibly 2013) you will need sighted assistance. grrr.

End of forwards.

HTH,
Richard


moderated Re: Becky email problem

Mike Rogers
 

Becky is an email program like Outlook. You can check it out, by googling Becky email program. It costs $40 and I've been using it for years. Works well, but there are a couple things to uncheck after installation, that allows it to work with screenreaders.

********************************

www.harmonicaworkshops.com



On Tue, 3 Apr 2018 16:35:53 +0000
"Sieghard Weitzel" <sieghard@live.ca> wrote:

What on earth is "becky" email?

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mike Rogers
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 8:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Becky email problem

When I try to read a reply that I'm writing, only part of the message shows up being read by the screenreader. It appears to be a problem in Becky, as this happens with Jaws and Window Eyes. Any suggestions?

********************************

www.harmonicaworkshops.com








moderated Re: Spyware

Gerald Levy
 

But if you live in a large city like New York, the local police are unlikely to get involved in petty computer crime unless you are threatened with physical violence if you refuse to pay the scammers' ransom demands. And the FBI probably gets deluged with ransomware and spyware attack reports every day, but is apparently powerless to prevent them. After all, if a hostile foreign government can hack into Facebook and affect the outcome of a presidential election,evading FBI scrutiny, how can we individual computer users feel safe?

Gerald

-----Original Message-----
From: David & his pack of dogs
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 1:27 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

Gerald, There was a news item where computer scamming was close to the top
of crimes. So, sorry to ruin your fun however, computer scams would not be
ignored. Smile. I should also jump in here. Just because you call the MS
help desk, does not insure you get qualified help. It is rare however, I
have experienced first hand a person there who kept giving me sighted
directions even though I told her I was using JAWS as a screen reader and
had a vision problem. Comments such as, "You see that red X in the top of
the screen? ?Click on it. Or, click on the yellow ? on the bottom of your
screen." When she asked for me to maximize the screen. I told her I was
not sure how to do that. Her response, "You see the yellow ? at the bottom
of the screen, click on that." Now she keeps calling me for a follow up
even though the problem has long been solved by level 2 techs. She even
called during the window of time they gave me to call me on this problem.
Yes, I have given her a scathing review on the feedback email I was sent by
Microsoft. At least I think it was Microsoft. Grin.



-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: April 3, 2018 10:12 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware


When I experienced the ransomware attack I described previously, I Googled
the 800 number I called and discovered that it was supposedly the number for
a legitimate computer repair company in Los Angeles. I suspect that the
scammers had hacked or hijacked this number so that calls were routed to
their offshore base of operations instead of the real company. So checking
the 800 number on Google may not be very helpful. Some tech experts actually
suggest calling the police if you experience such a ransomware attack. Can
you imagine anything so stupid? You call your local police precinct,
explain your situation to the desk sargeant, and he tells you, sorry
pal,can't help you. We have more important things to worry about like
solving murders and getting dangerous criminals off the streets. And if you
call 911, the dispatcher will probably send a pair of cops to your home to
arrestyou for reporting an emergency that is not life-threatening and
wasting their time. Call the FBI? What can they do if the scammers are
located overseas, well out of reach of the long arm of the law. There's
always Interpol, but my image of them comes from James Bond movies where
they are portrayed as a bunch of inept stuffed shirts who run around Europe
in Giorgio Armani suits and spend most of their time in Monte Carlo casinos
looking for blackjack cheaters. So there is really no place to turn.

Gerald




-----Original Message-----
From: Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 12:08 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

Hi John: Did you try copying that number to the clipboard and searching the
web to see if it's legit/

Hope your system is okay.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of John
Doering
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 5:07 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Spyware

Hello:

When surfing the web last night, I entered on a link and got a pop up window
that stated Windows detected my system was attacked by spyware. It stated
the spyware was now stealing my credit card numbers, passwords, and the
rest. It also stated this verbally in a female voice with what sounded like
a British accent. It demanded that I call Microsoft at an 800 number it
provided. It also stated that if I closed the window without calling that
Microsoft 800 number, Microsoft would to protect their system disable my IP
address.

I never trust pop ups from the web so tried to close the window without
success. I then shut down my system, but when I powered back up the pop up
came up again. This time though, I was able to close the window. I ran a
virus scan with Windows Defender and there were threats found. I entered on
the take action link and let it run its course. I then ran MRT.exe which
found nothing. Then I shut down the system and have not started it since.
Keep your fingers crossed that it is gone when I power up.

For your information, I am sending this message from my work computer, so
should not be infected.

Has anyone heard of this and is the 800 number legit?

Any help would be appreciated.



Thankyou,





John Doering

Administrative Pricing Specialist


p. 414-778-3040 Ext 4063 t. 800-642-8778 f. 414-778-3392



NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any document attached
hereto is intended only for the named recipient(s). If you are not the
intended recipient, nor the employee or agent responsible for delivering
this message in confidence to the intended recipient(s), you are hereby
notified that you have received this transmittal in error, and any review,
dissemination, distribution or copying of this transmittal or its
attachments is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmittal
and/or attachments in error, please notify me immediately by reply e-mail
and then delete this message, including any attachments.


moderated Re: JAWS 18.0.4354 - Navigation issue within JAWS itself

Dan Longmore
 

Hi, What happens when you use the JAWS cursor?  Also, JAWS and Excel have ongoing issues and to date JAWS seems unable to resolve them.  Their one resolve is to run a “Repair” and sometimes this fixes it for awhile.  Also, if you are using Excel with Office 365  there are ongoing Microsoft updates that ruin what JAWS seems to fix.

 

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, April 3, 2018 1:41 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: JAWS 18.0.4354 - Navigation issue within JAWS itself

 

I am currently working with a client and am encountering an issue that I never recall having had before.   We are working with MS-Excel, but it's JAWS that's being problematic.

If we open the JAWS Verbosity Menu and then do a search for "Column" and get to the "Column Titles to Row Range Set" item, I cannot manage to get over into the actual options for that item regardless of what keyboard shortcut I'm trying.  Tab doesn't do it, the right arrow key doesn't do it, CTRL or INS plus those don't do it.   How on earth does one shift one's focus over to the controls for a given MS-Office in JAWS settings dialog?

I'm also having the same issue in JAWS help, where we can search and get the correct item coming up with focus on it, but I then cannot throw focus off of the item in the tree to its individual controls.

Any assistance would be appreciated.

--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1709, Build 16299  (dot level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

 
If you don't like someone, the way he holds his spoon will make you furious; if you do like him, he can turn his plate over into your lap and you won't mind.     ~ Irving Becker


moderated JAWS 18.0.4354 - Navigation issue within JAWS itself

 

I am currently working with a client and am encountering an issue that I never recall having had before.   We are working with MS-Excel, but it's JAWS that's being problematic.

If we open the JAWS Verbosity Menu and then do a search for "Column" and get to the "Column Titles to Row Range Set" item, I cannot manage to get over into the actual options for that item regardless of what keyboard shortcut I'm trying.  Tab doesn't do it, the right arrow key doesn't do it, CTRL or INS plus those don't do it.   How on earth does one shift one's focus over to the controls for a given MS-Office in JAWS settings dialog?

I'm also having the same issue in JAWS help, where we can search and get the correct item coming up with focus on it, but I then cannot throw focus off of the item in the tree to its individual controls.

Any assistance would be appreciated.

--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1709, Build 16299  (dot level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

 
If you don't like someone, the way he holds his spoon will make you furious; if you do like him, he can turn his plate over into your lap and you won't mind.     ~ Irving Becker


moderated Re: Spyware

David & his pack of dogs
 

Gerald, There was a news item where computer scamming was close to the top
of crimes. So, sorry to ruin your fun however, computer scams would not be
ignored. Smile. I should also jump in here. Just because you call the MS
help desk, does not insure you get qualified help. It is rare however, I
have experienced first hand a person there who kept giving me sighted
directions even though I told her I was using JAWS as a screen reader and
had a vision problem. Comments such as, "You see that red X in the top of
the screen? ?Click on it. Or, click on the yellow ? on the bottom of your
screen." When she asked for me to maximize the screen. I told her I was
not sure how to do that. Her response, "You see the yellow ? at the bottom
of the screen, click on that." Now she keeps calling me for a follow up
even though the problem has long been solved by level 2 techs. She even
called during the window of time they gave me to call me on this problem.
Yes, I have given her a scathing review on the feedback email I was sent by
Microsoft. At least I think it was Microsoft. Grin.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gerald Levy
Sent: April 3, 2018 10:12 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware


When I experienced the ransomware attack I described previously, I Googled
the 800 number I called and discovered that it was supposedly the number for
a legitimate computer repair company in Los Angeles. I suspect that the
scammers had hacked or hijacked this number so that calls were routed to
their offshore base of operations instead of the real company. So checking
the 800 number on Google may not be very helpful. Some tech experts actually
suggest calling the police if you experience such a ransomware attack. Can
you imagine anything so stupid? You call your local police precinct,
explain your situation to the desk sargeant, and he tells you, sorry
pal,can't help you. We have more important things to worry about like
solving murders and getting dangerous criminals off the streets. And if you
call 911, the dispatcher will probably send a pair of cops to your home to
arrestyou for reporting an emergency that is not life-threatening and
wasting their time. Call the FBI? What can they do if the scammers are
located overseas, well out of reach of the long arm of the law. There's
always Interpol, but my image of them comes from James Bond movies where
they are portrayed as a bunch of inept stuffed shirts who run around Europe
in Giorgio Armani suits and spend most of their time in Monte Carlo casinos
looking for blackjack cheaters. So there is really no place to turn.

Gerald




-----Original Message-----
From: Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 12:08 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

Hi John: Did you try copying that number to the clipboard and searching the
web to see if it's legit/

Hope your system is okay.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of John
Doering
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 5:07 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Spyware

Hello:

When surfing the web last night, I entered on a link and got a pop up window
that stated Windows detected my system was attacked by spyware. It stated
the spyware was now stealing my credit card numbers, passwords, and the
rest. It also stated this verbally in a female voice with what sounded like
a British accent. It demanded that I call Microsoft at an 800 number it
provided. It also stated that if I closed the window without calling that
Microsoft 800 number, Microsoft would to protect their system disable my IP
address.

I never trust pop ups from the web so tried to close the window without
success. I then shut down my system, but when I powered back up the pop up
came up again. This time though, I was able to close the window. I ran a
virus scan with Windows Defender and there were threats found. I entered on
the take action link and let it run its course. I then ran MRT.exe which
found nothing. Then I shut down the system and have not started it since.
Keep your fingers crossed that it is gone when I power up.

For your information, I am sending this message from my work computer, so
should not be infected.

Has anyone heard of this and is the 800 number legit?

Any help would be appreciated.



Thankyou,





John Doering

Administrative Pricing Specialist


p. 414-778-3040 Ext 4063 t. 800-642-8778 f. 414-778-3392



NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any document attached
hereto is intended only for the named recipient(s). If you are not the
intended recipient, nor the employee or agent responsible for delivering
this message in confidence to the intended recipient(s), you are hereby
notified that you have received this transmittal in error, and any review,
dissemination, distribution or copying of this transmittal or its
attachments is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmittal
and/or attachments in error, please notify me immediately by reply e-mail
and then delete this message, including any attachments.


moderated Re: Spyware

Gerald Levy
 

When I experienced the ransomware attack I described previously, I Googled the 800 number I called and discovered that it was supposedly the number for a legitimate computer repair company in Los Angeles. I suspect that the scammers had hacked or hijacked this number so that calls were routed to their offshore base of operations instead of the real company. So checking the 800 number on Google may not be very helpful. Some tech experts actually suggest calling the police if you experience such a ransomware attack. Can you imagine anything so stupid? You call your local police precinct, explain your situation to the desk sargeant, and he tells you, sorry pal,can't help you. We have more important things to worry about like solving murders and getting dangerous criminals off the streets. And if you call 911, the dispatcher will probably send a pair of cops to your home to arrestyou for reporting an emergency that is not life-threatening and wasting their time. Call the FBI? What can they do if the scammers are located overseas, well out of reach of the long arm of the law. There's always Interpol, but my image of them comes from James Bond movies where they are portrayed as a bunch of inept stuffed shirts who run around Europe in Giorgio Armani suits and spend most of their time in Monte Carlo casinos looking for blackjack cheaters. So there is really no place to turn.

Gerald

-----Original Message-----
From: Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 12:08 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

Hi John: Did you try copying that number to the clipboard and searching the
web to see if it's legit/

Hope your system is okay.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of John
Doering
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 5:07 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Spyware

Hello:

When surfing the web last night, I entered on a link and got a pop up window
that stated Windows detected my system was attacked by spyware. It stated
the spyware was now stealing my credit card numbers, passwords, and the
rest. It also stated this verbally in a female voice with what sounded like
a British accent. It demanded that I call Microsoft at an 800 number it
provided. It also stated that if I closed the window without calling that
Microsoft 800 number, Microsoft would to protect their system disable my IP
address.

I never trust pop ups from the web so tried to close the window without
success. I then shut down my system, but when I powered back up the pop up
came up again. This time though, I was able to close the window. I ran a
virus scan with Windows Defender and there were threats found. I entered on
the take action link and let it run its course. I then ran MRT.exe which
found nothing. Then I shut down the system and have not started it since.
Keep your fingers crossed that it is gone when I power up.

For your information, I am sending this message from my work computer, so
should not be infected.

Has anyone heard of this and is the 800 number legit?

Any help would be appreciated.



Thankyou,





John Doering

Administrative Pricing Specialist


p. 414-778-3040 Ext 4063 t. 800-642-8778 f. 414-778-3392



NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any document attached
hereto is intended only for the named recipient(s). If you are not the
intended recipient, nor the employee or agent responsible for delivering
this message in confidence to the intended recipient(s), you are hereby
notified that you have received this transmittal in error, and any review,
dissemination, distribution or copying of this transmittal or its
attachments is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmittal
and/or attachments in error, please notify me immediately by reply e-mail
and then delete this message, including any attachments.


moderated Re: Becky email problem

Marten Post Uiterweer
 

Hi Mike,

Look if the window is maximized.
Check also of reference view is unchecked.
To to tools, general, tabcontrol Citation
This must be unchecked.

Regards, Marten

On Tue, 03 Apr 2018 11:25:51 -0400 "Mike Rogers" <harpman9@gmail.com> wrote:

When I try to read a reply that I'm writing, only part of the message shows up being read by the screenreader. It appears to be a problem in Becky, as this happens with Jaws and Window Eyes. Any suggestions?

********************************

www.harmonicaworkshops.com





moderated Re: Becky email problem

 

What on earth is "becky" email?

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mike Rogers
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 8:26 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Becky email problem

When I try to read a reply that I'm writing, only part of the message shows up being read by the screenreader. It appears to be a problem in Becky, as this happens with Jaws and Window Eyes. Any suggestions?

********************************

www.harmonicaworkshops.com


moderated Re: Spyware

 

I haven't heard that trying to close the window actually triggers the install, I'd like to know where this information comes from, but who knows. I'm not saying it's not so, but just that I keep pretty current on these things and haven't come across this statement/claim before.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gudrun Brunot
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 9:20 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

That was news to me! Great suggestion.



Gudrun


-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of netbat66
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 8:11 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

most of the time when you press alt f4, click on close, cancel etc. this will install the spyware.
you should not click on anything and turn the computer off with the power button.
without even trying to close it.
if you are realy infected, the only way you would be sure it is gone is to wipe the drive and re install windows from scratch.
or use a known good backup.




-----Original Message-----
From: Gerald Levy
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 6:07 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware



This happened to me a few months ago. I was surfing the web for more information about Spectrum Internet service, and when I clicked on the link for a seemingly innocent web site, all of a sudden,a window popped up and a message in a synthesized female voice with a British accent started playing over and over warning ominously that my computer had been taken over, and that if I wanted to have it restored to normal, I needed to call an 800 number. The message would not stop repeating itself, and I could not close the window to get rid of it. And I discovered to my horror that my computer had been frozen.
I could not access my desktop or start menu or launch any programs. I could not access any files or folders. I could not even bring up the shutdown menu to shut down my computer, and I was afraid that if I tried to perform a hard shut down by pressing and holding the power button, my computer would not boot up when I pressed the power button again. I figured that this was some kind of ransomware attack, so in a panic, I called the 800 number that the message kept repeating and was greeted by some scammer with a Nigerian accent who calmly told me that if I wanted my computer restored to normal,he would be glad to fix it for $150. When I agreed to send $150 to some offshore account using PayPal, the guy proceeded to “fix” my computer. I was scared sh-tless that my computer would never work again, but to my great relief, when I rebooted as the scammer instructed, everything was back to normal. I ran full scans using MSE and Malware Bytes, and everything came up clean. Fortunately, I got the last laugh because I immediately contacted PayPal which cancelled the transaction, so that the scammer never received a dime of my money. These scanners can apparently circumvent even the most effective anti-malware programs, and no matter how careful you are, this can happen suddenly and unexpectedly without warning. It is really scary.

Gerald



From: John Doering
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 8:07 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Spyware


Hello:

When surfing the web last night, I entered on a link and got a pop up window that stated Windows detected my system was attacked by spyware. It stated the spyware was now stealing my credit card numbers, passwords, and the rest. It also stated this verbally in a female voice with what sounded like a British accent. It demanded that I call Microsoft at an 800 number it provided. It also stated that if I closed the window without calling that Microsoft 800 number, Microsoft would to protect their system disable my IP address.

I never trust pop ups from the web so tried to close the window without success. I then shut down my system, but when I powered back up the pop up came up again. This time though, I was able to close the window. I ran a virus scan with Windows Defender and there were threats found. I entered on the take action link and let it run its course. I then ran MRT.exe which found nothing. Then I shut down the system and have not started it since. Keep your fingers crossed that it is gone when I power up.

For your information, I am sending this message from my work computer, so should not be infected.

Has anyone heard of this and is the 800 number legit?

Any help would be appreciated.



Thankyou,







John Doering

Administrative Pricing Specialist


p. 414-778-3040 Ext 4063 t. 800-642-8778 f. 414-778-3392















NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any document attached hereto is intended only for the named recipient(s). If you are not the intended recipient, nor the employee or agent responsible for delivering this message in confidence to the intended recipient(s), you are hereby notified that you have received this transmittal in error, and any review, dissemination, distribution or copying of this transmittal or its attachments is strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmittal and/or attachments in error, please notify me immediately by reply e-mail and then delete this message, including any attachments.


moderated Re: Spyware

Val Paul
 

you are a winder uper!

Good on you, keep them going, then drop them like a stone!

LOVE IT!


Val.

On 03/04/2018 16:29, paul lemm wrote:

Hi,

Yeah, I’ve had a couple of these calls come through, I love letting them go through their speel  about microsoft noticing I have an issue, then tell them I’ve got a MAC! Haha, I don’t actually have a mac, its just fun winding them up!. To be fair though the honest truth is you have to remember Microsoft are simply a company that supply your operating system and have no way of detecting if you have a problem or a virus, and even if they did they wouldn’t contact everyone about virus’s on their PC’s since it would take thousands upon thousands of manpower  hours to do and since they are only the providers of operating system its not something that has anything to do with them , so even if they could detect it they still wouldn’t contact you , that is what your anti-virus software is for.

Paul

*From:*main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] *On Behalf Of *Sieghard Weitzel
*Sent:* 03 April 2018 16:03
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: Spyware

Something like that is absolutely definitely not for real. If you had called this line they would have probably asked you to connect them to your computer to fix “the issue” and next thing you wold have been told that your computer was now encryped and if you want  it back you need to send them whatever amount of money.

I have even recceived phone calls where the person (usually with a heavy accent) was claiming to be from Microsoft and I urgently needed to give them access to my computer because they had detected it was infected by a bad virus… I usually have a bit of fun with these idiots before hanging up on them, some of them get outright nasty and threaten that I would get arrested if I don’t cooperate etc. Very funny.

*From:*main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io> <main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>> *On Behalf Of *Richard Turner
*Sent:* Tuesday, April 3, 2018 5:25 AM
*To:* main@jfw.groups.io <mailto:main@jfw.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: Spyware

John,

If you know the 800 number, you could Google it from your work computer to find out if it is for real, which I highly doubt.

But, I'd call Microsoft accessibility: 800-936-5900 from before turning on the computer. Ideally, from a speaker phone so when you turn it on, if the pop-up comes up they can hear it.

HTH,

Richard

“The secret is not to make your music louder, but to make the world quieter.”

- Mitch _Albom_ from The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto, page 1


On Apr 3, 2018, at 5:07 AM, John Doering <john.doering@ibsupply.com <mailto:john.doering@ibsupply.com>> wrote:

Hello:

When surfing the web last night, I entered on a link and got a pop
up window that stated Windows detected my system was attacked by
spyware.  It stated the spyware was now stealing my credit card
numbers, passwords, and the rest.  It also stated this verbally in
a female voice with what sounded like a British accent.  It
demanded that I call Microsoft at an 800 number it provided.  It
also stated that if I closed the window without calling that
Microsoft 800 number, Microsoft would to protect their system
disable my IP address.

I never trust pop ups from the web so tried to close the window
without success.  I then shut down my system, but when I powered
back up the pop up came up again.  This time though, I was able to
close the window.  I ran a  virus scan with Windows Defender and
there were threats found.  I entered on the take action link and
let it run its course.  I then ran MRT.exe which found nothing. 
Then I shut down the system and have not started it since. Keep
your fingers crossed that it is gone when I power up.

For your information, I am sending this message from my work
computer, so should not be infected.

Has anyone heard of this and is the 800 number legit?

Any help would be appreciated.

Thankyou,

*John Doering*

Administrative Pricing Specialist**

**

*p. **414-778-3040 Ext 4063****t. **800-642-8778
**f.** 414-778-3392*****

NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any document
attached hereto is intended only for the named recipient(s). If
you are not the intended recipient, nor the employee or agent
responsible for delivering this message in confidence to the
intended recipient(s), you are hereby notified that you have
received this transmittal in error, and any review, dissemination,
distribution or copying of this transmittal or its attachments is
strictly prohibited. If you have received this transmittal and/or
attachments in error, please notify me immediately by reply e-mail
and then delete this message, including any attachments.


moderated Re: Spyware

Gudrun Brunot
 

That was news to me! Great suggestion.



Gudrun

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of netbat66
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 8:11 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware

most of the time when you press alt f4, click on close, cancel etc. this will install the spyware.
you should not click on anything and turn the computer off with the power button.
without even trying to close it.
if you are realy infected, the only way you would be sure it is gone is to wipe the drive and re install windows from scratch.
or use a known good backup.




-----Original Message-----
From: Gerald Levy
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 6:07 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Spyware



This happened to me a few months ago. I was surfing the web for more
information about Spectrum Internet service, and when I clicked on the link for
a seemingly innocent web site, all of a sudden,a window popped up and a message
in a synthesized female voice with a British accent started playing over and
over warning ominously that my computer had been taken over, and that if I
wanted to have it restored to normal, I needed to call an 800 number. The
message would not stop repeating itself, and I could not close the window to
get rid of it. And I discovered to my horror that my computer had been frozen.
I could not access my desktop or start menu or launch any programs. I could
not access any files or folders. I could not even bring up the shutdown menu
to shut down my computer, and I was afraid that if I tried to perform a hard
shut down by pressing and holding the power button, my computer would not boot
up when I pressed the power button again. I figured that this was some kind of
ransomware attack, so in a panic, I called the 800 number that the message kept
repeating and was greeted by some scammer with a Nigerian accent who calmly
told me that if I wanted my computer restored to normal,he would be glad to fix
it for $150. When I agreed to send $150 to some offshore account using PayPal,
the guy proceeded to “fix” my computer. I was scared sh-tless that my computer
would never work again, but to my great relief, when I rebooted as the scammer
instructed, everything was back to normal. I ran full scans using MSE and
Malware Bytes, and everything came up clean. Fortunately, I got the last laugh
because I immediately contacted PayPal which cancelled the transaction, so that
the scammer never received a dime of my money. These scanners can apparently
circumvent even the most effective anti-malware programs, and no matter how
careful you are, this can happen suddenly and unexpectedly without warning. It
is really scary.

Gerald



From: John Doering
Sent: Tuesday, April 03, 2018 8:07 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Spyware


Hello:

When surfing the web last night, I entered on a link and got a pop up window
that stated Windows detected my system was attacked by spyware. It stated the
spyware was now stealing my credit card numbers, passwords, and the rest. It
also stated this verbally in a female voice with what sounded like a British
accent. It demanded that I call Microsoft at an 800 number it provided. It
also stated that if I closed the window without calling that Microsoft 800
number, Microsoft would to protect their system disable my IP address.

I never trust pop ups from the web so tried to close the window without
success. I then shut down my system, but when I powered back up the pop up
came up again. This time though, I was able to close the window. I ran a
virus scan with Windows Defender and there were threats found. I entered on
the take action link and let it run its course. I then ran MRT.exe which found
nothing. Then I shut down the system and have not started it since. Keep your
fingers crossed that it is gone when I power up.

For your information, I am sending this message from my work computer, so
should not be infected.

Has anyone heard of this and is the 800 number legit?

Any help would be appreciated.



Thankyou,







John Doering

Administrative Pricing Specialist


p. 414-778-3040 Ext 4063 t. 800-642-8778 f. 414-778-3392















NOTICE: The information contained in this email and any document attached
hereto is intended only for the named recipient(s). If you are not the intended
recipient, nor the employee or agent responsible for delivering this message in
confidence to the intended recipient(s), you are hereby notified that you have
received this transmittal in error, and any review, dissemination, distribution
or copying of this transmittal or its attachments is strictly prohibited. If
you have received this transmittal and/or attachments in error, please notify
me immediately by reply e-mail and then delete this message, including any
attachments.