Date   

moderated Re: using visual studio

Annabelle Susan Morison
 

Like I said before, I don't have $99.00. My machine hasn't given me any nagging notifications, everything works fine the way it is. I'm going to try Munawar Bijani's suggestion of Code Blocks.



From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Marvin Hunkin
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 4:26 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: using visual studio

Hi. Yes, visual studio 2017, works great with jaws and I am using visual studio 2019, and works great with jaws 2019. Annabelle, you can be able and eligible to get a one year subscription for jaws 2019 for $99, and can pay online via the freedom scientific.com site. Then, jaws 2019, will work with windows 7, but windows 7 is not being supported by Microsoft by January 14 2020. Windows 10, is a combination of windows 7 and 8.1. so, have been using it for almost 5 years, so, if you need help with windows 10. As your windows 7 machine, has a nagging notification saying it will not be supported.

Marvin.

Ps: if you need any help e-mail me and will try to help with jaws, windows 7, and windows 10.


Virus-free. www.avast.com


moderated Jaws and Express Scribe

David F. <scopist65@...>
 

Hello,

 

I’m new here but joined expressly so that I might ask if anyone on this list does transcription.  It can be medical, legal, or other.  If so, what transcription software do you use?  Do you use Express Scribe or another software package?

 

Thank you


Virus-free. www.avast.com


moderated using visual studio

Marvin Hunkin <startrekvoyager@...>
 

Hi. Yes, visual studio 2017, works great with jaws and I am using visual studio 2019, and works great with jaws 2019. Annablle, you can be able and eligible to get a one year subscription for jaws 2019 for $99, and can pay online via the freedom scientific.com site. Then, jaws 2019, will work with windows 7, but windows 7 is not being supported by Microsoft by January 14 2020. Windows 10, is a combination of windows 7 and 8.1. so, have been using it for almost 5 years, so, if you need help with windows 10. As your windows 7 machine, has a nagging notification saying it will not be supported.

Marvin.

Ps: if you need any help e-mail me and will try to help with jaws, windows 7, and windows 10.


Virus-free. www.avast.com


moderated Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Munawar Bijani <munawarb@...>
 

Ok, then you can use Code::Blocks. http://www.codeblocks.org/. Check the Features page for a list of languages it supports. One of them is MSVC++.

On 6/17/2019 5:20 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:
I'm trying to code in C++, which I believe is a language that not only is recognized by all operating systems, but someone, though I'm not sure who, said it can be recognized by JAWS. Right now, the Ceremony Script Generator I'm making has its pages coded in html, but that only seems to work with web browsers. I want to be able to take those same HTML pages I made, and code them in C++ so they'll work as a standalone application that customers can use on their computers.


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 1:56 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Well it all depends on what you're trying to do. Why do you need visual studio specifically? If you share what language you're coding in I can point you to alternate but slightly less accessible software.

On Jun 17, 2019, at 2:52 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison <foristnights@...> wrote:

I'm sticking with Windows 7 and JAWS 15, since they work very well for me. As for programs, what would be a fully accessible solution for my current configuration? I'd like a program that I can work with on any machine, where I won't have to install it, one that doesn't require me to have an account, and most important of all, won't take forever to configure!


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 11:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Hi,

Ok, if cost is prohibitive for you, I would suggest switching to NVDA, installing Windows 10 and using VS 2017. Both NVDA and JAWS work really well with VS 2017 (though NVDA's performance is slower compared to JAWS' performance in this program.)


If you're in the US, you can get on the JAWS Home Annual program; alternatively, you can get JAWS Home at no cost to you if you're a university student and your university has a site-wide license for JAWS.


Try to find a way to upgrade to Windows 10 and install the latest VS (which is free by the way) before deciding definitely that you MUST stick to VS 2005.


Getting VS 2005 will be difficult since it has been dropped by Microsoft. Unless you have an MSDN account, you'll have to get a copy from someone who still has a copy of it and hope that they haven't injected malicious code into the program, and that they give you a registration key if it's not VS Express.

On 6/17/2019 1:35 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:
I got my computer with Windows 7 back in 2011, and I got a free upgrade to JAWS 15, thanks to Freedom Scientific in 2017. Unfortunately, JAWS 15 is the latest build my SMA allows me to run. As for Windows Updates, they cause my CD Rom drive to shut off after several hours, which makes JAWS turn into demo mode, despite the fact that I have an authenticated version with a valid license. It's a pain in the cushioned rear! My sighted friend, Markus Johnson (yes, that's "Markus" with a "K", not a "C"), is the one who tells me not to update that machine, since both of us found out the hard way what it does. In fact, it was Markus who formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, as we were going by drive letter, so the second time we had to restore the machine, we learned that you actually have to go by model number (like ST1000 or ST3500). And, I don't use the Internet with that machine, since I only perform music and audio recordings and beginning programming on it.


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 8:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Hi,

I've found VS 2017 to be great in accessibility, mostly because it implements UIA rather than whatever Microsoft was using when VS 2005 was around.


I'd argue that 2017 is the most accessible version yet. I use it at work every day and it works really well with both JAWS and NVDA.


Why does updating Windows "break" things for you? I'd get that sorted out if I were you; people really shouldn't be using VS 2005 nowadays. Technology is so different from what it used to be and I strongly recommend staying current, especially with development tools. Things like the VC++ runtimes are updated with each new version of Visual Studio as well, and many of these updates patch security holes that you really don't want floating around.

On 6/17/2019 10:46 AM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:
Hi, it's Annabelle.
I've read somewhere that Visual Studio has a version that's fully accessible to JAWS. The version I was told is fully accessible is Visual Studio 2005. The problem is, I'm not sure where to get that one, especially a copy that's clean and free of viruses, malware, adware, spyware, and the like. I've tried the new version, but it updates Windows, which breaks screenreader compatibility on my machine. I've already had to restore it back to working order by reimaging the hard drive three times within 8 years! The first time, I formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, and now I have to recover what I didn't get the chance to back up on that hard drive. If I can't get Visual Studio 2005, I wonder what programming alternative I can use? Particularly I want to program my own virtual instruments and audio software, as well as software that lets customers write their own scripts for ceremonies. The site where I read about the accessibility of Visual Studio 2005 is here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/118984/how-can-you-program-if-youre-blind


moderated Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Annabelle Susan Morison
 

I'm trying to code in C++, which I believe is a language that not only is recognized by all operating systems, but someone, though I'm not sure who, said it can be recognized by JAWS. Right now, the Ceremony Script Generator I'm making has its pages coded in html, but that only seems to work with web browsers. I want to be able to take those same HTML pages I made, and code them in C++ so they'll work as a standalone application that customers can use on their computers.



From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 1:56 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Well it all depends on what you're trying to do. Why do you need visual studio specifically? If you share what language you're coding in I can point you to alternate but slightly less accessible software.

On Jun 17, 2019, at 2:52 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison <foristnights@...> wrote:

I'm sticking with Windows 7 and JAWS 15, since they work very well for me. As for programs, what would be a fully accessible solution for my current configuration? I'd like a program that I can work with on any machine, where I won't have to install it, one that doesn't require me to have an account, and most important of all, won't take forever to configure!


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 11:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Hi,

Ok, if cost is prohibitive for you, I would suggest switching to NVDA, installing Windows 10 and using VS 2017. Both NVDA and JAWS work really well with VS 2017 (though NVDA's performance is slower compared to JAWS' performance in this program.)


If you're in the US, you can get on the JAWS Home Annual program; alternatively, you can get JAWS Home at no cost to you if you're a university student and your university has a site-wide license for JAWS.


Try to find a way to upgrade to Windows 10 and install the latest VS (which is free by the way) before deciding definitely that you MUST stick to VS 2005.


Getting VS 2005 will be difficult since it has been dropped by Microsoft. Unless you have an MSDN account, you'll have to get a copy from someone who still has a copy of it and hope that they haven't injected malicious code into the program, and that they give you a registration key if it's not VS Express.

On 6/17/2019 1:35 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:
I got my computer with Windows 7 back in 2011, and I got a free upgrade to JAWS 15, thanks to Freedom Scientific in 2017. Unfortunately, JAWS 15 is the latest build my SMA allows me to run. As for Windows Updates, they cause my CD Rom drive to shut off after several hours, which makes JAWS turn into demo mode, despite the fact that I have an authenticated version with a valid license. It's a pain in the cushioned rear! My sighted friend, Markus Johnson (yes, that's "Markus" with a "K", not a "C"), is the one who tells me not to update that machine, since both of us found out the hard way what it does. In fact, it was Markus who formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, as we were going by drive letter, so the second time we had to restore the machine, we learned that you actually have to go by model number (like ST1000 or ST3500). And, I don't use the Internet with that machine, since I only perform music and audio recordings and beginning programming on it.


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 8:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Hi,

I've found VS 2017 to be great in accessibility, mostly because it implements UIA rather than whatever Microsoft was using when VS 2005 was around.


I'd argue that 2017 is the most accessible version yet. I use it at work every day and it works really well with both JAWS and NVDA.


Why does updating Windows "break" things for you? I'd get that sorted out if I were you; people really shouldn't be using VS 2005 nowadays. Technology is so different from what it used to be and I strongly recommend staying current, especially with development tools. Things like the VC++ runtimes are updated with each new version of Visual Studio as well, and many of these updates patch security holes that you really don't want floating around.

On 6/17/2019 10:46 AM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:
Hi, it's Annabelle.
I've read somewhere that Visual Studio has a version that's fully accessible to JAWS. The version I was told is fully accessible is Visual Studio 2005. The problem is, I'm not sure where to get that one, especially a copy that's clean and free of viruses, malware, adware, spyware, and the like. I've tried the new version, but it updates Windows, which breaks screenreader compatibility on my machine. I've already had to restore it back to working order by reimaging the hard drive three times within 8 years! The first time, I formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, and now I have to recover what I didn't get the chance to back up on that hard drive. If I can't get Visual Studio 2005, I wonder what programming alternative I can use? Particularly I want to program my own virtual instruments and audio software, as well as software that lets customers write their own scripts for ceremonies. The site where I read about the accessibility of Visual Studio 2005 is here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/118984/how-can-you-program-if-youre-blind


moderated Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Munawar Bijani <munawarb@...>
 

Hi, I used to make audio games. That's where a lot of my .net experience came from. In c++ I was involved in a block chain project at work. And I was shocked how accessible the IDE is now. Even things like the GitHub plugin.

On Jun 17, 2019, at 3:15 PM, Kevin Meyers <kevinmeyers@...> wrote:

What types of applications do you code in?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 1:03 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

 

Hi,

I used to do a lot of .NET development but now it's mostly C++.

On 6/17/2019 12:10 PM, Kevin Meyers wrote:

Just wondering…what type of work are you performing using VS2017?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 10:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

 

Hi,

I've found VS 2017 to be great in accessibility, mostly because it implements UIA rather than whatever Microsoft was using when VS 2005 was around.

 

I'd argue that 2017 is the most accessible version yet. I use it at work every day and it works really well with both JAWS and NVDA.

 

Why does updating Windows "break" things for you? I'd get that sorted out if I were you; people really shouldn't be using VS 2005 nowadays. Technology is so different from what it used to be and I strongly recommend staying current, especially with development tools. Things like the VC++ runtimes are updated with each new version of Visual Studio as well, and many of these updates patch security holes that you really don't want floating around.

On 6/17/2019 10:46 AM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

Hi, it's Annabelle.

I've read somewhere that Visual Studio has a version that's fully accessible to JAWS. The version I was told is fully accessible is Visual Studio 2005. The problem is, I'm not sure where to get that one, especially a copy that's clean and free of viruses, malware, adware, spyware, and the like. I've tried the new version, but it updates Windows, which breaks screenreader compatibility on my machine. I've already had to restore it back to working order by reimaging the hard drive three times within 8 years! The first time, I formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, and now I have to recover what I didn't get the chance to back up on that hard drive. If I can't get Visual Studio 2005, I wonder what programming alternative I can use? Particularly I want to program my own virtual instruments and audio software, as well as software that lets customers write their own scripts for ceremonies. The site where I read about the accessibility of Visual Studio 2005 is here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/118984/how-can-you-program-if-youre-blind


moderated Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Munawar Bijani <munawarb@...>
 

Well it all depends on what you're trying to do. Why do you need visual studio specifically? If you share what language you're coding in I can point you to alternate but slightly less accessible software.

On Jun 17, 2019, at 2:52 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison <foristnights@...> wrote:

I'm sticking with Windows 7 and JAWS 15, since they work very well for me. As for programs, what would be a fully accessible solution for my current configuration? I'd like a program that I can work with on any machine, where I won't have to install it, one that doesn't require me to have an account, and most important of all, won't take forever to configure!


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 11:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Hi,

Ok, if cost is prohibitive for you, I would suggest switching to NVDA, installing Windows 10 and using VS 2017. Both NVDA and JAWS work really well with VS 2017 (though NVDA's performance is slower compared to JAWS' performance in this program.)


If you're in the US, you can get on the JAWS Home Annual program; alternatively, you can get JAWS Home at no cost to you if you're a university student and your university has a site-wide license for JAWS.


Try to find a way to upgrade to Windows 10 and install the latest VS (which is free by the way) before deciding definitely that you MUST stick to VS 2005.


Getting VS 2005 will be difficult since it has been dropped by Microsoft. Unless you have an MSDN account, you'll have to get a copy from someone who still has a copy of it and hope that they haven't injected malicious code into the program, and that they give you a registration key if it's not VS Express.

On 6/17/2019 1:35 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:
I got my computer with Windows 7 back in 2011, and I got a free upgrade to JAWS 15, thanks to Freedom Scientific in 2017. Unfortunately, JAWS 15 is the latest build my SMA allows me to run. As for Windows Updates, they cause my CD Rom drive to shut off after several hours, which makes JAWS turn into demo mode, despite the fact that I have an authenticated version with a valid license. It's a pain in the cushioned rear! My sighted friend, Markus Johnson (yes, that's "Markus" with a "K", not a "C"), is the one who tells me not to update that machine, since both of us found out the hard way what it does. In fact, it was Markus who formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, as we were going by drive letter, so the second time we had to restore the machine, we learned that you actually have to go by model number (like ST1000 or ST3500). And, I don't use the Internet with that machine, since I only perform music and audio recordings and beginning programming on it.


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 8:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Hi,

I've found VS 2017 to be great in accessibility, mostly because it implements UIA rather than whatever Microsoft was using when VS 2005 was around.


I'd argue that 2017 is the most accessible version yet. I use it at work every day and it works really well with both JAWS and NVDA.


Why does updating Windows "break" things for you? I'd get that sorted out if I were you; people really shouldn't be using VS 2005 nowadays. Technology is so different from what it used to be and I strongly recommend staying current, especially with development tools. Things like the VC++ runtimes are updated with each new version of Visual Studio as well, and many of these updates patch security holes that you really don't want floating around.

On 6/17/2019 10:46 AM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:
Hi, it's Annabelle.
I've read somewhere that Visual Studio has a version that's fully accessible to JAWS. The version I was told is fully accessible is Visual Studio 2005. The problem is, I'm not sure where to get that one, especially a copy that's clean and free of viruses, malware, adware, spyware, and the like. I've tried the new version, but it updates Windows, which breaks screenreader compatibility on my machine. I've already had to restore it back to working order by reimaging the hard drive three times within 8 years! The first time, I formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, and now I have to recover what I didn't get the chance to back up on that hard drive. If I can't get Visual Studio 2005, I wonder what programming alternative I can use? Particularly I want to program my own virtual instruments and audio software, as well as software that lets customers write their own scripts for ceremonies. The site where I read about the accessibility of Visual Studio 2005 is here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/118984/how-can-you-program-if-youre-blind


moderated Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Annabelle Susan Morison
 

I don't have $99.00.

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of John
Covici
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 1:41 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

You do know you can upgrade Jaws to the latest for $99?

On Mon, 17 Jun 2019 14:52:20 -0400,
Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

[1 <text/plain; Windows-1252 (7bit)>]
[2 <text/html; Windows-1252 (quoted-printable)>] I'm sticking with
Windows 7 and JAWS 15, since they work very well for me. As for
programs, what would be a fully accessible solution for my current
configuration? I'd like a program that I can work with on any machine, where
I won't have to install it, one that doesn't require me to have an account,
and most important of all, won't take forever to configure!

----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 11:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Hi,

Ok, if cost is prohibitive for you, I would suggest switching to NVDA,
installing Windows 10 and using VS 2017. Both NVDA and JAWS work
really well with VS 2017 (though NVDA's performance is slower compared
to JAWS' performance in this
program.)

If you're in the US, you can get on the JAWS Home Annual program;
alternatively, you can get JAWS Home at no cost to you if you're a
university student and your university has a site-wide license for JAWS.

Try to find a way to upgrade to Windows 10 and install the latest VS
(which is free by the way) before deciding definitely that you MUST stick to
VS 2005.

Getting VS 2005 will be difficult since it has been dropped by
Microsoft. Unless you have an MSDN account, you'll have to get a copy from
someone who still has a copy of it and hope that they haven't injected
malicious code into the program, and that they give you a registration key
if it's not VS Express.

On 6/17/2019 1:35 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

I got my computer with Windows 7 back in 2011, and I got a free
upgrade to JAWS 15, thanks to Freedom Scientific in 2017.
Unfortunately, JAWS 15 is the latest build my SMA allows me to run. As
for Windows Updates, they cause my CD Rom drive to shut off after
several hours, which makes JAWS turn into demo mode, despite the fact that
I have an authenticated version with a valid license. It's a pain in the
cushioned rear! My sighted friend, Markus Johnson (yes, that's "Markus"
with a "K", not a "C"), is the one who tells me not to update that machine,
since both of us found out the hard way what it does. In fact, it was Markus
who formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, as we were going by drive
letter, so the second time we had to restore the machine, we learned that
you actually have to go by model number (like ST1000 or ST3500). And, I
don't use the Internet with that machine, since I only perform music and
audio recordings and beginning programming on it.

----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------
---------------------------
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 8:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Hi,

I've found VS 2017 to be great in accessibility, mostly because it
implements UIA rather than whatever Microsoft was using when VS 2005 was
around.

I'd argue that 2017 is the most accessible version yet. I use it at work
every day and it works really well with both JAWS and NVDA.

Why does updating Windows "break" things for you? I'd get that sorted
out if I were you; people really shouldn't be using VS 2005 nowadays.
Technology is so different from what it used to be and I strongly recommend
staying current, especially with development tools. Things like the VC++
runtimes are updated with each new version of Visual Studio as well, and
many of these updates patch security holes that you really don't want
floating around.

On 6/17/2019 10:46 AM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

Hi, it's Annabelle.
I've read somewhere that Visual Studio has a version that's fully
accessible to JAWS. The version I was told is fully accessible is
Visual Studio 2005. The problem is, I'm not sure where to get that
one, especially a copy that's clean and free of viruses, malware,
adware, spyware, and the like. I've tried the new version, but it
updates Windows, which breaks screenreader compatibility on my
machine. I've already had to restore it back to working order by
reimaging the hard drive three times within 8 years! The first time, I
formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, and now I have to recover
what I didn't get the chance to back up on that hard drive. If I can't
get Visual Studio 2005, I wonder what programming alternative I can
use? Particularly I want to program my own virtual instruments and
audio software, as well as software that lets customers write their
own scripts for ceremonies. The site where I read about the
accessibility of Visual Studio 2005 is here:
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/118984/how-can-you-program-if-your
e-blind

--
Your life is like a penny. You're going to lose it. The question is:
How do
you spend it?

John Covici wb2una
covici@ccs.covici.com


moderated Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

John Covici
 

You do know you can upgrade Jaws to the latest for $99?

On Mon, 17 Jun 2019 14:52:20 -0400,
Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

[1 <text/plain; Windows-1252 (7bit)>]
[2 <text/html; Windows-1252 (quoted-printable)>]
I'm sticking with Windows 7 and JAWS 15, since they work very well for me. As for programs, what would be a fully accessible solution for my current configuration? I'd like a program that I can work with on any machine, where I won't
have to install it, one that doesn't require me to have an account, and most important of all, won't take forever to configure!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 11:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Hi,

Ok, if cost is prohibitive for you, I would suggest switching to NVDA, installing Windows 10 and using VS 2017. Both NVDA and JAWS work really well with VS 2017 (though NVDA's performance is slower compared to JAWS' performance in this
program.)

If you're in the US, you can get on the JAWS Home Annual program; alternatively, you can get JAWS Home at no cost to you if you're a university student and your university has a site-wide license for JAWS.

Try to find a way to upgrade to Windows 10 and install the latest VS (which is free by the way) before deciding definitely that you MUST stick to VS 2005.

Getting VS 2005 will be difficult since it has been dropped by Microsoft. Unless you have an MSDN account, you'll have to get a copy from someone who still has a copy of it and hope that they haven't injected malicious code into the
program, and that they give you a registration key if it's not VS Express.

On 6/17/2019 1:35 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

I got my computer with Windows 7 back in 2011, and I got a free upgrade to JAWS 15, thanks to Freedom Scientific in 2017. Unfortunately, JAWS 15 is the latest build my SMA allows me to run. As for Windows Updates, they cause my CD
Rom drive to shut off after several hours, which makes JAWS turn into demo mode, despite the fact that I have an authenticated version with a valid license. It's a pain in the cushioned rear! My sighted friend, Markus Johnson (yes,
that's "Markus" with a "K", not a "C"), is the one who tells me not to update that machine, since both of us found out the hard way what it does. In fact, it was Markus who formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, as we were going
by drive letter, so the second time we had to restore the machine, we learned that you actually have to go by model number (like ST1000 or ST3500). And, I don't use the Internet with that machine, since I only perform music and audio
recordings and beginning programming on it.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 8:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Hi,

I've found VS 2017 to be great in accessibility, mostly because it implements UIA rather than whatever Microsoft was using when VS 2005 was around.

I'd argue that 2017 is the most accessible version yet. I use it at work every day and it works really well with both JAWS and NVDA.

Why does updating Windows "break" things for you? I'd get that sorted out if I were you; people really shouldn't be using VS 2005 nowadays. Technology is so different from what it used to be and I strongly recommend staying current,
especially with development tools. Things like the VC++ runtimes are updated with each new version of Visual Studio as well, and many of these updates patch security holes that you really don't want floating around.

On 6/17/2019 10:46 AM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

Hi, it's Annabelle.
I've read somewhere that Visual Studio has a version that's fully accessible to JAWS. The version I was told is fully accessible is Visual Studio 2005. The problem is, I'm not sure where to get that one, especially a copy that's
clean and free of viruses, malware, adware, spyware, and the like. I've tried the new version, but it updates Windows, which breaks screenreader compatibility on my machine. I've already had to restore it back to working order by
reimaging the hard drive three times within 8 years! The first time, I formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, and now I have to recover what I didn't get the chance to back up on that hard drive. If I can't get Visual Studio
2005, I wonder what programming alternative I can use? Particularly I want to program my own virtual instruments and audio software, as well as software that lets customers write their own scripts for ceremonies. The site where I
read about the accessibility of Visual Studio 2005 is here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/118984/how-can-you-program-if-youre-blind

--
Your life is like a penny. You're going to lose it. The question is:
How do
you spend it?

John Covici wb2una
covici@ccs.covici.com


moderated Re: JAWS License server upgrade to 2019 - impact to end users #advisory

nicole.bergstrom@...
 

Great!  Thanks for the info


moderated Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Kevin Meyers <kevinmeyers@...>
 

What types of applications do you code in?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 1:03 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

 

Hi,

I used to do a lot of .NET development but now it's mostly C++.

On 6/17/2019 12:10 PM, Kevin Meyers wrote:

Just wondering…what type of work are you performing using VS2017?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 10:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

 

Hi,

I've found VS 2017 to be great in accessibility, mostly because it implements UIA rather than whatever Microsoft was using when VS 2005 was around.

 

I'd argue that 2017 is the most accessible version yet. I use it at work every day and it works really well with both JAWS and NVDA.

 

Why does updating Windows "break" things for you? I'd get that sorted out if I were you; people really shouldn't be using VS 2005 nowadays. Technology is so different from what it used to be and I strongly recommend staying current, especially with development tools. Things like the VC++ runtimes are updated with each new version of Visual Studio as well, and many of these updates patch security holes that you really don't want floating around.

On 6/17/2019 10:46 AM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

Hi, it's Annabelle.

I've read somewhere that Visual Studio has a version that's fully accessible to JAWS. The version I was told is fully accessible is Visual Studio 2005. The problem is, I'm not sure where to get that one, especially a copy that's clean and free of viruses, malware, adware, spyware, and the like. I've tried the new version, but it updates Windows, which breaks screenreader compatibility on my machine. I've already had to restore it back to working order by reimaging the hard drive three times within 8 years! The first time, I formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, and now I have to recover what I didn't get the chance to back up on that hard drive. If I can't get Visual Studio 2005, I wonder what programming alternative I can use? Particularly I want to program my own virtual instruments and audio software, as well as software that lets customers write their own scripts for ceremonies. The site where I read about the accessibility of Visual Studio 2005 is here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/118984/how-can-you-program-if-youre-blind


moderated Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Annabelle Susan Morison
 

I'm sticking with Windows 7 and JAWS 15, since they work very well for me. As for programs, what would be a fully accessible solution for my current configuration? I'd like a program that I can work with on any machine, where I won't have to install it, one that doesn't require me to have an account, and most important of all, won't take forever to configure!



From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 11:00 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Hi,

Ok, if cost is prohibitive for you, I would suggest switching to NVDA, installing Windows 10 and using VS 2017. Both NVDA and JAWS work really well with VS 2017 (though NVDA's performance is slower compared to JAWS' performance in this program.)


If you're in the US, you can get on the JAWS Home Annual program; alternatively, you can get JAWS Home at no cost to you if you're a university student and your university has a site-wide license for JAWS.


Try to find a way to upgrade to Windows 10 and install the latest VS (which is free by the way) before deciding definitely that you MUST stick to VS 2005.


Getting VS 2005 will be difficult since it has been dropped by Microsoft. Unless you have an MSDN account, you'll have to get a copy from someone who still has a copy of it and hope that they haven't injected malicious code into the program, and that they give you a registration key if it's not VS Express.

On 6/17/2019 1:35 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:
I got my computer with Windows 7 back in 2011, and I got a free upgrade to JAWS 15, thanks to Freedom Scientific in 2017. Unfortunately, JAWS 15 is the latest build my SMA allows me to run. As for Windows Updates, they cause my CD Rom drive to shut off after several hours, which makes JAWS turn into demo mode, despite the fact that I have an authenticated version with a valid license. It's a pain in the cushioned rear! My sighted friend, Markus Johnson (yes, that's "Markus" with a "K", not a "C"), is the one who tells me not to update that machine, since both of us found out the hard way what it does. In fact, it was Markus who formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, as we were going by drive letter, so the second time we had to restore the machine, we learned that you actually have to go by model number (like ST1000 or ST3500). And, I don't use the Internet with that machine, since I only perform music and audio recordings and beginning programming on it.


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 8:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Hi,

I've found VS 2017 to be great in accessibility, mostly because it implements UIA rather than whatever Microsoft was using when VS 2005 was around.


I'd argue that 2017 is the most accessible version yet. I use it at work every day and it works really well with both JAWS and NVDA.


Why does updating Windows "break" things for you? I'd get that sorted out if I were you; people really shouldn't be using VS 2005 nowadays. Technology is so different from what it used to be and I strongly recommend staying current, especially with development tools. Things like the VC++ runtimes are updated with each new version of Visual Studio as well, and many of these updates patch security holes that you really don't want floating around.

On 6/17/2019 10:46 AM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:
Hi, it's Annabelle.
I've read somewhere that Visual Studio has a version that's fully accessible to JAWS. The version I was told is fully accessible is Visual Studio 2005. The problem is, I'm not sure where to get that one, especially a copy that's clean and free of viruses, malware, adware, spyware, and the like. I've tried the new version, but it updates Windows, which breaks screenreader compatibility on my machine. I've already had to restore it back to working order by reimaging the hard drive three times within 8 years! The first time, I formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, and now I have to recover what I didn't get the chance to back up on that hard drive. If I can't get Visual Studio 2005, I wonder what programming alternative I can use? Particularly I want to program my own virtual instruments and audio software, as well as software that lets customers write their own scripts for ceremonies. The site where I read about the accessibility of Visual Studio 2005 is here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/118984/how-can-you-program-if-youre-blind


moderated Re: Need help with file explorer

Shirley Tracy
 

Thanks. But what Siegard gave me worked, so I’m good. But your way works, too; so, now I have choices.

 

Cheerfully,

Shirley

 


moderated Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Munawar Bijani <munawarb@...>
 

Hi,

I used to do a lot of .NET development but now it's mostly C++.

On 6/17/2019 12:10 PM, Kevin Meyers wrote:

Just wondering…what type of work are you performing using VS2017?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 10:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

 

Hi,

I've found VS 2017 to be great in accessibility, mostly because it implements UIA rather than whatever Microsoft was using when VS 2005 was around.

 

I'd argue that 2017 is the most accessible version yet. I use it at work every day and it works really well with both JAWS and NVDA.

 

Why does updating Windows "break" things for you? I'd get that sorted out if I were you; people really shouldn't be using VS 2005 nowadays. Technology is so different from what it used to be and I strongly recommend staying current, especially with development tools. Things like the VC++ runtimes are updated with each new version of Visual Studio as well, and many of these updates patch security holes that you really don't want floating around.

On 6/17/2019 10:46 AM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

Hi, it's Annabelle.

I've read somewhere that Visual Studio has a version that's fully accessible to JAWS. The version I was told is fully accessible is Visual Studio 2005. The problem is, I'm not sure where to get that one, especially a copy that's clean and free of viruses, malware, adware, spyware, and the like. I've tried the new version, but it updates Windows, which breaks screenreader compatibility on my machine. I've already had to restore it back to working order by reimaging the hard drive three times within 8 years! The first time, I formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, and now I have to recover what I didn't get the chance to back up on that hard drive. If I can't get Visual Studio 2005, I wonder what programming alternative I can use? Particularly I want to program my own virtual instruments and audio software, as well as software that lets customers write their own scripts for ceremonies. The site where I read about the accessibility of Visual Studio 2005 is here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/118984/how-can-you-program-if-youre-blind


moderated Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Munawar Bijani <munawarb@...>
 

Hi,

Ok, if cost is prohibitive for you, I would suggest switching to NVDA, installing Windows 10 and using VS 2017. Both NVDA and JAWS work really well with VS 2017 (though NVDA's performance is slower compared to JAWS' performance in this program.)


If you're in the US, you can get on the JAWS Home Annual program; alternatively, you can get JAWS Home at no cost to you if you're a university student and your university has a site-wide license for JAWS.


Try to find a way to upgrade to Windows 10 and install the latest VS (which is free by the way) before deciding definitely that you MUST stick to VS 2005.


Getting VS 2005 will be difficult since it has been dropped by Microsoft. Unless you have an MSDN account, you'll have to get a copy from someone who still has a copy of it and hope that they haven't injected malicious code into the program, and that they give you a registration key if it's not VS Express.

On 6/17/2019 1:35 PM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:
I got my computer with Windows 7 back in 2011, and I got a free upgrade to JAWS 15, thanks to Freedom Scientific in 2017. Unfortunately, JAWS 15 is the latest build my SMA allows me to run. As for Windows Updates, they cause my CD Rom drive to shut off after several hours, which makes JAWS turn into demo mode, despite the fact that I have an authenticated version with a valid license. It's a pain in the cushioned rear! My sighted friend, Markus Johnson (yes, that's "Markus" with a "K", not a "C"), is the one who tells me not to update that machine, since both of us found out the hard way what it does. In fact, it was Markus who formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, as we were going by drive letter, so the second time we had to restore the machine, we learned that you actually have to go by model number (like ST1000 or ST3500). And, I don't use the Internet with that machine, since I only perform music and audio recordings and beginning programming on it.


From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 8:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Hi,

I've found VS 2017 to be great in accessibility, mostly because it implements UIA rather than whatever Microsoft was using when VS 2005 was around.


I'd argue that 2017 is the most accessible version yet. I use it at work every day and it works really well with both JAWS and NVDA.


Why does updating Windows "break" things for you? I'd get that sorted out if I were you; people really shouldn't be using VS 2005 nowadays. Technology is so different from what it used to be and I strongly recommend staying current, especially with development tools. Things like the VC++ runtimes are updated with each new version of Visual Studio as well, and many of these updates patch security holes that you really don't want floating around.

On 6/17/2019 10:46 AM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:
Hi, it's Annabelle.
I've read somewhere that Visual Studio has a version that's fully accessible to JAWS. The version I was told is fully accessible is Visual Studio 2005. The problem is, I'm not sure where to get that one, especially a copy that's clean and free of viruses, malware, adware, spyware, and the like. I've tried the new version, but it updates Windows, which breaks screenreader compatibility on my machine. I've already had to restore it back to working order by reimaging the hard drive three times within 8 years! The first time, I formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, and now I have to recover what I didn't get the chance to back up on that hard drive. If I can't get Visual Studio 2005, I wonder what programming alternative I can use? Particularly I want to program my own virtual instruments and audio software, as well as software that lets customers write their own scripts for ceremonies. The site where I read about the accessibility of Visual Studio 2005 is here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/118984/how-can-you-program-if-youre-blind


moderated Re: JAWS License server upgrade to 2019 - impact to end users #advisory

Jacob
 

JAWS 2018 at the clients will still run and find a license when your server is upgraded to 2019. If the clients want JAWS 2019 they have to install 2019. It'll not happen automatically.

OZ0TE Jacob

On 2019-06-17 19:24 nicole.bergstrom via Groups.Io wrote:
Hello,

We are running a JAWS license server that is about to be upgraded to v. 2019 - we are currently running v. 2018.  My question is about our end users who tap into this license server to use JAWS for testing.  Do our end users now need to also update their desktop instance of JAWS to 2019 as well or will the software they have on their local machines automatically update?


moderated JAWS License server upgrade to 2019 - impact to end users #advisory

nicole.bergstrom@...
 

Hello,

We are running a JAWS license server that is about to be upgraded to v. 2019 - we are currently running v. 2018.  My question is about our end users who tap into this license server to use JAWS for testing.  Do our end users now need to also update their desktop instance of JAWS to 2019 as well or will the software they have on their local machines automatically update?


moderated Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Annabelle Susan Morison
 

I got my computer with Windows 7 back in 2011, and I got a free upgrade to JAWS 15, thanks to Freedom Scientific in 2017. Unfortunately, JAWS 15 is the latest build my SMA allows me to run. As for Windows Updates, they cause my CD Rom drive to shut off after several hours, which makes JAWS turn into demo mode, despite the fact that I have an authenticated version with a valid license. It's a pain in the cushioned rear! My sighted friend, Markus Johnson (yes, that's "Markus" with a "K", not a "C"), is the one who tells me not to update that machine, since both of us found out the hard way what it does. In fact, it was Markus who formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, as we were going by drive letter, so the second time we had to restore the machine, we learned that you actually have to go by model number (like ST1000 or ST3500). And, I don't use the Internet with that machine, since I only perform music and audio recordings and beginning programming on it.



From: main@jfw.groups.io [mailto:main@jfw.groups.io] On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 8:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Hi,

I've found VS 2017 to be great in accessibility, mostly because it implements UIA rather than whatever Microsoft was using when VS 2005 was around.


I'd argue that 2017 is the most accessible version yet. I use it at work every day and it works really well with both JAWS and NVDA.


Why does updating Windows "break" things for you? I'd get that sorted out if I were you; people really shouldn't be using VS 2005 nowadays. Technology is so different from what it used to be and I strongly recommend staying current, especially with development tools. Things like the VC++ runtimes are updated with each new version of Visual Studio as well, and many of these updates patch security holes that you really don't want floating around.

On 6/17/2019 10:46 AM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:
Hi, it's Annabelle.
I've read somewhere that Visual Studio has a version that's fully accessible to JAWS. The version I was told is fully accessible is Visual Studio 2005. The problem is, I'm not sure where to get that one, especially a copy that's clean and free of viruses, malware, adware, spyware, and the like. I've tried the new version, but it updates Windows, which breaks screenreader compatibility on my machine. I've already had to restore it back to working order by reimaging the hard drive three times within 8 years! The first time, I formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, and now I have to recover what I didn't get the chance to back up on that hard drive. If I can't get Visual Studio 2005, I wonder what programming alternative I can use? Particularly I want to program my own virtual instruments and audio software, as well as software that lets customers write their own scripts for ceremonies. The site where I read about the accessibility of Visual Studio 2005 is here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/118984/how-can-you-program-if-youre-blind


moderated Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

John Covici
 

The latest versions are pretty accessible, I know about 2017 community
edition and anything later than that should work reasonably well with
Jaws, although not perfectly. It may update some libraries, but just
create a restore point before installing and you should be fine.

On Mon, 17 Jun 2019 10:46:00 -0400,
Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

[1 <text/plain; us-ascii (7bit)>]
[2 <text/html; us-ascii (quoted-printable)>]
Hi, it's Annabelle.
I've read somewhere that Visual Studio has a version that's fully accessible to JAWS. The version I was told is fully accessible is Visual Studio 2005. The problem is, I'm not sure where to get that one, especially a copy that's clean
and free of viruses, malware, adware, spyware, and the like. I've tried the new version, but it updates Windows, which breaks screenreader compatibility on my machine. I've already had to restore it back to working order by reimaging the
hard drive three times within 8 years! The first time, I formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, and now I have to recover what I didn't get the chance to back up on that hard drive. If I can't get Visual Studio 2005, I wonder what
programming alternative I can use? Particularly I want to program my own virtual instruments and audio software, as well as software that lets customers write their own scripts for ceremonies. The site where I read about the
accessibility of Visual Studio 2005 is here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/118984/how-can-you-program-if-youre-blind
--
Your life is like a penny. You're going to lose it. The question is:
How do
you spend it?

John Covici wb2una
covici@ccs.covici.com


moderated Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

Kevin Meyers <kevinmeyers@...>
 

Just wondering…what type of work are you performing using VS2017?

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Munawar Bijani
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 10:32 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Accessible Version of Visual Studio?

 

Hi,

I've found VS 2017 to be great in accessibility, mostly because it implements UIA rather than whatever Microsoft was using when VS 2005 was around.

 

I'd argue that 2017 is the most accessible version yet. I use it at work every day and it works really well with both JAWS and NVDA.

 

Why does updating Windows "break" things for you? I'd get that sorted out if I were you; people really shouldn't be using VS 2005 nowadays. Technology is so different from what it used to be and I strongly recommend staying current, especially with development tools. Things like the VC++ runtimes are updated with each new version of Visual Studio as well, and many of these updates patch security holes that you really don't want floating around.

On 6/17/2019 10:46 AM, Annabelle Susan Morison wrote:

Hi, it's Annabelle.

I've read somewhere that Visual Studio has a version that's fully accessible to JAWS. The version I was told is fully accessible is Visual Studio 2005. The problem is, I'm not sure where to get that one, especially a copy that's clean and free of viruses, malware, adware, spyware, and the like. I've tried the new version, but it updates Windows, which breaks screenreader compatibility on my machine. I've already had to restore it back to working order by reimaging the hard drive three times within 8 years! The first time, I formatted the wrong hard drive by accident, and now I have to recover what I didn't get the chance to back up on that hard drive. If I can't get Visual Studio 2005, I wonder what programming alternative I can use? Particularly I want to program my own virtual instruments and audio software, as well as software that lets customers write their own scripts for ceremonies. The site where I read about the accessibility of Visual Studio 2005 is here: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/118984/how-can-you-program-if-youre-blind