Date   

Re: Processor speed

Joseph Norton
 

Hi:

 

I bet you’re right.

 

If you’re moving the entire contents, everything will be set the same way.

 

Whether there is a way to have Windows look again at hardware or not, I have no idea.

 

When I’ve installed the ssd’s on my systems, I’ve always done a clean install, so I may not have run into this issue.

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Chris Hill
Sent: Monday, February 4, 2019 10:25 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is an article on it:

https://www.thewindowsclub.com/disable-superfetch-prefetch-ssd

 

They claim that windows will do this automatically if you install an ssd.  I've installed three ssd's and windows 10 doesn't seem to do it automatically.  It might be different with a new install of windows, but if you are putting your old operating system onto your new ssd, you should probably at least check to make sure prefetch and superfetch are disabled.

 

 

On 2/4/2019 08:23, Steve Nutt wrote:

Hi,

 

I don’t believe it does.  Where do you go to turn those off?

 

Thanks.

 

All the best


Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Hill
Sent: 04 February 2019 13:18
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Ideally, superfetch and prefetch should be turned off in the registry after the operating system is moved to a ssd, I don't believe Macrium Reflect  will do that for you., if it does that would save some steps.

 

On 2/4/2019 03:02, Steve Nutt wrote:

Hi,

 

No need to monkey with the registry, just use Macrium Reflect which is free, and image the drive.  I put an SSD into my old laptop the other day, and the speed is amazing.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Hill
Sent: 04 February 2019 00:41
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Actually, if the person doing the swapping knows what they are about, the windows, programs and all the data can be easily copied.  All one need do is to change a couple of registry settings so windows treats the ssd properly once the new drive is installed.  You make good points on the ease of dismantling the machine.  If I was him, I wouldn't even bother with best buy, find a local place that works on stuff and has a good reputation, you're more likely to get someone who will do the job right and put in the necessary time.

 

 

On 2/3/2019 17:15, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:

That is a fairly generic 1Tb 2.5 inch laptop hard drive with 32Mb of Cache and 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute).

I can see that after a little over 3 years this is not going to be the fastest, as I said before and now that it is confirmed you have a regular hard drive, you would get the most speed boost out of replacing this with a solid state drive. You would have to see how much space of this you use, but you would most likely want a 512Gb SSD, it is half the size of your current drive, but as far as what you get for your buck this is pretty much where the sweet spot is now. If you go to 240Gb you may run into space issues and you only save maybe $30 or $40, but if you want a 1Tb SSD (same size as what you have now) you’ll pay double of what a 512Gb costs, prices are constantly coming down and in a couple of years you’ll probably be able to buy a 1Tb for the same price as a 512Gb now, but that won’t do you any good. Of course you can just put up with longer boot times and loading times of applications and keep it the way it is. You would have to check anyways if this laptop you have can even be easily opened up, some of these convertible tablets/laptop thingies are sealed and changing components is not easily possible. Then of course there is the consideration whether it is worth putting $100 or $150 into it, I assume you can’t switch the drives out yourself and I have no idea what a place like Best Buy would charge for that. Keep in mind that you want to make sure you have a good backup of all your data and that whatever applications you have are available for a fresh install either by download or that you have the installers on a USB stick. If you change drives you start out with a fresh install of Windows which if you are comfortable with it you can do yourself with Narrator, then you have to install Jaws or NVDA (whatever you use) and after that install things like Chrome and/or Firefox, Office, iTunes or whatever applications you use. Depending on how much user data you have on your current hard drive you could copy it to an external hard drive first. You can get a 1Tb external drive in the States probably for $50 or $60 so not such a big expense and it is something you then have and can continue to use.

 

As for David’s comments on RAM, whether you buy a laptop or other computer, they do come with whatever RAM is supported by your CPU. You could not put DDR 4 RAM into your laptop which I am quite sure has and can only take DDR 3 RAM. If you have a custom system built you want to of course make sure you get the best RAM possible for your processor and motherboard at the time, beyond that RAM speed is not really a big issue and how much cache a hard drive has is also a lot less important than whether you have a hard drive or SSD.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 1:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:

 HGST HTS541010A7E630

 

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 

the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 

 


Re: Processor speed

Chris Hill
 

Here is an article on it:

https://www.thewindowsclub.com/disable-superfetch-prefetch-ssd


They claim that windows will do this automatically if you install an ssd.  I've installed three ssd's and windows 10 doesn't seem to do it automatically.  It might be different with a new install of windows, but if you are putting your old operating system onto your new ssd, you should probably at least check to make sure prefetch and superfetch are disabled.



On 2/4/2019 08:23, Steve Nutt wrote:

Hi,

 

I don’t believe it does.  Where do you go to turn those off?

 

Thanks.

 

All the best


Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Hill
Sent: 04 February 2019 13:18
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Ideally, superfetch and prefetch should be turned off in the registry after the operating system is moved to a ssd, I don't believe Macrium Reflect  will do that for you., if it does that would save some steps.

 

On 2/4/2019 03:02, Steve Nutt wrote:

Hi,

 

No need to monkey with the registry, just use Macrium Reflect which is free, and image the drive.  I put an SSD into my old laptop the other day, and the speed is amazing.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Hill
Sent: 04 February 2019 00:41
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Actually, if the person doing the swapping knows what they are about, the windows, programs and all the data can be easily copied.  All one need do is to change a couple of registry settings so windows treats the ssd properly once the new drive is installed.  You make good points on the ease of dismantling the machine.  If I was him, I wouldn't even bother with best buy, find a local place that works on stuff and has a good reputation, you're more likely to get someone who will do the job right and put in the necessary time.

 

 

On 2/3/2019 17:15, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:

That is a fairly generic 1Tb 2.5 inch laptop hard drive with 32Mb of Cache and 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute).

I can see that after a little over 3 years this is not going to be the fastest, as I said before and now that it is confirmed you have a regular hard drive, you would get the most speed boost out of replacing this with a solid state drive. You would have to see how much space of this you use, but you would most likely want a 512Gb SSD, it is half the size of your current drive, but as far as what you get for your buck this is pretty much where the sweet spot is now. If you go to 240Gb you may run into space issues and you only save maybe $30 or $40, but if you want a 1Tb SSD (same size as what you have now) you’ll pay double of what a 512Gb costs, prices are constantly coming down and in a couple of years you’ll probably be able to buy a 1Tb for the same price as a 512Gb now, but that won’t do you any good. Of course you can just put up with longer boot times and loading times of applications and keep it the way it is. You would have to check anyways if this laptop you have can even be easily opened up, some of these convertible tablets/laptop thingies are sealed and changing components is not easily possible. Then of course there is the consideration whether it is worth putting $100 or $150 into it, I assume you can’t switch the drives out yourself and I have no idea what a place like Best Buy would charge for that. Keep in mind that you want to make sure you have a good backup of all your data and that whatever applications you have are available for a fresh install either by download or that you have the installers on a USB stick. If you change drives you start out with a fresh install of Windows which if you are comfortable with it you can do yourself with Narrator, then you have to install Jaws or NVDA (whatever you use) and after that install things like Chrome and/or Firefox, Office, iTunes or whatever applications you use. Depending on how much user data you have on your current hard drive you could copy it to an external hard drive first. You can get a 1Tb external drive in the States probably for $50 or $60 so not such a big expense and it is something you then have and can continue to use.

 

As for David’s comments on RAM, whether you buy a laptop or other computer, they do come with whatever RAM is supported by your CPU. You could not put DDR 4 RAM into your laptop which I am quite sure has and can only take DDR 3 RAM. If you have a custom system built you want to of course make sure you get the best RAM possible for your processor and motherboard at the time, beyond that RAM speed is not really a big issue and how much cache a hard drive has is also a lot less important than whether you have a hard drive or SSD.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 1:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:

 HGST HTS541010A7E630

 

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 

the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 


Re: Processor speed

 

On Mon, Feb 4, 2019 at 08:28 AM, Joseph Norton wrote:
Fast startup is similar to hibernation, but, when it is enabled, the state of Windows kernel is saved in the hibernation file, not in ram.
Indeed.  It's OS hibernation only rather than OS and User State hibernation, which is what full regular hibernation entails.

If you have an SSD, Fast Startup is pretty much useless in improving boot speed perceptibly anyway.   If you have an HDD, I agree entirely with what Mr. Nutt said in that eventually corruption in the hiberfile causes significant issues that can be truly bizarre.  Two of the most difficult issues I ever had to solve were the direct result of corruption in the hiberfile, and it took a very long time to figure out the root cause.

As a matter of course, when I'm setting up any Windows 10 system, disabling Fast Startup is a part of my setup protocol.  The gains from it are minimal, even with an HDD, compared to the heartache I've seen it cause.  I'd rather have a slower system boot time, where I know the OS is being loaded completely from scratch, than deal with the occasional serious issues I've seen Fast Startup create.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

   Explanations exist; they have existed for all time; there is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible, and wrong.

         ~ H.L. Mencken, AKA The Sage of Baltimore


Re: Processor speed

Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

I don’t believe it does.  Where do you go to turn those off?

 

Thanks.

 

All the best


Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Hill
Sent: 04 February 2019 13:18
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Ideally, superfetch and prefetch should be turned off in the registry after the operating system is moved to a ssd, I don't believe Macrium Reflect  will do that for you., if it does that would save some steps.

 

On 2/4/2019 03:02, Steve Nutt wrote:

Hi,

 

No need to monkey with the registry, just use Macrium Reflect which is free, and image the drive.  I put an SSD into my old laptop the other day, and the speed is amazing.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Hill
Sent: 04 February 2019 00:41
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Actually, if the person doing the swapping knows what they are about, the windows, programs and all the data can be easily copied.  All one need do is to change a couple of registry settings so windows treats the ssd properly once the new drive is installed.  You make good points on the ease of dismantling the machine.  If I was him, I wouldn't even bother with best buy, find a local place that works on stuff and has a good reputation, you're more likely to get someone who will do the job right and put in the necessary time.

 

 

On 2/3/2019 17:15, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:

That is a fairly generic 1Tb 2.5 inch laptop hard drive with 32Mb of Cache and 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute).

I can see that after a little over 3 years this is not going to be the fastest, as I said before and now that it is confirmed you have a regular hard drive, you would get the most speed boost out of replacing this with a solid state drive. You would have to see how much space of this you use, but you would most likely want a 512Gb SSD, it is half the size of your current drive, but as far as what you get for your buck this is pretty much where the sweet spot is now. If you go to 240Gb you may run into space issues and you only save maybe $30 or $40, but if you want a 1Tb SSD (same size as what you have now) you’ll pay double of what a 512Gb costs, prices are constantly coming down and in a couple of years you’ll probably be able to buy a 1Tb for the same price as a 512Gb now, but that won’t do you any good. Of course you can just put up with longer boot times and loading times of applications and keep it the way it is. You would have to check anyways if this laptop you have can even be easily opened up, some of these convertible tablets/laptop thingies are sealed and changing components is not easily possible. Then of course there is the consideration whether it is worth putting $100 or $150 into it, I assume you can’t switch the drives out yourself and I have no idea what a place like Best Buy would charge for that. Keep in mind that you want to make sure you have a good backup of all your data and that whatever applications you have are available for a fresh install either by download or that you have the installers on a USB stick. If you change drives you start out with a fresh install of Windows which if you are comfortable with it you can do yourself with Narrator, then you have to install Jaws or NVDA (whatever you use) and after that install things like Chrome and/or Firefox, Office, iTunes or whatever applications you use. Depending on how much user data you have on your current hard drive you could copy it to an external hard drive first. You can get a 1Tb external drive in the States probably for $50 or $60 so not such a big expense and it is something you then have and can continue to use.

 

As for David’s comments on RAM, whether you buy a laptop or other computer, they do come with whatever RAM is supported by your CPU. You could not put DDR 4 RAM into your laptop which I am quite sure has and can only take DDR 3 RAM. If you have a custom system built you want to of course make sure you get the best RAM possible for your processor and motherboard at the time, beyond that RAM speed is not really a big issue and how much cache a hard drive has is also a lot less important than whether you have a hard drive or SSD.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 1:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:

 HGST HTS541010A7E630

 

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 

the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 


Re: Processor speed

Joseph Norton
 

There are certainly things to be aware of when using “fast startup”.

 

Fast startup is similar to hibernation, but, when it is enabled, the state of Windows kernel is saved in the hibernation file, not in ram.

 

So, when you shutdown with fast startup enabled, Windows logs all users out and returns to a state similar to when Windows is first booted up, no users logged in.  Then, it saves that state to the hibernation file.

 

Here is an article on HowToGeek explaining more about the pros and cons of fast startup.

 

https://www.howtogeek.com/243901/the-pros-and-cons-of-windows-10s-fast-startup-mode/

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Steve Nutt
Sent: Monday, February 4, 2019 4:03 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Hi,

 

I don’t recommend fast startup in any situation to be honest.  It stores the computer’s state completely in RAM and tries to bring it back, that’s how it starts up fast.  More often than not though, it corrupts what’s in memory, so you have to reboot anyway, that’s my experience.

 

All the best


Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Feliciano G
Sent: 04 February 2019 01:11
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Michael,

Windows has a feature by the name of fast start up. I would suggest you try enabling it and see how you like your computer before upgrading your hard drive to a solid-state drive if it’s not already enabled. Computers that I have worked with in the past have performed like a new computer once this setting was enabled. 

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 3, 2019, at 4:41 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Actually, if the person doing the swapping knows what they are about, the windows, programs and all the data can be easily copied.  All one need do is to change a couple of registry settings so windows treats the ssd properly once the new drive is installed.  You make good points on the ease of dismantling the machine.  If I was him, I wouldn't even bother with best buy, find a local place that works on stuff and has a good reputation, you're more likely to get someone who will do the job right and put in the necessary time.

 

 

On 2/3/2019 17:15, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:

That is a fairly generic 1Tb 2.5 inch laptop hard drive with 32Mb of Cache and 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute).

I can see that after a little over 3 years this is not going to be the fastest, as I said before and now that it is confirmed you have a regular hard drive, you would get the most speed boost out of replacing this with a solid state drive. You would have to see how much space of this you use, but you would most likely want a 512Gb SSD, it is half the size of your current drive, but as far as what you get for your buck this is pretty much where the sweet spot is now. If you go to 240Gb you may run into space issues and you only save maybe $30 or $40, but if you want a 1Tb SSD (same size as what you have now) you’ll pay double of what a 512Gb costs, prices are constantly coming down and in a couple of years you’ll probably be able to buy a 1Tb for the same price as a 512Gb now, but that won’t do you any good. Of course you can just put up with longer boot times and loading times of applications and keep it the way it is. You would have to check anyways if this laptop you have can even be easily opened up, some of these convertible tablets/laptop thingies are sealed and changing components is not easily possible. Then of course there is the consideration whether it is worth putting $100 or $150 into it, I assume you can’t switch the drives out yourself and I have no idea what a place like Best Buy would charge for that. Keep in mind that you want to make sure you have a good backup of all your data and that whatever applications you have are available for a fresh install either by download or that you have the installers on a USB stick. If you change drives you start out with a fresh install of Windows which if you are comfortable with it you can do yourself with Narrator, then you have to install Jaws or NVDA (whatever you use) and after that install things like Chrome and/or Firefox, Office, iTunes or whatever applications you use. Depending on how much user data you have on your current hard drive you could copy it to an external hard drive first. You can get a 1Tb external drive in the States probably for $50 or $60 so not such a big expense and it is something you then have and can continue to use.

 

As for David’s comments on RAM, whether you buy a laptop or other computer, they do come with whatever RAM is supported by your CPU. You could not put DDR 4 RAM into your laptop which I am quite sure has and can only take DDR 3 RAM. If you have a custom system built you want to of course make sure you get the best RAM possible for your processor and motherboard at the time, beyond that RAM speed is not really a big issue and how much cache a hard drive has is also a lot less important than whether you have a hard drive or SSD.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 1:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:

 HGST HTS541010A7E630

 

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 

the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 

 


Re: Processor speed

Chris Hill
 

Ideally, superfetch and prefetch should be turned off in the registry after the operating system is moved to a ssd, I don't believe Macrium Reflect  will do that for you., if it does that would save some steps.


On 2/4/2019 03:02, Steve Nutt wrote:

Hi,

 

No need to monkey with the registry, just use Macrium Reflect which is free, and image the drive.  I put an SSD into my old laptop the other day, and the speed is amazing.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Hill
Sent: 04 February 2019 00:41
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Actually, if the person doing the swapping knows what they are about, the windows, programs and all the data can be easily copied.  All one need do is to change a couple of registry settings so windows treats the ssd properly once the new drive is installed.  You make good points on the ease of dismantling the machine.  If I was him, I wouldn't even bother with best buy, find a local place that works on stuff and has a good reputation, you're more likely to get someone who will do the job right and put in the necessary time.

 

 

On 2/3/2019 17:15, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:

That is a fairly generic 1Tb 2.5 inch laptop hard drive with 32Mb of Cache and 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute).

I can see that after a little over 3 years this is not going to be the fastest, as I said before and now that it is confirmed you have a regular hard drive, you would get the most speed boost out of replacing this with a solid state drive. You would have to see how much space of this you use, but you would most likely want a 512Gb SSD, it is half the size of your current drive, but as far as what you get for your buck this is pretty much where the sweet spot is now. If you go to 240Gb you may run into space issues and you only save maybe $30 or $40, but if you want a 1Tb SSD (same size as what you have now) you’ll pay double of what a 512Gb costs, prices are constantly coming down and in a couple of years you’ll probably be able to buy a 1Tb for the same price as a 512Gb now, but that won’t do you any good. Of course you can just put up with longer boot times and loading times of applications and keep it the way it is. You would have to check anyways if this laptop you have can even be easily opened up, some of these convertible tablets/laptop thingies are sealed and changing components is not easily possible. Then of course there is the consideration whether it is worth putting $100 or $150 into it, I assume you can’t switch the drives out yourself and I have no idea what a place like Best Buy would charge for that. Keep in mind that you want to make sure you have a good backup of all your data and that whatever applications you have are available for a fresh install either by download or that you have the installers on a USB stick. If you change drives you start out with a fresh install of Windows which if you are comfortable with it you can do yourself with Narrator, then you have to install Jaws or NVDA (whatever you use) and after that install things like Chrome and/or Firefox, Office, iTunes or whatever applications you use. Depending on how much user data you have on your current hard drive you could copy it to an external hard drive first. You can get a 1Tb external drive in the States probably for $50 or $60 so not such a big expense and it is something you then have and can continue to use.

 

As for David’s comments on RAM, whether you buy a laptop or other computer, they do come with whatever RAM is supported by your CPU. You could not put DDR 4 RAM into your laptop which I am quite sure has and can only take DDR 3 RAM. If you have a custom system built you want to of course make sure you get the best RAM possible for your processor and motherboard at the time, beyond that RAM speed is not really a big issue and how much cache a hard drive has is also a lot less important than whether you have a hard drive or SSD.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 1:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:

 HGST HTS541010A7E630

 

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 

the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 


Re: Jaws2018 Youtube.com website How to pause video ?

Palmer Loux
 

no it is the plus sign on the numpad with your numlock off
--
Palmer from CBVI


Re: Processor speed

dan <oxo404@...>
 

migrating to ssd was no problem, the major headache was trying to find accessible cloning software On 04/02/2019 03:44, Joseph Norton wrote:

Hi:

 

Fast startup is usually enabled by default.

 

Putting in an SSD can make a huge difference.

 

My wife had a Dell she got back in 2013 or maybe in 2012, I'm not sure.

 

Anyway, it was one of the easier ones to change out, just pop the bottom pannell off, unscrew a few screws and the HD slid right out.

 

I bought a Crucial 256GB drive and slid it right into the laptop.

 

The laptop had 4 gigs of memory, and was slow to boot, and, swapped a lot.

 

That SSD made a big difference.

 

As a previous poster mentioned, some laptops are fitted so it is fairly easy to change out the HD, but, some are more trouble.

 

For example, this Acer I got from the Microsoft store back in 2015 was harder.  I had to unscrew a bunch of screws, practically pry the laptop apart, then, there were the keyboard on one side and the motherboard on the back, with ribbon cables connecting the two halves.  Once I got the thing apart, had to turn it over, disconnect the cables, unscrew the bay where the HD was housed, replace the HD, and reconnect the cables, which was challenging, to say the least.

 

With me feeling around in there, cables not wanting to stay on, it's a wonder I'm typing this message at all.

 

It's back together, seems to be working, but, I am very careful with it, wouldn't bet on it surviving a moderate drop.

 

Hopefully, yours won't be this hard, but, without looking at it, couldn't tell you.

 

But, if you ever do get A SSD installed, you should notice the difference.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Feliciano G
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 8:10 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Michael,

Windows has a feature by the name of fast start up. I would suggest you try enabling it and see how you like your computer before upgrading your hard drive to a solid-state drive if it’s not already enabled. Computers that I have worked with in the past have performed like a new computer once this setting was enabled. 

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 3, 2019, at 4:41 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Actually, if the person doing the swapping knows what they are about, the windows, programs and all the data can be easily copied.  All one need do is to change a couple of registry settings so windows treats the ssd properly once the new drive is installed.  You make good points on the ease of dismantling the machine.  If I was him, I wouldn't even bother with best buy, find a local place that works on stuff and has a good reputation, you're more likely to get someone who will do the job right and put in the necessary time.

 

 

On 2/3/2019 17:15, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:

That is a fairly generic 1Tb 2.5 inch laptop hard drive with 32Mb of Cache and 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute).

I can see that after a little over 3 years this is not going to be the fastest, as I said before and now that it is confirmed you have a regular hard drive, you would get the most speed boost out of replacing this with a solid state drive. You would have to see how much space of this you use, but you would most likely want a 512Gb SSD, it is half the size of your current drive, but as far as what you get for your buck this is pretty much where the sweet spot is now. If you go to 240Gb you may run into space issues and you only save maybe $30 or $40, but if you want a 1Tb SSD (same size as what you have now) you’ll pay double of what a 512Gb costs, prices are constantly coming down and in a couple of years you’ll probably be able to buy a 1Tb for the same price as a 512Gb now, but that won’t do you any good. Of course you can just put up with longer boot times and loading times of applications and keep it the way it is. You would have to check anyways if this laptop you have can even be easily opened up, some of these convertible tablets/laptop thingies are sealed and changing components is not easily possible. Then of course there is the consideration whether it is worth putting $100 or $150 into it, I assume you can’t switch the drives out yourself and I have no idea what a place like Best Buy would charge for that. Keep in mind that you want to make sure you have a good backup of all your data and that whatever applications you have are available for a fresh install either by download or that you have the installers on a USB stick. If you change drives you start out with a fresh install of Windows which if you are comfortable with it you can do yourself with Narrator, then you have to install Jaws or NVDA (whatever you use) and after that install things like Chrome and/or Firefox, Office, iTunes or whatever applications you use. Depending on how much user data you have on your current hard drive you could copy it to an external hard drive first. You can get a 1Tb external drive in the States probably for $50 or $60 so not such a big expense and it is something you then have and can continue to use.

 

As for David’s comments on RAM, whether you buy a laptop or other computer, they do come with whatever RAM is supported by your CPU. You could not put DDR 4 RAM into your laptop which I am quite sure has and can only take DDR 3 RAM. If you have a custom system built you want to of course make sure you get the best RAM possible for your processor and motherboard at the time, beyond that RAM speed is not really a big issue and how much cache a hard drive has is also a lot less important than whether you have a hard drive or SSD.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 1:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:

 HGST HTS541010A7E630

 

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 

the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 

 


Re: Processor speed

Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

I don’t recommend fast startup in any situation to be honest.  It stores the computer’s state completely in RAM and tries to bring it back, that’s how it starts up fast.  More often than not though, it corrupts what’s in memory, so you have to reboot anyway, that’s my experience.

 

All the best


Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Feliciano G
Sent: 04 February 2019 01:11
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Michael,

Windows has a feature by the name of fast start up. I would suggest you try enabling it and see how you like your computer before upgrading your hard drive to a solid-state drive if it’s not already enabled. Computers that I have worked with in the past have performed like a new computer once this setting was enabled. 

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 3, 2019, at 4:41 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Actually, if the person doing the swapping knows what they are about, the windows, programs and all the data can be easily copied.  All one need do is to change a couple of registry settings so windows treats the ssd properly once the new drive is installed.  You make good points on the ease of dismantling the machine.  If I was him, I wouldn't even bother with best buy, find a local place that works on stuff and has a good reputation, you're more likely to get someone who will do the job right and put in the necessary time.

 

 

On 2/3/2019 17:15, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:

That is a fairly generic 1Tb 2.5 inch laptop hard drive with 32Mb of Cache and 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute).

I can see that after a little over 3 years this is not going to be the fastest, as I said before and now that it is confirmed you have a regular hard drive, you would get the most speed boost out of replacing this with a solid state drive. You would have to see how much space of this you use, but you would most likely want a 512Gb SSD, it is half the size of your current drive, but as far as what you get for your buck this is pretty much where the sweet spot is now. If you go to 240Gb you may run into space issues and you only save maybe $30 or $40, but if you want a 1Tb SSD (same size as what you have now) you’ll pay double of what a 512Gb costs, prices are constantly coming down and in a couple of years you’ll probably be able to buy a 1Tb for the same price as a 512Gb now, but that won’t do you any good. Of course you can just put up with longer boot times and loading times of applications and keep it the way it is. You would have to check anyways if this laptop you have can even be easily opened up, some of these convertible tablets/laptop thingies are sealed and changing components is not easily possible. Then of course there is the consideration whether it is worth putting $100 or $150 into it, I assume you can’t switch the drives out yourself and I have no idea what a place like Best Buy would charge for that. Keep in mind that you want to make sure you have a good backup of all your data and that whatever applications you have are available for a fresh install either by download or that you have the installers on a USB stick. If you change drives you start out with a fresh install of Windows which if you are comfortable with it you can do yourself with Narrator, then you have to install Jaws or NVDA (whatever you use) and after that install things like Chrome and/or Firefox, Office, iTunes or whatever applications you use. Depending on how much user data you have on your current hard drive you could copy it to an external hard drive first. You can get a 1Tb external drive in the States probably for $50 or $60 so not such a big expense and it is something you then have and can continue to use.

 

As for David’s comments on RAM, whether you buy a laptop or other computer, they do come with whatever RAM is supported by your CPU. You could not put DDR 4 RAM into your laptop which I am quite sure has and can only take DDR 3 RAM. If you have a custom system built you want to of course make sure you get the best RAM possible for your processor and motherboard at the time, beyond that RAM speed is not really a big issue and how much cache a hard drive has is also a lot less important than whether you have a hard drive or SSD.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 1:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:

 HGST HTS541010A7E630

 

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 

the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 


Re: Processor speed

Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

No need to monkey with the registry, just use Macrium Reflect which is free, and image the drive.  I put an SSD into my old laptop the other day, and the speed is amazing.

 

All the best

 

Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Chris Hill
Sent: 04 February 2019 00:41
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Actually, if the person doing the swapping knows what they are about, the windows, programs and all the data can be easily copied.  All one need do is to change a couple of registry settings so windows treats the ssd properly once the new drive is installed.  You make good points on the ease of dismantling the machine.  If I was him, I wouldn't even bother with best buy, find a local place that works on stuff and has a good reputation, you're more likely to get someone who will do the job right and put in the necessary time.

 

 

On 2/3/2019 17:15, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:

That is a fairly generic 1Tb 2.5 inch laptop hard drive with 32Mb of Cache and 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute).

I can see that after a little over 3 years this is not going to be the fastest, as I said before and now that it is confirmed you have a regular hard drive, you would get the most speed boost out of replacing this with a solid state drive. You would have to see how much space of this you use, but you would most likely want a 512Gb SSD, it is half the size of your current drive, but as far as what you get for your buck this is pretty much where the sweet spot is now. If you go to 240Gb you may run into space issues and you only save maybe $30 or $40, but if you want a 1Tb SSD (same size as what you have now) you’ll pay double of what a 512Gb costs, prices are constantly coming down and in a couple of years you’ll probably be able to buy a 1Tb for the same price as a 512Gb now, but that won’t do you any good. Of course you can just put up with longer boot times and loading times of applications and keep it the way it is. You would have to check anyways if this laptop you have can even be easily opened up, some of these convertible tablets/laptop thingies are sealed and changing components is not easily possible. Then of course there is the consideration whether it is worth putting $100 or $150 into it, I assume you can’t switch the drives out yourself and I have no idea what a place like Best Buy would charge for that. Keep in mind that you want to make sure you have a good backup of all your data and that whatever applications you have are available for a fresh install either by download or that you have the installers on a USB stick. If you change drives you start out with a fresh install of Windows which if you are comfortable with it you can do yourself with Narrator, then you have to install Jaws or NVDA (whatever you use) and after that install things like Chrome and/or Firefox, Office, iTunes or whatever applications you use. Depending on how much user data you have on your current hard drive you could copy it to an external hard drive first. You can get a 1Tb external drive in the States probably for $50 or $60 so not such a big expense and it is something you then have and can continue to use.

 

As for David’s comments on RAM, whether you buy a laptop or other computer, they do come with whatever RAM is supported by your CPU. You could not put DDR 4 RAM into your laptop which I am quite sure has and can only take DDR 3 RAM. If you have a custom system built you want to of course make sure you get the best RAM possible for your processor and motherboard at the time, beyond that RAM speed is not really a big issue and how much cache a hard drive has is also a lot less important than whether you have a hard drive or SSD.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 1:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:

 HGST HTS541010A7E630

 

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 

the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 


Re: Processor speed

Steve Nutt
 

Hi,

 

Actually, the easiest way to get to Device Manager to be honest, is Windows key and the Pause or Break key.  It gets you there with a single keystroke.

 

All the best


Steve

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sieghard Weitzel
Sent: 03 February 2019 20:10
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Go to the Device Manager, tab once into the treeview and arrow down 5 or 6 times to “Disk Drives”. Right arrow to expand it and see what you have. It may give a model number, you can Google that or post it here and I can tell you what you have.

Easiest way to get to the device manager in Windows 10 is to press Windows Key + X followed by “M” as in “Manager” or down arrow to Device Manager and press enter.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 9:55 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Ok thanks  I'm running windows 10 64 bit of operating system. I don't know what drive is this computer is using. 

This is a Tablet and Laptop combo. 

it's an Hp NV X convertible. It does not have a DVD drive. 

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 5:53 PM Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 


Re: Processor speed

Joseph Norton
 

Hi:

 

Fast startup is usually enabled by default.

 

Putting in an SSD can make a huge difference.

 

My wife had a Dell she got back in 2013 or maybe in 2012, I'm not sure.

 

Anyway, it was one of the easier ones to change out, just pop the bottom pannell off, unscrew a few screws and the HD slid right out.

 

I bought a Crucial 256GB drive and slid it right into the laptop.

 

The laptop had 4 gigs of memory, and was slow to boot, and, swapped a lot.

 

That SSD made a big difference.

 

As a previous poster mentioned, some laptops are fitted so it is fairly easy to change out the HD, but, some are more trouble.

 

For example, this Acer I got from the Microsoft store back in 2015 was harder.  I had to unscrew a bunch of screws, practically pry the laptop apart, then, there were the keyboard on one side and the motherboard on the back, with ribbon cables connecting the two halves.  Once I got the thing apart, had to turn it over, disconnect the cables, unscrew the bay where the HD was housed, replace the HD, and reconnect the cables, which was challenging, to say the least.

 

With me feeling around in there, cables not wanting to stay on, it's a wonder I'm typing this message at all.

 

It's back together, seems to be working, but, I am very careful with it, wouldn't bet on it surviving a moderate drop.

 

Hopefully, yours won't be this hard, but, without looking at it, couldn't tell you.

 

But, if you ever do get A SSD installed, you should notice the difference.

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Feliciano G
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 8:10 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Michael,

Windows has a feature by the name of fast start up. I would suggest you try enabling it and see how you like your computer before upgrading your hard drive to a solid-state drive if it’s not already enabled. Computers that I have worked with in the past have performed like a new computer once this setting was enabled. 

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 3, 2019, at 4:41 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Actually, if the person doing the swapping knows what they are about, the windows, programs and all the data can be easily copied.  All one need do is to change a couple of registry settings so windows treats the ssd properly once the new drive is installed.  You make good points on the ease of dismantling the machine.  If I was him, I wouldn't even bother with best buy, find a local place that works on stuff and has a good reputation, you're more likely to get someone who will do the job right and put in the necessary time.

 

 

On 2/3/2019 17:15, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:

That is a fairly generic 1Tb 2.5 inch laptop hard drive with 32Mb of Cache and 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute).

I can see that after a little over 3 years this is not going to be the fastest, as I said before and now that it is confirmed you have a regular hard drive, you would get the most speed boost out of replacing this with a solid state drive. You would have to see how much space of this you use, but you would most likely want a 512Gb SSD, it is half the size of your current drive, but as far as what you get for your buck this is pretty much where the sweet spot is now. If you go to 240Gb you may run into space issues and you only save maybe $30 or $40, but if you want a 1Tb SSD (same size as what you have now) you’ll pay double of what a 512Gb costs, prices are constantly coming down and in a couple of years you’ll probably be able to buy a 1Tb for the same price as a 512Gb now, but that won’t do you any good. Of course you can just put up with longer boot times and loading times of applications and keep it the way it is. You would have to check anyways if this laptop you have can even be easily opened up, some of these convertible tablets/laptop thingies are sealed and changing components is not easily possible. Then of course there is the consideration whether it is worth putting $100 or $150 into it, I assume you can’t switch the drives out yourself and I have no idea what a place like Best Buy would charge for that. Keep in mind that you want to make sure you have a good backup of all your data and that whatever applications you have are available for a fresh install either by download or that you have the installers on a USB stick. If you change drives you start out with a fresh install of Windows which if you are comfortable with it you can do yourself with Narrator, then you have to install Jaws or NVDA (whatever you use) and after that install things like Chrome and/or Firefox, Office, iTunes or whatever applications you use. Depending on how much user data you have on your current hard drive you could copy it to an external hard drive first. You can get a 1Tb external drive in the States probably for $50 or $60 so not such a big expense and it is something you then have and can continue to use.

 

As for David’s comments on RAM, whether you buy a laptop or other computer, they do come with whatever RAM is supported by your CPU. You could not put DDR 4 RAM into your laptop which I am quite sure has and can only take DDR 3 RAM. If you have a custom system built you want to of course make sure you get the best RAM possible for your processor and motherboard at the time, beyond that RAM speed is not really a big issue and how much cache a hard drive has is also a lot less important than whether you have a hard drive or SSD.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 1:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:

 HGST HTS541010A7E630

 

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 

the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 

 


Re: Processor speed

 

It won’t help the load time of other programs and while it may speed up boot time a bit, it only does so until it messes things up. He would be much better off to just put the computer to sleep and then opening the lid or a press of a key would bring it up in 2 or 3 seconds.

As for Chris’s suggesting to transfer the entire content of a 3-year old 1TB hard drive to a 512Gb SSD I can only say that I’d never do it. He is concerned with getting more performance out of a 3-year old laptop and if he does decide to have an SSD installed then a fresh install of Windows will give him the absolutely best performance. People install stuff and uninstall stuff and all in all things do get bogged down over time, the registry probably has orphan entries and all he’d do is to put them back. Also, by the time you do all that copying or ghosting of the hard drive to the SSD, potentially fiddly with the registry and then maybe deal with whatever issues may or may not arise you might as well start new. I bought my Asus Zenbook a little over 2 years ago, it’s a high-end laptop with a 6th generation I7 processor, 16Gb of RAM and a 512Gb SSD, but it came with Windows 10 Home and I bought an upgrade to Pro, then over the last 2 years I did all sorts of stuff since often I experiment on the laptop rather than on one of my work PC’s and just recently I ran into a number of small issues which weren’t terrible but which bugged me. For example, I would open folders in file explorer and for some reason Alt+F4 would not close them or I would have to press it 4 or 5 times when it finally did. This is just one example of a few annoyances, but I had enough of it and made a Windows 10 version 1809 boot drive, had a quick look that all my data was in my OneDrive folder which it was and went ahead and wiped it out. All my email is either exchange via Office 365 for my business or Outlook.com for my personal email so I didn’t have to worry about backing up any emails or contacts and after deleting all partitions on the SSD and then re-partitioning and formatting it it took all of 10 minutes to install Windows 10 with Narrator. I then first installed Jaws and re-authorized it because I have been a Jaws user for 30 years and I can just work best with it. Then I re-upgraded to Windows 10 Pro through the Microsoft Store and after that was done I installed Roboform, my password manager, Office via Office 365, Chrome, Adobe Acrobat, Skype, iTunes and the Sonos controller and probably a few other things I forgot and that was it. Once I signed in to my OneDrive and Dropbox all my files, about 60 or 70 Gb started downloading and upon opening Outlook I set up my 3 email accounts, all emails and contacts synced back to the laptop and after a little less than 2 hours I was done.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Feliciano G
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 5:11 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Michael,

Windows has a feature by the name of fast start up. I would suggest you try enabling it and see how you like your computer before upgrading your hard drive to a solid-state drive if it’s not already enabled. Computers that I have worked with in the past have performed like a new computer once this setting was enabled. 

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 3, 2019, at 4:41 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Actually, if the person doing the swapping knows what they are about, the windows, programs and all the data can be easily copied.  All one need do is to change a couple of registry settings so windows treats the ssd properly once the new drive is installed.  You make good points on the ease of dismantling the machine.  If I was him, I wouldn't even bother with best buy, find a local place that works on stuff and has a good reputation, you're more likely to get someone who will do the job right and put in the necessary time.

 

 

On 2/3/2019 17:15, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:

That is a fairly generic 1Tb 2.5 inch laptop hard drive with 32Mb of Cache and 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute).

I can see that after a little over 3 years this is not going to be the fastest, as I said before and now that it is confirmed you have a regular hard drive, you would get the most speed boost out of replacing this with a solid state drive. You would have to see how much space of this you use, but you would most likely want a 512Gb SSD, it is half the size of your current drive, but as far as what you get for your buck this is pretty much where the sweet spot is now. If you go to 240Gb you may run into space issues and you only save maybe $30 or $40, but if you want a 1Tb SSD (same size as what you have now) you’ll pay double of what a 512Gb costs, prices are constantly coming down and in a couple of years you’ll probably be able to buy a 1Tb for the same price as a 512Gb now, but that won’t do you any good. Of course you can just put up with longer boot times and loading times of applications and keep it the way it is. You would have to check anyways if this laptop you have can even be easily opened up, some of these convertible tablets/laptop thingies are sealed and changing components is not easily possible. Then of course there is the consideration whether it is worth putting $100 or $150 into it, I assume you can’t switch the drives out yourself and I have no idea what a place like Best Buy would charge for that. Keep in mind that you want to make sure you have a good backup of all your data and that whatever applications you have are available for a fresh install either by download or that you have the installers on a USB stick. If you change drives you start out with a fresh install of Windows which if you are comfortable with it you can do yourself with Narrator, then you have to install Jaws or NVDA (whatever you use) and after that install things like Chrome and/or Firefox, Office, iTunes or whatever applications you use. Depending on how much user data you have on your current hard drive you could copy it to an external hard drive first. You can get a 1Tb external drive in the States probably for $50 or $60 so not such a big expense and it is something you then have and can continue to use.

 

As for David’s comments on RAM, whether you buy a laptop or other computer, they do come with whatever RAM is supported by your CPU. You could not put DDR 4 RAM into your laptop which I am quite sure has and can only take DDR 3 RAM. If you have a custom system built you want to of course make sure you get the best RAM possible for your processor and motherboard at the time, beyond that RAM speed is not really a big issue and how much cache a hard drive has is also a lot less important than whether you have a hard drive or SSD.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 1:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:

 HGST HTS541010A7E630

 

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 

the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 


Re: Processor speed

Feliciano G
 

Michael,
Windows has a feature by the name of fast start up. I would suggest you try enabling it and see how you like your computer before upgrading your hard drive to a solid-state drive if it’s not already enabled. Computers that I have worked with in the past have performed like a new computer once this setting was enabled. 
 

Regards,
Feliciano
For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v

On Feb 3, 2019, at 4:41 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Actually, if the person doing the swapping knows what they are about, the windows, programs and all the data can be easily copied.  All one need do is to change a couple of registry settings so windows treats the ssd properly once the new drive is installed.  You make good points on the ease of dismantling the machine.  If I was him, I wouldn't even bother with best buy, find a local place that works on stuff and has a good reputation, you're more likely to get someone who will do the job right and put in the necessary time.



On 2/3/2019 17:15, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:

That is a fairly generic 1Tb 2.5 inch laptop hard drive with 32Mb of Cache and 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute).

I can see that after a little over 3 years this is not going to be the fastest, as I said before and now that it is confirmed you have a regular hard drive, you would get the most speed boost out of replacing this with a solid state drive. You would have to see how much space of this you use, but you would most likely want a 512Gb SSD, it is half the size of your current drive, but as far as what you get for your buck this is pretty much where the sweet spot is now. If you go to 240Gb you may run into space issues and you only save maybe $30 or $40, but if you want a 1Tb SSD (same size as what you have now) you’ll pay double of what a 512Gb costs, prices are constantly coming down and in a couple of years you’ll probably be able to buy a 1Tb for the same price as a 512Gb now, but that won’t do you any good. Of course you can just put up with longer boot times and loading times of applications and keep it the way it is. You would have to check anyways if this laptop you have can even be easily opened up, some of these convertible tablets/laptop thingies are sealed and changing components is not easily possible. Then of course there is the consideration whether it is worth putting $100 or $150 into it, I assume you can’t switch the drives out yourself and I have no idea what a place like Best Buy would charge for that. Keep in mind that you want to make sure you have a good backup of all your data and that whatever applications you have are available for a fresh install either by download or that you have the installers on a USB stick. If you change drives you start out with a fresh install of Windows which if you are comfortable with it you can do yourself with Narrator, then you have to install Jaws or NVDA (whatever you use) and after that install things like Chrome and/or Firefox, Office, iTunes or whatever applications you use. Depending on how much user data you have on your current hard drive you could copy it to an external hard drive first. You can get a 1Tb external drive in the States probably for $50 or $60 so not such a big expense and it is something you then have and can continue to use.

 

As for David’s comments on RAM, whether you buy a laptop or other computer, they do come with whatever RAM is supported by your CPU. You could not put DDR 4 RAM into your laptop which I am quite sure has and can only take DDR 3 RAM. If you have a custom system built you want to of course make sure you get the best RAM possible for your processor and motherboard at the time, beyond that RAM speed is not really a big issue and how much cache a hard drive has is also a lot less important than whether you have a hard drive or SSD.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 1:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:

 HGST HTS541010A7E630

 

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 

the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 


Re: Processor speed

Chris Hill
 

Actually, if the person doing the swapping knows what they are about, the windows, programs and all the data can be easily copied.  All one need do is to change a couple of registry settings so windows treats the ssd properly once the new drive is installed.  You make good points on the ease of dismantling the machine.  If I was him, I wouldn't even bother with best buy, find a local place that works on stuff and has a good reputation, you're more likely to get someone who will do the job right and put in the necessary time.



On 2/3/2019 17:15, Sieghard Weitzel wrote:

That is a fairly generic 1Tb 2.5 inch laptop hard drive with 32Mb of Cache and 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute).

I can see that after a little over 3 years this is not going to be the fastest, as I said before and now that it is confirmed you have a regular hard drive, you would get the most speed boost out of replacing this with a solid state drive. You would have to see how much space of this you use, but you would most likely want a 512Gb SSD, it is half the size of your current drive, but as far as what you get for your buck this is pretty much where the sweet spot is now. If you go to 240Gb you may run into space issues and you only save maybe $30 or $40, but if you want a 1Tb SSD (same size as what you have now) you’ll pay double of what a 512Gb costs, prices are constantly coming down and in a couple of years you’ll probably be able to buy a 1Tb for the same price as a 512Gb now, but that won’t do you any good. Of course you can just put up with longer boot times and loading times of applications and keep it the way it is. You would have to check anyways if this laptop you have can even be easily opened up, some of these convertible tablets/laptop thingies are sealed and changing components is not easily possible. Then of course there is the consideration whether it is worth putting $100 or $150 into it, I assume you can’t switch the drives out yourself and I have no idea what a place like Best Buy would charge for that. Keep in mind that you want to make sure you have a good backup of all your data and that whatever applications you have are available for a fresh install either by download or that you have the installers on a USB stick. If you change drives you start out with a fresh install of Windows which if you are comfortable with it you can do yourself with Narrator, then you have to install Jaws or NVDA (whatever you use) and after that install things like Chrome and/or Firefox, Office, iTunes or whatever applications you use. Depending on how much user data you have on your current hard drive you could copy it to an external hard drive first. You can get a 1Tb external drive in the States probably for $50 or $60 so not such a big expense and it is something you then have and can continue to use.

 

As for David’s comments on RAM, whether you buy a laptop or other computer, they do come with whatever RAM is supported by your CPU. You could not put DDR 4 RAM into your laptop which I am quite sure has and can only take DDR 3 RAM. If you have a custom system built you want to of course make sure you get the best RAM possible for your processor and motherboard at the time, beyond that RAM speed is not really a big issue and how much cache a hard drive has is also a lot less important than whether you have a hard drive or SSD.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 1:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:

 HGST HTS541010A7E630

 

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 

the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 


Re: Processor speed

 

That is a fairly generic 1Tb 2.5 inch laptop hard drive with 32Mb of Cache and 5,400 RPM (revolutions per minute).

I can see that after a little over 3 years this is not going to be the fastest, as I said before and now that it is confirmed you have a regular hard drive, you would get the most speed boost out of replacing this with a solid state drive. You would have to see how much space of this you use, but you would most likely want a 512Gb SSD, it is half the size of your current drive, but as far as what you get for your buck this is pretty much where the sweet spot is now. If you go to 240Gb you may run into space issues and you only save maybe $30 or $40, but if you want a 1Tb SSD (same size as what you have now) you’ll pay double of what a 512Gb costs, prices are constantly coming down and in a couple of years you’ll probably be able to buy a 1Tb for the same price as a 512Gb now, but that won’t do you any good. Of course you can just put up with longer boot times and loading times of applications and keep it the way it is. You would have to check anyways if this laptop you have can even be easily opened up, some of these convertible tablets/laptop thingies are sealed and changing components is not easily possible. Then of course there is the consideration whether it is worth putting $100 or $150 into it, I assume you can’t switch the drives out yourself and I have no idea what a place like Best Buy would charge for that. Keep in mind that you want to make sure you have a good backup of all your data and that whatever applications you have are available for a fresh install either by download or that you have the installers on a USB stick. If you change drives you start out with a fresh install of Windows which if you are comfortable with it you can do yourself with Narrator, then you have to install Jaws or NVDA (whatever you use) and after that install things like Chrome and/or Firefox, Office, iTunes or whatever applications you use. Depending on how much user data you have on your current hard drive you could copy it to an external hard drive first. You can get a 1Tb external drive in the States probably for $50 or $60 so not such a big expense and it is something you then have and can continue to use.

 

As for David’s comments on RAM, whether you buy a laptop or other computer, they do come with whatever RAM is supported by your CPU. You could not put DDR 4 RAM into your laptop which I am quite sure has and can only take DDR 3 RAM. If you have a custom system built you want to of course make sure you get the best RAM possible for your processor and motherboard at the time, beyond that RAM speed is not really a big issue and how much cache a hard drive has is also a lot less important than whether you have a hard drive or SSD.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 1:00 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:

 HGST HTS541010A7E630

 

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 

the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.

 

Regards,

Feliciano

For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v


On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 


Re: Processor speed

Michael Munn
 

Here is the information about the drive of this laptop:
 HGST HTS541010A7E630

I got this from the disc and Drive section of the device manager.
Thanks 
best regards 
Michael munn 

Michael Munn
Member: Virginia Association of Blind students
 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org
Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students
National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org
Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind




On Sun, Feb 3, 2019 at 3:44 PM David Ingram <dingram269@...> wrote:
along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 
the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.


Regards,
Feliciano
For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v

On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.


Good luck.


CH


On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:
Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.
Thanks for answering my question.
Best regards
Michael Munn 

Michael Munn
Member: Virginia Association of Blind students
 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org
Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students
National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org
Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind




On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.


If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.


On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:
Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.
I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 
Thanks again. 
Best regards 
Michael Munn 

Michael Munn
Member: Virginia Association of Blind students
 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org
Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students
National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org
Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind




On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 


Re: Processor speed

David Ingram
 

along the lines of talking about the processer speed, it also should be noted about the size of the hard drive cache, also you can't forget that the faster the processer speed the ram speed might have something to do with the speed as well.  as an example the faster processers of today need the faster ram like ddr4 ram if i'm not mistaken.

-----Original Message-----
From: Feliciano G
Sent: Feb 2, 2019 5:15 PM
To: "main@jfw.groups.io"
Subject: Re: Processor speed

Hi Michael, 
the start up speed is due to the type of hard drive that you have. There are hard drives with lower revolutions per minute and higher  revolutions per minute and then there are solid state drives which are quicker. There are settings that can be adjusted to change how your windows machine loads.


Regards,
Feliciano
For tech tips and updates, LIKE www.facebook.com/theblindman12v

On Feb 2, 2019, at 2:53 PM, Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.


Good luck.


CH


On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:
Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.
Thanks for answering my question.
Best regards
Michael Munn 

Michael Munn
Member: Virginia Association of Blind students
 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org
Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students
National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org
Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind




On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.


If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.


On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:
Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.
I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 
Thanks again. 
Best regards 
Michael Munn 

Michael Munn
Member: Virginia Association of Blind students
 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org
Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students
National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org
Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind




On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 


Re: Processor speed

 

Go to the Device Manager, tab once into the treeview and arrow down 5 or 6 times to “Disk Drives”. Right arrow to expand it and see what you have. It may give a model number, you can Google that or post it here and I can tell you what you have.

Easiest way to get to the device manager in Windows 10 is to press Windows Key + X followed by “M” as in “Manager” or down arrow to Device Manager and press enter.

 

Regards,

Sieghard

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Munn
Sent: Sunday, February 3, 2019 9:55 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

Ok thanks  I'm running windows 10 64 bit of operating system. I don't know what drive is this computer is using. 

This is a Tablet and Laptop combo. 

it's an Hp NV X convertible. It does not have a DVD drive. 

Thanks 

best regards 

Michael munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 5:53 PM Chris Hill <hillco@...> wrote:

Well, don't give up.  If the slow machine doesn't have one (most likely) you should consider having a solid state drive (ssd) installed.  Your boot speed will go up a lot.  You can often get away with a much smaller drive if you aren't using all of what you have.  I went from a 1tb drive on my old laptop to a 512gb ssd.  At that time, 1tb was more than i wanted to spend.  It helped a lot.  I eventually took that drive and put it in my wife's machine and gave up on my 8-year-old laptop, it was way slower than what you have.

 

Good luck.

 

CH

 

On 2/2/2019 16:49, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks all. Yes the start up time really drive's me crazy. I used two different computers, one of them is faster then the other. I just want to know the information of the speed.

Thanks for answering my question.

Best regards

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 3:37 PM Jason White via Groups.Io <jason=jasonjgw.net@groups.io> wrote:

If applications are running more slowly than you would like, it would be best to find out why before investing in any new hardware.

 

If I recall correctly, Performance Monitor will show you how much your CPU, memory and storage are being used over time. Some of the same information is in Task Manager as well.

 

On 2/2/19 2:06 PM, Michael Munn wrote:

Thanks so much for the detail. i really appreciate it.

I got this laptop in DECEMBER of 2015. It's the current generation at that point. 

 

I just want to know about the information of the laptop that I'm currently using. 

Thanks again. 

Best regards 

Michael Munn 

 

Michael Munn

Member: Virginia Association of Blind students

 National Federation of the Blind of   Virginia   www.nfbv.org

Member: Maryland Association of Blind Students

National Federation of the Blind of  Maryland www.nfbmd.org

Students of: Hadley Institute of the Blind

 

 

 

On Sat, Feb 2, 2019 at 1:13 PM Sieghard Weitzel <sieghard@...> wrote:

And if you are gaming over the internet and you are on a 6 Mbps ADSL connection a super-fast computer with the latest processor and 32Gb of RAM won’t do you much good. Computers are a system and they are made up of various components and they all play a roll. To again use my car example from the previous email, the high-end Mercedes or BMW which can go 160 or 180 miles an hour won’t do you much good if you are taking the Road to Hanna on Maui. For those who don’t know of it, it’s a 2-lane highway which over a distance of just over 64 miles has approximately 620 curves many of them hairpin turns and you can rarely go faster than 30 miles an hour. In this case that highway would be equivalent to your internet connection speed. I can take my 7-year old laptop on my 275 Mbps fiber connection and download things a lot faster than somebody with the latest 9th generation I7 system on a much slower connection.

 

From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave...
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 10:02 AM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Processor speed

 

all depends on what you are doing. If you're into gaming on line real-time over the internet, then you need one heck of a lot more speed and memory. So it really depends. You're better off than if you still had an Apple II+ with 64k RAM and a 6052 processor.

 

What I'm saying is that this is a very open-ended question, and your answers will vary. For now, you have plenty, and actually more memory than I have, but then I'm a senior citizen.

 

Dave
Oregonite, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, February 02, 2019 09:56

Subject: Processor speed

 

Hi all, this is Michael. 

Today I checked the processor of my HP laptop and here is the information I get for the processor:

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz   2.20 GHz

Installed memory (RAM): 8.00 GB

System type: 64-bit Operating System, x64-based processor 

Is 2.2 GHZ enough? and how fast can it run? 

All comment and answers are greatly appreciate it.

best regards 

Michael Munn 


Re: Marking text to go to the clipboard with Jaws

Nino Dagostino
 

"smile" its that last step it will always get you

Thanks

-----Original Message-----
From: main@jfw.groups.io <main@jfw.groups.io> On Behalf Of Marten Post
Uiterweer
Sent: Saturday, February 2, 2019 2:37 PM
To: main@jfw.groups.io
Subject: Re: Marking text to go to the clipboard with Jaws

Nino,

You forget a step.
ctrl-shift-k to begin marking.
ins-space, m, to end the mark. Press ctrl-c. Now your text is on the
clipboard.

Regards, Marten


On Sat, 2 Feb 2019 14:34:19 -0500 "Nino Dagostino" <ndagostino3@gmail.com>
wrote:

Hello:



I tried to mark some text with Jaws using the control windows keys and
k



I can mark the text but when I press jaws key and spacebar and then
press c for copy, Jaws says no text on the clipboard.



What is the best way to copy text form the clipboard I have to mark a
lot of text.



Any help would be appreciated.